Tag Archives: violence

Video: Policeman attacks Belgrano"s Juan Quiroga with a truncheon in Argentinian football match

Video: More football violence, but this time it's the POLICE attacking one of the players!

By
Charles Reynolds

PUBLISHED:

00:40 GMT, 4 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

00:40 GMT, 4 March 2013

The seemingly never-ending problem of football related violence in Argentina reared its head once again this weekend when a member of the police struck a Belgrano player in the face with a truncheon.

The incident happened at the very end of Newell’s Old Boys clash with Belgrano, with the Rosario club leading 1-0.

Trouble began at the Estadio Marcelo Bielsa when sections of the visiting support began throwing projectiles at the home fans and the police moved in to usher them out of the stadium.

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Police brutality: Belgrano's Juan Quiroga on the floor after being hit in the face by a police truncheon

Police brutality: Belgrano's Juan Quiroga on the floor after being hit in the face by a police truncheon. And the moment he was hit (below)

The game was suspended as the police used the somewhat heavy-handed tactic of using truncheons and rubber bullets to attempt to calm the Belgrano fans, who only responded with more aggression.

Members of the Belgrano team moved to calm their own supporters but were also turned on by riot police with Juan Quiroga getting kicked in the leg and then shockingly Gastn Turus getting hit in the face by a truncheon.

The defender, who suffered a deep cut to his eye, told the media: 'The cop hit me with his truncheon.'

Juan Quiroga

In the ensuing melee Belgrano had Luciano Lollo sent off for clashing with a policeman and to add insult to injury they went on to concede a second goal when the game eventually resumed ten minutes later.

The club have subsequently issued a statement condemning the police violence which marred Saturday’s game: 'Belgrano repudiates, rejects and publicly and judicially denounces the pressure and generalised violence to which their supporters and professional squad were subjected to by Santa Fe (province) police.'

'But is it only the police who are responsible The Santa Fe provincial government knows this goes on. More than once we have presented statements and videos to the AFA. They also know and we expect a solution.

Juan Quiroga

Juan Quiroga

Juan Quiroga

'We won't cease in our repudiation, in denouncing all those involved and in the search for an end to the social and club violence that reigns at grounds, especially in Santa Fe province.'

Belgrano president Armando Perez has also asked Rosario prosecutor Enrique Paz to take a statement from Turus after the defender was denied the chance at a police station in the city, instead being charged with aggressive behaviour.

'I went to denounce an aggression towards me and I got my fingers painted,' the defender told local media as a result of having his fingerprints taken by Rosario police.

Eden Hazard ball boy row: police launch probe but video supports claim Chelsea ace kicked the ball

VIDEO: Police launch probe into alleged assault on ball boy… but is this the new camera angle that clears Chelsea's Hazard
Belgian FA hit out at Eden Hazard after incident during Capital One Cup tieHazard clashed with ball boy Charlie Morgan, 17, while trying to reclaim ballFormer Chelsea star Pat Nevin backs Hazard and calls Morgan 'disgraceful'
17-year-old ball boy is heir to 42m Swansea director's fortune Claims ball boys were under orders to help Swansea rubbished by club
FA investigating the incident, but PFA chief executive Gordon Taylor does not believe Hazard should face additional punishment

qualifier for Belgium and was filmed tucking into a burger from a van outside.

Steven Martens, the chief executive of the Belgian FA (KBVB) said: 'It's unfortunate and of course it's not something we are proud of. No football authority or person interested in football likes to see acts of violence or lack of respect and this is what happened.

'It might have happened in the heat of the fire but professionals are expected to be able to control themselves.

'They have to be able to control their emotions and when they don't that's unpleasant in general.

Anger: Swansea's Ashley Williams (centre) is held back as he tries to confront Eden Hazard (off camera)

Anger: Swansea's Ashley Williams (centre) is held back as he tries to confront Eden Hazard (off camera)

Sending off: Chelsea's Eden Hazard (#17) receives a red card from referee Chris Foy for violent conduct

Sending off: Chelsea's Eden Hazard (#17) receives a red card from referee Chris Foy for violent conduct

'Of course as we are the Belgium FA we don't like it to be a Belgium national squad player but I am very much convinced that Eden himself will realise that.

'Eden is more than intelligent enough to understand that this is going to be a lesson learned for him. All of us make mistakes in life.'

Martens, speaking at a meeting of UEFA's 53 member associations in Nyon, said Hazard's frustration was perhaps a reflection of the intense pressure on his shoulders.

Helping hand: Chelsea's Demba Ba (right) checks on the ball boy after he had clashed with Eden Hazard

Helping hand: Chelsea's Demba Ba (right) checks on the ball boy after he had clashed with Eden Hazard

Boast: The 17-year-old earlier wrote on Twitter that he was 'needed for timewasting'

Boast: The 17-year-old earlier wrote on Twitter that he was 'needed for timewasting'

He added: 'It is easy to judge from outside but you also have to see it from the player's side too.

'I have been a professional sports coach for many years and the demands on athletes and players are there day-in, day-out.

'Yes we think these guys are well-paid and have a luxury life but on the other hand there is an expectation on them all the time. 'It's not an excuse but it is something that could help us try to understand.'

While the boss of Belgium's football association was damning of Hazard, the Chelsea forward found a supporter in Pat Nevin.

