Tag Archives: trials

Bradley Wiggins turns back on second Tour de France title to support Chris Froome

Wiggins stuns fans by turning back on Tour de France defence to support Froome after nightmare route is unveiled

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UPDATED:

12:11 GMT, 24 October 2012

Reigning champion Bradley Wiggins has turned his back on a second Tour de France title after agreeing to support Chris Froome's bid for glory.

The move marks a role reversal for the Team Sky team-mates after Froome played a key part in Wiggins' historic victory in July.

Look says it all: Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome watch the 2013 route presentation

Look says it all: Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome watch the 2013 route presentation

Rivals: Andy Schleck, Alberto Contador and Bradley Wiggins

Rivals: Andy Schleck, Alberto Contador and Bradley Wiggins

Wiggins has set his sights on winning the Giro d’Italia next year as he attempts to secure all three Grand Tour titles.

Speaking at Wednesday's 2013 route announcement, Wiggins said: 'It's more than likely I'll be there in a helping capacity. For me it was about winning one Tour. I want to win the Giro.'

The 32-year-old became the first
Briton to win the Tour this summer when he beat Froome to the yellow jersey.

This year's race suited Wiggins'
time-trial prowess but next year's event, which starts for the first
time in Corsica, is apparently more mountainous which would not favour
the Briton but instead the likes of Alberto Contador.

Enlarge

The 2013 Tour de France route

The 2013 Tour de France route

the 2013 cycling classic Tour de France route

The Tour – the first since lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven titles – will end on the Champs-Elysees at night, organisers confirmed.

Tour director Christian Prudhomme revealed a 3,360-kilometre, 21-stage route, which takes place entirely in France, beginning on Corsica on June 21 and finishing under floodlights on the most famous boulevard in Paris on July 21.

Organisers made a decision to shorten
the combined length of the race's two individual time trials in part as
a response to the domination in this year's tour by champion Wiggins.

The 65 kilometers (40 miles) of time
trials split evenly between the 11th and 17th stages is almost 40
kilometers (25 miles) less than in the 2012 Tour, which could play into
Olympic time trial champion Wiggins' decision to focus instead on the
Giro d'Italia.

The first individual time trail on July 10 finishes against the backdrop of the Mont Saint-Michel monestary.

Line up: (l to r) Bradley Wiggins, Cadel Evans, Mark Cavendish, Philippe Gilbert, Tejay van Garderen, Chris Froome and Alberto Contador

The contenders: (l to r) Bradley Wiggins, Cadel Evans, Mark Cavendish, Philippe Gilbert, Tejay van Garderen, Chris Froome and Alberto Contador

Main man: Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme

Main man: Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme

Organisers have given sprinters like Mark Cavendish a gift – the June 29 stage finish in Bastia is the first time since 1966 that a sprinter can hope to wear the yellow jersey after the first stage, Prudhomme said.

The traditional Bastille Day stage on July 14 is the race's longest at 242 kilometers (150 miles), ending with the 20.8-kilometer (13-mile) ascent of Mont Ventoux, one of cycling's most mythical climbs.

In another first for the race, which has only stopped for the two world wars since the first Tour in 1903, riders will begin the final stage on July 21 inside the grounds of the Versailles Palace. With the sprawling 17th-century chateau as a backdrop to the race start, 'It's going to be a knockout,' Prudhomme said.

The last stage will start later in the day than traditionally and timed for a finish at about 9 p.m., while there is still enough light to ensure riders' safety, Prudhomme said.

'We wanted the finish of the 100th Tour winner to be unique,' Prudhomme said.

In another change to tradition, the eight laps of the Champs Elysees will send riders all the way around the giant Arc de Triomphe arch at the top of the grand avenue, rather than just passing in front of it as in past years.

Armstrong finished on the top of the podium in a record seven Tours from 1999 to 2005 but was subject to a United States Anti-Doping Agency investigation and stripped of his titles and banned for life.

