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London to host World Paralympic Athletics Championships in 2017

London to host World Paralympic Athletics Championships in 2017

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UPDATED:

11:23 GMT, 19 December 2012

London has been named as the host city for the 2017 IPC Athletics World Championships, the Mayor of London Boris Johnson has announced.

The Championships, organised by the International Paralympic Committee, will be held at the Olympic Stadium in July, one month before the same venue stages the IAAF World Athletics Championships.

',' Johnson said.

London calling: David Weir stormed to success in 2012 and fans will be hoping to see similar British heroics in 2017

London calling: David Weir stormed to success in 2012 and fans will be hoping to see similar British heroics in 2017

It will be the first time one city has hosted the two Championships side-by-side after it was argued during the bidding process that London 2012 justifies the return of international Paralympic competition to the capital.

'This year London just staged the best spectacle of sport the world has seen,' said Johnson, who is chairman of the London Legacy Development Corporation.

'London’s Paralympic Games were the first ever to sell out and these Championships provide a perfect chance to build on that enthusiasm for disabled sport, bringing back the world’s greatest Paralympians to the Olympic Stadium, and at the same time providing a major economic boost to the capital.'

IPC President Sir Philip Craven hailed London 2012 as the 'best Games' in history with 1,134 athletes taking part in track and field events, setting 102 world and 139 Paralympic records.

Sprint king: Fans will hope to see Jonnie Peacock make a return to the Olympic Stadium

Sprint king: Fans will hope to see Jonnie Peacock make a return to the Olympic Stadium

The athletics at the Paralympics drew sold-out crowds of 80,000 for every session and attracted more than a billion cumulated television viewers worldwide.

'The UK’s capital city has already demonstrated its ability to provide an excellent experience for athletes and spectators alike,' said Ed Warner, IPC Athletics Sport Technical Committee Chairperson and Chair of UK Athletics.

'London 2017 will bring record crowds for an IPC World Championships, creating an ideal backdrop for athletes to break records, further raising the profile of sport for people with an impairment in the process.'

The IPC Athletics World Championships are the largest single-sport competition for athletes with an impairment in the world and take place on a bi-annual basis.

When they were young…the 12 heroes who made us feel proud in 2012

When they were young: The 12 heroes who made us feel proud in 2012

PUBLISHED:

23:56 GMT, 15 December 2012

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UPDATED:

00:27 GMT, 16 December 2012

Tonight the BBC Sports Personality of the Year will be announced to an audience expected to top 15 million viewers.

And in a year of extraordinary sporting achievement, at London 2012 and beyond, the final 12 contenders represent the cream of British sport.

NICK HARRIS and MARTHA KELNER talked to the people who know them best to find out what they were like … when they were young.

1. SIR CHRIS HOY

Age: 36

Nominated: For winning two gold medals at London 2012, in the team sprint and keirin, to become the British sportsman with the most Olympic gold medals in history (six), overtaking Sir Steve Redgrave’s five.

Chris Hoy

Future knight: A young Chris Hoy shows off one of his first prizes

Parents: David and Carol. Mum Carol says: ‘I am just as proud of the way Chris conducts himself when he loses, when things don’t go to plan or an opponent comes up with a moment of brilliance.

'Chris is able to handle winning and losing equally and I value that in life.

'When I hear Chris described as a true “Olympian”, that means more to me than all of the medals and honours.

Great Britain's Chris Hoy celebrates winning Gold in the Mens Team Sprint Final

Olympic glory: Hoy celebrates winning Gold in the men's team sprint final. He also won the keirin

'He was brought up simply to do things as well as possible and treat other people properly, whatever the circumstances.’

Plans for future: ‘I’m definitely not going to Rio,’ says Hoy. ‘Nothing will top London.’ He hopes to cap his career on a high at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Scotland.

2. ELLIE SIMMONDS

Age: 18

Nominated: For winning gold in the 400m freestyle, one of the most thrilling swimming races of the summer, and another gold in the 200m individual medley to add to her two Paralympic titles won at Beijing in 2008.

Parents: Steve and Val. ‘It sometimes gets a bit surreal, you have to give yourself a pinch,’ says Val of the moment she saw her teenage daughter collecting her fourth Paralympic gold medal.

Ellie Simmonds Age 7

ELLIE SIMMONDS WITH HER GOLD MEDAL FOR THE SWIMMING 200 METRES MEDLEY

Golden girl: Ellie Simonds' infectious smile was there to see at the age of seven. She went on to pick up two golds in 2012 with the 400m freestyle final considered to be one of the most exciting races of the Games

She remembers having to say goodbye when Ellie went away before Beijing for a month’s training camp in South Africa.

‘She was only 12, my little baby, but she’s very mature and loved it.’

If Ellie does not win Sports Personality, Val is backing Mo Farah.

‘I’m a keen athletics fan and used to watch it all the time before swimming took over our lives,’ she says.

Plans for the future: ‘She certainly has plenty more years to carry on swimming and get on the Sports Personality list again,’ says Val.

3. DAVID WEIR

Age: 33

Nominated: For winning three wheelchair racing gold medals on the track this summer, before topping it by becoming road race champion, the final gold of the Games and his sixth Paralympic medal in total. He has also won the London marathon six times.

Parents: Jackie and David, a former soldier from Belfast, brought up David, who was born with a severing of the spinal cord, in a similar way to his three brothers.

Britain's David Weir

David Weir age 11.

Triple gold: David Weir aged 11 (right) and in action during this summer celebrated his success with his mum in a quiet pub

‘I never mollycoddled them,’ says Jackie.

‘We brought him up to expect taunts and told him not to worry because all kids get them, don’t they’ David would join in with everything.

‘When his mates had a kickaround, David would go in goal and use his sticks to save the ball,’ says Jackie.

He celebrated winning his fourth gold in London by having a quiet drink with his mum in their local pub in Richmond.

Plans for the future: He is not thinking about defending his titles in Rio in 2016 yet but the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow are on the agenda.

