Tag Archives: triumphs

Lance Armstrong given two week deadline extension on co-operation with investigators

Disgraced Armstrong given two week extension on investigation co-operation deadline

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

01:41 GMT, 7 February 2013

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UPDATED:

01:42 GMT, 7 February 2013

The US Anti-Doping Agency have announced Lance Armstrong wants to 'assist in the effort to clean up the sport of cycling' and have given the disgraced cyclist a two-week extension to co-operate with investigators.

Armstrong had been given until yesterday to confess all under oath after admitting to doping during each of his seven Tour de France triumphs in a televised interview with Oprah Winfrey last month.

However, USADA have set a new deadline.

Extension: Lance has two more weeks to co-operate

Extension: Lance has two more weeks to co-operate

Chief executive Travis Tygart said in a statement: 'We have been in communication with Mr. Armstrong and his representatives and we understand that he does want to be part of the solution and assist in the effort to clean up the sport of cycling.

'We have agreed to his request for an additional two weeks to work on details to hopefully allow for this to happen.'

USADA revealed last year that Armstrong had led 'the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme sport has ever seen'.

The UCI, cycling's world governing body, stripped Armstrong of his seven Tour titles – none of which were reassigned – and he was banned from sport for life.

Armstrong told Winfrey he would 'be the first man through the door' to take part in a truth and reconciliation hearing.

First man: Lance said he would not be the last person 'through the door'

First man: Lance said he would not be the last person 'through the door'

And in an email interview with cyclingnews.com, the American was adamant a truth and reconciliation commission is the only way forward for all endurance sports.

'It's not the best way, it's the only way,' he said.

'As much as I'm the eye of the storm this is not about one man, one team, one director.

'This is about cycling and to be frank it's about ALL endurance sports.'

Armstrong stated the UCI should not be involved in a TRC, believing the World Anti-Doping Agency should lead it.

Asked why WADA and not USADA should run the process, Armstrong said: 'No brainer. This is a global sport not an American one. One thing I'd add – the UCI has no place at the table.

'When I was on speaking terms with ol' Pat McQuaid (the UCI president) many, many months ago I said, 'Pat, you better think bold here. A full-blown, global, TRC is our sport's best solution.' He wanted to hear nothing of it.'

Ryan Giggs Premier League ever-present: 20 years of stickers

Sticking with Giggs for 20 years… the United legend is still collectable two decades on

-13 version is as classy as ever.

Then... Ryan Giggs takes on Everton back on January 23, 1994 - the year the Premier League's sticker album debuted

Then… Giggs takes on Everton back in January 1994 – the year the Premier League's sticker album debuted

1993-94: 38 appearances, 13 goals

1993-94: 38 appearances, 13 goals

1994-95: 29 apps, 1 goal

1994-95: 29 apps, 1 goal

1995-96: 33 apps, 11 goals

1995-96: 33 apps, 11 goals

1996-97: 26 apps, 3 goals

1996-97: 26 apps, 3 goals

1997-98: 29 apps, 8 goals

1997-98: 29 apps, 8 goals

Since Giggs first appeared on a
sticker, two years after his full debut, United have had four kit
sponsors (Sharp, Vodafone, AIG and AON) and two kit makers (Umbro and
Nike).

Some shirts have been more attractive
than others – 2010 is a particular blip – and Giggs’ age (now 39) seems
to vary depending on whether he had shaved that morning.

As the Premier League's only ever-present player, Giggs' success is unrivalled in England's top flight over the last 20 years (and the last 20 sticker albums).

1998-99: 24 apps, 3 goals

1998-99: 24 apps, 3 goals

1999-2000: 30 apps, 6 goals

1999-2000: 30 apps, 6 goals

2000-01: 31 apps, 5 goals

2000-01: 31 apps, 5 goals

2001-02: 25 apps, 7 goals

2001-02: 25 apps, 7 goals

2002-03: 36 apps, 8 goals

2002-03: 36 apps, 8 goals

2003-04: 33 apps, 7 goals

2003-04: 33 apps, 7 goals

2004-05: 32 apps, 5 goals

2004-05: 32 apps, 5 goals

2005-06: 27 apps, 3 goals

2005-06: 27 apps, 3 goals

2006-07: 30 apps, 4 goals

2006-07: 30 apps, 4 goals

The Welshman has not only been a part of all 12 of Sir Alex Ferguson's Premier League-winning squads, but he has played a pivotal role in each and every one of the triumphs.