The UCI, cycling's world governing body, ratified the sanctions on Monday.

Debbie Dunn hit with two-year doping ban

American athlete Dunn hit with two-year ban after positive drug test

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UPDATED:

23:02 GMT, 11 September 2012

American 400 metres runner Debbie Dunn has accepted a two-year doping ban.

The 34-year-old, who was world indoor champion in 2010, tested positive for an anabolic agent at the US Olympic team trials in June.

She withdrew from the US 4x400m relay team for the Olympics before the Games after returning a positive test for testosterone/epitestosterone.

Punished: Debbie Dunn has been hit with a two-year doping ban

Punished: Debbie Dunn has been hit with a two-year doping ban

Dunn's suspension began on August 1, 2012, the date she accepted a provisional suspension.

The United States Anti-Doping Agency said: 'As a result of the sanction, Dunn has been disqualified from all competitive results achieved on and subsequent to June 22, 2012, the date the US Olympic team trials began, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.'

Zara Phillips high hopes for Black Tuxedo at Blenheim

The biggest test yet for Black Tuxedo, Zara's star in the making

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UPDATED:

13:00 GMT, 9 September 2012

Suits you: Zara Phillips on Black Tuxedo

Suits you: Zara Phillips on Black Tuxedo

Two days before she parades as one of Britain's medal-winning Olympians, Zara Phillips was competing at the Blenheim Horse Trials on the horse she hopes will bring her more glory.

Phillips hopes Black Tuxedo, bought from New Zealand at the end of last year, will be a successor to Toytown, her world and European champion, and High Kingdom, on whom she won Olympic team silver last month at London 2012.

However, the combination are lying
37th out of 70 competitors after the dressage and showumping phases
before the final cross-country stage on Sunday.

Andrew Nicholson, on a high after his
superb victory at Land Burghley and the inexperienced Quimbo have a
lead of just four penalties over Piggy French who missed the Olympics
after both her selected rides went lame – and West Side.

William Fox-Pitt, who last month won
silver as part of Britain's Olympic eventing team, is in the lead at the
Fidelity Blenheim Palace International Horse Trials in Oxfordshire.

He leads former double Olympic champion Mark Todd by three penalty points going into the final day.

London 2012 Olympics: Phillips Idowu crashes out of triple jump

Idowu saga ends with a whimper as Brit crashes out of triple jump at the first stage

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UPDATED:

10:37 GMT, 7 August 2012

Phillips Idowu's brief appearance at the London Olympics is over as quickly as it began after the British triple jumper crashed out of his home Games in the qualifying stage.

Idowu, suffering from a trapped nerve, only arrived at the athletes' village on Sunday shrouded in mystery and amid a row with UK Athletics chief Charles van Commenee.

The former world champion, born in Hackney, could only manage 16.53m with his third and final jump of the morning, leaving him outside the top 12 and short of the distance needed to qualify for the final.

The pits: Phillips Idowu competes in the men's triple jump at the Olympic Stadium on Tuesday

The pits: Phillips Idowu competes in the men's triple jump at the Olympic Stadium on Tuesday

Falling short: Idowu jumps in London

Falling short: Idowu jumps in London

There had been frenzied speculation
over the Beijing silver medallist's fitness following his late
withdrawal from the Olympic trials and last month's London Grand Prix,
when he pulled out just 25 minutes before the competition was due to
start.

Despite his late arrival into the
athletes village, Idowu claimed that for the last few weeks he has
simply been in his home city of London, finalising his preparation and
receiving treatment, easily reachable by the 'appropriate people'.

In contrast, UK Athletics head coach
Van Commenee said last week he was perplexed that Idowu had turned his
back on UKA and his own coach Aston Moore, who had only received a brief
text before Idowu cut off contact.

Idowu needed to jump 17.10m to qualify automatically for Thursday's final.

More to follow.

