Tag Archives: wankhede

England beat India in second Twenty20 – Eoin Morgan scores six off last delivery

Final-ball drama in India as Morgan hammers maximum to hand England Twenty20 victory

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UPDATED:

18:01 GMT, 22 December 2012

Eoin Morgan hit the last ball for a straight six as England pulled off their highest Twenty20 run chase to conclude their 2012 schedule with a thrilling six-wicket victory over India.

It seemed Morgan (49no) had left it too late, with three still needed to win off the final ball from Ashok Dinda.

But the Irishman kept his cool, even after Dinda controversially pulled out of the delivery first time round with Morgan crouched in his stance.

Match winner: Morgan hit six off the final delivery to bring England level in the Twenty20 series

Match winner: Morgan hit six off the final delivery to bring England level in the Twenty20 series

An apparent rethink then worked a treat for England as Morgan stood his ground to strike a perfect blow straight back over the seamer's head to tie the two-match series.

England had earlier struggled to contain Mahendra Singh Dhoni and Suresh Raina's late onslaught and appeared to be up against it to better 177 for eight at the Wankhede Stadium.

But on a good batting surface, and with a heavy dew making life difficult for India after Morgan had won an important toss, Michael Lumb (50) and then the captain himself scrambled England home.

Even another three economical wickets from Yuvraj Singh could not quite tip the balance India's way this time.

Lumb shared an opening stand of 80 with Alex Hales – and then after Yuvraj had done his worst, Morgan finished the job in company with Jos Buttler.

Lumb counted four from the very first ball of England's chase, thanks to a hapless Parvinder Awana misfield as he lost his footing at third-man.

The same fielder, at deep square-leg, then let the greasy ball slip out of his hands as he dropped Hales when he had just seven.

Lumb also had some minor early fortune, mishooking Awana three times in his first over – for a six, a four and a two.

There were plenty more authentic shots in his 30-ball half-century, including a second six over an unguarded long-on during the powerplay off Ravichandran Ashwin.

As in the first match in Pune, the introduction of Yuvraj's left-arm spin was soon significant.

First, Lumb went walkabout and was stumped down the leg-side to end an opening stand of 80 in the ninth over; then Luke Wright got in a tangle and was hit in front, and finally Hales picked out deep square-leg with a sweep.

In the wickets: Dernbach took two key scalps

In the wickets: Dernbach took two key scalps

Yuvraj had taken three for 18 two days ago, and this time he improved his career-best with another three for one run fewer.

Samit Patel holed out in the chase off Dinda, but Morgan and Buttler got the target down to nine off the last over and got home right at the wire.

Wright's first over and Stuart Meaker's last earlier both cost 20 runs, and England had no answer during a 60-run sixth-wicket partnership in just 27 balls between Dhoni and Raina.

Jade Dernbach had struck in only the second over when Ajinkya Rahane carved a catch down to debutant Joe Root at third-man. But first-change Meaker began poorly, with five wides somehow hurled almost straight to fine-leg before he was pulled for four twice.

Hitting out: Dhoni was joint top scorer for India with 38 runs

Hitting out: Dhoni was joint top scorer for India with 38 runs

England's outcricket took another turn for the worse when Wright overstepped for a big no-ball, and saw the free-hit slapped wide of mid-on by Virat Kohli for another boundary.

The upshot was a 50 stand for the second wicket in only 25 balls. Meaker redeemed himself with the wicket of Kohli, for the second match running, lbw pushing across the line to a ball which might have beaten leg-stump.

Wright switched ends to make amends too, with another big wicket when Yuvraj pulled to long-on to give Root some more catching practice.

Opener Gautam Gambhir was cast in the sheet-anchor role, but appeared to be taking the brief to extremes – and it was not clear to whose advantage it was when he mis-pulled Wright to be caught at a fine third-man for 17 off 27 balls.

Rohit Sharma missed a slog-sweep at
James Tredwell and was bowled but Raina was dropped on nine, a tough
chance to diving wicketkeeper Buttler off Tim Bresnan.

Then
just when it seemed England might be about to restrict India, the
left-hander went into overdrive in Meaker's last over – and Dhoni's
canny placement and power proved telling too.

England, however, had done just enough in the middle overs to give their batsmen the chance they needed.