Giggs' success initially came as a winger, who's pace and trickery were up there with the world's best, but in recent years he has been deployed as a deeper lying midfielder as his speed has diminished along with his locks.

Such is the level of Giggs' fitness and professionalism that the fewest appearances he has made in any one Premier League season came back in 1998-99, when he played in 24 games.

2007-08: 31 apps, 3 goals

2007-08: 31 apps, 3 goals

2008-09: 28 apps, 2 goals

2008-09: 28 apps, 2 goals

2009-10: 25 apps, 5 goals

2009-10: 25 apps, 5 goals

2010-11: 25 apps, 2 goals

2010-11: 25 apps, 2 goals

2011-12: 25 apps, 2 goals

2011-12: 25 apps, 2 goals

2012-13: 11 apps (... and counting)

2012-13: 11 apps (and counting)

That means that Giggs has always
comfortably passed the minimum requirement of 10 games played in to collect
a Premier League winners medal.

In the last 20 years Giggs has faced Liverpool – his most frequent opposition – 35 times in the League and scored four goals. With the 36th clash looming on Sunday, no wonder United don’t want to swap him.

... and now: Giggs has already made 11 Premier League appearances for United this season

… and now: Giggs has already made 11 Premier League appearances for United this season

NFL want to beat West Ham to Olympic Stadium Americans

It was the home of Britain's greatest sporting triumphs, now the Mayor is in talks for the Olympic Stadium to be the new London home of America's NFL

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UPDATED:

19:29 GMT, 31 October 2012

The Olympic stadium in Stratford could become the London home of the NFL after talks involving Mayor Boris Johnson.

The ambitious plan is for NFL franchises to become the 'anchor tenant'. It would leave West Ham scuppered in their attempt to turn the East End venue in their new home.

'Sunday’s
game at Wembley, in front of more than 80,000 fans, further cements
London’s reputation as the natural home of American football outside of
the US,' the mayor's spokesman said.

Mayor Boris Johnson is heckled by protestors as he visits Bristol yesterday. West Ham fans may feel the same way about him.

Mayor Boris Johnson is heckled by protestors as he visits Bristol yesterday. West Ham fans may feel the same way about him.

West Ham's bid to take on the tenancy has hit a stumbling block and Johnson – the chairman of the London Legacy Development Corporation who operate the stadium – opened talks last weekend when four NFL teams were in London playing regular-season games at Wembley.

A spokesman for Johnson added: 'Given the ever-growing popularity of gridiron this side of the Atlantic the mayor and his team have held a number of meetings with senior executives in the last few days to explore further opportunities for NFL in London.

Up in the air: The future of the Olympic Stadium remains unclear

Up in the air: The future of the Olympic Stadium remains unclear

'The talks were exploratory and we are at an early stage but the signs are encouraging.'

West Ham are also looking to take over the anchor tenancy but the Treasury’s refusal to hand over the 337 million Olympic-contingency underspend to help install retractable seating is hampering their bid.

The retractable seating is expected to cost in the region of 200 million and the Mayor will be expecting any anchor tenant to make a significant contribution.

It is understood West Ham are willing to offer more than 8million a year in rent and related payments in addition to a reported multi-million lump sum.

The club are understood to be unwilling to reveal the true nature of their financial package due to confidentiality issues.

Touchdown: The NFL arrived in London last weekend

Touchdown: The NFL arrived in London last weekend

West Ham also believe that as several other events will be taking place at the Olympic Stadium throughout the next few years – such as the 2015 Rugby World Cup and the 2017 World Athletics Championships – they should not be the sole party asked to foot the bill.

A decision on the future of the stadium was expected to be announced by the end of October but negotiations are ongoing. Other contenders for the stadium tenancy are Leyton Orient, a football business college and a group wanting to host a Formula One race at the Olympic Park.

The NFL proposition is an attractive one as the stadium would only be required up to 10 times per year – compared to up to 25 times a year for football. This would free up time for other events such.

Boris takes to the microphone with opera singer Katherine Jenkins at Wembley on Sunday

Boris takes to the microphone with opera singer Katherine Jenkins at Wembley on Sunday

Boris meets the officials before kick-off between the New England Patriots and St. Louis Rams in London on Sunday

Boris meets the officials before kick-off between the New England Patriots and St. Louis Rams in London on Sunday

Bringing in other sports such as gridiron to the capital on a more regular basis is something that the Mayor's office are keen on exploring.

