Tag Archives: twickenham

England will begin their summer tour of South America with a tough test in Uruguay

Lancaster's England to begin summer tour of South America in Uruguay

By
Duncan Bech, Press Association

PUBLISHED:

14:15 GMT, 22 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

14:35 GMT, 22 April 2013

England have confirmed that their summer tour to South America will begin in Montevideo, Uruguay, on June 2.

The RBS 6 Nations runners-up will meet a CONSUR XV representing the South American nations, before playing two Tests against Argentina.

The first Test will be staged in Salta – the setting for the Pumas’ 24-22 victory in 2009 – on June 8 and at Velez Sarsfield in Buenos Aires on June 15.

Pumas test: Stuart Lancaster will be desperate to erase England's Grand Slam heartache in Argentina

Pumas test: Stuart Lancaster will be desperate to erase England's Grand Slam heartache in Argentina

Lions hopefuls: Tom Croft, David Wilson and Courtney Lawes could be in South America if they are snubbed by the British Lions

Lions hopefuls: Tom Croft, David Wilson and Courtney Lawes could be in South America if they are snubbed by the British Lions

It will be the first two-match series between the teams in Argentina since the 1997 tour with England coach Stuart Lancaster set to name his squad in early May.

'Argentina is a formidable rugby nation and we’re looking forward to facing the Pumas in back-to-back Tests, which a young and developing side will need to be at its very best to win,' Lancaster said.

'Together with matches against the
Barbarians at Twickenham and the CONSUR team in Uruguay, the summer
programme gives this group a real opportunity to measure their progress
and continue to learn what they need to succeed at the highest level.'

On the way out: England will not have to face the likes of Felipe Contepomi (pictured centre) this summer after the fly-half announced plans to retire

On the way out: England will not have to face the likes of Felipe Contepomi (pictured centre) this summer after the fly-half announced plans to retire

England tour dates:

May 29 – Arrive
in Buenos Aires

June 2 – CONSUR XV v England XV (Montevideo, 7.30pm BST)

June 8 Argentina v England (Salta, 8.10pm BST)

June 15 Argentina v England (Velez Sarsfield, Buenos
Aires, 8.10pm BST)

Rugby World Cup 2015: Football grounds make up three-quarters of the venues

The 2015 Rugby World Cup… coming soon to a football ground near you (but at least Twickenham gets the final)

By
Rik Sharma

PUBLISHED:

10:58 GMT, 3 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

12:12 GMT, 3 March 2013

The venues for England's Rugby World Cup in 2015 have been revealed and three-quarters of the selected stadiums are football grounds.

Wembley, Old Trafford and St James' Park will host fixtures while the likes of Leicester Tigers' Welford Road and Harlequins' Twickenham Stoop have been overlooked.

The only club rugby ground which has been selected is Gloucester's Kingsholm, while the Millenium Stadium and Twickenham, which will host the final, are the other recognised rugby stadiums on the list.

Unfamiliar surroundings: The All Blacks could be playing at Wembley, which hosts six fixtures

Unfamiliar surroundings: The All Blacks could be playing at Wembley, which hosts six fixtures

RWC2015 Venues

Twickenham (Hosting 8 games inc. final, capacity 82,000)

Millennium Stadium (8, 74,500)

Wembley (6, 90,000)

Kingsholm (4, 16,500)

King Power Stadium (4, 32,262)

Amex Stadium (3, 27,350)

Villa Park or Ricoh Arena (3, 42,788 or 32,609)

Ashton Gate (3, 21,497)

Stadium MK (3, 22,000 planned increase to 32,000)

St James' Park (2, 52,387)

Elland Road (2, 37,697)

Old Trafford (2, 75,765)

Unless the Olympic Stadium becomes available before the venues are officially announced later this month, these are the final selections according to the Sunday Times.

The only issue left to resolve is whether Villa Park or the Ricoh Arena will be used.

But a spokesman for the 2015 Rugby World Cup denied the list was valid.

'That list is not at all true. It is entirely speculation,' he said. 'It is not the final list.

'The long-list has been in the public domain for a long time. The use of football stadiums was a part of the bid which was well documented.'

Leicester Tigers are particularly angry that Welford Road (24,000) is being overlooked in favour of Leicester City's King Power Stadium (32,000).

Larger capacities – and therefore the potential for more tickets sold – are the reason football stadiums are being used.

The organisers need an average
attendance of 55,000 in order to reach the 80million guarantee they
have made to the International Rugby Board.