Injured: The ballboy was named as 17-year-old Charlie Morgan, the son of Swansea director David Morgan

Martin Morgan

Wealthy: Charlie Morgan (left), the ball boy who
was kicked by Eden Hazard during a League Cup game last night, is the
son of multi-millionaire businessman Martin Morgan (right)

Property: The self-made tycoon is the owner of the luxury Morgans hotel in Swansea, pictured

Property: The self-made tycoon is the owner of the luxury Morgans hotel in Swansea, pictured

Boasting: Charlie posted this picture of a broken bottle of Veuve Clicquot champagne on his Twitter page

betting slips

Boasting: Charlie posted a picture of a broken
bottle of Veuve Clicquot champagne on his Twitter page, as well as one
of torn-up betting slips

The former Chelsea winger claimed he would have done the same as Hazard if he had been involved in the controversial ball-boy incident at Swansea.

When asked how he would have reacted to the situation, Nevin told BBC Radio 5: 'I would have kicked the ball out from underneath the ball boy if he had been lying like that, 100 per cent.'

And Nevin also criticised the behaviour of 17-year-old Morgan, branding it 'disgraceful'. He added: 'I was very, very disappointed by the way the ball boy acted, and I say “acted”.

'He must have been watching footballers, the way he rolled around and pretended to be more injured.

Travelling in style: Charlie put up this picture of himself in Virgin Atlantic's upper class

Travelling in style: Charlie put up this picture of himself in Virgin Atlantic's upper class

Destination: The teenager on holiday in Las Vegas, in another picture he posted to Twitter

Destination: The teenager on holiday in Las Vegas, in another picture he posted to Twitter

'He only has one job and his job is to go and give the ball back, and what did he do He keeps the ball.

'I have to say I was absolutely amazed this morning to find he is 17, not 12, not 13. 'He should know what his action should be in that situation. His behaviour was disgraceful.'

The ball boy at the centre of the storm Charlie Morgan is the son of hotel and property tycoon Martin Morgan, said to be the 32nd richest person in Wales.

Morgan is on the the Swansea board of directors – which is how Charlie ended up as a ballboy for the League Cup semi-final against the Londoners.

Pricey: A photo of the Louis Vuitton store in Las Vegas which Charlie put on Twitter

Pricey: A photo of the Louis Vuitton store in Las Vegas which Charlie put on Twitter

Charlie Morgan receipt

Charlie Morgan weather

Shared: The teenager retweeted someone else's
120,000 receipt with the caption, 'This is huge time', and also let his
friends know about the good weather at his holiday destination

Posting on Twitter before the game, the teenager wrote: ‘The king of all ballboys is back making his final appearance #needed #for #timewasting.'

Charlie's father is the director of 11 hotel and property companies and has featured in recent editions of the Sunday Times Rich List.

Morgan comes in at No 32 in the top 100 list for Wales – ahead of Premier League footballers Michael Owen and Ryan Giggs and 80s rock chick Bonnie Tyler.

Ben Watkins, 18, a former school friend of Charlie's, said: 'He must be the richest ball boy in football.

In pain: Morgan (second right) is ushered away from the sidelines following the incident with Hazard

In pain: Morgan (second right) is ushered away from the sidelines following the incident with Hazard

'He's mad about Swansea City – what he did was a bit foolish especially after be boasted he was going to time waste. I guess he's been a bit spoiled because his dad's got pots of money.'

In posts on Twitter Charlie brags about drinking Veuve Clicquot champagne and going on holiday to Las Vegas and Dubai.

Swansea are highly unlikely to take any action against Morgan for his part in the ugly clash – and the club has rubbished claims that their ball boys were ordered to give them an unfair advantage in the Capital One Cup clash.

Morgan has been widely accused of
deliberately withholding the ball, a stance seemingly supported by his
posts on Twitter earlier in the day.

Chelsea star: Eden Hazard (right) is pictured earlier in the League Cup match with Swansea City's Ben Davies

Eden Hazard award in May 22, 2011 in Paris

Striker: Eden Hazard is pictured earlier in the match (left) and winning an award in Paris in May 2011 (right)

The club refused to comment when asked to explain the decision, but Swansea vice-chairman Leigh Dineen reiterated Michael Laudrup’s assertion that their ball boys were not briefed to favour the home side.

Dineen told the Guardian: ‘There was no agenda, absolutely not. Stoke, a few years ago, would get the ballboy to wipe the ball down for a long throw and that was something the ballboys were obviously told to do. But certainly we don't line up the ballboys and ask them to waste time. Definitely not.’

A club spokesman added that Morgan,
who started his role aged 12 in 2008, ‘has been a ballboy for about six
seasons and there’s never been a complaint before’.

The
FA have also confirmed they will be taking no action against Swansea
over the incident, while South Wales Police are not pursuing the case as
Morgan declined to press charges.

The FA are reviewing footage of the
action, but Professional Footballers' Association chief executive Gordon
Taylor does not believe Hazard should face additional punishment.

Hurt: The ballboy (centre) is ushered away from the sidelines following the incident with Eden Hazard

Hurt: The ballboy (centre) is ushered away from the sidelines following the incident with Eden Hazard

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He said: 'There is obviously a process which the FA have to go through and it is up to them what they decide. 'But I don't think the young lad involved would want to see Hazard punished further.