'Only last week the mayor, in conjunction with the NFL, announced an expansion from one to two regular-season matches in London from 2013. That means in total an additional 44 million in revenue for the capital from next year,' the Mayor’s spokesman added.

Arsenal fans not content with the last eight years – Matt Fortune

Matt Fortune: It's been the same old story at Arsenal for the last eight years

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UPDATED:

00:15 GMT, 25 October 2012

The first eight games of this season have been a microcosm of the last eight years of Arsenal Football Club.

From the sublime (Santi Cazorla) to the ridiculous (Olivier Giroud) to the abject surrender at Norwich.

They currently sit eighth, but no one has pressed the panic button. History tells us they are England’s third most successful club, now housed in the country’s third largest football stadium.

Style: Santi Cazorla has been a superb acquisition

Style: Santi Cazorla has been a superb acquisition

Last season they finished behind the Manchester clubs in the Premier League after their worst start in half a century.

At a time when two of their nearest rivals are benefitting from billion pound investment, and another is led by the greatest manager in world football, third is no bad thing.

From a personal point of view I have been spoiled growing up lavished by success – five league titles, five FA Cups, two league cups, a European Cup Winners’ Cup, plus a handful of finals, including the Champions League in 2006, all of which has been achieved with a style revered around the globe.

My poor old dad, on the other hand, in the first 26 years of his life, ‘endured’ one league title, two FA Cup triumphs and a European Fairs Cup win. And the 80s.

So why is the overriding feeling at Emirates one of frustration Why will Thursday’s AGM feel more like a public execution, with questions becoming progressively more contentious – if indeed they’ve not been vetted – and the roars of the masses ever more disapproving

Have Arsenal fans – perhaps the most patient in the Premier League – persevered with ‘the project’ to the point where entitlement has set in

Who would have thought that when Patrick Vieira slammed home the final penalty in a smash-and-grab FA Cup triumph over Manchester United in Cardiff, that Arsenal’s trophy cabinet would remain under lock and key for the next seven years

Just a memory: Patrick Vieira with Arsenal's last piece of silverware

Just a memory: Patrick Vieira with Arsenal's last piece of silverware

Driven by the admirable philosophy of a man more desperate for vindication than any of those who used to pack the state-of-the-art stadium in north London, Arsenal have been there in body at times but sadly lacking in spirit. Dwindling attendances show the fight is dying in the fans as well.

Of course, the goalposts were moved first by the arrival of Roman Abramovich and then Sheik Mansour in 2008.

Chelsea Russian gold rush seemingly sucked the life out of north London. Champions in 2002, careless in 2003 but still FA Cup winners, and in 2004 all the pieces came into place for an unbeaten season that must be ranked as the finest achievement of any English team in the modern era. Arsenal were Invincible. Now they’re inconsequential.

There have, though, been other excuses. The season before Manchester City were accelerated back into English footballs elite, Arsenal finished four points off the top having led the way until late February, when their season was derailed by the sickening injury suffered by Croatian striker Eduardo.

As the old phrase goes, it’s the hope that kills you.

Derailed: Eduardo suffered a shocking injury

Derailed: Eduardo suffered a shocking injury

Wenger has seemed like a man swimming against the tide from within yet somehow kept his side in the slip stream of the leaders. There is, though, no overtaking. For all he and his band of young and hungry stars have thrown at those around them, they are forever coming up short.

Yet what the Frenchman has achieved against the backdrop of key player departures and the financing of a 400million stadium is nothing short of remarkable.

Liverpool, Everton and rivals Tottenham have all taken temporary residence of the top four, yet all finished outside the top six as well. Arsenal, by hook or by crook (2006 Lasagne-gate), have never dipped below the elite.

From the outside, the shortcomings seem so simple to fix. Speculate to accumulate, throw a bit of caution to the wind. But when Wenger has, he’s been bitten. Andrey Arshavin and Jose Antonio Reyes, his most lavish expenses until recently, both let him down. His caution, therefore, seems understandable.

But at the same time there is a feeling that Wenger treats players and the club like a personal project; the fans come second.

