Tag Archives: zaheer

Nasser Hussain: We have to bring in DRS for all Test matches

Nasser Hussain: 'Enough is enough. We have to bring in DRS for all Test matches.'

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UPDATED:

21:47 GMT, 16 December 2012

The time has now come for the ICC to stand up to the Indian cricket board and say: ‘Enough is enough. We are using the decision review system in all Test matches.’

This series has provided all the proof needed that the game is categorically better off using technology rather than relying totally on the men in the middle.

Controversy: England captain Alastair Cook was given out caught despite the ball traveling well wide of his bat

Controversy: England captain Alastair Cook was given out caught despite the ball traveling well wide of his bat

Surely the world game’s governing body can now go to India and say, ‘we have listened to your reservations and we respect them, but just look at what has happened in a marquee series when technology hasn’t been used. Big mistakes have been made on both sides and your players have misbehaved because of it’.

All the boards bar India now seem to want the system in place. Spectators want it and, judging by his reaction to a decision yesterday, India captain MS Dhoni wants it.

And sitting in the Indian dressing room is the man who invented DRS, their coach Duncan Fletcher. What more do they need

Nobody is saying the technology used is perfect. But the very professional people behind it are working towards making it as near perfect as it can be. And if it had been used in these four Tests, I reckon there might have been one or two errors made with important decisions. Instead, there have been 10 or 12.

I was asked by Sky to come up with the blatant umpiring errors in this series, and I quickly picked out 10 that really should have been spotted by the naked eye by elite umpires. I’m sure there have been other mistakes too.

10 UMPIRING HOWLERS THIS SERIES

Batsman / Bowler – What happened…

Test: Ahmedabad (1st Test)

Samit Patel / Ravi Ashwin – Should have been given out lbw on four

Mumbai (2nd)

Zaheer Khan / Graeme Swann – Given out caught at short leg — nowhere near it

Mumbai (2nd)

Pragyan Ojha / Monty Panesar – Obvious glove to leg slip — missed by Aleem Dar

Mumbai (2nd)

Gautam Gambhir / Graeme Swann – Out lbw after edging the ball into his pads

Kolkata (3rd)

Alastair Cook / Ravi Ashwin – Caught at short leg, not noticed by umpire

Kolkata (3rd)

Monty Panesar / Ravi Ashwin – lbw after nicking it

Nagpur (4th)

Alastair Cook / Ishant Sharma – lbw, despite being hit outside line of off

Nagpur (4th)

Cheteshwar Pujara / Graeme Swann – Given out at short leg off the forearm

Nagpur (4th)

Alastair Cook / Ravi Ashwin – Caught behind, but didn’t hit it

Nagpur (4th)

Jonathan Trott / Ravindra Jadeja – Hit in line with the stumps, survived the lbw shout

I am just not sure it is right when people say the elite panel get 90 per cent of their decisions right. It certainly hasn’t been that way in this series.

The four umpires used in these games seem to have become uncertain once they have had their safety net taken away from them. They have seen from technology that more decisions are out than was perceived in the past and, without it, they are not sure what to give and what to turn down.

The genie is out of the bottle. The modern generation can’t understand why technology isn’t being used. It’s time for India to see the error of their ways and accept the views of the vast majority. We have seen with our own eyes that it is the only way forward now.

Commanding: Despite his unfair dismissal, Alastair Cook's (pictured) England team remain on course for an historic series win

Commanding: Despite his unfair dismissal, Alastair Cook's (pictured) England team remain on course for an historic series win

We
are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a
dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and
international news organisations.

The
BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies
Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

India drop Yuvraj Singh, Zaheer Khan and Harbhajan Singh for final Test v England in Nagpur

India drop Yuvraj, Zaheer and Harbhajan ahead of do-or-die final Test in Nagpur

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UPDATED:

10:17 GMT, 9 December 2012

Dropped: Yuvraj

Dropped: Yuvraj

India's selectors have responded to their seven-wicket defeat against England in Kolkata by dropping three of their squad for the final match of the series starting in Nagpur next week.

From the third Test XI batsman Yuvraj Singh and seamer Zaheer Khan have been dropped, while spinner Harbhajan Singh – who played in the 10-wicket defeat in the second Test in Mumbai – is also out of the squad.

Called up in place of the trio are all-rounder Ravindra Jadeja, seamer Parvinda Awana and leg spinner Piyush Chawla.

The timing of the announcement in the immediate aftermath of another humiliating defeat is bound to raise further questions over the leadership of the side, with captain MS Dhoni coming under increasing pressure from the country's media.

India are trailing the four-match series 2-1 and need to win in Nagpur to avoid defeat.

Dhoni made it clear after the defeat that he was happy to defer to the wisdom of the Board of Control for Cricket, but that he relishes the opportunity to try to put his team back on track.

'The selectors are here to decide,' said the wicketkeeper-batsman.

'It's always fine to lead a side when they're doing really well, and everyone's performing.

'But that's not the time when you need a leader.

'Leading a side is all about (doing it) when the team is not doing well, trying to gel them together, back the youngsters and the senior guys.

'The easiest thing for me to do right now is to give up the captaincy and be part of the side, because that's just running away from the responsibility.

Off the pace: Zaheer Khan has been replaced by Parvinda AwanaOff the pace: Zaheer Khan has been replaced by Parvinda Awana

Off the pace: Zaheer Khan has been replaced by Parvinda Awana

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

'I have to get the team together, and be prepared for the next Test match.'

Dhoni does not believe either that India are at their lowest ebb in his tenure, citing instead whitewash defeats away to both Australia and England.

'We were not really able to compete (then).

'We know what our faults are here, and I think we should be able to rectify them.'

He believes a lack of collective productivity among India's frontline batsmen in back-to-back defeats in Mumbai and Kolkata is the main problem.

'I think the batting order will have to take the responsibility.

'We need to score more runs, on a very good wicket to bat on like this.

'Of course, the bowlers will bowl a few good deliveries that you need to keep out.

'But in the top seven, most of us need to score at the same time to give the bowlers a par total to defend.

'Otherwise, it's very difficult and you find yourself under pressure.'

LIVE: India v England – day two, third Test, Kolkata

India v England – the action on day two of the third Test in Kolkata as it happened

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UPDATED:

11:08 GMT, 6 December 2012


India v England – essentials

India: Sehwag, Gambhir, Pujara, Tendulkar, Kohli, Yuvraj, Dhoni (c/wk), Ashwin, Zaheer, Sharma, Ojha.

England: Cook (c), Compton, Trott, Pietersen, Bell, Patel, Prior (wk), Swann, Anderson, Finn, Panesar.

Umpires: HDPK Dharmasena (SRI) and RJ Tucker (AUS)

Match referee: JJ Crowe (NZ)

India won the toss and elected to bat

First innings: India 316.

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3am: Morning one, morning all and welcome to Sportsmail's coverage on day two of the third Test between England and India from Kolkata.

The tourists efforts yesterday have rightly been described as heroic after being asked to bowl and taking seven wickets on the flattest of tracks.