'The referee made the correct decision on the night and you do not want people to be hung, drawn and quartered for things that happen in the heat of the moment.

'It is disappointing and Hazard has shown remorse and the two clubs handled the matter very well.

'It will be seen as another stick to beat the game with, but the game has always been about passion and emotions running high and it is a shame for this to overshadow the wonderful achievements of Swansea and Bradford – two clubs who have faced extinction – in reaching the final.'

Coach Alan Curtis also insisted the ball boys were not told to waste time.

He said: 'We never gave them any
instructions whatsoever to slow the game down. It’s never ever been the
case at all. It was a really unfortunate situation.

'I’ve got to be honest though, if I had been the player, I would have tried to get the ball back as quickly as possible.

'Unfortunately it’s been blown up to
be a major incident. It was quickly defused straight after the game.
They met up after the game and shook hands, both apologised and, as far
as we’re concerned, that is the end of it.

'It’s a shame that it’s overshadowed everything.'

Meanwhile, Fulham boss Martin Jol has accused Morgan of 'playing rugby' against Chelsea and said he could understand Hazard kicking out at the teenager.

Jol said: 'Our ball boys are between 10 and 12 years of age. I saw he (Morgan) was probably over-age, probably 21. A big boy, you know Six foot, maybe

'I felt for Hazard, but you can't kick people. He (the ball boy) was playing rugby with him, so I can understand he wanted to get the ball.

'We always tell coaches to tell the ball boys to give the ball back as soon as possible. To do it quick; and not to irritate people.

'Of course you could say Eden should have controlled himself, but it was bizarre. The ball boy shouldn't lie on the ball and play rugby with it.

'He (Hazard) should have controlled himself, but I can see why he did it. I'm not allowed to say I would have done the same so, of course, I would not have done that.'

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Football fans treated terribly at Christmas again – Patrick Collins

So this is how football gets into the spirit of Christmas! Fans are once again taken for granted during festive season

|

UPDATED:

00:07 GMT, 23 December 2012

Football fans have had a terrible
year. There was aggravation at Anfield, offensive chanting at Chelsea
and all manner of unsavoury capers from Luton to Leeds. Add the sombre
overtones of racism and the disturbing threat of sporadic violence and
we see how ancient stereotypes have been miserably reinforced. Yet there
is another side to the story and it reveals itself once again this
Christmas.

For those fans are routinely taken
for granted. They are what an old fighter once described as ‘prawns in
the game’, faceless legions who can be shunted around the country at the
whim of a lazy fixture scheduler or an arrogant television executive.

Their convenience is irrelevant and
their loyalty crassly exploited. They are victims of their own
allegiances, condemned to tour the nation’s motorways in the worst of
the weather and the height of the holiday season.

What about the fans Southampton played Sunderland on Saturday

What about the fans Southampton played Sunderland on Saturday

More from Patrick Collins…

Patrick Collins: How Fergie's bedtime habits set standards at Old Trafford
15/12/12

Patrick Collins: The anti-Wenger mob should be careful what they wish for
15/12/12

Patrick Collins: England's sensational miracle workers have everyone believing again
08/12/12

Patrick Collins: Captain Cook must stand the test of time before he can join the greats
08/12/12

Patrick Collins: Football's silent majority must set the tone, not the bigots who just want to be noticed
01/12/12

Patrick Collins: Richie McCaw, Dan Carter… your boys took one hell of a beating!
01/12/12

Patrick Collins: Tears follow tragic mistake that turned into an ordeal for brave Hatton
25/11/12

Patrick Collins: Let's hope Pep has the right answers when Roman comes calling
24/11/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

As you might expect, the Premier
League are the most cynical culprits. Their fixtures are designed for
those who are more at ease with a remote control than a Satnav.
Saturday offered several harrowing examples. Sunderland played at
Southampton. According to my AA Route Planner, it involved a journey of
318 miles, taking 5hr 58min to complete. In total, the Saturday trip
covered around 640 miles in 12 hours’ driving, with congestion, floods
and the search for a parking place no more than occupational hazards.

QPR were at Newcastle, some 564 miles
in 10hr 20min. Fulham fans travelled to Liverpool, a round trip of 440
miles in 8hr 12min. Which sounds considerably more comfortable, until we
remember that, courtesy of a television contract, the match kicked off
at 5.30pm.

The followers of Manchester United
will make a similar journey to and from Swansea on Sunday — eight hours,
440 miles. While next weekend Arsenal supporters will go to Newcastle
(10hr 20min, 560 miles), while Spurs visit distant Sunderland (same
time, same distance).

/12/22/article-0-16A04F13000005DC-679_634x421.jpg” width=”634″ height=”421″ alt=”What Christmas cheer Fulham fans went all the way to Anfield to see their team thrashed” class=”blkBorder” />

What Christmas cheer Fulham fans went all the way to Anfield to see their team thrashed

Now neutrals/civilians/the
indifferent and uncommitted might observe that nobody is forcing all
those people to make all those exhausting, expensive, environmentally
damaging and essentially unnecessary journeys. And they would have a
point. Yet they make no allowance for the obsessive, the fanatical, the
blindly loyal and those for whom such journeys are not trials to be
endured but challenges to be embraced.

These people are football’s poor
bloody infantry, cannon fodder for sellers of expensive seats and
inferior catering. Their views are unsolicited because they are
unwanted. They exist as little more than a television producer’s sound
effects; a cheery chant, a sigh of despair, the roar that signifies a
goal or a victory.