Project: Arsene Wenger does not always operate in what would be the fans best interests

Project: Arsene Wenger does not always operate in what would be the fans best interests

Take the recent trend of playing Aaron Ramsey, a one-paced creative central midfielder, on the right of an attacking three. The manager will say it gives the Welshman a greater understanding of the game for later down his career. The same was done with powerful centre-forward Nicklas Bendtner, deployed wide. Whatever it was the Dane learned, he is now putting into practice elsewhere.

At the top, Alisher Usmanov makes all the right noises and comes stocked with a wallet to dwarf even that of Abramovich. Stan Kroenke makes no noises at all.

Having been labelled ‘that sort’ by current, ageing and forever putting his foot-in-it chairman Peter Hill Wood when the American first began buying his way into the club, Silent Stan is now the leading shareholder and none of the fans have any idea what ‘sort’ he actually is.

When someone from the club does speak out, the sound bites are the same: belief, progress, mental strength. The club even temporarily changed the motto to ‘Forward’. How ironic, then, that last season represented the biggest step backwards of this seven-year drought.

Sales: Robin van Persie is the latest big name to leave

Sales: Robin van Persie is the latest big name to leave

It’s getting tiresome, my red-tinted glasses are steaming up and my patience is at an end. Ivan Gazidis is the focus of much of the wrath, trotting out lines straight from the media training handbook.

Wenger once said he could write a book about the frustrations he experienced during the summer of 2011. So why doesn’t he No-one expects him to air his dirty laundry, just some crumbs of explanation as to why the tweaks so patently obvious to those on the outside have not been made. Only then might patience be restored.

Nothing would give me greater satisfaction than seeing Wenger on the steps of Islington town hall come late May, hands full with silverware, smile plastered across his face. My joy would be for him, not for me. It would be the perfect ‘two-fingers’ to those who doubted him. Including me.

Stuart Broad ready to put captaincy skills to the test as England eye back-to-back World Twenty20 triumphs

Broad ready to put captaincy skills to the test as England eye back-to-back triumphs

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UPDATED:

12:37 GMT, 15 September 2012

Stuart Broad believes he is ready to lead England to back-to-back ICC World Twenty20 trophies, despite his lack of experience both as England captain and a sprint format cricketer.

Broad has already acknowledged others in his squad have inevitably become more attuned to the demands of Twenty20 cricket in domestic competitions, while his opportunities have been strictly limited by a relentless Test and one-day international schedule.

Even after 16 months in the job, his CV as captain contains a sparse sample of fixtures on which to be judged – or learn his trade.

All set: Broad and the rest of the captains line up before the ICC World Twenty20

All set: Broad and the rest of the captains line up before the ICC World Twenty20

Specifically, thanks to an injury last autumn and the Spartan diet of international Twenty20s outside biennial world tournaments, Broad has captained England nine times and achieved a marginally favourable split of five wins to three losses in his eight completed matches.

He was in predictably optimistic mood, especially following England's impressive series-levelling win over South Africa on Wednesday, after disembarking in Colombo.

Broad concedes his captaincy is still developing, but is excited at the chance to follow in Paul Collingwood's steps, who became the first English skipper to win an International Cricket Council global tournament.

Asked if he feels ready for the significant challenge, he said: 'Yes, I do. I've worked very hard with the guys; the squad's been very focused on this world tournament.'

Baptism of fire: Broad is ready to put his captaincy skills to the test

Baptism of fire: Broad is ready to put his captaincy skills to the test

Time has been short, of course, and will continue to be so before England begin their warm-up campaign – against Australia, no less – on Monday.

'I've been in the job nearly 18 months, but not had more than a week in charge at a time,' he added.

'So this is a great opportunity to have a month in charge and really develop my skills as a captain and also see what the guys are like in a longer period of time.

'It's an exciting month for me, and the guys are really focused on this “World Cup”, and it's a joy to see.'

Twenty-six-year-old Broad will be put off by neither his inexperience, nor the ongoing controversy surrounding Kevin Pietersen and the possibility of his return to the England fold in time for the imminent Test tour of India.

Pleased to make your acquaintance: Broad shakes hands with Australian counterpart George Bailey

Pleased to make your acquaintance: Broad shakes hands with Australian counterpart George Bailey

The England captain also dismisses the direct relevance, in a tournament full of firepower, of his team's world No 1 status.