4. BEN AINSLIE

Age: 35

Nominated: For winning a fourth Olympic gold this summer to confirm his status as the world’s greatest ever sailor.

Parents: Roddy and Susan. Roddy was a renowned sea captain and Ben was bred for maritime glory, given his first taste of sailing on a family holiday to Cornwall when he was eight.

Ben Ainslie

Britain's Ben Ainslie

Incredible career: Ben Ainslie has announced his Olympic retirement admitting he will never beat the buzz of Weymouth

/12/16/article-2248817-145DA7F8000005DC-915_306x454.jpg” width=”306″ height=”454″ alt=”Fourth time lucky: Katherine Grainger celebrates her gold medal after missing out in 2000, 2004 and 2008″ class=”blkBorder” />

Fourth time lucky: Katherine Grainger celebrates her gold medal after missing out in 2000, 2004 and 2008

Fourth time lucky: Katherine Grainger celebrates her gold medal after missing out in 2000, 2004 and 2008, and in her youth (right)

They knew how upset I was when we didn’t win gold at Beijing. All a parent wants is for their child to be happy, and seeing me so unhappy was very difficult for them.’

Plans for future: Says she remains undecided whether to attempt to win a fifth Olympic medal and second gold in Rio.

‘I’m certainly not burning my bridges and deciding that I won’t be at the next Olympics. I’m looking forward to getting back in a boat in 2013 and making a fresh start.’

6. ANDY MURRAY

Age: 25

Nominated: For becoming the first British man in 76 years to win a Grand Slam singles title (the US Open), having just won Olympic singles gold at Wimbledon, just a few weeks after losing on the same court against Roger Federer in the Wimbledon men’s singles final. Also won Olympic doubles silver.

ANDREW MURRAY TENNIS PLAYER FROM DUNBLANE. ANDREW IS PICTURED HERE AGED 8. Andrew Murray pictured during his first round Boys' Singles victory over Mykyta Kryvonos at the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis

Andy Murray

Emotional year: After bursting into tears at Wimbledon, Andy Murray went on to grab gold in London 2012 before picking up his first grand slam

Parents: Judy and Will. Judy has been a consistent presence at courtside throughout his career after both parents, despite their divorce, helped him in his early years, funding his attendance at a Barcelona academy.

‘Both of my parents made a lot of sacrifices to give me and [brother] Jamie the opportunity to play tennis,’ he says.

Plans for future: Will certainly want to defend his Olympic crown in Rio in 2016 if fit and healthy but the demands of the singles circuit — and four Slams each year — will take precedence before then, starting with the Australian Open early in 2013.

7. BRADLEY WIGGINS

Age: 32

Nominated: For becoming the first Briton to win the Tour de France and for winning the time trial gold medal at London 2012.

Olympic cyclist Bradley Wiggins aged 2 on his first ever bike

Road racer: A two-year-old Bradley Wiggins on his first ever bike

Parents: Linda and Gary. His father was an Australian cyclist who drank heavily, was violent to Linda and who abandoned the family when Wiggins was two.

Linda supported her son’s fledgling career, taking him to Paris to see the Tour when he was 13.

When he won, he pointed to Linda and said: ‘Some dreams do come true. My old mum over there

Her son has just won the Tour de France!’

Bradley Wiggins

Hot favourite: Wiggins is the bookie's favourite to scoop Sports Personality of the Year after winning Olympic gold as well as the Tour de France

Plans for future: Wiggins has said he wants to return to track cycling for the 2016 Games in Rio. Whether he goes for another Tour de France triumph depends on whether Team Sky pick him or Chris Froome as their No 1.

8. NICOLA ADAMS

Age: 30

Nominated: For becoming the first-ever female Olympic boxing champion, a feat she celebrated with a chicken wrap at Nando’s.

Nicola Adams

Olympic boxer Nicola Adams aged three.

Record breaker: Nicola Adams became the ever female boxing champion this summer

Parents: Mother Dee and father Innocent split up when Nicola was a child. When Dee could not get a babysitter, she took Nicola and brother Kurtis to an aerobics class.

Nicola, who had watched videos of Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier with her dad, joined in with a boxing class instead.

‘It has been really tough for Nicola being a female boxer,’ says Dee. ‘I thought, “She’s doing this for her country and she isn’t getting the recognition she deserves”. But now she has made history. It is amazing. I am just so proud of her.’

Plans for the future: Back in training with TeamGB boxers in Sheffield. Next up are the European Championships, then the 2014 Commonwealth Games, where women’s boxing is debuting. Plans to defend her Olympic title in Rio.

9. JESSICA ENNIS

Age: 26

Nominated for: Coping with the pressure of being the face of the Games and dominating the Olympic heptathlon, before sealing victory in the 800m.

Jessica Ennis

Jessica Ennis - aged 4

Super Saturday: Ennis played a huge role in one of the greatest nights of sport this country has ever seen

Parents: Vinnie and Alison took Jessica and younger sister Carmel to an athletics summer camp when she was 10.

‘I think they just wanted to get rid of me for a bit,’ jokes Jessica. But while Carmel did not like running, Jess thrived.

‘She always wanted to stand on the top of a podium and I’m just so proud of her,’ says Vinnie.

‘After all those years of going to low-key meetings when she was little with the rain and the snow and the early mornings, it has all come together and it’s just brilliant.’

Plans for the future: A spring wedding to childhood sweetheart Andy Hill means a delayed start to the 2013 outdoor season. Has not ruled out defending her heptathlon title in Rio but may switch to the hurdles.

10. RORY MCILROY

Age: 23

Nominated: For winning his second major and being part of Europe’s winning Ryder Cup team.

Parents: Father Gerry McIlroy worked 100 hours a week and mother Rosie did night shifts at a factory in their native Holywood, in Northern Ireland, to save to send Rory to competitions in the US as a junior.