Nobody consults a chant or seeks the
opinion of a sigh and so they are seen as optional extras, their value
is diminishing year upon year. Yet, for all their occasional excesses,
they are the lifeblood of the game, the people who love it most dearly.

Players are bought and sold, managers
come and go, owners hang around in the hope of an oligarch’s cheque or a
sheik’s largesse. Yet the fans are saddled with their fate, lumbered
with their first love. And so they undertake extraordinary journeys,
peering painfully through the motorway murk for 12 hours and 640 miles
on the Saturday before Christmas.

Except, they do not regard it as
extraordinary. Instead, they see it as a kind of secular vocation, a way
of life which they freely chose and fiercely cherish, despite the
sacrifices it entails.

They know they are being used, they
are aware that those sacrifices are routinely derided by the people who
control the game, but they also know they have neither power nor voice.

There is something faintly daft in
such devotion but there is also something rather wonderful. For they
will be there when all the freeloaders and the corporates, the social
networkers and the fly-by-night proprietors have left the building.

Without them, there is no game. From time to time, we do well to recognise their contribution.

A 201,000 bonus for the boss of the 'useless' LTA

Baroness Billingham has a gift for plain speaking and last week she used it to full effect.

‘The Lawn Tennis Association are one of the wealthiest sporting organisations in the country,’ she said. ‘And it’s my honest and genuine opinion that they are useless.’

As chair of the All Party Parliamentary Tennis Group, the noble lady knows her subject. And the facts support her argument.

Tennis is funded on a lavish scale. The LTA receive around 30million every year from Wimbledon’s profits. In addition, the funding body, Sport England, awarded them 24.5m over a four-year span, with the object of increasing grassroots participation. And what has happened

Participation has fallen from 487,500 in 2008 to 445,100 in 2012. This at a time when Andy Murray’s success has given the sport a profile it has never before enjoyed. ‘Useless’ is almost an understatement.

LTA chief executive Roger Draper has come under fire

LTA chief executive Roger Draper has come under fire

Incidentally, it should be noted that Murray’s eminence, in common with the impressive British women, Heather Watson and Laura Robson, owes nothing to the LTA, since all three followed an independent path in the game.

So the LTA are feeble among the grassroots and irrelevant among the elite.

Sport England have, therefore, quite properly, decided to cut the funding from 24.5m to 17.4m. For the first year it will hold back 10.3m of that reduced total until the LTA have proved that they can deliver.

As Jennie Price, the Sport England chief executive, said: ‘Their plan simply wasn’t strong enough to justify the four-year investment.’ Thus we have an organisation that are not only ‘useless’ but officially incompetent.

And what would you do with the chief executive of such a body Well, if you were the LTA, you’d award him a bonus. Of 201,000. Along with his basic wage of 394,000 and his pension contribution of 45,000, it brings his total salary up to 640,000. This represents an increase of 42,000 on his package for 2011.

Which makes us wonder what Roger Draper might have earned had he been even remotely successful.

Sadly, Draper has not been around to defend his position. Instead, the LTA put up somebody called Simon from the commercial department to flannel a few cliches. Outrageously, nobody was prepared to explain the 201,000 bonus.

So what will be the fate of the visionary who announced: ‘I want to make tennis the No 2 sport after football’

The question answers itself. The statistics are devastating and Draper’s position is untenable. For British tennis could do very much better. Indeed, as the plain-spoken Baroness Billingham will tell you, it could scarcely do worse.

PS… It is reported that the Stoke manager Tony Pulis has officially complained about the three-match suspension of Everton’s Marouane Fellaini. The ban was imposed for Fellaini’s headbutting of Stoke’s Ryan Shawcross. Mysteriously, Pulis suggests that one of his players would have received something far more punitive. This is the same Pulis who, three years ago, saw the tackle which Shawcross flung at Arsenal’s Aaron Ramsey, shattering his leg and putting him out of the game for almost a year. Shawcross was banned for three matches. I can’t recall Pulis complaining about his man’s lenient sentence but I’m sure he must have done. Otherwise he would now risk appearing both absurd and hypocritical.

Tony Pulis

Tony Pulis

Zlatan Ibrahimovic hits out after being told he is too aggressive

Angry Ibrahimovic hits out at detractors after being told he is too aggressive

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UPDATED:

00:45 GMT, 21 December 2012

A stubborn Zlatan Ibrahimovic has
insisted he will not change the way he plays despite criticism
suggesting he is too aggressive.

The Sweden and Paris Saint-Germain
striker has been called before the French FA after appearing to stamp on
the head of Lyon rival Dejan Lovren.

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Ouch: Zlatan Ibrahimovic has been accused of stamping on Lyon's Dejan Lovren

Ouch: Zlatan Ibrahimovic has been accused of stamping on Lyon's Dejan Lovren

Zlat in a hat: Ibrahimovic (right) vies with French defender Zoumana Camara during a training session

Zlat in a hat: Ibrahimovic (right) vies with French defender Zoumana Camara during a training session

Although the referee did not spot the
incident it enraged Lyon's president Jan-Michel Aulas, who believes the
volatile striker did it deliberately.

But Ibrahimovic told BeInSPort: 'I
want a lot in the field when I play. I may look aggressive, it is the
way to feel alive, because if I relax on the field you will not see me
playing.