Tigers
chairman Peter Tom had expressed his shock and disappointment at the
decision on the club's official website. 'We are hugely disappointed to
learn that Welford Road will not play a part in England's hosting of the
Rugby World Cup in 2015,' he said.

'Welford
Road has hosted many, many major occasions over the years, including
visits from South Africa, Australia and Argentina national teams in
recent seasons. It is home to the best-supported and most successful
club in the history of the professional game in this country and, as
such, we believe is worthy of Rugby World Cup status.

Snub: Leicester Tigers' ground Welford Road is being overlooked

Snub: Leicester Tigers' ground Welford Road is being overlooked

Selected: Newcastle's St James' Park will be used

Selected: Newcastle's St James' Park will be used

'That the organisers of RWC2015 do not think this an appropriate venue for its fixtures is disappointing and confusing both for the professional club game in this country and for its supporters.'

An RFU statement suggested the larger capacities and better facilities on offer at modern football stadiums led to the controversial policy.

It read: 'The selection procedure for the long list of venues took into account a geographical spread across the country, sporting and facilities criteria, levels of support from candidate host cities and capacity requirements for the successful delivery of a Rugby World Cup.'

Six Nations 2013: venue guide

Six Nations venue guide: A look at the stadiums playing host to this year's Championship

By
Duncan Bech, Press Association

PUBLISHED:

12:10 GMT, 28 January 2013

|

UPDATED:

18:57 GMT, 1 February 2013

The Six Nations kicks off in February and ahead of the annual feast of rugby Sportsmail runs through the venues that will host this year's games.

TWICKENHAM – LONDON

A capacity of 82,000 identifies the home of England as the world's largest rugby-dedicated venue and the nation's second-largest stadium behind Wembley. When England are winning there are few more rousing places to be – witness the atmosphere against New Zealand last autumn for example – but long spells of quiet can often dampen the occasion. Travelling there can be hellish as the roads become gridlocked while the all-too-infrequent rail service can see trains become horribly overcrowded.

HQ: England's Twickenham Stadium in Surrey

STADE DE FRANCE – PARIS

Just pipped by Twickenham in capacity terms, the 81,338 seater Stade de France was built for the 1998 football World Cup and remains an impressive sight within the unwelcoming district of Saint-Denis, where it is inadvisable to linger after dark. Seasoned Les Bleus supporters still yearn for the more gladiatorial Parc des Princes, the previous home of French rugby, not least because of some poor results at the Stade de France.

General view of the Stade de France in St Denis,Paris.  Mandatory Credit: David Rogers /Allsport Z0111169

AVIVA STADIUM – DUBLIN

Ever since returning to their revamped home, Ireland have spoken of the need to turn Aviva Stadium into a fortress but it has proved an uncomfortable relationship so far after losing seven of their 13 games there. A superb, modern venue, the 51,700 ground is among the finest rugby stadia in the world and access is relatively painless partly thanks to the battalions of available taxis. The atmosphere can be eerily silent, however, and contrast markedly with the noise generated at Irish provincial games.

Aviva Stadium

STADIO OLIMPICO – ROME

Italian rugby has a new home while work continues on the Stadio Flaminio, with the 82,000 capacity Stadio Olimpico proving a superb addition to the list of Six Nations stadia. More traditionally known as the home of Lazio and Roma football clubs, it is one of Italy's most cherished sporting venues and was home to the 1960 Rome Olympics. A running track surrounds the pitch and this affects the atmosphere.

Stadio Olimpico

MURRAYFIELD – EDINBURGH

The declining fortunes of Scottish rugby are evident at Murrayfield, where a dwindling number of spectators turn out to watch a team that has suffered like no other amid the transition to professionalism. Located in the west of the Scottish capital, the superb 67,130 stadium is capable of generating some rousing atmospheres – if only those attending were given something to celebrate on a regular basis once again.

Murrayfield

MILLENNIUM STADIUM – CARDIFF

The finest rugby stadium in the world An argument could certainly be made for what many regard as the jewel in the Six Nations' crown. Brilliantly designed and situated in the heart of Cardiff, it is a spectacular centre-piece for Welsh rugby that can take noise levels to a new dimension. When Wales are firing, it becomes an inspiring venue. The only negative is the difficulty getting out of the city – by car or train – after a match.