Rory McIlroy on his local golf course aged nine

Rory McIlroy f

In form: Rory McIlroy bagged his second major while playing his part in a hugely emotional Ryder Cup

It has paid off already but there could be a further 200,000 windfall for Gerry and three friends, who bet 400 at 500-1 that the then 15-year-old would win The Open before 2014.

‘It’s ridiculous really, isn’t it’ says Gerry. ‘You realise you can make more money on the golf tour in one week than some people make in a lifetime.’

Plans for the future: Greg Norman believes Rory McIlroy is more likely to break Jack Nicklaus’s record of 18 major wins than Tiger Woods. Golf will feature at Rio 2016, so McIlroy could add Olympic gold to his impressive medal cabinet.

11. SARAH STOREY

Age: 35

Nominated: For winning four cycling gold medals in the Paralympics, including Britain’s first gold of those Games in the Velodrome, having narrowly missed selection to compete for Team GB at the Olympics.

Sarah Storey

 Sarah Storey

Ruling the roads: Storey picked up a phenomenal four gold medals at the Paralympics

Parents: John and Mary Bailey, who wore T-shirts at the Games listing every gold medal their daughter had ever won in swimming and cycling, as well as being ‘the Under-14s Cheshire table tennis champion’.

Storey was born without a functioning left hand and was bullied at school.

‘When I was at my lowest, my parents told me to keep looking to the future, that everything would be all right,’ she says. ‘It was the best lesson anyone could have taught me.’

Plans for future: Says that defending her four Paralympic titles at Rio 2016 would be ‘the ultimate dream’.

12. MO FARAH

Age: 29

Nominated: For winning a historic Olympic 5,000m and 10,000m distance double in London and making the Mo-bot his trademark.

Parents: Father Muktar left Somalia as a young man to settle in London and met Mo’s mother, Amran, during a holiday in his homeland.

Mo Farah

Mo Farah,14

Party time: Mo Farah (aged 14 – right) created one of the most iconic images of London 2012

They married and brought Mo to London as an eight-year-old for the opportunity of a more prosperous life after weighing up the cost of parting him from his twin brother, Hassan, and two older brothers who remained in Somalia.

When Mo arrived at Feltham Community College as an 11-year-old he was barely able to speak English.

‘I was giving a javelin lesson and trying to instill some discipline into the boys,’ says PE teacher, Alan Watkinson.

‘I walked on to the field and Mo was swinging on the crossbar.’ Mo went the wrong way round the athletics track the first time he ran — but soon found his direction.

Plans for the future: Could run the marathon as well as the 10,000m at Rio in 2016, but that would be a tough challenge.

Anniversary of the first colour transmission of Match of the Day

'You can see the colour of their hair!' A look back at the first colour transmission of Match of the Day 43 years ago today

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UPDATED:

13:37 GMT, 15 November 2012

We all remember the first time we were allowed to sit up late and watch Match of the Day.

It was a rite of passage into what seemed a grown-up world of men in suits and ties exchanging opinions on what had passed at grounds up and down the country that day.

But more excitingly, it guaranteed goals and action and the magic of seeing your heroes in your front room. And that wonderful feeling became even more vivid 43 years ago today.

For the first time, Match of the Day was broadcast in glorious Technicolor on November 15, 1969. What was once a soulless sludge of black and grey now exploded into all the hues of the rainbow as though the curtains had been drawn and the light let in.

First game in colour: A snapshot from Liverpool vs. West Ham United on November 15, 1969 - the first Match of the Day game in colour. Ron Greenwood (right) checks on the fitness of Billy Bonds

First game in colour: A snapshot from Liverpool vs. West Ham United on November 15, 1969 – the first Match of the Day game in colour. Ron Greenwood (right) checks on the fitness of Billy Bonds

Commentating in Colour: Kenneth Wolstenholme on Match of the Day duty. The programme's first colour broadcast was on November 15, 1969

Commentating in Colour: Kenneth Wolstenholme on Match of the Day duty. The programme's first colour broadcast was on November 15, 1969

MATCH FACTS

Liverpool 2 West Ham United 0
Saturday November 15, 1969 at Anfield
Attendance: 39,668

Liverpool: Tommy Lawrence; Chris Lawler, Tommy Smith, Emlyn Hughes, Ron Yeats; Ian Callaghan, Peter Thompson, Ian St John, Steve Peplow (Roger Hunt); Bobby Graham, Geoff Strong

West Ham United: Bobby Ferguson; Bobby Moore, Alan Stephenson, Bobby Howe, Billy Bonds, Frank Lampard; Ronnie Boyce, Trevor Brooking, Harry Redknapp; Clyde Best, Geoff Hurst

Goalscorers: Lawler 27, Graham 60

For the first time, viewers could enjoy the fresh green of the pitch, their favourite side’s colours, the tint of the star striker’s hair and the glorious sight of a sea of scarves, banners and rosettes being waved on a swaying terrace.

We take it for granted nowadays – in fact, many of us won’t settle for watching Match of the Day unless it’s in pixel-popping High Definition or even 3D – but we shouldn’t underestimate just what a revolution this was in 1969.

It was in 1966 that the BBC unveiled plans to start broadcasting television programmes in colour. Initially, colour output would be limited to just four hours a week on BBC Two, which had launched in 1964. This would then be gradually cranked up depending on how people reacted.

After all, making the leap into colour wouldn’t be cheap. /11/15/article-2233369-1328A836000005DC-658_306x423.jpg” width=”306″ height=”423″ alt=”Colour picture of Bobby Moore from 1967″ class=”blkBorder” />

Colour pic of Liverpool's Ian St John from 1967

Much better: Match of the Day's switch to colour meant football fans could see heroes like Bobby Moore (left) and Ian St John (right) in full colour for the first time

The match ticked all the boxes – Bill Shankly was slowly but surely moulding Liverpool into the pre-eminent force in English and European football, while West Ham still carried the Spirit of ’66 with Bobby Moore, Geoff Hurst and Martin Peters in their side, not to mention Trevor Brooking, Billy Bonds, Frank Lampard Sr and Harry Redknapp.