'When I am angry in the field I play
better – according to me. And if people say I'm aggressive it stimulates
me because I will be even more aggressive. People say I shout I will
shout even more. Because it stimulates me.

'It doesn't mean that I will relax or something because I won wherever I came and I know how it is to win and I will continue.

'I came here to win and I will
continue to be the way I am, because the way I am, I had in ten years a
fantastic career. So people telling me now to change… no! I will tell
people what to do.'

You won't like him when he's angry: Ibrahimovic is prone to outbursts of violence

You won't like him when he's angry: Ibrahimovic is prone to outbursts of violence

As well as trying to deal with the
headstrong striker, PSG must also try and cope with Brazilian defender
Thiago Silva, who signed for around 34million in the summer, wanting to
go back to AC Milan.

'I miss Milan a lot, to tell the
truth. No one can deny that I miss Milan, the club will surely always be
in my heart because they gave me so much,' he told Sky Sport 24.

'I would like to return, certainly.
Milan are a great team, the most successful in the world. I played there
for three years and I do not know the future, but, if there is the
chance to return again, I would definitely go back.'

Hoping for home: Thiago Silva said he would love to go back to AC Milan

Hoping for home: Thiago Silva said he would love to go back to AC Milan

Silva continued: 'It is better now,
but, to be honest at the start, it was a bit difficult for me. French
football is strong and at times very challenging to play. It is not as
easy as everyone thinks.

'Robinho and Pato to return to Brazil
The club are going through a difficult period, this year was always
going to be different from the past.

'I am not sure if Robinho is unhappy.
But, in my opinion he is not as happy as he was in the first year that
he joined the club. He had an immense desire to win.

'As for Pato, I would advise him that a
change of scenery may be required. It is difficult to say what is right
for another person, but, again I do not think that he is happy there
anymore. He may have to return to Brazil.'

Watch video of Zlatan's 'stamp'

Three teenagers to be charged with manslaughter by for allegedly taking part in an attack on a linesman in Holland

Three teenagers to be charged with manslaughter after attack on a linesman in Holland

|

UPDATED:

18:33 GMT, 4 December 2012

Three teenagers will be charged with manslaughter by Dutch prosecutors for allegedly taking part in an attack on a linesman at a youth football match.

Volunteer linesman Richard Nieuwenhuizen died in hospital on Monday, a day after he was beaten and kicked by players from Amsterdam team Nieuw Sloten.

Mr Nieuwenhuizen’s son had been playing in the game, which was held in the town of Almere.

Shock: Members of the soccer club Buitenboys are briefed by board members after the death of a linesman

Shock: Members of the soccer club Buitenboys are briefed by board members after the death of a linesman

Attack: Richard Nieuwenhuizen died after being attacked by three teenagers

Attack: Richard Nieuwenhuizen died after being attacked by three teenagers

And prosecutors said the three males, two 15 and one 16, would be arraigned on Thursday on charges of manslaughter, assault and public violence. Their identities were not released.

Mr Nieuwenhuizen’s team, Buitenboys, have not announced the exact cause of his death, but Dutch TV station RTL said he had brain damage.

Mr Nieuwenhuizen left after Sunday’s match and was not aware anything was wrong. He returned to his club later that night and collapsed.

‘You can’t believe this could happen. That kids of 15 or 16 are playing football, you come to watch and see something like that,’ said Buitenboys chairman Marcel Oost.

Tribute: Flowers are left on the side of the pitch

Tribute: Flowers are left on the side of the pitch

‘He did it every week. He enjoyed doing it. He was a real football man – he was always here.’

FIFA president Sepp Blatter said in a statement he was ‘deeply shocked’ by Mr Nieuwenhuizen’s death.

‘I would like to express my sadness and distress on hearing of the death of assistant referee Richard Nieuwenhuizen,’ he said.

‘I was deeply shocked to learn of this tragic incident.

‘Football is a mirror of society and, sadly, the same ills that afflict society – in this case violence – also manifest themselves in our game.

Sadness: The whole of Dutch football is shocked by the news

Sadness: The whole of Dutch football is shocked by the news

‘Nevertheless, I remain convinced that football – through the example set by the tireless efforts of people like Mr Nieuwenhuizen – is a force for good, and we must continue use its positive example to educate people against these wrongs.’

Dutch sports minister Edith Schippers said: ‘It is absolutely terrible that something like this can happen on a Dutch sports field.’

Meanwhile, all amateur fixtures in Holland have been postponed this weekend as a mark of respect to Mr Nieuwenhuizen.

Respect: Buitenboys fly their flag at half mast

Respect: Buitenboys fly their flag at half mast

The Dutch Football Association, the KNVB, announced all amateur games this weekend have been called off while professional matches will be preceded by a minute’s silence with all players and referees involved wearing black armbands.

KNVB director of professional football Bert van Oostveen said: ‘It is inconceivable that anything like this occurs on a football field.

‘These are the volunteers that we build our sport on, that we cannot do without. Without respect, no football.

‘That is why we in professional football want to show our support in this terrible situation.

‘Our thoughts go out to the family of Richard Nieuwenhuizen.’

Crystal Palace and Brighton fans fight: 10 arrests made

Ten arrests made after Brighton and Palace fans scrap in London

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UPDATED:

17:31 GMT, 3 December 2012

Ten men arrested following a brawl between rival football fans have been released on bail.