'I don't think form, (back in) January time, comes into it; it's all about when you get to the world tournament and you try to get your momentum here, and that's what we're looking to do.

'Rankings, when you get into a World Cup, don't mean a huge amount. You look through this World Cup, and there are five or six teams who could win it – it's really hard to choose.

'Of course, we're proud to be No 1 and proud to have won the World Cup last time. But the rankings don't mean anything when you step out on to that field.

'There are some very good teams here, some amazing players here, and we need to perform at our best.'

Andy Murray wins US Open: Brit celebrates in Central Park

This is just the beginning! Lendl backs King of New York Murray to land more Slams

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UPDATED:

15:59 GMT, 11 September 2012

Andy Murray's coach Ivan Lendl believes the 25-year-old's victory at the US Open can be the first of many grand slam triumphs in his career.

Murray claimed a thrilling five-set victory against Novak Djokovic last night in New York.

And Lendl, who like Murray lost four grand slam finals before winning his fifth, is hopeful the Britain can take his career to a new level.

Time to shine: Andy Murray celebrates his US Open final win over Novak Djokovic

Time to shine: Andy Murray celebrates his US Open final win over Novak Djokovic

Britain's Andy Murray poses with his trophy in Central Park

Andy Murray celebrates his US Open final win over Novak Djokovic

Proud mum: Murray with Judy in New York's Central Park after his final win

Proud mum: Murray with Judy in New York's Central Park after his final win

Andy Murray of Great Britain poses with the US Open Championship trophy

Andy Murray of Great Britain poses with the US Open Championship trophy

Not letting go: Murray with his US Open trophy in New York's Central Park

Lendl himself retired after winning eight major titles.

'I'm very happy for him. It's a great achievement for him and let's hope he can continue and rack up many more,' said Lendl, who joined the Murray team last December.

'You can help somebody for a very short period of time. However, it takes more than that. You cannot help somebody in one week, you cannot do that in one month and hopefully we are not anywhere near where Andy can be.'

Former British No 1 Roger Taylor, a four-time grand slam semi-finalist, believes Lendl's contribution cannot be overlooked.

The 70-year-old told Sky Sports News: 'So much confidence has come from Andy's Olympics win and Lendl has added a great presence.

Eyes on the prize: Murray with his US Open trophy following a stunning win over Djokovic

Eyes on the prize: Murray with his US Open trophy following a stunning win over Djokovic

'Andy respects him and Ivan has realised Andy needs to play closer to the baseline.

'He (Lendl) has made a great difference, he is a great character and has gelled the team together.'

Former British number one Greg Rusedski, who tasted defeat in the 1997 US Open final, believes Lendl has helped Murray to be mentally tougher.

'At the end of the day he found a way to get it done and found a way to control his emotions,' Rusedski told Sky Sports 1.

'He can thank Ivan Lendl for that. You have to give him so much credit for what he's done, to keep believing in what he's done.

Britain's Andy Murray poses with the trophy after defeating Serbia's Novak Djokovic

'It shows you what a champion he is and, having won this, he can go on to win many majors and maybe end the year as the world No 1.'

Great Britain's Davis Cup coach Leon Smith, who is also head of men's tennis at the Lawn Tennis Association and was Murray's first coach of his professional career, knew from an early age the Scot had the talent to go all the way in a grand slam.

Smith told BBC Radio Five Live: 'I'm so pleased for Andy, because knowing him you see how much work he's put in, not just this year but over the years.

'He's really worked so hard, physically and mentally to get his game to this level.'

Britain's Andy Murray poses with the trophy after defeating Serbia's Novak Djokovic

Sheer relief: Murray celebrates winning the US Open after a enthralling battle with Djokovic

Sheer relief: Murray celebrates winning the US Open after a enthralling battle with Djokovic

Roger Draper, chief executive of the LTA, believes the win caps a remarkable year for Murray, with the triumph coming off the back of victory over Roger Federer to win Olympic gold at Wimbledon.

Draper said: 'We are really proud of Andy and what he has achieved. We see the hard work that he puts in day in and day out. It's a fantastic achievement for Andy.

'To win Olympic gold, to beat the greatest tennis player on Centre Court, to then win the silver with Laura Robson and then again to go out and be the first British man in 76 years to win a grand slam has been a phenomenal achievement.'

It was Murray's first win in five grand slam finals, and Miles Maclagan, who was Murray's coach between 2008 and 2010, believes the setbacks had prepared Murray for the closing moments of his US Open win.