Talk of pace and bounce were rendered nonsense early on and huge credit must go to James Anderson and Monty Panesar whose efforts have given England the advantage.

The plan from here is to wrap up the three final wickets with minimal fuss then begin the task of building big first-innings runs.

That's the ideal scenario, of course. But if the previous two Tests have taught us anything the first day has been a pretty accurate precursor of what's to come.

3.14: Right, we've got about 15 minutes before play resumes, enough time to have quick peruse of Bumble's Test diary. Day one left him dreaming of Monty and Bruno!

3.20: James Anderson drew huge plaudits for his efforts on day one. Nasser Hussain stood and admired as he got the better of Sachin Tendulkar.. again.

3.24: So, how do you see the action panning out today Can England wrap up the remnants of this India innings without too much fuss. Or are you worried this low, slow track will start turning big when England come in to bat Twitter and email details are above if you so wish to use them.

91st over: India 280-7 (Dhoni 27, Z Khan 1)

Credit to the hardy bunch of Barmy Army fans who serenade their heroes with a rendition of Jerusalem in the early stages of the over. James Anderson begins the attack for England and MS Dhoni is straight on the attack, taking a couple of steps down the track and firing Jimmy back to the rope at long-off.

92nd over: India 282-7 (Dhoni 28, Z Khan 2)

Are you prepared for another long day at the coal face, Monty He bowled 35 overs yesterday and is hoicked straight into the action this morning. Zaheer Khan is – unsurprisingly – in blocking mood, until the final ball of the over where he takes a quick single to retain the strike. Brave. I like it.

93rd over: India 291-7 (Dhoni 28, Z Khan 6)

Dropped! Anderson is absolutely fuming after Swann (now no longer his best mate) shells a dolly at second slip. What a chance that was. Swann was a close second slip, the ball hit him on the chest/ribs and looped up, but Cook couldn't catch the loose ball. Jimmy responds with a ludicrously short one which bounced over Prior for five runs (with the wide). And Khan slogs the final delivery of the over square for four more. It is all going on.

WICKET! Zaheer Khan lbw b Panesar 6

Khan wastes the extra life he was given in the previous over, lunging forward and playing around a straight one. The ball pitched on middle/leg and straightened enough.

94th over: India 292-8 (Dhoni 29)

Maybe that wicket has saved the Anderson/Swann friendship what with Khan adding not many after Swanny shelled him at Slip Well done, Monty. Your still the man. Although your celebrations remain bloody awful.

95th over: India 296-8 (Dhoni 33, Sharma 0)

Anderson dips one back of a length, Dhoni leans back and clubs the ball backward of square for four runs. Meat and drink that kind of length for the Insia captain. Final delivery is wide of off stump, Dhoni swings hard, but misses, which gives Monty a chance to have a dip at new boy Ishant Sharma.

Magic Monty: Panesar has picked up four vital wickets for England

Magic Monty: Panesar has picked up four vital wickets for England

WICKET! Ishant Sharma b Panesar 0

Lofted flight on the delivery does for Sharma who misreads it and plays all around a straight one. Proper No 10's shot and Monty has a four-fer.

96th over: India 296-9 (Dhoni 33, Ojha 0)

Wicket maiden for the boy Monty. But the face on MS Dhoni as he watched Sharma play all around a straight delivery was a peach. Fuming.

97th over: India 296-9 (Dhoni 33, Ojha 0)

'It's a stalemate', notes Nasser in the Sky comms boxs. And he's right. Dhoni's in blocking mode, until the final delivery which he heaves square for a single to retain strike.

98th over: India 309-9 (Dhoni 46, Ojha 0)

Now, here's a stat: No England bowler has taken three five wicket hauls in a row since 1970-71. Monty has five in his previous two and is on four here. One more, Monty, can you do it Well, no, Dhoni's having none of it as he rocks back on his heels and scores the second SIX of the innings over long-off. And then he scores the third SIX with the final delivery of the over – a massive boomer over midwicket.

99th over: India 311-9 (Dhoni 47, Ojha 0)

Well, if you want anyone marshalling the end of an innings, you'd be hard-pressed to find a better candidate than MS Dhoni. Ojha faces a couple, there's a big lbw shout which is turned down, and the India captain dabs a quick single to retain strike.

100th over: India 312-9 (Dhoni 48, Ojha 0)

A much brighter morning today than the misty fug which enveloped Eden Gardens yesterday, but that hasn't encouraged more spectators in this 63,000-capacity ground. A mere smattering: 4 or 5,000 at most. Monty continues to Dhoni, field set well back, the captain takes a single with the final delivery, chipping one to vacant mid-off.

101st over: India 312-9 (Dhoni 48, Ojha 0)

Nick Knight reveals the news that Phil Hughes will replace Ricky Ponting in the Australia team. I'm no gambling man, but if I was (and I'm not) I would be down the bookies as soon as the door opened to wager every penny I can lay my greedy mitts on for England to win the Ashes. Hughes hasn't enjoyed the best of luck against England. Maiden for Monty.

102nd over: India 312-9 (Dhoni 48, Ojha 0)

Bowling change: Graeme Swann is hoicked in in James Anderson's stead. Much to the paceman's chagrin, I presume – certainly when he has the No 11 to face. Slip, gully and short leg come in, Ojha does well to block out. Maiden.

103rd over: India 312-9 (Dhoni 48, Ojha 0)

Do you think the denizens of Kolkata have any inkling knowledge of Only Fools and Horses Granted, why should those who live in this sprawling metropolis care for the antics of two zooms from Peckham Still, they'll be familiar with the theme tune now that Billy Cooper – the Barmy Army's trumpeter-in-chief has just belted it out.

104th over: India 312-9 (Dhoni 48, Ojha 0)

Proddy, proddy, touch, touch. Ojha's doing his best to hang around, but this seems all rather futile, India haven't added a run in five overs. It's that tedious, I've searched – and listened to – Fat Larry's Band classic Zoom on youtube. Maiden.

105th over: India 316 (Ojha 0)

Bowling change: Steven Finn comes into the action to try and frighten India out of this innings. Which he does!

WICKET! Mahendra Singh Dhoni c Swann b Finn 52

Great work from Swann who races from second slip to pouch Dhoni's attempted cut which booms up off his gloves. And that is that.

INDIA ALL OUT FOR 316

On the attack: Cook is hoping to score more big runs as England begin their first innings

On the attack: Cook is hoping to score more big runs as England begin their first innings

1st over: England 4-0 (Cook 4, Compton 0)

England will be very pleased with their work so far. Restricting India to 316 after losing the toss is a super effort, particularly on a pitch which is offering no assistance. But what of England's replay Zaheer Khan begins the attack with two slips and a gully in position. Cook moves off the mark with a well timed dash via point for four runs.

2nd over: England 6-0 (Cook 4, Compton 2)

Ishant Sharma joins Khan in the attack to Compton whose busy defensive strokes I admire so. Compton pushes a quick single to cover, but some shoddy work in the field – an overthrow – allows the England pair to take another.