The game's up: Idowu knows his jump is not good enough to carry him into the final

The game's up: Idowu knows his jump is not good enough to carry him into the final

London 2012 Olympics: Jesse Williams goes for high jump gold… then he"ll live the high life

Williams goes for high jump gold… then he'll live the high life

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UPDATED:

22:14 GMT, 6 August 2012

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Jesse Williams is the world high jump champion who hopes to beat Great Britain’s European champion Robbie Grabarz to Olympic gold in London.

The 28-year-old lives life to the full. He nearly didn’t qualify for the Games after coming fourth in the US Olympic trials on his home track in Eugene, Oregon, only making the team because the third-placed athlete, Nick Ross, had not jumped the ‘A’ qualifying standard.

Sportsmail columnist and double Olympic champion Daley Thompson sat down with this ‘social butterfly’ to find out what makes him tick — and how he’s hoping to find more than just a gold medal in London…

Daley Thompson: So, Jesse, explain to me what happened at the US trials.

Jesse Williams: It was very dramatic. I went in with very high expectations but — and I haven’t said this before — I was playing basketball and I rolled my ankle a week before. It wasn’t a bad sprain but it was my take-off foot and it was significant enough to affect my mental side.

Going for gold: Jesse Williams

Going for gold: Jesse Williams

Thompson: Why on earth were you playing basketball a week before the most important date of your life

Williams: I live life to the fullest, man. Last year I played basketball the week before the US champs. I just feel good after it. I’m at a point in my career where I shouldn’t be doing things like that but, at the same time, I think it’s helped me get to where I am. You got to pick your battles, of course. There’s not going to be any basketball before the Games — although I might see LeBron James and see if he’ll shoot around a little bit.

Thompson: At the trials, was that the most pressure you’ve been under in a competition

Williams: Yes, definitely. I feel like this is my year to get things done. Everything’s been going so well — it would have been a disaster for me not to make the Olympic team. That was another thing at the trials: because of the rain I changed who I was. I have to figure out how not to do that. Of course I want great weather in London but I’m expecting torrential downpours, because you have to. We have the technology, these things called spikes on our shoes, and I just need to be able to trust it. If I can do that, nothing’s going to go wrong.

Thompson: How are you at dealing with the run-up to a big competition Some people don’t like being in the Village and seeing all their competitors and stuff.

Williams: I’m kind of a social butterfly and I’m recently single so…

Social butterfly: Williams

Social butterfly: Williams

Thompson: Shall we put that in big letters

Williams: Yes! I look at everything that walks by. I want to enjoy London. I feel like in Beijing I was a little too cooped up. Our training camp was far away and it was boring. I want this to be a memorable experience from start to finish. Of course I aspire to win but I just want to have fun with it.
Thompson: What do you know about our guy, Robbie Grabarz

Williams: I met him a few years ago when we were jumping at Crystal Palace. He’s a really cool guy. He’s European champ now and every time I know he’s jumping I look out for his results. He’s going to be the guy to beat, I think.

Thompson: You think so

Williams: Definitely. He looks unbelievable right now. He’s in his own country and the medal counts from the host country always go up a dramatic amount. He’s going to be ready to jump and that crowd’s going to help him jump high.

Thompson: What kind of height do you think is going to win it Assuming the weather’s good, of course.

Williams: I’m a student of the sport. I know the results from years past from a long time. Atlanta ’96 is definitely the best Olympics the high jump has ever seen and this year could top it. There are a number of guys who could jump 2.40 metres. The Olympic record is 2.39m. Charles Austin’s record isn’t safe, that’s for sure, but I think it’s going to take at least a 2.37m or 2.38m bar to win it. It could even be 2.36m to medal.