Plus, as MOTD producer Alec Weeks pointed out, Anfield was the kind of noisy and colourful venue you wanted for such an occasion. Indeed, it had been a game between Liverpool and Arsenal on the ground on August 22, 1964 that first launched the programme.

The first Match of the Day in 1964

‘We chose Liverpool for the first colour transmission because we wanted a colourful place,’ Weeks told the Liverpool Echo on the day of the match.

‘There’s nowhere as colourful as Anfield, both literally and in character, with the Kop and their comments.

‘Football in colour is fantastic. Tonight the red and light blue on the green will stand out. Identification of the players is much easier – you can see the colour of their hair, even the blushes if someone is being bawled out!’

Just as there had been a nationwide scramble for black and white television sets and aerials when Match of the Day started out in 1964, the excitement generated by such comments left Merseyside electrical retailers besieged. Everyone wanted to watch the Reds – and everyone else – in full colour.

Enlarge

Liverpool team photo 1969-1970

Better in Technicolour: Liverpool's squad for the 1969-1970 season – Back Row (left to right) Geoff Strong, Gerry /11/15/article-2233369-017AB035000004B0-971_634x725.jpg” width=”634″ height=”725″ alt=”Cutting edge: A customer takes a closer look at a new colour television at the 1967 Ideal Home Exhibition” class=”blkBorder” />

Cutting edge: A customer takes a closer look at a new colour television at the 1967 Ideal Home Exhibition

Viewers saw 35 minutes of colour highlights from Liverpool’s 2-0 win over the Hammers. This was well before clubs were equipped for TV crews and so the Anfield boardroom had to be converted into a makeshift studio. ‘It was a mammoth task,’ said Liverpool secretary Peter Robinson. ‘Extra lighting had to be installed in the boardroom.’

Goals from Chris Lawler and Bobby Graham won the game for Liverpool in a torrid weekend for West Ham. Peters had been forced to return to London on the eve of the match to deal with an urgent family matter and manager Ron Greenwood had call young Scouse trainee Bobby Sutton into the squad.

Sutton was only there for the experience and to see his mum, who worked in the Anfield canteen! He didn’t take part in the game however.

Liverpool finished fifth that season, while West Ham languished in 17th.

West Ham in colour action at Manchester United later in 1969-1970

But football coverage had been transformed forever. There was no turning back for Match of the Day, with every week from then on seeing extensive match highlights in colour.

Gradually, cameras were sent to more and more grounds and other advances such as instant replays added, as more and more people made the switch to colour sets in order to watch this English institution.

A NATIONAL TREASURE: TIMELINE OF MATCH OF THE DAY

1958: BBC screens its first live football match, the FA Cup semi-final between Fulham and Manchester United.

August 22, 1964: First edition of Match of the Day, screened on BBC Two at 6.30pm. Showed highlights of just one match, Liverpool vs. Arsenal at Anfield. The estimated audience was a mere 20,000 because BBC Two was only available in London at the time.

The Original Anfield Cat: The Match of the Day cameras picked up this moggy, who ran the whole length of the Anfield pitch at the first broadcast game between Liverpool and Arsenal in 1964

The Original Anfield Cat: The Match of the Day cameras picked up this moggy, who ran the whole length of the Anfield pitch at the first broadcast game between Liverpool and Arsenal in 1964

1965: Match of the Day switches to BBC One to reflect its growing availability and popularity. Several clubs try to block its broadcast, fearing a decline in attendances. A compromise is made when the BBC agreed not to reveal which match would be shown until after the day’s play was concluded.

1967: First competition as ITV starts to show regional highlights of matches on a Sunday afternoon.

1969: Attracting audiences of nearly ten million. First colour broadcast on November 15 of Liverpool vs. West Ham at Anfield. Number of matches increased from one to two per episode.

1970: Goal of the Month competition is introduced, as is the iconic theme tune.

1971: Introduction of slow motion replays.

Capturing the action: The Match of the Day cameras at Portman Road for Ipswich Town vs. Liverpool in 1974

Capturing the action: The Match of the Day cameras at Portman Road for Ipswich Town vs. Liverpool in 1974

Front man: Jimmy Hill introduces an episode of Match of the Day in 1981

Front man: Jimmy Hill introduces an episode of Match of the Day in 1981

1979: BBC forced to share highlights rights with ITV’s Big Match. Match of the Day is moved to a Sunday in 1980-1981 and 1982-1983 as a result, but the number of games goes up to three. Coverage is shared between the two channels through the eighties.

1992: BBC regains exclusive rights for highlights with the launch of the Premier League, which is to be screened live by Sky. It retains the coverage since, except for 2001-2004 when it moved to ITV.

Trophy trio: The Match of the Day line-up in 1999 - Alan Hansen, Gary Lineker and Mark Lawrenson

Trophy trio: The Match of the Day line-up in 1999 – Alan Hansen, Gary Lineker and Mark Lawrenson

2004: Match of the Day 2 is launched on a Sunday night.

2012: Match of the Day still draws in one in every four television viewers on a Saturday night.

Sky won"t send presenters to India after refusing to meet pay demands

Sky snub India demands: No presenters or commentators will be sent to England tour

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UPDATED:

23:41 GMT, 30 October 2012

Sky will not send any presenters or production staff to India for England’s forthcoming tour after refusing to meet the financial demands from the country’s cricket board.

The broadcasters are instead preparing a studio in west London from which to cover the four-Test series. It will be the first time in 20 years that television viewers do not receive British coverage of an overseas England tour from inside the grounds.

No go: Sky's presenters and commentators including Sportsmail's Nasser Hussain

No go: Sky's presenters and commentators including Sportsmail's Nasser Hussain

Staying at home: Michael Atherton will not be in India after Sky decided not to meet India's demands

Staying at home: Michael Atherton will not be in India after Sky decided not to meet India's demands

The move comes after the Indian cricket board (BCCI) wanted to charge 500,000 for what it labelled ‘realistic’ facility costs.