'Towards the end he was quite calm,' Maclagan said. 'I think he was ready for it. He had experience of four finals before so he knows what went wrong and what went right. He knew what he had to do and he was ready to do it.'

Sheer relief: Murray celebrates winning the US Open after a enthralling battle with Djokovic


Battle to the end: Both players were at their very bast in New York as the match went all the way

Battle to the end: Both players were at their very bast in New York as the match went all the way

Battle to the end: Both players were at their very bast in New York as the match went all the way

Party time: Murray's mum Judy and girlfriend Kim Sears celebrate his win in New York

Party time: Murray's mum Judy and girlfriend Kim Sears celebrate his win in New York

Team Murray: Coach Ivan Lendl (left) and hitting partner Daniel Vallverdu watch their charge in the final

Team Murray: Coach Ivan Lendl (left) and hitting partner Daniel Vallverdu watch their charge in the final

Nick Watney wins Barclays as Sergio Garcia fades

Garcia blows lead as Watney gives Love plenty to ponder ahead of Ryder Cup

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UPDATED:

22:34 GMT, 26 August 2012

Nick Watney staked a late claim for a place on the United States Ryder Cup team as he took advantage of a bad day for Sergio Garcia to carry off the title at The Barclays.

The 31-year-old has endured a poor year on tour but put that behind him to register a three-shot victory after a closing 69, with fellow American Brandt Snedeker in second place at Bethpage State Park, Farmingdale.

Garcia was seeking back-to-back triumphs after winning at the Wyndham Championship last Monday, but he went from the top of the leaderboard at the start of the day to a tie for third alongside Dustin Johnson after a four-over 75.

Main man: Nick Watney celebrates with the trophy at The Barclays

Main man: Nick Watney celebrates with the trophy at The Barclays

US captain Davis Love III is due to name his 12 on September 4 for the match against Europe at Medinah, starting on September 28.

Mo Farah hopes for future success on track

More Mobots to come! Farah promises future track glory before turning attention to marathons

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UPDATED:

19:20 GMT, 20 August 2012

Britain's double Olympic champion Mo Farah still has plenty more he would like to achieve on the track before turning his attention to competing in marathons.

Farah became one of London 2012's biggest success stories after capturing gold in the 10,000 metres before returning a week later to emerge victorious in the 5,000m.

Those triumphs are the jewels in a collection that go alongside his long distance double at the European Championships in Barcelona in 2010 as well as the two medals he won at last year's World Championships in Daegu.

More to come: Mo Farah hopes to win more medals on the track before competing in marathons

More to come: Mo Farah hopes to win more medals on the track before competing in marathons

But any thoughts of resting on his laurels are dismissed by the 29-year-old, who revealed he would relish participating on the track at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

'I've still got a long way to go, there are always more things to achieve and when everything's going well, it's good to get as many gold medals as you can,' he said.

'I feel like I would like to carry on on the track and then after that go on the road.

'I've never won a title at a Commonwealth Games so it would be good to have another win.

'You can't have too many medals, you've got to take what you can.'

Farah, however, makes no secret of his aim to eventually make the switch to marathon running but added much will depend on the advice of his coach Alberto Salazar.

You've done it: Farah took gold in the 5,000 and 10,000m at the Olympics

You've done it: Farah took gold in the 5,000 and 10,000m at the Olympics

The Cuban – who was a successful long-distance runner in his prime, winning the New York marathon for three successive years from 1980 – has made a great impact on Farah, who has described Salazar as a 'genius'.

But the Londoner is a driven individual and is determined to push himself to his limits.

'It's definitely true, I'll definitely be stepping up to the marathon at some point but I've not decided when yet,” said Farah, who will perhaps be testing the waters when he runs a half-marathon in the Great North Run on September 16.

'We'll just have to wait and see what the coach says – he hasn't said much.

'He's said to take it one race at a time, see how it goes, see how we recover and then go into next year.

'I'm always wanting to try new events and test myself to see what I can do.'

While Farah is still hungry to add to his medal haul over the next few years, he admitted becoming just the seventh man to win the long-distance Olympic double in London will take some beating.

'To have the Olympics in your hometown was the dream,' he said. 'It's exciting, being a London man and growing up here and winning two gold medals at the Olympics means a lot.