3rd over: England 10-0 (Cook 8, Compton 2)

It is said that whenever the word 'cricket' is mentioned, a Frenchman or German, somewhere in the world, starts laughing, such is esteem in which they hold the game.

Bucking this trend, however, is former Newcastle, Liverpool and Manchester City midfielder Dietmar Hamann. Didi Hamann, via Twitter: 'England on top if they get 400+ you got to fancy them to win …Anderson outstanding #onlyonemonty'. Thick edge from Cook sends the ball between slips and gully for four.

4th over: England 10-0 (Cook 8, Compton 2)

Six deliveries outside off, Compton doesn't look interested. That's a maiden.

5th over: England 16-0 (Cook 13, Compton 3)

A rather tepid start from the India pacemen. Cook and Compton looking unruffled, the captain helps himself to four via clip off his pads and, erm, that's about it.

6th over: England 17-0 (Cook 13, Compton 4)

The stats suggest Sharma has had the making of Cook more than many bowlers. But the seamer isn't going to trouble the left-hander with his current line, which is too straight into the England captain. He needs to look for the feather edge, wider of off stump if he is to prosper. Unless he can find some extra pace to leave Cook open to lbw. Just a single for Compton.

7th over: England 17-0 (Cook 13, Compton 4)

Pleased to say Eden Gardens is starting to fill up as the morning carries on. Still huge swathes of empty seats, but there's plenty of atmosphere pouring down from the stands as England go about their business diligently in the middle. Compton faces six from Khan and that's a maiden.

8th over: England 21-0 (Cook 17, Compton 4)

Cook hangs hit bat out to Sharma who finds an edge, but it is of the thickish variety and thusly runs wide of slips, but inside gully and brings up another boundary. Maybe some spin before lunch It's only 10 minutes away.

9th over: England 21-0 (Cook 17, Compton 4)

It's another maiden over for Khan, but it was almost so much worse for England after Compton called a kamikaze single, only to send Cook back before any damage could be done. Steady now boys, you're within a sniff of the lunch break. Now is not the time for rash decisions.

In good Nick: Compton has started well as England begin their first innings

In good Nick: Compton has started well as England begin their first innings

10th over: England 21-0 (Cook 17, Compton 4)

Bowling change: Yep, it's time for some spin and Ravichandran Ashwin is hoicked in to turn his arm over for six before the break. Nothing extra going on for him over Panesar or Swann. Maiden.

11th over: England 22-0 (Cook 17, Compton 5)

Short leg comes in for Compton as Sharma changes ends at in the dregs of the session. Just a single for the Somerset man. And that is lunch. Muy bien.

Sportsmail's Lawrence Booth in Kolkata writes: So, England have done the first bit. /12/06/article-2243328-0D25177D00000578-345_306x459.jpg” width=”306″ height=”459″ alt=”Plenty to ponder: Dhoni's side have struggled to break England down” class=”blkBorder” />

Plenty to ponder: Dhoni's side have struggled to break England down

23rd over: England 61-0 (Cook 44, Compton 17)

Full credit to the England pair who are picking the right moments when to stick or twist. The tandem threat of Khan and Ishant had to be seen off, now with Ashwin's gentle spin on, they can vary the attack and take it to the hosts. Just a single from the over.

24th over: England 62-0 (Cook 45, Compton 17)

So, after an hour of the afternoon session, England continue to move forward serenely. They have added 40 runs without the loss of a wicket in the 12 overs thus far. A decent return. But there's plenty left to do. Another single from the over keeps the scorecard ticking over.

25th over: England 62-0 (Cook 45, Compton 17)

Dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot. That's a maiden. And time for some drinks.

26th over: England 62-0 (Cook 45, Compton 17)

England moving along serenely here. They've enjoyed this session so far. They've added 40 runs without losing a wicket. Still plenty of work left to do, mind. Another maiden.

27th over: England 62-0 (Cook 50, Compton 17)

Shot! Zaheer's attempted inswinging yorker arrows in towards off stump, but Cook flat bats back down the ground for four. Stunning shot. Another single also brings up the captain's half-century.

28th over: England 74-0 (Cook 51, Compton 23)

Shot! Compton leaves his crease and punches Ojha high and mighty over the midwicket boundary for another maximum! SIX big runs for Nick, England sitting pretty here.

29th over: England 74-0 (Cook 51, Compton 23)

A series of dots. Six in total. That's a maiden.

30th over: England 77-0 (Cook 53, Compton 24)

Ojha's in now, so we have spin on at both ends. England have played it well thus far. But I can tell you, this over-by-over lark isn't half made difficult with two twirlers on, what with their minute long overs and all. There's steam coming off my keyboard. Cook taps a couple backward of square.

31st over: England 83-0 (Cook 58, Compton 25)

Howizaaaat! Ashwin asks the question, but he's clutching at straws – the ball hit Compton's boot on the flush, but miles outside the line of the stumps. There follows a howler in the field – of which there have already been a few – which allows England to nick a single and overthrows add another four. Ouch.

32nd over: England 86-0 (Cook 60, Compton 26)

Half an hour to go until the tea break, England will be mighty pleased if they reach the break without loss. And will certainly hope to reach three figures by that point, too. Three more singles from Ojha's bowling.

33rd over: England 90-0 (Cook 64, Compton 26)

Courtesy of Sky Sports' statto Bendict Bermange, on Twitter: 'If – or rather – when Cook gets to 88 he will be the youngest to reach 7000 Test runs. Another Sachin record will fall'. Cook finds the rope with a well timed club through covers.

34th over: England 94-0 (Cook 67, Compton 27)

So, after a promising opening 34 overs, England trail by 222 runs. An excellent base from which to work on and takes the pressure off those coming in behind the openers. But India are allowing them to find the singles, find the gaps to keep the score ticking over. A couple of singles and one brace come as England move forward.

35th over: England 95-0 (Cook 68, Compton 27)

An eerie silence around the ground at the moment, despite the fact there must be 15,000 spectators in attendance. The locals have had very little to cheer today. Ashwin zooms through his over, one from it as yet another misfield allows the England pair to cross without too much fuss.

36th over: England 100-0 (Cook 69, Compton 31)

Dhoni's not happy with the ball, he asks the umpires to run it through that piece of kt which measures the balls roundness. It doesn't come up to scratch and so a selection of new'uns is brought on. But even the new cherry cannot help India as Compton chops forward of point to take England past the century mark.

Solid start: The England openers have laid excellent foundations for England's first innings

Solid start: The England openers have laid excellent foundations for England's first innings

37th over: England 104-0 (Cook 73, Compton 31)

Of course Cook will receive plaudits for his excellent form again today, but mention must be made of some of the dross which is being served up. Ashwin dips down a rank wide one and the England captain dispatches it through cover point for four. Easy peasy lemon squeezey.