Picture dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from the Twenty 20 match in Mumbai due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Jimmy Anderson on cloud nine after dismissing Sachin Tendulkar – Lawrence Booth

Top Spin at the Test: 'Burnley Express' on cloud nine

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UPDATED:

19:50 GMT, 14 December 2012

When Jimmy Anderson knocked back Sachin Tendulkar's middle stump via an inside edge to dismiss him for just two, it was the ninth time in Tests Anderson has got his man – the most by any bowler during Tendulkar's 194-match career, one clear of Sri Lankan spinner Muttiah Muralitharan. In all, Anderson has trapped Tendulkar lbw three times, bowled him twice and had him caught behind and in the slips twice each.

Tormentor: James Anderson (file image)

Tormentor: James Anderson (file image)

Sehwag's unwanted record

Tendulkar may not be the only Indian batsman developing a complex about Anderson. Virender Sehwag also lost his middle stump to the England bowler, thus completing his 16th Test duck – a record for an Indian recognised batsman. Seven of those blobs have come against England, with Anderson now his chief tormentor, having also removed him for nought at Mumbai in March 2006 and at Edgbaston in August 2011.

Cheteshwar Pujara became the latest victim of a poor umpiring decision in this series when he was given out by Rod Tucker caught at short leg off his elbow. Despite that, it was a superb reflex catch by Ian Bell, who had resumed his customary position under the helmet after Joe Root had missed a chance there seven overs earlier, failing to stay down and getting hit flush on the right shin as Pujara played forward to Monty Panesar.

Root is up in good company

Only three England batsmen have made more runs in their debut Test innings against India than Joe Root's 73. Kent's Bryan Valentine hit 136 at the Brabourne Stadium in what was then Bombay way back in December 1933, while Owais Shah managed 88 at Mumbai's newer Wankhede Stadium in March 2006, an innings in which he was affected by wrist cramps. Lancashire's Geoff Pullar hit 75 at Headingley in 1959.

Swann is flying again

When Graeme Swann made 85 against South Africa at Centurion three years ago, hopes were high that England were uncovering a bowling all-rounder. But his 56 yesterday was his first half-century since that Test, in which time – until yesterday – he had scored only 679 Test runs at an average of 18. The way he timed Ravindra Jadeja and Piyush Chawla for sixes was a long overdue reminder of what he is capable of.

Steven Finn fit to face India as England contemplate omitting Stuart Broad for third Test

Finn champing at bit to face India as England contemplate omitting Broad for third Test

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UPDATED:

09:08 GMT, 3 December 2012


Bowled over: Finn is ready and raring to go for the third Test in Kolkata

Bowled over: Finn is ready and raring to go for the third Test in Kolkata

Steven Finn has described himself as 'ready to go' as England consider whether to drop vice-captain Stuart Broad ahead of Wednesday's crucial third Test in Kolkata.

Finn, who picked up a thigh injury after bowling only four overs on the opening day of the tour in Mumbai, came through a workout in the Eden Gardens nets this morning, and is set to share new-ball duties with Jimmy Anderson.

'I did exactly what I planned to do today,' he said. 'I bowled six overs in two spells – four and two. And I bowled well and I feel that if I'm needed on Wednesday I'll be ready to go.'

The inclusion of Finn would be bad news for Broad, whose combined figures in the Ahmedabad and Mumbai Tests were a disappointing 36-2-157-0.

England's Twenty20 captain has not been dropped from the Test side since the previous full tour of India, four years ago, when he was left out of the game at Chennai.

'It's difficult as a bowler,' said Finn. 'There's no hiding place, and you have to keep running in. But Broady's an exceptional bowler. He's played 50-odd Test matches, so he's a world-class player and we’ll know he’ll come back, definitely.'

Following their stunning 10-wicket in at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai, England are keen to keep India on the canvas.

Sitting it out Broad may miss out after failing to take a wicket all series

Sitting it out Broad may miss out after failing to take a wicket all series

And, as fast-bowling coach David Saker
intimated last week when he spoke of Finn's X-factor, that involves
enacting their original plan of hitting the hosts with their fastest
bowler.

'It's definitely encouraging for the bowling coach to be saying that about you,’ said Finn. 'I feel in good rhythm coming into it. I had a run-out the other day in Navi Mumbai with the Performance Programme, and I feel in a good place.

'The injury was majorly disappointing.
I’ve never had that feeling of something popping before. It was alien to
me, as well as scary and frustrating knowing I had a chance of playing
in that first Test match.