Millennium Stadium

Chris Robshaw has been named England skipper for the Six Nations as Stuart Lancaster keeps his faith in the flanker

Robshaw named England skipper for Six Nations as Lancaster keeps faith in flanker

By
Duncan Bech, Press Association

PUBLISHED:

19:53 GMT, 21 January 2013

|

UPDATED:

20:03 GMT, 21 January 2013

England have confirmed Chris Robshaw as their captain for the forthcoming RBS Six Nations in an appointment that will have caused no surprises.

Robshaw has been retained after leading England to a record 38-21 victory over New Zealand at Twickenham on December 1 and will fill the post for a second successive championship.

Northampton forwards Dylan Hartley and Tom Wood are viewed as potential captains, but coach Stuart Lancaster views 26-year-old Harlequins openside Robshaw as the outstanding candidate.

Chris Robshaw will lead England into the Six Nations as one of the favourites

Responsibility: Chris Robshaw will lead England into the Six Nations as one of the favourites

Lancaster, who announced Robshaw's reappointment at tonight's squad meeting, believes the Lions captaincy candidate has developed into superb leader.

'Chris stepped into the role 12 months ago when we were building a new team and he has grown as a captain on and off the field,' Lancaster said.

'He showed those leadership qualities during the QBE Internationals and especially against the All Blacks when the whole squad got behind him.

'We have a number of leaders and I know they will all take this team forwards with Chris as we look to kick on from that result.'

Robshaw will be hoping to continue the success which led to victory over New Zealand

Ice Cold: Robshaw will be hoping to continue the success which led to victory over New Zealand

Robshaw made his Test debut against
Argentina in 2009 and despite his lack of experience, was installed as
skipper upon his next cap against Scotland at the start of last year's
Six Nations.

He has continued in the post since,
missing only the final Test against South Africa last June due to
injury, and has been a key part of Lancaster's rebuilding program
following the disastrous 2011 World Cup.

'Stuart told me this afternoon and I am really pleased to be asked again,' Robshaw said.

'There are other leaders in the squad that Stuart could have turned to so I am really honoured.

'The lads have been great over the
last year and now we our focus is on building on the New Zealand
performance and getting a result against Scotland.'

Gloucester fly-half Freddie Burns will
undergo a scan over the coming days to assess the extent of the damage
of the knee injury he sustained during Saturday's 36-16 victory over
Mont de Marsan.

Robshaw celebrates with Ben Youngs and James Haskell

Good times: Robshaw celebrates with Ben Youngs and James Haskell

Robshaw and Stuart Lancaster have formed a formidable partnership leading England

Together: Robshaw and Stuart Lancaster have formed a formidable partnership leading England

Rugby Autumn Internationals immortalised in Lego

Now you can never Lego of history! Ashton and Tuilagi brilliance immortalised as toys

|

UPDATED:

17:35 GMT, 13 December 2012

England rugby kit sponsors Canterbury have teamed up with talented filmmaker and animator Graham Love to create a brilliant Lego film which tells the story of the autumn internationals.

The innovative clip lasts one minute and 18 seconds and begins with Tim Visser scoring Scotland’s first try against New Zealand for an incredible seven years, though the Scots were beaten 51-22 by the All Blacks, who maintained their 107-year long unbeaten record against the Tartan Army.

The next international star to be immortalised into Lego is the Samoan George Pisi as he storms to a try in their shock 19-26 victory against Wales at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff.

Scroll down to watch the video

Ash Splash! England's unforgettable win over New Zealand in the Autumn Internationals has been immortalised in Lego by filmmaker Graham Love

Ash Splash! England's unforgettable win over New Zealand in the Autumn Internationals has been immortalised in Lego by filmmaker Graham Love

The clip progresses with Manu Tuilagi’s controversial try as England fell to a defeat against South Africa and cheekily pokes fun at England’s rugby purple kit, displaying a tweet from Graham Love that says: 'Stick to white. #Englandisall.'

There is even space to make reference to the resignation of Andy Robinson, Scotland’s head coach, after Tonga defeated Scotland 15-21 at Pittodrie on November 24, with a mocked-up newspaper front page called The Scotsboy declaring: “You’ve been Tongaed”.

Silverware: The film features great moments from the Autumn matches involving all the Home Nations

Silverware: The film features great moments from the Autumn matches involving all the Home Nations

The film, however, ends on a triumphant note as Brad Barritt, Chris Ashton and Manu Tuilagi score tries as England defeat New Zealand at Twickenham to bring an end to the All-Blacks 20 match run of games undefeated.