A couple more Farah hopes to add to his two Olympic gold medals

A couple more Farah hopes to add to his two Olympic gold medals

'There's nothing out there that means more than an Olympic medal unless I can became an Olympic champion at a different event.'

Farah was speaking as part of the nationwide grassroots Join In campaign, which aims to encourage new participants to harness their enthusiasm for sport off the back of the successful Olympic Games.

'We're trying to get as many volunteers as we can for the clubs; it could be a rowing club, it could be a football club it could be anything,' Farah said.

'If we can just give the kids enough support then hopefully they'll get involved.

'When I was younger, I got motivated by footballers and seeing football on TV so having the Olympics here has helped a lot.

'I hope we can inspire the next generation and teach them hard work and dedication.'

Unsurprisingly, Farah has become a much heralded figure after capturing his second goal medal in the 5,000m on the final day of the Games, with his celebration – the 'Mobot' – taking the nation by storm.

Asked if he has adapted to his new status, he added: 'Yeah it's sunk in, I've just been chilling out and relaxing.

'I haven't really done much. I've been all over the place doing media stuff and shows.'

Proud: Farah celebrated with his family at the Olympic Park after taking gold

Proud: Farah celebrated with his family at the Olympic Park after taking gold

London 2012 Olympics: Shanaze Reade back on track

Reade is back on track! BMX star promises to end her four-year hurt

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UPDATED:

22:09 GMT, 7 August 2012

Olympics 2012

The concept behind Sportsmail's Magnificent 7 was that we would follow the sporting and personal development of young people as they strove to realise their dreams at these London Games.

On the pages of this newspaper over the course of seven years, we would cheer their triumphs and feel their pain in defeat, laugh with them, cry with them and reach the defining moment of their careers caring for their welfare.

Handling it: Shanaze Reade has dealt with the despair of Beijing and is ready to prove her doubters wrong

Handling it: Shanaze Reade has dealt with the despair of Beijing and is ready to prove her doubters wrong

In the journey of Shanaze Reade, the emotions have been more raw than most. Here was a girl who was born to triumph, yet in Beijing when her world temporarily collapsed in on itself, it felt as if she scraped all of our faces along the asphalt BMX track when she crashed out in pursuit of glory.

Today the path to Olympic redemption begins. The 23-year-old from the terraced streets of Crewe takes her place in qualifying for the women’s BMX and Friday’s final.

Reade knows that four years of hurt can be wiped away by claiming a gold medal which many thought would be hers in Beijing, until an uncharacteristically slow start left her trailing France’s Anne-Caroline Chausson.

She then had a decision to make — settle for silver or risk all for gold on the final bend. True to herself, she chose the latter option, but tumbled to the Tarmac and ended up in tears. Barring the tears, she promises to take the same course on the track on which she won the Olympic test event.

Reade said: ‘It comes with your personality. In anything I do, I train to be the best that I can be. If that is fifth on the day, I will still try my absolute best.

Wheely disappointed: Reade's Olympic hope was run off the road in Beijing four years ago

Wheely disappointed: Reade's Olympic hope was run off the road in Beijing four years ago

‘For the last four years solid I’ve worked so hard to try to achieve my goal. If it presents itself and there’s an opportunity to go for gold, if I’m in second position then, yes, I’ll go for it.

‘After the last Games I had a love-hate relationship with the Olympics. Coming into this one it just feels more normal and relaxed, but the Olympic title is the piece that’s missing.

‘I’ve won the World Championship, I’ve won the Europeans, I’ve won all these races but I’ve not won the Olympic Games. That’s what keeps the fires burning all the time for me.

On track: Reade is ready to ride

On track: Reade is ready to ride

‘I can sit here and say it was the best thing to happen in Beijing to not win the Olympics because it gave me the rules of how to be an Olympic champion. Four years on I’ve matured, I’ve experienced a lot more and I’m ready now to take on the challenge of being the Olympic champion and everything that comes with it.’

Brave words which, if true, are testament to those around Reade. Namely her coach Grant White, British Cycling’s genius of a sports psychologist Steve Peters and, most importantly, her family, for reining in the spirits of a teenager who was emotionally crushed by her Beijing experience.

When she returned to Britain, she sought refuge in a makeshift gym her grandad Mick put together in the extraordinary outhouse which housed South American breeding parrots, iguanas and tarantulas.