Violence broke out between Brighton supporters and Crystal Palace fans in London after the npower Championship clubs were involved in separate fixtures on November 10.

A group of 10 men were questioned on suspicion of violent disorder this weekend and have been bailed until early January.

Scrap: Crystal Palace and Brighton fans clashed following the derby

Scrap: Crystal Palace and Brighton fans clashed following the derby

Four of the men were arrested in Sussex while six were held in Croydon and other parts of south London, Scotland Yard said.

Violence broke out in the King’s Cross area after Brighton drew 3-3 at Wolves and Palace secured a late 2-1 victory at Peterborough.

The arrests this weekend came as the rival clubs met each other in the league, at Palace’s Selhurst Park, in south London. The home side secured a 3-0 victory over their visitors who were reduced to 10 men in the first half.

Complaints: Brighton players moan to the referee during their thrashing

Complaints: Brighton players moan to the referee during their thrashing

The result – inspired by two goals from Palace’s former Brighton favourite Glenn Murray – sent the club to the top of the league.

Detective Chief Inspector Andy Barnes said police would seek football banning orders 'where appropriate'.

Jovan Belcher shoots his girlfriend dead before killing himself at Kansas City Chiefs" stadium

Kansas City Chiefs' Belcher shoots girlfriend dead before killing himself at Arrowhead StadiumUnconfirmed reports that Jovan Belcher, 25, is the Kansas City Chief who shot and killed his girlfriend at their home
He then traveled to the team's Arrowhead stadium, where he shot himself in a practice areaBelcher and his girlfriend had a baby less than three months ago

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UPDATED:

18:01 GMT, 1 December 2012

A 25-year-old Kansas City Chiefs player shot his girlfriend early on Saturday morning, then drove to the team's Arrowhead Stadium and turned the gun on himself as two team officials were confronting him, police have said.

There are several unconfirmed media reports that the dead player is linebacker Jovan Belcher, 25, originally from Long Island, New York. Belcher and his girlfriend had a baby less than three months ago on September 11.

Police spokesman Darin Snapp said authorities received a call from a woman who said her daughter had been shot multiple times at a residence about five miles away from the Arrowhead complex.

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There are unconfirmed reports that linebacker Jovan Belcher, 25, is the footballer who shot and killed his girlfriend and then himself on Saturday morning

There are unconfirmed reports that linebacker Jovan Belcher, 25, is the footballer who shot and killed his girlfriend and then himself on Saturday morning

Crime scene: Authorities received a call Saturday morning from a woman who said her daughter had been shot multiple times at a residence five miles away from the Arrowhead complex

Crime scene: Authorities received a call Saturday morning from a woman who said her daughter had been shot multiple times at a residence five miles away from the Arrowhead complex

Upon arriving at the Arrowhead Stadium complex, police witnessed a black male in a car with a handgun to his head talking to two Chiefs officials

Upon arriving at the Arrowhead Stadium complex, police witnessed a black male in a car with a handgun to his head talking to two Chiefs officials

Belcher has been the Chiefs starting inside linebacker for the last two seasons after going undrafted in 2009

Belcher has been the Chiefs starting inside linebacker for the last two seasons after going undrafted in 2009

Snapp told KCTV5 that a call was then received from the Chiefs' practice facility.

After a confrontation with team personnel, in which they attempted to stop the player from committing additional acts of violence, he shot himself near the front doors of the practice area. Police heard the single gunshot as they arrived at the scene.

According to CBSSports.com, Chiefs Coach Romeo Crennel and General Manager Scott Pioli were outside the facility when Belcher took his own life. The player apparently 'thanked both men before taking his life, and that Pioli and Crennel did not feel threatened.'

Belcher had no history of violence according to those who knew him, had a strong relationship with Crennel and the incident has come as a surprise to the organization and many who knew Belcher well.

'We can confirm that there was an
incident at Arrowhead earlier this morning,' the Chiefs said in a
statement. 'We are cooperating with authorities in their investigation.'

Belcher grew up on Long Island, New York and played for the Maine Black Bears in college. There, he was named first team All American in the Football Championship Subdivision.

Video: Kansas City football player shoots his girlfriend dead and then kills himself

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Jovan Belcher #59 stretches before a game against the Oakland Raiders at Arrowhead Stadium in 2009

Jovan Belcher #59 stretches before a game against the Oakland Raiders at Arrowhead Stadium in 2009

Shooting: Arrowhead Stadium is home of the Kansas City Chiefs, Kansas City

Shooting: Arrowhead Stadium is home of the Kansas City Chiefs, Kansas City

After going undrafted in 2009, Belcher
agreed to a free agent contract with the Chiefs. In 2011, he
became a starting linebacker for the team. He had started 10 of 11
games at inside linebacker for the Chiefs this season.

The season has been a massive
disappointment for the Chiefs, who were expected to contend for the AFC
West title.

But they're just 1-10
and mired in an eight-game losing streak that has been marked by
devastating injuries and fan upheaval, with constant calls the past few
weeks for general manager Scott Pioli and coach Romeo Crennel to be
fired.

The Chiefs are scheduled to host the Carolina Panthers on Sunday.