Watch the film in full

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Tom Wood will take no fear mentality from England to Northampton

Northampton's Wood still in mood for upset after England triumph

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UPDATED:

23:13 GMT, 6 December 2012

Tom Wood will resume club duties for Northampton on Friday night armed with the same ‘no fear’ mentality that he took into England’s epic victory over the All Blacks.

He and his fellow Saints aim to halt another double-digit winning run in their Heineken Cup pool four clash with Ulster at Franklin’s Gardens.

The flanker wears No 7 tonight after his man-of-the-match contribution to New Zealand’s downfall at Twickenham, when he wore No 6. But the positional change won’t mean a notable change of approach.

Spirit: Tom Wood (right) wants to take momentum and attitude from England's win over the All Blacks

Spirit: Tom Wood (right) wants to take momentum and attitude from England's win over the All Blacks

This will be a return to normality for the 26-year-old and lock Courtney Lawes after the high of being part of Saturday’s record win against the All Blacks.

But for the likes of Dylan Hartley and Ben Foden, this Anglo-Irish collision represents a first major opportunity to press their cases for a Test recall in the new year.

Yet the main focus for Wood and his fellow Saints is finding a way to stop an Ulster side who are runaway leaders of the Rabo-Direct Pro12 league and have won all their 12 games this season.

Then again, New Zealand were unbeaten in 20 international matches when they arrived in London, only to lose 38-21.

Wood said: ‘We’ll be on a high from that for a long time, it was a memorable day. But my feet are on the ground here at Northampton and I’ve been straight into training again.

Memorable: Wood certainly enjoyed beating New Zealand

Memorable: Wood certainly enjoyed beating New Zealand

'We’re not getting carried away, there are no egos or heroes, we’re looking forward to another big game for Saints.

‘Ulster are on a good run but we won’t worry too much about that. We know on our day, especially at Franklin’s Gardens, we can compete with anybody. There are a lot of good teams out there — Ulster are one of those.

‘But “fear” isn’t a word we use. We’re confident, especially at home in front of a full house. We can put on a positive performance and hopefully get the win.’

While Ulster will miss talismanic flanker Stephen Ferris, who has had surgery to repair ankle tendon damage and will be out of action for some time, Wood identified ex-Northampton No 8 Roger Wilson as a major threat.

Threat: Ruan Pienaar played England for South Africa and Wood will face him again

Threat: Ruan Pienaar played England for South Africa and Wood will face him again

However, the Irish province have threats all over, from Tommy Bowe and Andrew Trimble out wide to Ruan Pienaar pulling the strings at scrum-half and Rory Best at the heart of a big, abrasive pack.

Last year’s losing finalists will take some beating, but the Saints know they must win if they are to retain hopes of making it through to the knockout stages.

‘Without a win this weekend we will really be up against it’ said Wood. ‘After a disappointing campaign last year, it’s important we progress. We’re a club with high expectations and we want to do well in this competition. We need to win these big games at home.’

Ben Youngs said England victory over New Zealand is benchmark for Six Nations

Youngs hopes England take their Six Nations lead from All Blacks bashing

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UPDATED:

22:30 GMT, 2 December 2012

Ben Youngs claimed after England’s record win over New Zealand the display had set a benchmark for the Six Nations Championship next February.

But the Leicester scrum-half said the England team were disappointed at the narrow defeats by Australia and South Africa in an autumn series which also brought a win over Fiji.

'It was a great result and a great way to finish the series, but we are still disappointed because we could have been four from four.

Benchmark: Ben Youngs thinks the win should show England the way for the Six Nations

Benchmark: Ben Youngs thinks the win should show England the way for the Six Nations

'We got in a huddle after the game and said “enjoy the night”, but also we must remember it’s a benchmark for when we meet up in the Six Nations.

'We have to hit the ground running. But it’s tough. We will play Scotland at Twickenham (on February 2) in the first game and it is difficult to explode in the first game.

The win gave Youngs and his brother, Tom, their first win over New Zealand thus matching the deed of father Nick who played in the England team who beat the All Blacks in November 1983.

'I’m really happy, because I can finally shut my dad up because he beat them and now we are one up as well.'

Youngs claimed England were not worried by the draw for 2015 Rugby World Cup which takes place in London on Monday afternoon.

No fear: Youngs said England are not worried about the Six Nations draw

No fear: Youngs said England are not worried about the Six Nations draw

Despite England’s win over the world champions, they remain in the second group of teams and could be drawn against the All Blacks in the pool stages of the tournament.

'I don’t think the draw is a huge thing for us at the moment. We are a young side and are developing.

'You have to remember that in the last two finals the two teams have come out of the same pool. We will notice who we are against, but we won’t worry about rankings.'