Thompson: Robbie’s going to his first Olympics. You went to Beijing four years ago. What kind of things can get in a new guy’s way

Williams: I was just in awe of being an Olympian. I take pride in my country and it was always my goal to make an Olympic team. I feel like I’ve grown up a lot since then. I’m there to win now. Last time I thought I had an outside shot of a medal, but I didn’t even make the finals. I know it’s very realistic that I could bring home the gold medal and, when I’m confident, that’s when I do my best. This is what I’ve been looking forward to since I won the World Championships last year.

Rival: Robbie Grabarz

Rival: Robbie Grabarz

Thompson: Definitely. The Olympics is the greatest place on earth.

Williams: My family is from New Zealand and they’ve always been sports fans, so I grew up watching the Olympic Games from start to finish. I was at the ’84 Olympics. I was six months old and my parents took me. I’ve got pictures of me as a baby in the stadium. The first one I really remember is Barcelona in ’92. The US had some good high jumpers and Javier Sotomayor (who still holds the world record, 2.45m) ended up winning. I was just in awe of those guys.

Thompson: Did that inspire you to become a high jumper

Williams: Yes. But since I was young, I could just jump. I just had this thing for the high jump because I always wanted to test my limits, so it was just the perfect event for me. You feel like you can do anything when you’re jumping well. It’s an awesome feeling. It’s about timing it and doing it at the Games, that’s for sure.

Usain Bolt will win 100m final – London 2012 Olympics

Don't believe the hype… Usain is fit and ready to extend his 100m reign

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 3 August 2012

Prepare to be astonished! Usain Bolt is in town, fit and ready to go and determined to achieve his sole aim for these Games of becoming a legend.

'I am here to win, same as Beijing,' said the fastest man on the planet and I cannot see any other result.

Nobody in the history of sprinting has been where Usain Bolt has. None of his rivals know what it is to run 100 metres faster than 9.6sec. None can contemplate covering the length of a straight in 41 strides. For them it is physically impossible. So why would anybody else win the 100m on Sunday evening

Picture perfect: Bolt's image is projected on to The House of Commons in honour of the sprint star

Picture perfect: Bolt's image is projected on to The House of Commons in honour of the sprint star

Yes, he has been beaten by his training partner Yohan Blake in the Jamaican Olympic trials but that was the Jamaican Olympic trials. Bolt only had to finish in the first three to qualify for the team. It is the Olympics that motivate him.

Yes, he has admitted to slight injuries during this summer but they were not so significant that he was prevented from running 9.76sec and only three men have run faster. Ever.

And in spite of those injuries he has run three of the five fastest 100s this year. And, yes, we all know that Blake and Asafa Powell, his compatriots, and Tyson Gay and Justin Gatlin, the Americans, are faster starters.

Wave your flag: Bolt (right) is favourite to win the 100m despite his injury problems

Wave your flag: Bolt (right) is favourite to win the 100m despite his injury problems

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But almost everybody in the field is a faster starter. They were faster starters in 2008 and 2009, and Bolt destroyed them.

Bolt will never be great out of the blocks. His legs are too long. There is not the short, explosive power that there is in the shorter legs of others. But coach Glen Mills has come up with an answer to that.

'You weren't a good starter in Beijing, and you broke the world record. You weren't any better in Berlin and you broke it again. You will never be a great starter but you can still break world records,' is Mills's pragmatic philosophy.

False start: The Jamaican superstar was disqualified at the 2011 World Championships in Daegu

False start: The Jamaican superstar was disqualified at the 2011 World Championships in Daegu

So Blake, and Gay and Gatlin cannot win the 100m. Bolt has to lose it. He could do that at the start – he did in the World Championships in Daegu when he was disqualified. He can do it here if he comes out sluggishly and gives Blake or Gay or Gatlin too much of a lead.

Blake has his supporters but his best is only 9.75sec. Bolt has only to run as fast as he has to win. Can Bolt run as quick again Certainly, and probably faster.

He is stronger now than three years ago and refined by the intervening time under the tutelage of Mills.