Picture dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from England's tour of India due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

'But I’ve had a little bit of time out, and I feel fresh for it. You can put a positive spin on it, and say my body’s had a chance of recovering from the English season and the Twenty20 World Cup. I can’t feel the injury at all now.'

And Finn, whose 16 Tests have brought him 66 wickets at the useful average of 28, is determined not to endure a repeat of his Mumbai experience, where his participation in the Performance Programme match meant he could follow events an hour away at the Wankhede only on TV.

'It was difficult knowing that the lads were there in Mumbai celebrating the win and being together, and I was on the other side of town watching it on TV.

'It was a strange sort of feeling, and something I didn’t particularly enjoy missing out on. I’m keen to get in on the act if it happens in this game.'

India v England, Second Test, Day Two report

Cook and KP put on 100 run partnership as England look to take control in second Test

By
David Clough, Press Association

PUBLISHED:

11:05 GMT, 24 November 2012

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UPDATED:

11:29 GMT, 24 November 2012

Alastair Cook and Kevin Pietersen's unbroken century partnership put England in a position of great promise on day two of the second Test against India at the Wankhede Stadium.

Cook (87no) and Pietersen (62no) joined forces at a critical point in an intriguing contest, on this spinners' pitch, after England had lost two wickets for as many runs to Pragyan Ojha.

From 68 for two shortly before tea, in reply to 327 all out, they then saw out the day to the tune of 178 without further loss – and England's prospects of battling back here after their nine-wicket defeat in the first Test of four were significantly bolstered.

There was an England all-time record-equalling 22nd Test century on offer as extra motivation for each of the third-wicket pair.

But it was the opportunity to be associated with a famous victory here which had to be the principal guiding force.

England fared well almost throughout, save the setbacks of losing Nick Compton and Jonathan Trott in such quick succession.

After Monty Panesar completed his five-wicket haul, and Graeme Swann finally shifted Cheteshwar Pujara (135), openers Cook and Compton shared an encouraging stand of 66.

Leading the charge: Kevin Pietersen and Alastair Cook put England in a good position at the end of Day Two (file picture)

Leading the charge: Kevin Pietersen and Alastair Cook put England in a good position at the end of Day Two (file picture)

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures from the Second Test in Mumbai due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations. The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Cook was less crease-bound than in his heroic but vain 176 in Ahmedabad – and after the captain had twice hit Ojha over the top, once for six over long-on, Compton too was emboldened to use his feet against India's three-strong specialist spin attack.

It was only when slow left-armer Ojha returned for his second spell that Compton was undone, caught at slip off a full ball which turned enough to take the edge of his forward-defence.

Then Trott went fatally back, as he has tended to on this tour, and was stone-dead lbw for his second duck in three Test innings in India.

Ojha, Ravichandran Ashwin and Harbhajan Singh had conditions in their favour.

But Cook and Pietersen answered every question, in their contrasting styles, each needing a little luck as well as plenty of skill as edges were controlled short of slip and the line of the stumps protected when sharp turn often beat the bat.

Pietersen began with a cover-driven four off Harbhajan, and reached his 63-ball 50 with a back-foot stroke in the same direction for his eighth boundary off Ashwin.

Cook's tempo was slower, but his presence equally assured, taking more than twice as many deliveries to reach his half-century but hitting six fours and that six along the way.

Cleaning up: Spinners Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann wrapped up the India innings (file picture)

Cleaning up: Spinners Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann wrapped up the India innings (file picture)

Only when he escaped a sharp chance to Virender Sehwag, on 85, in the last over of the day from Harbhajan did he make a notable mistake.

Panesar and Swann had combined well too this morning, to take India's last four wickets for 61 runs. By the time Swann had Pujara stumped half an hour before lunch, the near immovable India number three had batted for almost 18 hours without being dismissed in the series since first taking guard at the Sardar Patel Stadium last week.

He underpinned a total which had appeared highly unlikely when the hosts stumbled to 119 for five yesterday, and his stand of 111 with Ashwin (68) was a source of particular frustration for England. Ashwin had hardly batted like a number eight, since his arrival at the crease last night.

Finally dismissed: Cheteshwar Pujara was out for 135 off the bowling of Graeme Swann - it was the first time he had lost his wicket in the series. (File picture)

Finally dismissed: Cheteshwar Pujara was out for 135 off the bowling of Graeme Swann – it was the first time he had lost his wicket in the series. (File picture)

But he was deceived by Panesar (five for 129), who followed a series of stock balls with one that hurried on to hit the back pad just on off-stump and win an lbw as Ashwin picked the wrong one to cut.