Youngs hopes by 2015 England will be a 'team to beat' and one of the favourites. 'The World Cup is quite a way to go yet and the whole idea of Stuart’s plan is that we will be a vastly more experienced team.'

Chris Foy: England must build on New Zealand victory

England's stunning victory over All Blacks must not be a glorious exception

|

UPDATED:

23:39 GMT, 2 December 2012

The teams were in a meeting with broadcasters in the countdown to kick-off at Twickenham when a member of the All Blacks staff asked a question.

Where should they stand when collecting the Hillary Shield for winning the Test

'When' rather than 'if' certainly jarred with England. Victory had been assumed. Hours later, the tourists had an answer they weren't expecting.

Showmanship: Manu Tuilagi made two tries and scored one

Showmanship: Manu Tuilagi made two tries and scored one

Flying high: Chris Ashton goes over in typically exuberant fashion

Flying high: Chris Ashton goes over in typically exuberant fashion

Over: Ashton

The New Zealand players found
themselves standing on the grass at HQ, looking up into the stand as
Chris Robshaw raised the shield which England had wrenched from Kiwi
clutches.

A week after being booed at the same
stadium, the captain and his team-mates were swamped by euphoria, having
delivered a performance from the heavens and a result to sit high in
the pantheon.

There have been few days like it, certainly not against these opponents.

In a year when British sporting
triumph has become almost routine, here was one last instalment to set
among the golden highlights from 2012.

Put aside for now the magical,
startling numbers – a scoreline from English fantasies – it was the
manner in which the hosts shattered the All Blacks' aura of
invincibility which generated such joy.

This was not a wild and wonderful fluke, although only time will tell if it is truly a watershed.

Stuart Lancaster's team systemically
and thrillingly dismantled the world champions. In the post-match search
for an explanation, it became apparent that the backs-to-the-wall
mind-set of the squad after defeats against Australia and South Africa
was a factor.

They had stood by their embattled
skipper and challenged themselves to deliver a stirring riposte, without
perhaps ever imagining it would be quite as stirring as this.

On the charge: Brad Barritt breaks away before going over for England's first try

On the charge: Brad Barritt breaks away before going over for England's first try

On the charge: Brad Barritt breaks away before going over for England's first try
5 KEY ISSUES FOR LANCASTER

Thinking it over: Stuart Lancaster

RETURNING STARS
If the injuries clear up in the New Year, Stuart Lancaster (right) has plenty to ponder, with Ben Foden, Tom Croft and Dylan Hartley trying to force their way back into the team, but perhaps finding their positions taken, judging by Saturday's performance.

THE SKIPPER'S CASE
Chris Robshaw suffered in the defeats by Australia and South Africa, then led with distinction against the All Blacks. It fortified his case for captaining the side in the Six Nations but Hartley and Tom Wood remain contenders.

DEPTHS DISCOVERED
Tom Youngs prospered at hooker to offer an alternative to Hartley, and lock Joe Launchbury showed stunning potential. There is ample tight-five cover, and England are well stocked with flankers and scrum-halves, but reserves are thinner at No 8 and on the wing.

PERFECT EXECUTION
England varied their game but, until Saturday, the execution let them down. The midfield axis was better used against New Zealand, forward runners did not clog up the line too much, and a better chase justified the in-field kicking.

LOGICAL SELECTION
Lancaster and his assistants kept a logical selection policy, even when making six changes before the South Africa game. Failings were fixed between games, hinting at good work in training. The set-up didn't panic under pressure.

The spirit was willing, but there was
no secret formula underpinning English exploits. They simply did all
their jobs with that much more precision.

A week earlier, Lancaster had lamented an absence of composure and this time that precious quality was evident in abundance.

Take the build-up to Chris Ashton's
try. When the marauding Manu Tuilagi blasted through Dan Carter, Richie
McCaw and Aaron Smith and burst clear towards the 22, he shaped to pass
to his supporting wing but delayed for a second.

That made all the difference in
clearing space for Ashton's gallop to the corner. It showed that, in the
midst of a tumultuous encounter, Tuilagi had used his head.

That was the composure his coach
wanted to see. There were various clues to England's state of mind and
their intent to be positive against the world's leading team.

In the first minute, deep in his own
half, Mike Brown shaped to clear his lines but instead chose to swerve
past Cory Jane and scorch clear.

Shortly after half-time, that sense
of adventure from the players in white was writ large again when the
ball was shipped down the line in their own 22 and Alex Goode stormed
clear.