38th over: England 110-0 (Cook 74, Compton 36)

Compton leans across his pads and clips the ball square for four more. I don't want to gush, but England are filling their boots here at the moment, India need to find a creative spark from somewhere. Maybe they're waiting on an England mistake Doesn't look forthcoming at the moment.

39th over: England 113-0 (Cook 77, Compton 36)

Final few overs before tea now. England must be eyeing the break. They will be delighted to reach it without losing a wicket. India keeping everything crossed that they can.

40th over: England 116-0 (Cook 79, Compton 37)

England nurdle three more singles from Ojha who has looked pretty toothless in his eight overs thus far. And he's going at a shy under four an over.

41st over: England 116-0 (Cook 79, Compton 37)

Ashwin continues, a series of dot balls. That's a maiden.

42nd over: England 116-0 (Cook 81, Compton 40)

Four more from that over as England reach the break without loss. Sterling effort in that afternoon session from the tourists.

Sportsmail's Lawrence Booth in Kolkata writes: That was another sparkling session for England – and a miserable one for India. Cheteshwar Pujara dropped Alastair Cook at first slip on 17, their spinners lacked bite, and the fielding was lethargic. If England reach stumps without major damage, they will be in a decent position to take a scarcely believable 2-1 lead in this four-match series.

Quietly, Cook and Nick Compton have gone about establishing an opening partnership that, despite a few rough edges (mainly Compton’s), seems to work.

Against the odds, Cook has become the aggressor, with Compton content to defend the good balls, chance the occasional quick single to mid-off, and take toll of the free gifts. The six he launched down the ground off Pragyan Ojha was a glorious aberration.

Cook simply looks immovable, and it needed a beauty from Zaheer Khan to induce the error that was spurned by Pujara: the ball shaped to swing in, then held its line before kissing the outside edge. It was the kind of delivery only in-form batsmen tend to nick.

This pair have put on 123, 66, 58* and now 121* since they were parted early on the second evening in Ahmedabad. And if Cook has stolen the headlines, scoring more runs in a series in India than any England captain in history (Ted Dexter, who has been at this game, was the previous record-holder, with 409 runs in 1961-62), Compton has been a more than faithful sidekick.

As for India, some shoddy work in the field betrayed their state of mind. But it's far too early for heads to drop: a couple of quick wickets, and a reversing ball after tea, can bring them back into the game.

TEA: ENGLAND ARE 121-0

43rd over: England 127-0 (Cook 80, Compton 46)

No pressure, but Alastair Cook needs just 20 more runs to become England's most successful batsman ever. Those runs will take him to his 23rd centrury, taking him past the tally of 22 held by Kevin Pietersen, Wally Hammond, Colin Cowdrey and Sir Geoffrey Boycott. Compton gets England underway with a rather ugly chop backward of square for four.

44th over: England 131-0 (Cook 81, Compton 49)

India really have been poor in the field today. Two rather shoddy pieces of work turn dicey singles into comfortable strolls. Surely cricket -even in India where the hosts are usually so dominant – has moved on from this part-time-looking attitude.

45th over: England 138-0 (Cook 88, Compton 49)

I'll be honest, we've had a bit of a chat about the impending milestone Alastair Cook could pass if he reaches 100 runs here, and I was worried I could jinx his chances. But with bowling like that, he'll have no trouble becoming the first Englishman to score 23 Test centuries. Man at extra cover could have stopped the ball, I reckon, before it passed him to the boundary. But I think I've covered the quality of India's fielding already.

46th over: England 138-0 (Cook 88, Compton 49)

Ashwin continues – with very little reward. That's a series of six dots – a maiden in old money.

47th over: England 144-0 (Cook 92, Compton 50)

Are they signs of frustration creeping in there from Ishant Sharma The paceman dips one in well short, Compton has to take evasive action and there follows some staring action from the pair. There follows two singles which bring up Compton's half-century. You can't see me, but I'm clapping in admiration. A huge milestone in any player's career. Cook chips in with a dashing drive which finds a the edge and races to vacant third man.

48th over: England 146-0 (Cook 93, Compton 51)

England into the 48th over, still without loss and trail India by 170 runs with all their wickets intact. They won't find parity today, but could be within 50 runs of the hosts' total by the close of play. Two singles dabbed either side of the wicket.

49th over: England 146-0 (Cook 93, Compton 51)

There's a Mexico Wave wending its way round the stadium at the moment. It seem the locals are entertaining themselves seeing as their players are declining to offer any support. I'd ban the bloody things if I could. Mexican Waves, that is. Not locals. Maiden over.

50th over: England 148-0 (Cook 94, Compton 52)

I am getting ahead of myself here, but, for the record, England's highest first wicket stand against India was the 225 scored by Messrs Gooch and Atherton at Headingley in 1990.

51st over: England 152-0 (Cook 98, Compton 52)

Shot! Cook goes on the sweep, finds the rope in front of square to take him to two runs shy of that tantalising 23rd Test century for England.

Man of the moment: Cook has become England's most successful batsman ever

Man of the moment: Cook has become England's most successful batsman ever

52nd over: England 156-0 (Cook 101, Compton 53)

There it is, he's done it! Alastair Cook dabs the two runs he needs to become England's most successful Test batsman, with his 23rd century. Plaudits will rightly rain down on Ice Man. He's on some run at the moment.

WICKET! Nick Compton lbw b Ojha 57

The attempted paddle/sweep, but misses the ball which hits his back leg. That looks plumb.

53rd over: England 165-1 (Cook 106)

Big moment for India , they've been desperate for the breakthrough. The crowd have really come alive now, too.

54th over: England 176-1 (Cook 117, Trott 0)

Zaheer Khan returns to the fray… can he shake up the England pair with a new man in Nope. Cook pulls one just behind square for four and another boundary come via backward point.

55th over: England 181-1 (Cook 118, Trott 4)

So, the ever dependable Trott is in. But he's in dire need of some runs. His scores thus far in this series are 0, 17, 0. Not good enough. But he makes a decent start here, with a flick round the corner for four runs.

56th over: England 187-1 (Cook 124, Trott 4)

The wicket has really endowed the Indian players and crowd with renewed energies. Ishant Sharma has just performed an athletic slid e to save a certain four and the crowd scream their agreement as Ojha asks for an lbw decision against Cook. No dice, well outside the line. There follows a stunning cover drive from the England captain. A real beauty. And that takes us up to drinks.

57th over: England 187-1 (Cook 124, Trott 4)

Here we go then, final hour of the day – or 17 overs. Should squeeze them all in with the spinners in play. If England end the day with just the one in the wickets column they will be mighty pleased. The trick will be to bat all day tomorrow, build a lead of 200-odd and go from there. Granted, that is a best-case scenario, India are formidable on home soil, surely they can't remain as docile as this for much longer. Ojha continues with a maiden.

58th over: England 191-1 (Cook 128, Trott 4)

Cook eyes the ball as it races to the fence via mid-on. He holds his pose, just long enough to let Ashwin know who's in charge. The local producers also show us Trott's three dismissals in this tour. All have come on turning pitches. This is not one of those.