Harbhajan survived on one when an outside-edge off Panesar flew between wicketkeeper and first slip for four, and clubbed the slow left-armer for a six wide of long-on before Swann (four for 70) ended his fun – lbw walking across his stumps.

England's off-spinner then achieved what no one else had since this series started – getting Pujara up the wicket and missing on the forward-defence as an arm ball slid past the outside edge for Matt Prior to complete a routine stumping.

It was an underwhelming way for the new 'Wall' to fall at last, in an India innings which closed soon afterwards when Swann had Zaheer Khan caught at short-leg – off pad and shirt, on replay evidence, but to England's relief nonetheless.

By close of play, thanks to Cook and Pietersen, the visitors' dressing-room was doubtless an altogether more optimistic place.

Andy Flower takes the blame for getting Test selection wrong

Flower takes heat off Cook by saying: I'm to blame for Monty error

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UPDATED:

00:26 GMT, 21 November 2012

Andy Flower has admitted England got it badly wrong in leaving spinner Monty Panesar out of their side for the first Test and insisted: ‘Blame me.’

The team director, who makes all selection calls on tour along with his captain, shielded new leader Alastair Cook from criticism by taking full responsibility for what may go down as England’s worst howler since calling up Darren Pattinson out of the blue four years ago.

‘With hindsight, yes, it was a mistake not to play Monty in Ahmedabad,’ said Flower after England’s arrival here in Mumbai for Friday’s second Test. ‘I didn’t expect that pitch to turn as early as it did. I certainly misjudged it.’

It's good to talk: Andy Flower speaks with Kevin Pietersen during England training

It's good to talk: Andy Flower speaks with Kevin Pietersen during England training

The chances of Panesar playing here were improved yesterday when Steven Finn was ruled out after aggravating his thigh injury. It is a big blow for England’s fastest bowler, who was expected to play a significant part in this series.

Ahead of the first Test England believed they were better off concentrating on their seam-bowling strengths but the slow, dry, dusty Ahmedabad surface proved far more conducive to the likes of Pragyan Ojha and Graeme Swann, who took 15 wickets between them in a match India won by nine wickets.

England will look at the pitch at the Wankhede Stadium on Wednesday and Thursday before they decide if the time is right to pair Panesar with Swann in a match they have to win.

Set for a recall England captain Alastair Cook could be able to turn to Monty Panesar in the second Test

Set for a recall England captain Alastair Cook could be able to turn to Monty Panesar in the second Test

It is probable Panesar will return at the ground where he made his first big impression as an England player six years ago — but not absolutely certain.

The rebuilt stadium is now more open, with the Mumbai breeze assisting reverse-swing, and the pitch offering more bounce than Ahmedabad.

The feeling remains that Panesar, still a one- dimensional cricketer, is not a man in whom England really trust but Flower dispelled the strong suggestion that the Sussex slow left-armer blotted his copybook with his poor behaviour earlier this year on tour in Sri Lanka.

‘I’ve got no issues with Monty Panesar,’ said Flower. ‘He’s been working extremely well out here and he’s in good form. He’s ready to play if we want him to. He was OK in Sri Lanka.’

Finn was due to have a scan today on an injury he picked up fielding in a warm-up game here and England hope he will be fit enough to play for the Performance Squad in their first game here next week. If he is not then, sadly, he will be on his way home.

Sitting it out: Steven Finn is not fit to play in the second Test

Sitting it out: Steven Finn is not fit to play in the second Test

His absence means vice- captain Stuart Broad will definitely get a chance to prove that his poor performance in the first Test was an aberration but there was a warning for Broad yesterday about the dangers of Twitter.

The spiky Broad had clashed with Sir Ian Botham after England’s greatest all-rounder called for him to be dropped for the next Test.

‘I’ve had a word with Broady about it already,’ said Flower. ‘You have to be very careful what you say on Twitter. With so many athletes using it and journalists watching very closely, it’s quite easy to write stories about some of the comments. It’s inevitable.

‘We have to educate our players on doing it the right way. In the main our guys are pretty good. I don’t think this is a big thing.’

Flower is likely to miss the one-dayers in India in the new year — a call that, given his workload, would be sensible.