He released Ben Youngs and although
the scrum-half 's off-load went forward, this was England using the
weapons at their disposal.

They had the courage of their
convictions. Conservatism was chased out of town. There was a familiar
hallmark of Lancaster's England in there, too: character.

In the closing seconds, when the
game was up, New Zealand's Charlie Faumuina rumbled towards the home
line but was resolutely held up by Courtney Lawes and Dan Cole.

Even at that late stage, shattered from the effort, they had a fierce determination to quell the last resistance.

Setting nerves jangling: Kieran Read went on the charge for the All Blacks' second try

Setting nerves jangling: Kieran Read went on the charge for the All Blacks' second try

On the charge: Julian Savea scores the first of his two tries to give New Zealand a foothold after half-time

On the charge: Julian Savea scores the first of his two tries to give New Zealand a foothold after half-time

So many aspects of this herculean
achievement warrant so much credit, but the fundamental issue which has
been spectacularly enhanced is England's breakdown work.

Man of the match Tom Wood, along with
Robshaw and the likes of Cole and Geoff Parling, annihilated the All
Blacks in the contact areas.

The usually peerless McCaw could do
nothing to stem the tide and in being reduced to mere mortality, he was
joined by fellow Kiwi icon Carter, who missed kicks and tackles, and was
hounded to oblivion.

England established a 15-0 lead just
after the break, founded on a relentlessly swarming defence, Owen
Farrell's kicking and that breakdown ascendancy, allied to a distinct
edge in the set piece.

What happened next was remarkable.
The All Blacks, a champion team raging against the dying of the light,
hit back with tries from Julian Savea and Kieran Read.

Twickenham practically trembled with foreboding of a New Zealand onslaught, but instead the mayhem unfolded at the other end.

Under pressure: England were 12-0 up at half-time, the first time New Zealand have failed to score before the break since 1998

Under pressure: England were 12-0 up at half-time, the first time New Zealand have failed to score before the break since 1998

Metronomic: Owen Farrell's right boot accounted for 20 points

Metronomic: Owen Farrell's right boot accounted for 20 points

In the space of eight minutes,
England scored three tries. First, their derided midfield pair ripped
the visitors apart, Brad Barritt dashing through a hole on the left and
passing out to Tuilagi, who flipped the ball back infield for his centre
partner to cross from close range.

Then came the 'Ash-Splash', courtesy
of Tuilagi, before Leicester's Anglo-Samoan wrecking ball claimed a try
of his own by intercepting a pass from Read on halfway and first
sprinting clear, then jogging and finally walking over to touch down.

'I looked into the eyes of my
opposite number and said, “I accept your challenge, now let's play some
rugby”.'

– Manu Tuilagi on the Haka

Perhaps the All Blacks should have feared the worst when England's No 13 watched the Haka and responded with a big grin.

'I really enjoyed it,' said Tuilagi.
'It was the first time I had faced it. I looked into the eyes of my
opposite number and said, “I accept your challenge, now let's play some
rugby”.'

Boy, did he play some rugby. They all did.

England were sensational and the upshot was one of the greatest victories, not just of the professional era but of any era.

They spoke later of the need to use
this win as a launchpad for improvement in the Six Nations and beyond,
which is just the right tone to adopt.

This cannot be an isolated success. It must become the norm, rather than a glorious exception.

But for now, a fanfare is fully justified.

ROB WILDMAN'S PLAYER RATINGS FROM ENGLAND'S DAY OF GLORY:

Player ratings

Player ratings

Owen Farrell praises England performance against new Zealand

England played like champions at Twickenham, says Farrell after All Blacks are stunned

|

UPDATED:

16:45 GMT, 2 December 2012

Owen Farrell hailed the 'champions' attitude' which underpinned England's sensational 38-21 victory over New Zealand – and proved a point to the rest of the world.

Farrell kicked 17 points and overshadowed his illustrious opposite number Dan Carter as England powered their way to a record victory over the world champions.

England went into the game on the back of frustrating defeats to Australia (20-14) and South Africa (16-15) while the All Blacks were on a 20-game unbeaten run.

Top performance: Farrell kicked 17 of England's 38 points

Top performance: Farrell kicked 17 of England's 38 points

The gulf in experience was vast. New Zealand boasted more caps in their front row than Stuart Lancaster's young team had in their entire starting XV.

But England bridged that gap with a ferocious performance at Twickenham and delivered the victory they needed to validate their own belief and all the talk of improving performances.