59th over: England 191-1 (Cook 128, Trott 4)

Dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot. That's a maiden.

60th over: England 194-1 (Cook 130, Trott 5)

With spinners on at both ends we might actually end up bowling more than the allotted 90 today. A rare scenario and one which will please Bumble immensely. Trott dabs one and Cook dabs a couple of singles.

61st over: England 194-1 (Cook 131, Trott 9)

Zoooom! Ojha rips through his over at lightning speed, Trott scores what now seems like the obligatory boundary – through midwicket – for England.

62nd over: England 201-1 (Cook 132, Trott 10)

Cook dabs a single to mid-on which brings the England supporters to their feet as England reach the 200 mark. In all honesty, it has been something of a cake walk.

63rd over: England 205-1 (Cook 132, Trott 14)

England
are still behind by 111 runs, but India already look deflated. It is
like they are being forced to watch and swallow England's lesson in how
to play the conditions in their own back yard. They're probably keen to
get back into the dressing room to regroup and think about the plan of
attack for tomorrow. Trott bangs one through midwicket which zip to the
fence in a flash. Four!

64th over: England 207-1 (Cook 133, Trott 15)

Another
couple of singles and we have nine overs left today. India desperate to
make a breakthrough before the close of play. They need it to give them
some impetus for tomorrow.

Able assistant: Trott is hoping to improve on his poor record in the series

Able assistant: Trott is hoping to improve on his poor record in the series

65th over: England 208-1 (Cook 133, Trott 16)

Trott dabs a single via midwicket. Shot playing is being reined in now as the England pair have their sights firmly set on the close of play.

66th over: England 209-1 (Cook 133, Trott 17)

The life's gone out of this one. Is it worth shaking hands on the day now England aren't playing any shots, India's body language suggests they've had enough for the day.

67th over: England 209-1 (Cook 133, Trott 17)

Dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot. That's a maiden.

68th over: England 209-1 (Cook 133, Trott 17)

You can read more on Alastair Cook's batting heroics today right here. As for the action out in the middle Well, erm, there isn't any, really. Maiden.

69th over: England 210-1 (Cook 133, Trott 18)

Trott pushes to midwicket and England snaffle a single. Sends my heart a-flutter, been a while since England scored four overs left in the day.

70th over: England 212-1 (Cook 134, Trott 19)

Another couple of singles added to the tally in the fag end of what has been a thoroughly successful day for England. The defeat in Ahmedabad seems like a lifetime ago just now.

71st over: England 214-1 (Cook 135, Trott 20)

Final throw of the dice today for MS Dhoni who asks Zaheer Khan to come back in and tried to 'do a Jimmy'. And by that, I mean take a late wicket in the dregs of the day, not the rhyming slang Jimmy Riddle (you can work it out for yourself). Nowt doing, though, three singles from the over.

72nd over: England 214-1 (Cook 135, Trott 20)

The penultimate over of the day starts after a lengthy break for the England pair to take on some fluids. Trott blocks/shoulder arms the life out of the over from Ishant Sharma. Maiden.

73rd over: England 216-1 (Cook 136, Trott 22)

Cook dabs a single to mid-off, Trott angles one to third man and that – my good friends – is stumps.

STUMPS: England are 216-1

Picture Dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

India v England: Alastair Cook takes command of third Test with record 23rd century

Cook breaks records and Indian hearts as England take command of the third Test thanks to skipper's 23rd Test century

|

UPDATED:

11:13 GMT, 6 December 2012

Alastair Cook became England's most prolific Test centurion when he completed his 23rd – and third in successive matches – at Eden Gardens today.

Cook (136 not out) is also the youngest batsman in history to 7,000 runs, a milestone he passed with his 88th this afternoon as he and Nick Compton took control in an opening stand of 165 on day two of the third Test against India.

/12/06/article-2243830-02374BA100000514-789_468x324.jpg” width=”468″ height=”324″ alt=”In command: Record-breaker Alastair Cook (right) and Nick Compton (left)” class=”blkBorder” />

In command: Record-breaker Alastair Cook (right) and Nick Compton (left)

Cook was dropped on 17 when he edged Zaheer Khan low to slip, where Cheteshwar Pujara could not hold the catch.

Otherwise, though, the most likely mode of dismissal appeared to be a run-out as Cook and his apprentice partner took chances with scampered singles and more than once were in danger of mid-wicket collisions as they kept holding the same line.

Cook is the greatest!

Captain Marvel breaks record for most Test tons aged just 27 – Read more…

Lawrence Booth: Pujara left to ponder drop on just 17 – Read more…

There were to be no such mishaps, though, and Cook duly reached his 179-ball century with a leg-glance off Ravichandran Ashwin – having previously also hit the off-spinner for one memorable straight six to go with his 14 fours.

Compton (57) had fewer obvious scoring options but also profited from using his feet, hitting Pragyan Ojha for a six of his own over long-on, on his way to a maiden Test half-century in 123 balls.

Grandson of Denis, and two years Cook's senior, Compton therefore claimed a notable milestone of his own – albeit on a reduced scale to his captain's – before Ojha got his revenge.

Awesome foursome: Monty Panesar (left) took another two wickets on day two

Awesome foursome: Monty Panesar (left) took another two wickets on day two

Cook was safely past his hundred when Compton missed an attempted sweep at the slow left-armer and was, eventually, given out lbw by umpire Rod Tucker just as the batsmen completed what they thought by then was a leg-bye.

Jonathan Trott had made two ducks in his last three Test innings, but did enough here to help Cook consolidate an advantage which gives England clear prospects of pushing for a second successive win over their hosts.

Monty Panesar had earlier finished with four for 90, to add to his 11 wickets in the series-levelling victory in Mumbai, as England picked up the last three Indian wickets for 43 runs this morning – despite some late belligerence from Mahendra Singh Dhoni (52).

The home captain made his intent clear immediately, up the wicket to the second ball of the day to crunch James Anderson past mid-off.

His overnight partner Zaheer was dropped by Graeme Swann off Anderson, but was soon gone anyway – lbw to a Panesar arm ball.

Thinking to do: India captain MS Dhoni hit a half-century but is now under the cosh

Thinking to do: India captain MS Dhoni hit a half-century but is now under the cosh

Panesar also made short work of Ishant Sharma, but the last-wicket pair frustrated England for more than half an hour.

Ojha made no runs but kept out 19 balls, allowing Dhoni to club Panesar for successive sixes over long-off and long-on as England brought the field up for the final two deliveries of one over.

The cat-and-mouse continued, with four consecutive maidens at one point, until Cook had to rest Anderson for Steven Finn.

It was a change which brought Dhoni's 50, with his fifth four from 113 balls crashed past cover, but then the end too when he gloved the next ball and Swann did well to make ground from slip to complete a diving catch.

England had done well to restrict Dhoni's attempt to alter the momentum of a match which was to swing still further the tourists' way thanks to the next historic tour de force from Cook's remorseless repertoire.