The competitiveness of Blake at training has also persuaded him to go easy on the Guinness and chicken nuggets, to shut down the video games before midnight and leave chatting up the ladies in the Athletes' Village until the 100 is done.

He is that much closer to being the complete sprinter. He can run inside 9.5 tomorrow. He will emerge a legend, not a loser.

Olympic kings

Wiggins bullish about gold medal hopes ahead of mouthwatering time-trial

Wiggins bullish about gold medal hopes ahead of mouthwatering time-trial

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UPDATED:

14:50 GMT, 31 July 2012

Olympics 2012

Bradley Wiggins hopes to carry his Tour de France-winning form into Wednesday's London 2012 time-trial as he seeks a fourth Olympic gold and a British record seventh Games medal.

The 32-year-old Londoner on July 22 became the first British winner of the Tour's yellow jersey, the victory owing much to his proficiency against the clock as he won the stage nine and stage 19 time-trials by significant margins.

Wiggins does not believe the Tour or Saturday's 250-kilometre road race, in which he worked tirelessly and fruitlessly in support of Mark Cavendish, will have an impact on his individual bid to overtake Sir Steve Redgrave as the British Olympian with the most medals.

Raring to go: Bradley Wiggins took part in a recce of the time-trial course on Tuesday

Raring to go: Bradley Wiggins took part in a recce of the time-trial course on Tuesday

'The Tour is such a good boot camp for this,' said Wiggins ahead of the 44km test, where he will be seeking to become the first man to win the Tour and Olympic gold in the same year.

'This is going be a piece of p*** now compared to that. It's just an hour and not three weeks. It's been the best preparation. That's the baseline of worst-case scenario of pressure and expectation, with three weeks lying ahead of you. And we handled that pretty well, so an hour time-trial to make history should be a doddle.'

Wiggins, whose first assessment of the 44km Hampton Court route took place yesterday, believes his 53.5km stage 19 win in Chartres, which all-but confirmed his Tour triumph, was the best performance against the clock of his career.

Wait for me: Team GB rider Chris Froome warms up with Wiggins at Hampton Court

Wait for me: Team GB rider Chris Froome warms up with Wiggins at Hampton Court

Focus: Wiggins is confident that he can finish on top and take gold

Focus: Wiggins is confident that he can finish on top and take gold

'The benchmark is there from Chartres,' he added. 'Nothing is going to change from that performance. I have 100 per cent faith in the training Tim (Kerrison, the Team Sky coach) has set me.

'I've done enough now to realise that it is not all suddenly going to collapse on Tuesday night and that I'm going to be a pile of s*** on Wednesday. My performances have been so consistent all year and I've no reason to think that is going to change.'

Wiggins enhanced his hold on the maillot jaune with victory on stage nine, a 41.5km race against the clock, by 35 seconds from Team Sky colleague and fellow Briton Chris Froome.

Froome was again second in Chartres, by a considerable margin of 1min 16secs, but should be in medal contention with Wiggins.

Defending Olympic champion Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland and world champion Tony Martin of Germany had departed the Tour by that stage, but were handsomely beaten in Besancon earlier in the race.

Good luck, pal: A soldier takes a glance at Bradley Wiggins at Hampton Court

Good luck, pal: A soldier takes a glance at Bradley Wiggins at Hampton Court

Cancellara crashed during the opening day's road race and will ride through the pain barrier, while Martin withdrew from the Tour with a wrist injury which he is still nursing. Wiggins, who was second to Martin in Copenhagen last September, is unconcerned about his rivals, though.

The three-time Olympic track champion said: 'The main thing is that I am on track and that is really all that matters. “I'll just go out there and do the performance – I have done so well all year in time-trials – and see if you are good enough on the day. I can't predict what they are going to do.'

Australia's Michael Rogers is another potential rival for Wiggins, while Taylor Phinney of the United States is also set to be in medal contention. The 22-year-old has pedigree. He is the son of Connie Carpenter-Phinney, who won road race gold in Los Angeles in 1984, and Davis Phinney, who won bronze in the equivalent men's event at the same Games.