'The belief has always been there. This win just solidifies that. We know that when we bring our game we can beat anybody,' Farrell said.

'We felt the performances were there but we didn't quite get the results we wanted. We felt like it was nearly there. I know on the outside people didn't think that.

'But the stuff that has been said on the outside has only made us tighter as a group.

Clinging on: Farrell tackles Conrad Smith

Clinging on: Farrell tackles Conrad Smith

'There is a lot of fight in this team, there is a champions' attitude and it showed out there. The boys put their bodies on the line and really worked hard to put the pressure on.

'We really put in a good performance and it can only do us good going forward.

'If we stick to our processes and do what we do well, we will challenge any team. If we take our game to them on the day, it doesn't matter who we are playing we are going to trouble them.'

Farrell kicked three penalties and a drop goal to open England a 15-0 lead before the All Blacks hit them with two tries in three minutes, from Julian Savea and Kieran Read.

At that moment, England's young team faced the biggest test of their character and they reacted in the way of champions with Brad Barritt, Chris Ashton and Manu Tuilagi all scoring in a three-try blitz.

Try time: Manu Tuilagi goes over for England

Try time: Manu Tuilagi goes over for England

'We knew they would come back and throw the kitchen sink at us. We know what a good team they are, that they would never lie down and be beaten,' Farrell said.

'Credit to them for fighting back but we always had belief in what we were doing and we never gave up and that showed in the way we played.'

Farrell and Carter are both on the International Rugby Board's shortlist for world player of the year, along with Richie McCaw and Frederic Michalak.

No one was more shocked by Farrell's inclusion than the Englishman himself but his performance eclipsed Carter's at Twickenham.

'There is no bigger admirer of him than me. I have watched him very closely,' Farrell said.

'We had a little chat after the game and swapped shirts.

'I was massively shocked to be on the list. I think I showed bits of what I can do today. I can always get better.'

England 38 New Zealand 21 match report: Owen Farrell, Brad Barritt, Chris Ashton and Manu Tuilagi secure victory

England 38 New Zealand 21: Sensational display of character sees Lancaster's men turn their autumn around

PUBLISHED:

16:19 GMT, 1 December 2012

|

UPDATED:

18:46 GMT, 1 December 2012

England's young men came of age at Twickenham with a sensational record-breaking victory over world champions New Zealand.

Owen Farrell kicked England into a 15-0 lead before the All Blacks hit back with two tries in three second-half minutes from Julian Savea and Kieran Read.

Twickenham sensed the worst. The All Blacks had found their cutting edge and a third consecutive defeat to southern hemisphere opposition seemed in the offing.

But England responded with a stunning three-try blitz from Brad Barritt, Chris Ashton and Manu Tuilagi and the records tumbled.

Showmanship: Manu Tuilagi made two tries and scored one

Showmanship: Manu Tuilagi made two tries and scored one

Flying high: Chris Ashton goes over in typically exuberant fashion

Flying high: Chris Ashton goes over in typically exuberant fashion

Over: Ashton
England's records

England's previous biggest win over New Zealand was 13-0 at Twickenham in January, 1936.

England's previous highest score against New Zealand was the 31 points they scored in a 31-28 victory at Twickenham in November, 2002.

Only once in 498 Tests had New Zealand been beaten by a bigger margin – 28-7 against Australia in August, 1999.

England's last victory over New Zealand was 15-13 in Wellington in June, 2003.

England had not beaten New Zealand in their previous nine matches before this game.

New Zealand were unbeaten in their 20 Tests (19 victories and one draw) before this game.

New Zealand had not lost a Test to European opposition on an autumn tour since the 31-28 defeat to England in November, 2002.

The All Blacks had not lost in 20
matches. They had not lost an autumn Test for a decade, since England
beat them 31-18 in November 2002.

That England team went on to win the
Rugby World Cup a year later. Stuart Lancaster's current England team
are at the opposite end of their development.

The absence of Toby Flood through
injury left them without a single 50-cap player. England had fewer caps
in their entire starting line-up than New Zealand had in their front
row.

The team's character had never been
denied but their maturity and ability to turn positive performances into
results had been questioned after narrow defeats to Australia and South
Africa.

No longer. England rocked the All
Blacks. New Zealand were hit by a vomiting bug in the week. But not as
hard as they were hit by England.

The first signs of England's physical
dominance came in the lineout and with their early ball-carrying, with
Joe Launchbury, Tom Youngs and Tuilagi all making early ground.