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

England beat India by 10 wickets in second Test: Report

Cook and Compton see England home after spin twins set up Test win in Mumbai

|

UPDATED:

06:06 GMT, 26 November 2012

England raced to a famous 10-wicket win over India in the second Test this morning, after Monty Panesar finished with a career-best match haul of 11 for 210.

The tourists' series-levelling victory was achieved principally on the back of Kevin Pietersen and captain Alastair Cook's wonderful first-innings centuries yesterday.

Today, they merely had to complete an apparently straightforward task – and duly did so with the minimum of fuss at the Wankhede Stadium.

Panesar recorded innings figures of six for 81 as he and Graeme Swann accounted for 19 of the 20 home wickets to fall and India mustered just 142 all out on this spinners' pitch.

Beginning 31 runs in front and with just three wickets remaining on day four, India had to believe opener Gautam Gambhir (65) could somehow inspire enough resistance to set England an awkward total.

It was an unlikely scenario, and one which proved beyond him.

Professional job: Alastair Cook saw England home to victory

Professional job: Alastair Cook saw England home to victory

Harbhajan Singh made his intentions clear from the first ball of the morning, clubbing Panesar for four high over mid-off in an over which cost 10 runs.

But Swann (four for 43) made short work of the tailender at the other end, finding extra bounce with an off-break to take the glove for a neat catch by Jonathan Trott away to his left at slip after Harbhajan shaped to cut.

Positive play: Nick Compton made 30 not out as England won on day four

Positive play: Nick Compton made 30 not out as England won on day four

Zaheer Khan also tried to slog India into more credit, but managed only a single before his sweep at Panesar resulted in a gentle skier safely held by wicketkeeper Matt Prior.

Number 11 Pragyan Ojha then appeared to have made contact with his bat, for a catch at short-leg, off Panesar.

But umpire Aleem Dar's agreement about that was required to close the India innings, and it was not forthcoming.

Jumping for joy: Monty Panesar was a key bowler for England taking 11 wickets in the game

Jumping for joy: Monty Panesar was a key bowler for England taking 11 wickets in the game

It was not a decision which looked likely to be significant, and so it proved as India could add only another six runs before Gambhir fell to another dubious call – this time from Tony Hill – when there was a suspicion of inside-edge about his lbw dismissal.

There were no complaints from England, of course, and fewer still after Cook and Nick Compton passed their target of just 57 well before lunch in under 10 overs.

Doing his bit: Graeme Swann helped clean up the India tail on day four

Doing his bit: Graeme Swann helped clean up the India tail on day four

The tourists therefore surpassed India's nine-wicket margin of victory from the first Test, and will head for the third in Kolkata with renewed confidence that they can after all become the first Englishmen to win a series here since 1984/85.

BUMBLE TEST DIARY:David Lloyd says England should drop Jonathan Trott because India are having England for breakfast

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: Drop Trott, it's time to wield the axe because India are having England for breakfast

|

UPDATED:

12:59 GMT, 19 November 2012

JONATHAN'S ON A BAD TROTT

Controversial call: England need to consider axing Jonathan Trott

Controversial call: England need to consider axing Jonathan Trott for Friday's second Test

I want to freshen things up with England’s batting so that is why I would take the bold step of dropping Jonathan Trott. He has been a brilliant No 3 for England in the last few years and averages almost 50 in Test cricket but I’d give him a break. He only averages 32 in his last 15 Tests and has struggled here, as well as in Sri Lanka, and in the UAE against Pakistan. As for Samit Patel, I’d stick with him. He got two shocking lbw decisions so he deserves another chance with the bat and he can be a useful third spinner behind Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann.

TIME FOR ENGLAND'S SPIN TWINS

As for the bowling, England need to do some positive thinking…and to ‘think Indian’. It was a thoroughly deserved win for India but England must now get the team right for the second Test. Monty Panesar has to come in, and England must forget about seamers. Zaheer Khan, who is India’s spearhead, bowled only two out of 40 overs in the second innings! There has been some talk about England not winning a Test when Panesar and Graeme Swann have been in the same side but don’t blame them, blame England’s batters.

Dynamic duo: Graeme Swann (right) shares a joke with Monty Panesar during the 2010 tour of South Africa

Dynamic duo: Graeme Swann (right) shares a joke with Monty Panesar during the 2010 tour of South Africa

BROADLY SPEAKING, ENGLAND ARE OFF THE PACE

England also need some pace. It was alarming that Umesh Yadav was comfortably the quickest bowler on show in the first Test. Jimmy Anderson, Stuart Broad and Tim Bresnan are all capable of bowling close to 90mph, but they were barely above 80mph in Ahmedabad. England need Steven Finn, who consistently hits 90mph. If he has to replace Stuart Broad, who is vice-captain, then so be it

England's cricketer Samit Patel bats during a warm-up match against India A in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012

England's Tim Bresnan jumps over a rope during a cricket training session at Lord's Cricket Ground, in London, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012.

In the slow lane: Samit Patel (left) deserves another crack after two shoddy LBW decisions, but Tim Bresnan (right) and his fellow seamers have not been testing the speed gun enough (FILE IMAGES)

ENGLAND TEST SERIES

Second Test
Mumbai, begins Friday (4,30am)

Third Test
Kolkata, December 5-9

Fourth Test
Nagpur, December 13-17

WIN TOSS, BAT FIRST, SCORE BIG. SIMPLE

If England are to get back on level terms
in this series, they also need a bit of luck. We spoke to former India
captain Sourav Ganguly after the Test and he said it is imperative that
Alastair Cook wins the toss. Then England must bat first and bat big.
Get at least 400, preferably 500, and then you are controlling the game.
They say India’s batsmen play spin very well but let’s see how good
they are when they are playing catch-up…

BUMBLE DOES THE FULL MONTY (TWICE)

I’m not sure these early starts are doing much for my waistline. I had a fry-up in the studio at 5.30am…then another on the train home at 11am!

Full english breakfast, fried egg, sausages,tomatoes,fried bread, baked beans, scrambled egg, black pudding,

Full English breakfast with tea and white bread toasted

Breakfasts of a champion: Bumble has been wading his way through two full English breakfasts

LIVE: India v England, day two, first Test, Ahmedabad

LIVE: India v England – the action on day two of the first Test in Ahmedabad

|

UPDATED:

04:09 GMT, 16 November 2012

Stay up to date with all the action on day two of the first Test between England and India with Sportsmail's
unrivalled team. We'll deliver over-by-over coverage as the action
unfolds in Ahmedabad while our brilliant team of writers update
with their insights from the ground. Contact me on Twitter via: JamesAndrew_ or e-mail your thoughts to [email protected]

India v England: Essentials

India: Virender Sehwag, Gautam Gambhir, Cheteshwar Pujara, Sachin Tendulkar, Virat Kohli, Yuvraj Singh, Mahendra Dhoni (capt & wk), Ravichandran Ashwin, Zaheer Khan, Umesh Yadav, Pragyan Ojha.