But Sky always felt they had already paid for these as part of their rights package and have declined to hand over the extra money.

It means presenters, including Sportsmail’s Nasser Hussain, Sir Ian Botham and Mike Atherton, will watch pictures from host broadcaster Star TV in Isleworth, rather than Ahmedabad, Mumbai, Nagpur and Kolkata and their words will be grafted over the top.

Chris Kirkland attack: Aaron Cawley charged with assault after drink binge

Jailed: Leeds thug handed four-month sentence for drunken attack on Kirkland… as court hears he downed 'cans of Stella, bottle of vodka and up to 10 pints of cider'

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UPDATED:

12:53 GMT, 22 October 2012

Aaron Cawley – the fan who ran onto the pitch and attacked Chris Kirkland – has been jailed for four months after pleading guilty to assault and entering the field of play.

The 21-year-old, from Cheltenham, pleaded guilty to assault and invading the pitch during Sheffield Wednesday's home match against Leeds on Friday night.

Prosecutor Paul Macaulay said Cawley told police he was so drunk he could not remember the incident, which has been seen by millions of TV viewers.

Scroll down for video

Disgrace: The fan attacked Chris Kirkland

Disgrace: The fan caught Sheffield Wednesday keeper Chris Kirkland flush in the face with a sickening assault

Disgrace: The fan attacked Chris Kirkland

Disgrace: The fan attacked Chris Kirkland

VIDEO: Chris Kirkland is punched in the face by a fan…

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Early years: Cawley - once a Leeds mascot - poses with Robbie Keane

Early years: Cawley – once a Leeds mascot – poses with Robbie Keane

Cawley, who appeared at Sheffield
Magistrates' Court, was arrested after Wednesday keeper Kirkland was
pushed in the face during the game at Hillsborough.

The incident was one of a number of ugly scenes at the Yorkshire derby, which ended in a 1-1 draw.

Kirkland, who has played for England, was shoved to the ground moments after conceding an equaliser in the 76th minute.

A man was clearly seen running from the Leeds fans onto the pitch and
pushing Kirkland in the face before running back into the crowd.
The incident was caught on camera by Sky Sports, which was broadcasting the game.

Unemployed labourer Cawley stood in the glass-fronted dock wearing a
blue T-shirt which left an 'LUFC' tattoo clearly visible on his neck and
a Leeds United club crest on his right arm.

The court heard that he had been the subject of two football banning orders in the past, which he had breached four times.

Despite living with his mother in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, he had
supported Leeds United all his life and went to every game – home and
away, a district judge was told.

District Judge Naomi Redhouse said she had not seen the footage and it was played for her in court on Monday.

Mr Macaulay said Cawley told officers he had drunk a number of cans of
Stella Artois lager on Friday morning, followed by three-quarters of a
litre of vodka – all before he got to Sheffield by train.

Once in Sheffield, he had a further seven to 10 pints of cider, the court heard.

District Judge Redhouse heard that Cawley, of Blenheim Square,
Cheltenham, only realised what he had done when other people told him
and then he saw himself clearly on TV.

He emailed the police to say sorry and also emailed Sky Sports in the
hope that his apology would be passed on to the two clubs and Kirkland.

Pain: Kirkland holds his face after the incident

Pain: Kirkland holds his face after the incident

His solicitor, Elizabeth Anderton, tried to tell the judge that reports
that her client had bragged about the incident in social networking
sites were wrong. But District Judge Redhouse stopped her, saying she
had not seen the reports and was not interested.

Mr Macaulay told the court the incident happened in about the 77th or 78th minute of the match.

Kirkland told police he had been already been hit by an object as he
warmed up in front of the Leeds United fans after coming out for the
beginning of the second half.

The Leeds fans were in the Leppings Lane end of the ground – the area where the Hillsborough disaster claimed 96 lives in 1989.

The prosecutor said Cawley came on to the pitch after Leeds scored and,
when he stood in front of Kirkland, the goalie thought it was someone
just 'excessively celebrating' or 'taking the mickey out of Mr
Kirkland'.

Mr Macauley described how Cawley then slapped the keeper on both sides of the face – hardest on the left-hand side.

Treatment: Leeds fans chant and jeer while Kirkland lies injured

Treatment: Leeds fans chant and jeer while Kirkland lies injured

He said Kirkland told police it was like he had been 'hit by a ton of bricks and went straight on the floor'.

The prosecutor said Kirkland was not seriously injured and Cawley was quickly identified as the perpetrator on the internet.

'This was not the most difficult police investigation,' Mr Macaulay said.

He added that Cawley was fully co-operative with the police but told
them he did not remember what happened after half-time because of his
drunken state.

He said he left the stadium before the end of the match and a steward
opened a gate for him to leave. Cawley told police he had been drinking
since 10am.

'He saw exactly what he had done on TV although he did not recall what he'd done,' Mr Macaulay said.

'He accepted it was clearly him on TV. He made email contact with South Yorkshire Police and Sky TV.'

The court heard that in the emails he said: 'It was a disgrace and I'm embarrassed by my actions.'

He said he had 'brought shame on Leeds United Football Club'.

Ripped down: A sign is torn from its berth at Hillsborough

Ripped down: A sign is torn from its berth at Hillsborough

The court heard that Cawley has a long history of football-related offending.

He was given a three-year football banning order in January 2008 at
Leeds Crown Court and another at Derby Magistrates' Court in November
2008 after breaches.

When he breached that order in September last year he was given 10 weeks in a Young Offenders' Institution.

The court was told that Kirkland made a Victim Impact Statement which said: “I feel shocked, upset and angry.

'I think the man is a thug and should be caught and put jail.

'Anyone who supports what he's done is just as bad.'

Today, Cawley admitted common assault and going on to a football pitch.

He was jailed for 16 weeks and ordered to pay 85 costs.

The district judge said he will be given a new banning order, probably
for five years, but the details of this will be sorted later.

Steven Gerrard: This is our chance to deliver a message to football. The sick chants have to stop.