Set to play: Stuart Broad will have the chance to prove his critics, including Sir Ian Botham, wrong in the second Test

Set to play: Stuart Broad will have the chance to prove his critics, including Sir Ian Botham, wrong in the second Test

He accepted England’s first innings batting in subcontinental conditions let them down in the first Test, as it did this year in the UAE against Pakistan and in Sri Lanka, but he wants people to wait until the end of this series before being too harsh on his batsmen. ‘Let’s judge at the end of this tour, not after one Test,’ said Flower.

‘I sincerely hope that at the end of this series we will have fought our way back and showed real skill against spin. I still believe our batsmen can do that. There might be a little more bounce here which would help our seamers and we’ve got to overturn what seems predictable at the moment.

‘I hope there is no real reason why our batsmen should keep failing in the first innings. We have to turn that round and I’m as excited about that challenge as I was before the first Test. It will be really interesting to see if we’re good enough to do that.’
England’s reputation as a Test team of substance depends on it.

Alastair Cook admits England selection was wrong

We know we got it wrong! Cook admits England need to improve selection

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UPDATED:

22:53 GMT, 19 November 2012

Alastair Cook admitted England might have picked the wrong side after they lost the first Test to India by nine wickets in Ahmedabad.

The second game starts on Friday in Mumbai, leaving Cook and Andy Flower only three more days to produce a team capable of coming from 1-0 down with three to play.

‘Clearly we’re going to have to look at our selection,’ said the England captain, whose superb 176 proved futile. ‘There are some good people making decisions, and we thought we were doing the right thing. The result showed that we might have got it wrong. There will be a lot to ponder.

Admission: Alastair Cook said England got their selection wrong

Admission: Alastair Cook said England got their selection wrong

‘We showed a lot of character in that second half of the game. But when you get bowled out for 190 in that first innings, on a good wicket, that is where we lost. If we’re going to win a series out here, everyone has to contribute. ‘I’m bitterly disappointed. We had an outside chance in the (final) morning. It was a very small chance, but one we could have taken.’

Perhaps hoping for another seam-heavy English attack on a Wankhede Stadium pitch that is likely to help the spinners, India’s captain MS Dhoni insisted: ‘Seam bowling is their strength. They need to back their strength. I think it was the right decision.’

Ian Bell to leave England"s tour on paternity leave

England batting concerns with Bell set to quit India tour for labour day

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 4 September 2012

England's concern over the strength of their batting line-up for the tour of India has intensified after it emerged Ian Bell may take paternity leave during the second Test in Mumbai.

Bell’s wife Chantal is due to give birth to their first child in late November, which means Bell — a veteran of 80 Tests — could be back home while his team-mates walk out at the Wankhede Stadium.

That would leave new captain Alastair Cook and team director Andy Flower with a selection headache. With Andrew Strauss retired and Kevin Pietersen’s place on the tour dependent on the outcome of meetings with the ECB, England can ill-afford to lose a third senior batsman for a gruelling four-Test series.

England expects: Ian Bell has been among the country's better batsmen recently

England expects: Ian Bell has been among the country's better batsmen recently

Officially the ECB are refusing to comment until the tour party is finalised and the date of the birth confirmed, but Sportsmail understands Bell has been preparing for the possibility of missing Mumbai for some time.

His potential absence is not without precedent. Strauss missed a Test in Lahore seven years ago to attend the birth of his first son, Sam, while wicketkeeper Matt Prior flew home from a tour of the West Indies in early 2009 for the birth of his son Jonathan.

Important: Bell could, though, take a break from the upcoming tour

Important: Bell could, though, take a break from the upcoming tour

Bell was in Nottingham on Tuesday ahead of Wednesday's final one-day international against South Africa and, though England place great store by team spirit, it was still a surprise to see them holding hands during one fielding drill

Perhaps they were trying to show Pietersen they are one big happy family without him.

The drill is one of many devised by assistant coach Richard Halsall — England were also speed-walking at one point — who was in an imaginative mood after being put in charge for the game.

The fact the hosts hold a 2-1 lead going into today’s finale has encouraged them that the time is right for Flower to have a well-earned break after a difficult summer and hand over to his trusted lieutenant.

England will be determined to complete a notable NatWest Series triumph after the huge disappointment of their heavy Test defeat by South Africa. But they must do so without Jonathan Trott, who was last night ruled out with the hand injury he suffered in Sunday’s victory at Lord’s.

Jonny Bairstow comes into the middle order with England having to decide whether Ravi Bopara or Craig Kieswetter is promoted to three.