England: Alastair Cook (capt), Nick Compton, Jonathan Trott, Kevin Pietersen, Ian Bell, Samit Patel, Matt Prior (wk), Tim Bresnan, Stuart Broad, Graeme Swann, James Anderson.

Umpires: Aleem Dar (Pakistan) and Tony Hill (New Zealand).

Referee: Roshan Mahanama (Sri Lanka).

Click here for a full scorecard

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PICTURE DISPUTE:

We are unable to carry live pictures from the First Test in Ahmedabad due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations. The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

92nd over: India 328-4 (Singh 24 Pujara 99)

Stuart Broad bowls at the other end and it is Cheteshwar Pujara at the other end. A single off the second ball takes him to 99 runs and off strike. Broad has a big appeal for LBW but the ball was pitching way out side leg stump and it goes away for four byes.

91st over: India 323-4 (Singh 24 Pujara 98)

Graeme Swann opens the bowling on day two and it is Yuvraj Singh at the other end. Appeal from the second ball, but the ball looks too high, maiden to start with for Swann.

3.52: Here is Paul Newman's report on day one: Captain Cook suffers nightmare first day as India build on Sehwag blitz… and Monty omission threatens to haunt England

While Lawrence Booth writes: Swann bags himself a new rabbit on day of toil for Bresnan

And Chief sports writer Martin Samuel says: Little Master can bow out on his own terms

Former England captain Nasser Hussain says: Missing Monty is England's achilles in Ahmedabad

Finally Sky commentator and former England coach David Lloyd, says: England have picked the wrong team… but why I'm in a tizz over Chas

Swann bags himself a new rabbit on day of toil for Bresnan

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/cricket/article-2233594/Graeme-Swann-excels-England–Top-Spin-Test.html#ixzz2CM24VRUK

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

3.50am: Before play starts, don't forget to read some of the brilliant pieces from Sportsmail's top team in Ahmedabad, Paul Newman, Lawrence Booth, Martin Samuel, Nasser Hussain and of course Bumble.

3.45am: Good morning and welcome to Sportsmail's coverage of day two of the first Test between India and England.

It is fair to say that the hosts had the better of the first day, but England did manage to keep the runs down and take some wickets as the day went on. Today, they will be looking to take some early wickets and try and dismiss India before setting about of chasing down their total.

Graeme Swann was England's main success story yesterday with all four of the wickets for the tourists, while Virender Sehwag was India's star with the bat.

Caught in a spin: Graeme Swann took all four of England's wickets on day one of the first Test

Caught in a spin: Graeme Swann took all four of England's wickets on day one of the first Test

World Twenty20: Australia beat India by nine wickets

Watson stars with bat and ball as Aussies blow India away in Super Eights

|

UPDATED:

17:35 GMT, 28 September 2012

Shane Watson blitzed India with runs and wickets as Australia raced to a nine-wicket win to make a mockery of tonight's heavyweight ICC World Twenty20 clash at the Premadasa Stadium.

Watson (72) and his opening partner David Warner (63 not out) gorged 10 sixes between them, in a stand of 133, after the former had also taken three for 34 to restrict India to 140 for seven.

India, whose last outing at this venue was their own 90-run Group A trouncing of off-colour England, were on the other side of an unequal equation this time as Australia finished them off with more than five overs to spare.

Blown away: Shane Watson was the match winner for Australia

Blown away: Shane Watson was the match winner for Australia

Australia v India scorecard:

Click here to see the full scorecard

Watson began patiently before topping and tailing Piyush Chawla's first over – the eighth – with a six over mid-wicket to start and then a second maximum back over the leg-spinner's head to finish. Warner joined in with successive leg-side sixes off Harbhajan Singh in the next over, and Australia were already on track to complete their task notably early in this Super Eight match.

Watson repeated the same dose of double maximums when Mahendra Singh Dhoni brought Irfan Pathan into the attack, and for good measure he passed his 28-ball fifty with his first four – off his pads – to go with six sixes.

Warner had a close call for lbw against Zaheer Khan on 21, and was dropped caught-behind by Dhoni off Yuvraj Singh on 45.

Three and easy: Watson took three wickets with the ball

Three and easy: Watson took three wickets with the ball

Good knock: Watson then went on to score 72 with the bat

Good knock: Watson then went on to score 72 with the bat

Watson, by contrast, gave no chances until he was caught at cover off Yuvraj – a wicket which came far too late to make any difference to the outcome in an extraordinarily one-sided contest.

India had to work hard for what seemed initially to be a near-par total, after winning the toss, Pathan top-scoring with 31 at better than a run a ball.

Pathan, opening with Gautam Gambhir as India again chose to leave out Virender Sehwag, provided the stability others could not.

In good form: Australia's Mitchell Starc celebrates with teammates after he dismissed Indian batsman Rohit Sharma

In good form: Australia's Mitchell Starc celebrates with teammates after he dismissed Indian batsman Rohit Sharma

Not enough: Irfan Pathanof and India did not set a high enough total

Not enough: Irfan Pathanof and India did not set a high enough total

But his was the second of three wickets to fall for four runs, in the 70s, and India therefore needed some productivity from their middle and lower order. Gambhir was run out when Pat Cummins kicked the ball on to the stumps to effect the first dismissal of the match.

Then Pathan apart, none of India's specialist batsmen managed to establish himself – and it was only some late hitting from Suresh Raina, down at an unaccustomed number seven, and R Ashwin that gave them a score they could even hope to defend.

If they thought they might have enough runs, they very quickly discovered otherwise.

Jadeja and Ashwin hold their nerve and guide India to victory over Sri Lanka

Jadeja and Ashwin hold their nerve and guide India to victory over Sri Lanka

India survived a late scare to hang
on for a Virat Kohli-inspired four-wicket victory over Sri Lanka in the
Commonwealth Bank Series match at the WACA Ground.

India seemed to be cruising to their
target of 234 – at one point needing just 77 runs off 98 balls to win
with seven wickets in hand – before they lost three for 24 in a middle
order collapse which saw them slump to 181 for six.

Close call: Mahendra Singh Dhoni (left) attempts to run out Angelo Mathews

Close call: Mahendra Singh Dhoni (left) attempts to run out Angelo Mathews

But all-rounder Ravindra Jadeja hit 24 off 28 balls and tail-ender Ravichandran Ashwin added 30 off 38 to steady the ship with an unbeaten 53-run seventh wicket stand to guide India home with 20 balls to spare.

In-form batsman Kohli had earlier set them up for victory with an impressive 77 off 94, but he ran himself out at a crucial stage of India's innings and injured himself in the process.

Kohli required assistance to leave the ground with an apparent left leg injury suffered while diving to avoid the run out.

Still waiting: Sachin Tendulkar stuck on 99 centuries

Still waiting: Sachin Tendulkar stuck on 99 centuries

Sachin Tendulkar also played an important role in India's chase but again fell short of his 100th international century, dismissed after looking at ease through most of his innings when he chopped the ball onto his stumps for 48 off 63.