Gerrard: This is our chance to deliver a message to football. The sick chants have to stop

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UPDATED:

22:15 GMT, 22 September 2012

Shortly before half-past one at an
Anfield heaving with emotion, Liverpool captain Steven Gerrard will step
forward with his Manchester United counterpart, Nemanja Vidic, and
release 96 red balloons, each one representing a victim of the
Hillsborough tragedy 23 years ago.

It will be a public act of unity
witnessed by hundreds of millions of people around the world, from the
inner cities of Manchester and Liverpool to prime-time television
viewers in Beijing, Bangkok and Singapore.

Yet for 32-year-old Gerrard, it will
be an intensely personal moment, too, as he remembers his cousin,
Jon-Paul Gilhooley, who died at Hillsborough aged just 10, the youngest
of all the fatalities.

Big responsibility: Steven Gerrard will lead his Liverpool team out against Manchester United

Big responsibility: Steven Gerrard will lead his Liverpool team out against Manchester United

'He was the same as me, a Liverpool fan from a council estate who loved his footy and kicked a ball around in the street,' said Gerrard, as he struggled to control his feelings.

The publication of the long-awaited report of the Hillsborough Independent Panel 11 days ago, absolving Liverpool fans of blame in the tragedy, has heightened dark memories for many, including Liverpool's iconic leader.

One of the most harrowing segments of the report revealed how the body of Gerrard's cousin was subjected to tests for alcohol as the police sought scapegoats for the disaster.

At Anfield …United fans entering the ground will receive a letter from Sir Alex Ferguson asking for respect Ferguson and Sir Bobby Charlton will lay wreaths in front of The Kop Both teams will come out for the match wearing tracksuits bearing the number 96Rival captains Steven Gerrard and Nemanja Vidic to release 96 balloons in memory of those who died Fans will unveil mosaics on three sides of the stadium reading 'Justice', 'The Truth' and '96'

Gerrard admits that he cannot bring himself to read what happened to his cousin.

'I'm delighted that people around the world now know how the tragedy came about, but I don't want to read it myself,' he said. 'It is difficult for my family and all the families.

'Every time Hillsborough comes up in a conversation or I see it in the paper or TV, you automatically think about Jon-Paul, the other victims and the disaster itself. It could have happened to anyone, any Liverpool fan. I was a year younger than Jon- Paul and I'd stood on the Kop many times when it was still terraced.'

Against such an emotional backdrop, it is little wonder that there have been calls from managers Brendan Rodgers and Sir Alex Ferguson for supporters to end the hostility between that has developed in recent times, particularly since the notorious Luis Suarez-Patrice Evra race abuse case last season.

Liverpool fans have sung disrespectfully about the 1958 Munich air crash that resulted in the death of eight United players. Last weekend, a minority of United supporters provocatively chanted 'Always the victims, it's never your fault' just a few days after the Hillsborough report came out.

Yet none of the appeals carries as much resonance as the one from Gerrard, partly because of his status on Merseyside but also because of his personal connection with the tragedy and an innate honesty that does not try to hide the fact that both sets of supporters have been at fault in the past.

'I'm hoping human decency breaks out. It's a great opportunity for both sets of fans to put the sick chants to bed,' said Gerrard. 'This is the perfect chance to send a message to all supporters around the world who may be singing about the wrong things. If it's a fantastic match, there's a handshake (between Suarez and Evra) before the game and there's no vile chanting during it, it will be a great advert to everyone watching. This is more important than football.

'Munich and Hillsborough are not the only two disasters to have happened. There are all different kinds of chants, including racist ones, that need to stop. And if two big clubs send out the right message that it has no place in football, then everyone else will take note.'

Memorial: Fans left tributes to the 96 at Hillsborough before Sheffield Wednesday's game

Memorial: Fans left tributes to the 96 at Hillsborough before Sheffield Wednesday's game

Gerrard is prepared to get involved personally to make sure the headlines from the game are about football. As captain, he will have a private word with striker Suarez to ask him to shake Evra's hand before the kick-off and end a feud that has added bitterness to the great rivalry between the clubs.

The Liverpool forward was banned for eight games for racially abusing Evra but the Uruguayan has always maintained his innocence and he refused to shake the Frenchman's hand when the clubs last met in February.

'My advice to him (Suarez) will be to shake hands and move on,' said Gerrard. 'Those two players could be the key. That's going to be at the beginning of the game, the handshake, and they've got a responsibility to start the day off on a good note.'

Respect: Luis Suarez (right) refused to shake Patrice Evra's hand in the last fixture between the teams

Respect: Luis Suarez (right) refused to shake Patrice Evra's hand in the last fixture between the teams

Above all, Gerrard wants the game to maintain the passion and rivalry of English football's biggest club fixture without crossing into bad taste.

'Liverpool players and Manchester United players are not all of a sudden going to start liking each other. That's fine,' he said. 'These rivalries make the Premier League the best in the world. It is why we all love football. That can't stop but there is a line you can't go over.'

In full agreement will be Kenny Dalglish, who was in his first spell as Liverpool manager at the time of the Hillsborough disaster and who returns to Anfield for the first time since being sacked in the summer, to witness the balloons being released and a crowd mosaic formed on three sides of the ground reading The Truth, Justice and 96.

The perfect tribute would be a cracking game of football and for Liverpool, in particular, the three points at stake carry huge significance.

Personal: Steven Gerrard, whose cousin died at Hillsborough, attends the 23rd anniversary service, along with Kenny Dalglish (right)

Personal: Steven Gerrard, whose cousin died at Hillsborough, attends the 23rd anniversary service, along with Kenny Dalglish (right)

New manager Brendan Rodgers is still looking for his first Premier League win after hastily breaking up Dalglish's team and allowing his big signings, Charlie Adam and Andy Carroll, to leave.

Police warn fans: We'll punish abuse

Merseyside Police have promised to act against fans who chant about Munich or Hillsborough.