Phinney, who has won world individual pursuit titles on the track, said: 'I am confident in my ability in the time-trial.'

London 2012 Olympics: Usain Bolt admits to injury

Yes I had injury but I am ready to defend sprint titles in London, says Bolt

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UPDATED:

22:36 GMT, 26 July 2012

Usain Bolt has admitted he has been carrying injuries that have affected his performance.

Following Sportsmail's exclusive pictures that showed the triple Olympic champion enduring an agonising stretching routine during training, Bolt conceded that a bad back had been causing him hamstring problems.

Thumbs up: Bolt has conceded he was carrying an injury but says he is ready to race in London

Thumbs up: Bolt has conceded he was carrying an injury but says he is ready to race in London

Thumbs up: Bolt has conceded he was carrying an injury but says he is ready to race in London

But the 100 metres world record holder, who will carry Jamaica's flag in the opening ceremony, insisted he is fit to defend his titles.

'I've had some slight problems but I'm ready to go. It's fixed now,' said Bolt, who was beaten in the Jamaican Olympic trials by his training partner Yohan Blake and then missed a race in Monaco this month.

'My fitness at the trials was all right but I wasn't at my best. For me it's all about getting it right on the day. I'm all right.'

Hats your lot: Bolt looked relaxed as he talked talked at a Jamaica press conference

Hats your lot: Bolt looked relaxed as he talked talked at a Jamaica press conference

Hats your lot: Bolt looked relaxed as he talked talked at a Jamaica press conference

London 2012 Olympics: Bradley Wiggins going for gold

I'll be fresh for London, roars Wiggins as Tour hero eyes Olympic gold

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 23 July 2012

Olympics 2012

There was precious little time to dwell on the enormity of his achievement for Bradley Wiggins on Monday. Not with a fourth Olympic gold medal to chase eight days from now in the Olympic road time trial.

What is termed in cycling as the race of truth was the foundation stone of Wiggins’ Tour de France triumph. It is so called because there can be no hiding in the peloton, sheltered against the wind by teammates or towed up mountain passes by pacemakers. It is simply man against the clock, each riding alone, with whoever comes home in the fastest time declared as the winner.

Wiggins has excelled in the discipline since he began cycling although his three previous Olympic golds were won in a velodrome over just 2.5 miles which took under four minutes to complete for the team time trial, just over for the individual event in which he was victorious in Athens and Beijing.

No rest for the wicked: Wiggins was back on his bike on Monday in the UK

No rest for the wicked: Wiggins was back on his bike on Monday in the UK

Until this year, road time trials have been another matter. Next Wednesday afternoon, starting and finishing at Hampton Court Palace, the Olympic course is over 27.5 miles, a distance at which Wiggins has been competitive in recent years but not dominant as he was on the track.

Simply put, Fabian Cancellara and Tony Martin – between them world champions in five of the past six years in the discipline – have been faster.

That all changed last winter with another example of meticulous planning by Team Sky Performance Analyst Tim Kerrison and of Wiggins’ determination to become Britain’s first-ever Tour de France winner.

Through the mysterious workings of cadence, torque and rolling resistance, Wiggins found another gear – literally.

Wiggins said: ‘A year ago when I was
beaten by Tony (Martin) at the world championships by quite a way, I
thought I was probably just going to get a medal at the Olympics, but 12
months on I’ve closed the gap now if not surpassed it. It’s going to be
another tough race, but a very realistic chance of gold.

Happy to chat: Wiggins poses for a picture with a fellow cyclist

Happy to chat: Wiggins poses for a picture with a fellow cyclist

‘Tim said: “I think we can close the gap.” We started training and we were doing a lot of different, non-traditional stuff. It was much more like the track stuff and we started physically working the machine to get to the point in July when we could ride like this in the Tour. That’s made the difference, ultimately, between now and the Brad Wiggins of 2010 who tried to do it himself.’