The 38-year-old's quest for his
100th ton has now gone on for nearly a year and has included six one-day
international innings and 21 Test knocks.

But along with Kohli and a vastly improved bowling performance,
Tendulkar still helped to lead India to their first win of the
tri-series in a big confidence boost for their struggling side.

Sri Lanka always faced an uphill battle after they were restricted to
233 for eight by excellent bowling spells from Ashwin, who took three
for 32 off 10 overs, and paceman Zaheer Khan, who took two for 44.

Youngster Dinesh Chandimal (64 off 81) was the best of Sri Lanka's batsman, while Angelo Mathews' 33 not out off 28 helped lift a run-rate which had been poor for much of the innings in the latter overs.

Despite the best efforts of
all-rounder Mathews, who took two for 30 off 9.3 overs and the rest of
Sri Lanka's bowlers, their modest total gave them little hope of winning
in Graham Ford's first game in charge.

Sri Lanka have now won just two of their 16 50-over games at the WACA, a
record they will be desperate to improve in Friday's match against
Australia.

After losing
struggling opener Virender Sehwag for four early in their chase, India
soon recovered through Tendulkar and Kohli's 75-run stand before Mathews
dismissed the 'Little Master'.

He's gone: India's Virat Kohli lies on the pitch after being run out

He's gone: India's Virat Kohli lies on the pitch after being run out

Kohli and Rohit Sharma then guided the score to 122 before the latter fell for 10 to a spectacular Tillakaratne Dilshan catch off Thisara Perera's bowling.

After Suresh Raina and MS Dhoni fell in consecutive overs, their chase hit a major hurdle when Kohli was comfortably run out while attempting a suicidal single to put his side in big trouble.

But Jadeja and Ashwin showed great composure and guided India to victory in front of a crowd of 6685.

Ricky Ponting passes 13,000 runs

Ponting passes 13,000 runs as Aussies take charge against India in Adelaide

Ricky Ponting became the third man in history to accumulate 13,000 Test runs as Australia charged into a commanding position at stumps on day one of the fourth Test against India at the Adelaide Oval.

Captain Michael Clarke (140no) and his predecessor Ponting (137no) came together with the score at 84 for three shortly before lunch and went on to share a record-breaking unbeaten 252-run stand for the fourth-wicket to guide Australia to 335 for three at the close of play in scorching conditions.

It was the duo's second double-hundred stand of the series after their 288-run union during the second Test in Sydney when Clarke notched a memorable triple ton.

Landmark: Ricky Ponting has now accumulated 13,000 Test runs

Landmark: Ricky Ponting has now accumulated 13,000 Test runs

Ponting – who joins Indian pair Sachin Tendulkar and Rahul Dravid on his latest landmark – powered to his 41st Test century after coming in with his side in a spot of bother at 31 for two after 10 overs.

The crowd rose to its feet when Ponting worked Zaheer Khan behind square for a couple but the faithful were quickly subdued when the signal for leg byes was realised, the ball clearly deflecting off the batsman's thigh pad.

The very next ball Ponting received a standing ovation and raised his arms triumphantly after he pushed Zaheer between point and gully for two to bring up his second hundred of the series, this dig far more fluent than his determined, gutsy knock at the SCG.

Crowd-pleaser: Ponting

Crowd pleaser: Ponting

With the ton – which arrived off 164 balls and included 11 boundaries – Ponting drew level with South African compatriot Jacques Kallis in second place for all-time most Test centuries, behind only India's Sachin Tendulkar (51).

Amazingly, it was Ponting's fourth
ton in as many Tests against India at the ground – all coming in the
first innings – and sixth overall at this ground.

Clarke
has enjoyed a similar success rate, his magnificent ton his second in
as many stints at the Adelaide crease against India.

Four overs after Ponting saluted, Clarke caressed Umesh Yadav to the third man boundary to register his 19th Test ton.

He
removed his helmet and kissed the crest as the crowd rose once more to
celebrate an innings that was even more aggressive and impressive than
Ponting's.

It was Clarke's fifth century in 12 Tests since taking over as skipper and fifth overall against India.

The 30-year-old's wonderful, momentum-shifting century came off just 133 balls and including 14 fours and a big six.

That six came on just the second ball
after tea when Clarke, making his intentions clear, charged India's
acting skipper Virender Sehwag – who surprisingly bowled himself
immediately after the break – and thumped him over the long straight
boundary.

Ponting and
the imperious Clarke were rarely troubled in perfect batting conditions
under hot, sunny skies against a listless Indian outfit.

Leading by example: Skipper Michael Clarke celebrates by kissing his helmet

Leading by example: Skipper Michael Clarke celebrates by kissing his helmet

The
pitch, which was a belter and further flattened throughout the day, did
not assist the tourists' cause, but they didn't help themselves either
with a general lack of energy and intensity, inattentive fielding,
defensive field placings and some pedestrian bowling.

Ishant
Sharma (nought for 50) bowled better than his figures suggested. He was
unlucky at times and asked plenty of probing questions of the in-form
pair, bowling some of his best spells of the summer.

The
paceman almost achieved the belated breakthrough in the 86th over when,
with the second new ball, he captured Clarke's outside edge which flew
to VVS Laxman's right, the veteran grassing a very tough chance.

The
next over Clarke tentatively edged Zaheer just short of a diving
Wriddhiman Saha as his concentration wavered, albeit fleetingly.

The only other time the visitors really perked up was the final over before tea.

Sehwag introduced Virat Kohli for a one-off over to bowl some gentle medium pacers in a hope to break the damaging partnership.

Dream team: Ponting (left) and Clarke

Dream team: Ponting (left) and Clarke

Clarke was untroubled seeing off the part-timer before drama unfolded on the penultimate ball of the middle session.

Clarke turned Kohli to the on-side for a sharp single when Zaheer had a shy at the non-striker's end from square leg.

The ball ricocheted off the sliding bat of the Aussie skipper, who infuriated the Indians by running two more as a result of the deflection.

India
appealed for Clarke to be given out obstructing the field, arguing he
had deliberately deviated in an attempt to divert Zaheer's throw but
after umpires Kumar Dharmasena and Aleem Dar conferred with third umpire
Paul Reiffel, Clarke was rightly allowed to bat on.

Take that: Clarke prepares to smash one

Take that: Clarke prepares to smash one

Earlier, Australia lost two wickets inside the first 10 overs before
losing another one shortly before lunch to momentarily give India the
upper hand after Clarke had won the toss and elected to bat in hot, dry
conditions.

David
Warner (eight) and Shaun Marsh (three) were sent packing early as Sehwag
surprised by introducing off-spinner Ashwin in the fourth over of the
innings.

Ed Cowan made
30 before falling to an excellent catch from Laxman at cover which
created some murmurs in the home camp as Ashwin picked up two wickets
before lunch, but Ponting and Clarke destroyed the wilting Indians and
will look to continue the carnage on Wednesday.