It was there that she pieced together her broken heart and rekindled the desire to succeed as she always has — by winning races.

Gradually she began to understand her 2008 failure and recognise the mistakes of a teenager.

She added: ‘Naturally I’ve matured with age. When I got back I assessed what went wrong and why it went wrong and what I needed to do to be a better athlete and to win this Olympics.

'I thought I was mature enough at the last one when I was there. But I stepped away from it and thought, “No, you’ve got a lot of growing up to do”.

‘So I got all the people around me in Team Reade, all the people that I fully believed in and who fully believed in me and who I knew would be honest. They told me some home truths that I needed to know and I vented some as well.

‘I’ve kept my eye on everything that’s going on in this Olympics but I’ve enjoyed it. Like Saturday night when Mo Farah was on. We opened the door on the balcony, we had the TV on mute because Victoria Pendleton was in bed and we could just hear the roar of the crowd even though we were quite far away from the stadium.

High hopes: Reade's bid for glory starts in the shadow on the velodrome on Wednesday

High hopes: Reade's bid for glory starts in the shadow on the velodrome on Wednesday

‘In Beijing it was different. Other athletes succeeding put a lot of pressure on me. I shared a room with Wendy Houvenaghel and Rebecca Romero of the track pursuit team and Vicky. I was like, “Oh God, it’s my turn next” and I felt a lot of pressure and stress to perform.

‘But this time around I think, “Why look at it that way Why not look at it and think, these girls can do it, why can’t I I’m sharing an apartment with them, I’ve trained just as hard to win my event so I want to win just as much as they have”.’

We want you to as well, Shanaze, and, as for the past seven years, we will be there with you.

Celtic want Rangers stripped of titles

Moral victory! Celtic boss Lennon wants Rangers to be stripped of silverware

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UPDATED:

00:09 GMT, 19 July 2012

Neil Lennon has reiterated his call for Rangers to be stripped of cups and titles if found guilty of breaking strict registration rules.

The Celtic boss said he would consider it 'a moral victory' – and, although he wouldn’t want the medals he would have lost out on retrospectively, he claimed the recognition would be ‘enough’.

The SPL have set up a commission which will shortly investigate and, if necessary, punish the alleged wrongful registration of players who were signed to the Ibrox club between 2001 and 2009.

It never happened: Celtic manager Neil Lennon wants Rangers stripped of the title they won during the period under investigation, including this one in 2003

It never happened: Celtic manager Neil Lennon wants Rangers stripped of the title they won during the period under investigation, including this one in 2003

Both SFA and SPL rules clearly state that all remuneration a player receives for playing must be logged with them.

Rangers are said to have excluded payments made into Employee Benefit Trusts (EBTs) during that period from contracts — the basis for the so-called big tax case, the outcome of which has yet to be known.

If found guilty, the Ibrox club could be stripped of the leagues they won in 2003, 2005, 2009, 2010 and 2011 as well as their Scottish Cup triumphs of 2002, 2003, 2008 and 2009.

The record books could change to show Celtic, who finished second, were rightful champions while the Parkhead side, Dundee, Queen of the South and Falkirk, who lost the finals, could be awarded the cup wins.

In the event of Rangers being found guilty, Lennon believes the rewriting of the history books will be the only appropriate thing to do.

Up for a cup: Neil Lennon

Up for a cup: Neil Lennon

‘I will see what the commission finds and, if they are found to have broken the rules, then they should be stripped of their titles,’ he said.

‘It will not change what has gone on in the past but I suppose there will be a sort of moral victory in that respect.

‘It is not going to change my life now, by any stretch of the imagination, but it would be good to be changed for historical reference.

‘I can’t get that title or feeling back and it won’t make a huge dent on my life from here on in. It would be a lot better on my CV, though. I wouldn’t want the medals, just the recognition. That would be enough.’

Asked if the team who finished second or who lost the final should be retrospectively declared the winners as opposed to the tournament being declared null and void, Lennon replied: ‘Yes. At that time, though, it might have cost players contracts, bonuses, managers their jobs and might have relegated teams.

‘There are so many ripple effects to it. Again, you go back to the integrity of the game, was it there If not, then it should be investigated. That is all we ask for. We are in the game for the glory and then the money comes with it.

‘The more successful you are, the more money you get but when you are a kid growing up all you want to do is to play football for a big club and to win things. That never changes.’