Abusive chants will be treated as an arrestable public order offence and supporters who make offensive gestures towards rival fans will also face police action.

Having fired Dalglish for not finishing in the top four last season, the club are embarrassingly stuck near the foot of the table and must cling to the fact that United have not won at Anfield since 2007.

'It's a great opportunity for us to win our first game in the league and kickstart the season,' said Gerrard. 'We've been inconsistent in the opening four games. We were fantastic against Manchester City and Sunderland and very disappointing against West Bromwich and Arsenal. If we were to take the points, it would give us the confidence we need.'

Ferguson might have something to say about that, but even the United manager senses the result is not the only thing that matters.

A letter from Ferguson will be handed to every visiting fan at Anfield, reminding them of their responsibilities.

Wise words: Sir Alex Ferguson has called on Manchester United fans to be respectful

Wise words: Sir Alex Ferguson has called on Manchester United fans to be respectful

And the 71- year-old has even offered warm words for The Kop to build the mood of respect.

'When I go to Liverpool to watch a game, the fans are brilliant to me,' he said. 'A bit of joking and that kind of thing but never any abuse. Not a bit. Never.'

All right-minded people will hope that applies. None more so than Gerrard as he puts on his red shirt and thinks of the 10-year-old cousin who never had the chance to grow up.

LONDON 2012 OLYMPICS: Boxing fans want scores to be shown

Give us the score, rage fight fans as new Olympic system continues to anger TV viewers

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UPDATED:

21:12 GMT, 2 August 2012

The International Amateur Boxing Association have angered boxing fans by scrapping live scoring and judges’ scorecards from TV coverage at the Olympics.

Hundreds of people, including former heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis, have complained that the AIBA have changed the scoring system so that fans cannot keep track of who is winning during the fight and there has been further outrage at the failure to show judges’ scores at the end of each round, a bizarre move considering they are on screens inside the arena at Earl’s Court.

In previous Olympics, scores have been visible throughout fights, with each point scored by a boxer appearing a couple of seconds later on the screen.

Boxing clever: Josh Taylor (right) in action against Italy's Domenico Valentino on Thursday night

Boxing clever: Josh Taylor (right) in action against Italy's Domenico Valentino on Thursday night

But the system was changed for London 2012 and now the judges’ registered punches are counted up at the end of each round. A score is given to each fighter by taking an average of three of the five judges’ tallies.

Because that takes so much time, it means scores can’t be shown on TV as each round progresses, making the fight difficult to follow. Internet message boards were awash with complaints on Thursday.

‘I like the old scoring system,’ said Sportsmail columnist Clinton McKenzie.

‘I’m lost and I’m a boxer. I don’t know when they’ve landed a punch. I’m confused. Unless you are a keen fan, it will affect you.

‘People want to know what is happening. You are worried that people are going to switch off. And why don’t you get the scorecards after each round We are in the dark. You think one guy has won and then the other guy has. The sport needs to be easy to understand to bring in more fans. This is the exact opposite.’

Packing a punch: Mexico's Oscar Valdez Fierro in action with Tajakistan's Anvar Yunusov

Packing a punch: Mexico's Oscar Valdez Fierro in action with Tajakistan's Anvar Yunusov

Lewis complained: ‘You never know who is going to win until the end of the fight,’ while Teddy Atlas, who worked with Mike Tyson as a trainer and is now a leading commentator, said he would like to smash the scoring consoles with a hammer.

The failure to show the scorecards at the end of each round, when they are put up on screens in the arena, is equally odd.

But while fingers were pointed at the Olympic Broadcast Service, they made it clear on Thursday night that they were as bemused as anyone by the decision.

An OBS source told Sportsmail: ‘The AIBA requested that we don’t show the judges’ scorecards so it is out of our control. We would like to show them.’

An AIBA statement added to the confusion. It said: ‘Since the scores are not updated live during the rounds any more, we thought it would have been misleading to put them up during the rounds.’

Boxing is the long-term loser from David Haye"s win over Dereck Chisora: Jeff Powell

Jeff Powell: Rogue duo cash in their millions but boxing is the long-term loser

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UPDATED:

22:02 GMT, 15 July 2012

First the heavens poured down, judgment by way of a sodden prelude to a night out for two unlovable rogues in the East End.

Then, David Haye made his statement… of the obvious.

As a former world heavyweight champion, he confirmed what British boxing already knew: that he is a class above Dereck Chisora and that he has fun beating up moderate opponents.

Friends in the end: David Haye and Dereck Chisora shake hands after their fight with trainer Adam Booth in the centre

Friends in the end: David Haye and Dereck Chisora shake hands after their fight with trainer Adam Booth in the centre

Then, once they had scraped Chisora off the floor following his fifth-round knockout, it was time to pass the sick bag wherever you were watching — in my case, in a Las Vegas casino.

These two Londoners who snarled, scowled and spat such venomous hatred at each other, while making threats with menaces, promptly embraced like long-lost brothers.

As they did so, they grinned and chuckled. The joke was on the paying public, be they subscription television viewers or the rain-soaked thousands in West Ham’s football ground. Had they been professional conmen, they could hardly have made a bigger killing.

Ugly scenes: Haye and Chisora eyeball each other ahead of the fight

Ugly scenes: Haye and Chisora eyeball each other ahead of the fight

/07/15/article-2173950-1411B145000005DC-127_468x286.jpg” width=”468″ height=”286″ alt=”Leaving it in the ring: Haye and Chisora settled their difference in the Upton Park ring” class=”blkBorder” />

Leaving it in the ring: Haye and Chisora settled their difference in the Upton Park ring

He came in at his lowest poundage since growing into a heavyweight — and all that training translated into a further acceleration of hand speed that would not disgrace a middleweight.

It helped that Chisora hit back almost as infrequently as a punch bag in the gymnasium, but after a year in premature retirement, Haye was commendably sharp.

There was water, water everywhere but not a spot of ring-rust.

And despite the incredible lightness of his being, Haye had lost little if any of his old power.