West Ham fans" anti-Semitic chants at Tottenham disgraced football

Chanting 'can we stab you every week' and mocking the Jews killed in Nazi gas chambers… West Ham fans' despicable behaviour at Tottenham disgraced football

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UPDATED:

11:59 GMT, 26 November 2012

The bile-spewing West Ham fans who baited their Tottenham Hotspur rivals because some of their number had been stabbed by a Nazi mob could take a couple of lessons in history.

First, they could acquaint themselves with the famous image of Bobby Moore and Pele embracing in 1970.

The icon of West Ham and England was rated by the greatest footballer in history, the man with whom he is pictured swapping shirts, as the finest defender of them all.

Disgusting: Sections of the West Ham support brought shame on their club with their chants at White Hart Lane

Disgusting: Sections of the West Ham support brought shame on their club with their chants at White Hart Lane

What the West Ham fans were chanting

'Viva Lazio'

'Adolf Hitler, he's coming for you'

'Can we stab you every week'

Joy, warmth and respect abound.

Second, and more gravely, they may wish to consider the horrors of the Holocaust, the mass extermination of two-thirds of Europe's nine million Jews.

They were men, women and children for whom there were no tomorrows. Many arrived on trains to be gassed to death.

Forgive the stark reminder but what other recourse is there for those too young to know – or perhaps too callous to care – among the latest group of football fans to besmirch the name of a proud club and our national sport

Too young to know We are perhaps being too kind here because only last week – not in the middle of the last century – Ashley Mills, a 25-year-old Tottenham fan, was the most severely injured of 10 compatriots who were subject to an unprovoked act of violence while drinking in the Drunken Ship pub in Campo de Fiori, Rome, ahead of his club's Europa League tie with Lazio.

Heard around the world: West Ham fans' chants were highlighted by Sky Sports News

Heard around the world: West Ham fans' chants were highlighted by Sky Sports News

Heard around the world: West Ham fans' chants were highlighted by Sky Sports News

No gas chambers this time but knuckle-dusters, knives, baseball bats and broken bottles. How we have moved on since Hitler committed suicide.

The Ultras – renowned hooligans in the Eternal City – had come 50 strong to make an anti-Semitic attack against Tottenham, with their traditionally Jewish heritage.

Two men, both fans of Lazio's neighbouring club Roma, were arrested and charged. In celebration of the foregoing hate-crime, West Ham fans, who were said to number hundreds rather than dozens yesterday, chanted 'Viva Lazio'.

They hissed during the game, imitating the Holocaust gassing.

They chanted: 'Adolf Hitler, he's coming for you.'

Tottenham, who won 3-1, asked: 'Can we play you every week'

The tasteless response from the away end: 'Can we stab you every week'

Aftermath: The Drunken Ship pub in Rome where Spurs fans were attacked this week

Aftermath: The Drunken Ship pub in Rome where Spurs fans were attacked this week

Y-word: Spurs fans call themselves the Yid Army

Y-word: Spurs fans call themselves the Yid Army

The morons may be a minority in football crowds, as apologists always tell us, but they are too big a minority to be waved aside as an unimportant sideshow. The lessons of the last few weeks and months tell us that.

For all the immense progress that has been made over the last 30 years to dispel the worst of the right-wing hooligan element from our stadia and to welcome women and children into what was once an intimidating machismo bastion, the fact is that a base element who would not be tolerated in other walks of life find expression in the anonymity of the football crowd.

I stress the word football deliberately. You would not find this kind of racist conduct from the striped blazers in the Lord's Long Room to the hooped shirts at our rugby league grounds, even though much drink is regularly consumed at both ends of sport's class spectrum.

I would also emphasise that this is not a total evisceration of football. Many, many thousands cheer their clubs on passionately while never contemplating any sort of race or religion-based barbarism.

Indeed, many West Ham fans will curse Sunday's offenders, whose thuggish antics appal their sense of innate decency.

We are talking about the kind of
decency that is not of the headline-grabbing variety generated by the
Society of Black Lawyers, who are in danger of making a mockery of the
situation by objecting to Tottenham fans calling themselves the Yid
Army.

I would rather those supporters did not use the Y-word but that is their business and, anyway, I detest political correctness.

But back to football. We only need to look at recent events to know that the game is apt to throw up anti-social chants.

Derby day: Not all West Ham fans at White Hart Lane were involved in the offensive chanting

Derby day: Not all West Ham fans at White Hart Lane were involved in the offensive chanting

There
are Liverpool fans goading Manchester United fans with aeroplane
gestures. That last happened at Anfield on September 23, 2012.

The 21 who died in the Munich air disaster perished on February 6, 1958.

United
fans retorted with: 'Always the victims – it's never your fault' just
as they had the previous week in their 4-0 win over Wigan.

The background to the victims ditty was the Hillsborough tragedy of 1989, when 96 Liverpool fans were crushed to death.

But what gave this oh-so-witty exchange topicality was the release a few days earlier of the Hillsborough files that incriminated the police and finally exonerated Liverpool fans of being complicit in their own demise by being drunk and ticketless.

Not always off the pitch: The Premier League has been rocked by race rows such as the one between Chelsea captain John Terry (right) and Queens Park Rangers defender Anton Ferdinand

Not always off the pitch: The Premier League has been rocked by race rows such as the one between Chelsea captain John Terry (right) and Queens Park Rangers defender Anton Ferdinand

In vain, Sir Alex Ferguson had led the calls for the long-awaited report to mark an end to the unsavoury chanting excesses that have long accompanied one of football's great tribal rivalries.