But it was without the ball that
England really set the tone. Their kick-chase had the All Blacks under
pressure and they swamped New Zealand in defence.

On the charge: Brad Barritt breaks away before going over for England's first try

On the charge: Brad Barritt breaks away before going over for England's first try

On the charge: Brad Barritt breaks away before going over for England's first try

England had a slice of fortune when
Cory Jane was judged to have strayed marginally offside before
collecting Dan Carter's inch-perfect cross-kick.

Carter, almost inexplicably, also
missed two penalty shots at goal. England felt they had not had that
bounce of the ball against Australia and South Africa. Today they made
the most of it.

After 21 minutes, England won a scrum
penalty and Farrell kicked a fantastic touch, to move play into the All
Blacks 22 for the first time and Geoff Parling won a confident lineout.

England drove powerfully but fell
foul of the new five-second law after referee George Clancy, under the
mistaken impression the maul had halted, called on scrum-half Ben Youngs
to use it.

Setting nerves jangling: Kieran Read went on the charge for the All Blacks' second try

Setting nerves jangling: Kieran Read went on the charge for the All Blacks' second try

New Zealand were awarded the scrum
but England kept the pressure on. Tom Wood charged down Savea's
clearance to keep England in the All Blacks 22 and more pressure earned
another lineout.

Ben Morgan peeled off the driving
maul, Chris Robshaw crashed the ball up the middle and England moved it
wide through Morgan and Alex Goode to Ashton.

The wing dropped the ball but he was
well covered anyway and referee Clancy brought play back for a penalty,
which Farrell kicked confidently to push England ahead.

Almost immediately from the restart,
Morgan was penalised for hitting a ruck from the side but Carter missed
his second shot at goal from virtually in front of the posts.

On the charge: Julian Savea scores the first of his two tries to give New Zealand a foothold after half-time

On the charge: Julian Savea scores the first of his two tries to give New Zealand a foothold after half-time

New Zealand began to work through the
phases but England's white defensive wall responded with some ferocious
tackles, notably Tom Youngs on Carter, before Dan Cole won a turnover.

Israel Dagg tried to run back a Ben
Youngs box kick but he was smothered in his own half by Launchbury and
Wood, who won the penalty and Farrell coolly kicked the goal.

Keven Mealamu then overthrew a
lineout and England were back on the attack, with Tuilagi and Goode
combining to break the gain-line before Farrell slotted a drop-goal.

As the clock ticked down to
half-time, England kept the ball. Robshaw drove around the fringes, the
All Blacks were drawn offside and Farrell slotted his third penalty.

Metronomic: Owen Farrell's right boot accounted for 20 points

Metronomic: Owen Farrell's right boot accounted for 20 points

England then extended their lead
beyond two converted tries when the All Blacks scrum went down and
Farrell landed his fourth penalty from wide on the right.

But when Farrell scragged Aaron Smith at a ruck near England's line and was penalised, the tide appeared to have turned.

New Zealand went for touch, won the
lineout and then spread play to the opposite wing where Savea cut
infield and beat four defenders to score, with Carter converting.

Suddenly, the All Blacks had their
tails up. Farrell was under pressure as he tried to clear England's
lines and he failed to find touch.

Clearing his lines: Ma'a Nonu kicks under pressure Owen Farrell

Clearing his lines: Ma'a Nonu kicks under pressure Owen Farrell

Dagg danced down the right touchline,
England's defence was disorganised and the All Blacks cut them open
again with Jane and Conrad Smith combining to send Read over.

England could have wobbled under the
onslaught of two tries in three minutes. Instead, they hit back with a
vengeance with Tuilagi the destroyer in-chief.

Smith drifted too early in defence,
Barritt straightened through the gap and passed to Tuilagi before
receiving the offload back to score his first Test try. Farrell's
conversion hit the crossbar.

Tuilagi then crashed through two
defenders as England attacked from clean lineout ball and his
perfectly-delayed pass sent Ashton searing over the line for his first
try in 12 Tests.

Under pressure: England were 12-0 up at half-time, the first time New Zealand have failed to score before the break since 1998

Under pressure: England were 12-0 up at half-time, the first time New Zealand have failed to score before the break since 1998

Tuilagi then picked off a loose pass
from Read and galloped 50 metres for England's third try in eight
minutes, which Farrell converted before being replaced by Freddie Burns.

The Gloucester fly-half wrapped up the victory with two penalties.

Savea scored his second try with five
minutes remaining but nothing could deny England their first win
against New Zealand in nine years.