Chisora is ponderous but he has always been durable. Until Saturday, that is. Having been softened up for four rounds — all of which he lost — Del Boy fell for the old left-right one-two.

Flat out: Chisora hits the deck

Flat out: Chisora hits the deck

He lurched up that time, but a four-punch combination polished him off with just one second left in the fifth round.

This was all well and good for Haye, within the strict confines of the fight as its own entity, but hardly beneficial for Chisora in the long run, nor for boxing as a whole.

A fourth defeat in five fights is not exactly career-enhancing for Chisora, and his prospects of getting back his British licence any time soon must be diminished by his participation in an event in his own country that was sanctioned contentiously by the Luxembourg Boxing Federation.

Nor did the flourish with which Haye terminated the proceedings eradicate the concerns about it taking place at all.

Done and dusted: Haye celebrates his win

Done and dusted: Haye celebrates his win

In addition to the undermining of the authority of the British Boxing Board of Control, it is regrettable that two men who disgraced the country and put themselves to shame by brawling in Munich like yobs at the Beerfest should be so richly rewarded.

There should be no place in any sport for the wages of infamy — and boxing, most of all, cannot afford the damage to its reputation.

But then this was not really about boxing. It was about money.
Haye’s performance presented a momentary distraction from that reality, but the illusion was broken when they smiled knowingly between themselves at how they had sucker-punched the people who braved a downpour to support them.

The finish was punch-perfect, but the end does not justify the means.

Wimbledon 2012: Andy Murray will rush to Kim Sears if he wins

Destiny calls for Andy… and if he wins, Murray will battle through crowd into arms of his girlfriend

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UPDATED:

21:01 GMT, 7 July 2012

Andy Murray will embark on a spectacular Pat Cash-style ascent through the crowds into the players' box – and the arms of his girlfriend Kim Sears – if he becomes the first British man to win Wimbledon in 76 years.

That, at least, is the assessment of the man who has seen more Wimbledon champions come and go on Centre Court than just about any other, veteran honorary steward David Spearing, a permanent fixture in the players' box for 15 years.

With the Duchess of Cambridge expected to attend, if Murray elects to climb close to the Royal Box there could be a coming together of sporting and real Royalty.

Big chance: Andy Murray is on the verge of what would be a career defining moment

Big chance: Andy Murray is on the verge of what would be a career defining moment

Millions of TV viewers at home will recognise Spearing as the man who wears a distinctive cowboy hat as he perches close to the players' nearest and dearest.

He has seen this scaling of the stands, traditionally frowned upon by the All England Club, become de rigueur in recent years.

'I feel certain Andy Murray would rush up there to his family,' said Spearing.

Hopeful: Kim Sears would love it if her boyfriend had cause to rush to her after the final

Hopeful: Kim Sears would love it if her boyfriend had cause to rush to her after the final

Watchful eye: Murray puts in the hard yards in preparation for his fourth Grand Slam final

Watchful eye: Murray puts in the hard yards in preparation for his fourth Grand Slam final

'It would be such a huge, emotional moment for him. For Federer, it is different because it would be just another title, he has become slightly blase about it all.'

Should he win, Murray is likely to look to the heavens and point his fingers to the sky, his trademark celebration at these Championships. It is believed to relate to a health issue of one of his friends, but the British No 1 has twice refused to explain why he does it.

Murray said: 'It's something for me and the guys that I work with. I don't really want to go into too much detail because I'll end up getting asked about it every single day. Whether it is [anything to do with religion] or not, I'm not going to tell anyone.'

Making their day: Murray braves the elements to sign autographs for fans

Making their day: Murray braves the elements to sign autographs for fans

Cash was the first player to stray from the stringent protocol of the Championships when he triumphed – coincidentally over Ivan Lendl, who now coaches Murray – in 1987 before a watching Princess Diana.

His dash through the seats to hug his father, coach and girlfriend was later re-enacted by Pete Sampras, Maria Sharapova and Rafael Nadal.

Dwain Chambers in foul-mouthed outburst after 100m win

Chambers stuns TV viewers as he shouts 'f*** off' seconds after 100m victory at Olympic trials

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UPDATED:

18:46 GMT, 23 June 2012

Dwain Chambers stormed to victory in the men's 100m at the Olympic trials in Birmingham, but then had to apologise after shocking millions of television viewers with a foul mouthed outburst.

Chambers reacted with delight after winning the race in 10.25 seconds, but then clearly said 'f*** off' in front of the cameras.

BBC commentator Steve Cram commented: 'There's no need for that.'

Delight: Chambers celebrates winning the 100m in Birmingham on Saturday

Delight: Chambers celebrates winning the 100m in Birmingham on Saturday

And Chambers himself said sorry to fans in an interview soon after, admitting he got a bit carried away.

The controversial 34-year-old hopes to compete in sport's greatest show later this summer in London. He was only cleared to take part at the Olympics recently, when the Court of Arbitration for Sport overturned his lifetime ban from the Games. He was caught taking a performance enhancing drug in 2003, and banned from the sport for two years.

Storming to victory: Dwain Chambers crosses the line first

Storming to victory: Dwain Chambers crosses the line first

Chambers still needs to make the Olympic qualifying time to be certain of his place at the Games.

Adam Gemili finished second at the Alexander Stadium to make sure of his place at sport's greatest shpw. Gemili and James Dasaolu are the only two to have beaten the qualifying time of 10.18 this year.

Elsewhere, teenager Adam Gemili qualified for the Olympics as he finished second in 10.29.

Brit of all right: Adam Gemili celebrates after finishing second

Brit of all right: Adam Gemili celebrates after finishing second

Chambers now said he was looking forward to next week's European Championship in Helsinki.

'I'm optimistic it, I like championships,' he said. 'I am aiming for the qualifying time.

'I'm glad the pressure of the trials is over. I'm really happy to have won.'

All smiles: Chambers and Gemili both qualified for the Olympic Games

All smiles: Chambers and Gemili both qualified for the Olympic Games