We are also aware of Manchester City's Munich runway song. And of Liverpool fans booing the National Anthem at Wembley before the FA Cup Final in May.

And of John Terry, the then England captain and still captain of Chelsea, calling Anton Ferdinand a black ****.

Arsene Wenger, the cerebral Arsenal manager, is so regularly taunted by paedophile chants that he has learned to block them out.

In light of this background are we surprised by yesterday's anti-Semitism

Well, Michael Henderson, the prominent sports writer, quoted in his book Fifty People Who Fouled up Football a prison doctor-turned-writer called Anthony Daniels, who observed the worst kind of football fan supporting England in Rome, of all places: 'They think of their savagery as a kind of democratic virtue, a proof that they do not hold themselves above the common man.

'Hence their surprise, outrage and disbelief when they are treated by foreigners as the most degraded specimens of humanity they have ever encountered.'

Seems so long ago: But this picture of Bobby Moore and Pele at the 1970 World Cup is much more recent than some of the things the West Ham fans were singing about during the match at White Hart Lane

Seems so long ago: But this picture of Bobby Moore and Pele at the 1970 World Cup is much more recent than some of the things the West Ham fans were singing about during the match at White Hart Lane

What to do beyond the well-meant but inadequate tactic of placing a phone number in match-day programmes and inviting people to phone in anonymously to report misbehaviour they witness

One answer is to dock points from the offending fans' team. It might work but is that unfair on the clubs who themselves scorn the rogue elements among their supporters as much as any of us

Still, it may be worth a try, not least because levying a fine is a largely meaningless sanction in a sport oozing with monopoly money.

Requiring the police to do their job properly would seem another massive advance. Why did they not make a few hundred arrests yesterday

Of course, we know the practical impediments to doing so, but should not a new standard, intolerant of craven misbehaviour, be imposed

Or perhaps we should just show the morons that picture of Moore and Pele. Hopeless romanticism, no doubt.

Failing that, let us explain to them the horrors of Auschwitz and Dachau and tell them about Himmler and Heydrich and Eichmann.

And ask them if they still find their little joke so hilariously funny.

Home Office confirms Football-related arrests down 24 per cent

Football arrests at an all time low as Home Office confirms 24 per cent drop last season

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UPDATED:

15:05 GMT, 15 November 2012

The number of arrests from football matches involving teams from England and Wales has dropped by nearly a quarter, the Home Office has announced.

Arrests at international and domestic games in 2011-12 dropped by 24 per cent to 2,363, 726 fewer than in the previous year.

It means that football-related arrests are 'at an all-time low', policing and criminal justice minister Damian Green said.

Safe: There were record low arrests at football last season (stock image)

Safe: There were record low arrests at football last season (stock image)

There was no police presence at 53 per cent of all matches last season, in which officers did not have to make an arrest at 74 per cent of matches.

An average of less than one – or 0.72 – arrests were made per match, according to the Home Office figures that were gathered for the first time by the Office for National Statistics.

Tough banning orders have been used since 2000 to tackle football violence and disorder, which once scarred the sport and saw hooliganism termed “the English disease”.

Banning orders, which are time-limited, dropped to 2,750 from 3,173. There were 500 new banning orders imposed during last season.

Euro madness: Ugly scenes marred some of the games at Euro 2012

Euro madness: Ugly scenes marred some of the games at Euro 2012

Mr Green said: 'That football-related arrests are at an all-time low is testament to our hugely successful model of football policing.

'Where hooliganism was once described as “the English disease”, we now set an example for others to follow.

'No English supporters have been arrested for football-related offences at the last two major international tournaments, and domestically more than half of all matches had no police presence last season – freeing up officers to be on the beat in their communities.

'Despite this progress, football disorder has not been eradicated and remains a lingering threat. That is why we continue to work closely with European partners for international matches and use tough banning orders against those who step out of line.'

25 Manchester City fans arrested in Amsterdam ahead of Ajax game

Police arrest 25 fans in red light district ahead of City's game with Ajax

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UPDATED:

18:26 GMT, 24 October 2012

Amsterdam police have made 25 arrests in the red light district of the city in the lead-up to Manchester City's Champions League match against Ajax.

A spokesman for the city's police force said that arrests had been made for 'public violence' offences after fans from both sets of clubs clashed.

It is not known how many City fans have been arrested, although the majority of those detained are believed to be local supporters.

Enjoying Amsterdam: Manchester City fans pictured in The Old Sailor pub prior to their team's Champion League match agsinst Ajax

Enjoying Amsterdam: Manchester City fans pictured in The Old Sailor pub prior to their team's Champion League match agsinst Ajax

Police were first forced called into action at 5pm local time when the trouble flared and arrests were made during the ensuing two hours before supporters began to make their way to the Amsterdam ArenA.

'There have been 25 arrests before the Champions League match for public violence, mostly in the red light district,' the spokeswoman said.

'Police first took action at 5pm. Most of the fans that have been arrested are from Ajax.

'The city centre was very busy but now as the match approached it is getting calmer and more quiet as the fans head to the stadium.

'We were aware that it would be busy before and after the match and we had deployed extra police to deal with this.

'We hope that it will remain calm after the match.'