Before the challenge of the time trial, Wiggins has pledged to ride all out for Mark Cavendish in Saturday’s Olympic road race around Surrey. Just as the yellow jersey wearer led out Cavendish for Sunday’s final Tour stage victory on the Champs-Elysees, he is committed to ensuring another sprint finish to capitalise on Cavendish’s standing as the fastest man in the world of road cycling rather than conserve energy for the time trial four days later.

Wiggins added: ‘I’ve just done a world
class time trial on Saturday, averaging a ridiculous amount of power
after three weeks of bike racing and two really tough Pyrenees stages
and physically not a lot’s going to change in the next week. If
anything, I’m going to be fresher.

Brit special: Wiggins celebrates his win in the Tour de France on Sunday

Brit special: Wiggins celebrates his win in the Tour de France on Sunday

'And once you start thinking in those terms, that you’re so fit and you’ve trained for the demands of three weeks and you’ve actually got three days off in between the road race and the time trial, it shouldn’t be a problem.’

One tiny cloud drifted on to Wiggins’ horizon from France with the news that next year’s Tour de France route will be aimed more at his weaknesses than his strengths. The Tour organisers are already devising a route for the 100th running of the race which is more mountainous than the one Wiggins conquered over the past three weeks.

Tour director Christian Prudhomme said: ‘The one thing I can tell you is that the 2013 Tour will favour the climbers a lot more than this year’s route did. Whatever we decide, there will be more stages with summit finishes.’

With only one individual time trial, as opposed to this year’s two, likely to be planned, Wiggins’ may struggle to hold on to any advantage gained when the race reaches the Alps and the Pyrenees. Team Sky could therefore elect to favour Chris Froome, a more natural climber, as its team leader with Wiggins supporting him.

London 2012 Olympics: Philips Idowu injury worry as he pulls out of training camp

Injury worry for Idowu as Team GB triple jump medal hope pulls out of training camp

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UPDATED:

16:30 GMT, 23 July 2012

Olympics 2012

Phillips Idowu's participation at London 2012 has been thrown into further doubt after he pulled out of Team GB's warm-weather training camp in Portugal.

The 33-year-old Beijing silver medallist has not competed since injuring his foot when he landed awkwardly in a triple jump competition in Oregon on June 2.

He has subsequently pulled out the Olympic trials in Birmingham and also the Diamond League meet at Crystal Palace just moments before he was due to compete, saying he had felt tightness in his left hip during the warm-up.

Exit: Idowu has pulled out of the warm weather camp in Portugal

Exit: Idowu has pulled out of the warm weather camp in Portugal

Idowu has avoided making any concrete statement on his fitness, preferring to keep those outside his circle, including UK Athletics head coach Charles Van Commenee in the dark.

Sportsmail told how he began using his own doctor, rather than one supplied by UKA and his absence from the holding camp is a worrying sign.

Leap of faith: Idowu's preparations have been unconventional

Leap of faith: Idowu's preparations have been unconventional

In a statement, Idowu's coach, Aston Moore, said: 'In training recently Phillips has had an ongoing injury problem and we have not been able to go at things 100 per cent.

'At the weekend, Phillips told me he would continue to seek treatment from a private physio in London and would not travel to prepare in Portugal, although he may join us here later.

'He is an experienced athlete who I
have worked with for more than four years and we will assess the
situation again in the coming days.'

Sydney gold medallist Jonathan
Edwards tweeted: 'So Philips has pulled out of GB training camp…prob
not hugely surprising given his unconventional #london2012 preparations
thus far.'

On Sunday, Idowu took to Twitter to exclaim: 'I WILL NOT GIVE UP!'.

Other members of Team GB's athletics
squad today arrived at the training base in Portugal, with 100m star
Adam Gemili tweeting: 'This holding camp is mad!!!!!'