Tag Archives: trent

England beat South Africa in fourth ODI at Lord"s

Brilliant Bell leads charge with 88 as England look set to take series after thumping South Africa at Lord's

|

UPDATED:

19:00 GMT, 2 September 2012

Jonathan Trott has to drag himself from the crease even at lunch and tea so there was no way he would let the small matter of a suspected broken hand stop him from helping to cement England’s place at the top of the world one-day rankings.

The man who loves to bat on and on was perfect for the job in hand after England had again lost Alastair Cook cheaply in pursuit of the victory that confirms their No 1 ranking whatever the result at Trent Bridge on Wednesday.

Trott did not disappoint. Even a nasty blow on the right glove from Dale Steyn at his most hostile could stop him joining Ian Bell in guiding England calmly towards their target of 221 to guarantee them at least a share of this series.

Whack! Ian Bell was in remarkable form at the Oval

Whack! Ian Bell was in remarkable form at the Oval

Something to cheer: Dale Steyn celebrated the wicket of Alastair Cook

Something to cheer: Dale Steyn celebrated the wicket of Alastair Cook

ENGLAND V SOUTH AFRICA

Click here for the full scorecard

Bell chose the day after team director
Andy Flower took the first step to welcoming Kevin Pietersen back into
the England fold to remind the errant star he will not give up his place
at the top of the one-day order lightly.

Flower met Pietersen on Saturday and will report back to Hugh Morris,
managing director of England cricket, on Monday before giving the green
light to talks with new captain Cook this week. There is a way to go
before England can even contemplate selecting Pietersen for their winter
Tests in India but it is a start.

A slow start to the reply is what Bell and Trott gave England here at
Lord’s, but as South Africa had again under-achieved with the bat they
had no need to rush in this fourth NatWest one-day international.

It looked as though Trott would have to retire hurt when Steyn, hitting
90 miles per hour, forced one through his good friend’s defences and on
to his glove but Trott is made of stern stuff. He gulped down a couple
of painkillers, winced through a few virtually one-handed shots and
joined Bell in a partnership of 141.

Off you go: Dean Elgar celebrated the dismissal of Jonathan Trott by lbw

Off you go: Dean Elgar celebrated the dismissal of Jonathan Trott by lbw

Well done! Steven Finn congratulated Jade Dernbach after running out Ryan McLaren

Well done! Steven Finn congratulated Jade Dernbach after running out Ryan McLaren

It was just the tonic England needed after the loss of the Test series
and captain Andrew Strauss. After this emphatic six-wicket victory, they
should remain top of the one-day world until at least the new year.

Trott, who will have an X-ray on Monday, fell two runs short of his
half-century to a reviewed lbw off Dean Elgar originally turned down by
Simon Taufel. But Bell, given another one-day chance this season when
Pietersen retired from limited-overs cricket, marched on.

Bell had finally shown he could convert his natural gifts to the one-day
stage with a century against West Indies on his return this summer and
he added 88 before becoming bogged down and falling to Steyn.

South Africa made an impressive start to this series but it is clear
that, if you get beyond the big guns of Graeme Smith, Hashim Amla and AB
De Villiers, there is a lack of depth to their one-day side, if not
their Test one.

England did their best to keep the biggest South African gun of all,
Amla, at the crease when they dropped him yet again, James Tredwell the
culprit at slip this time when the run machine had scored just four.

Spectator sport: Cook (right) was bowled out for just two runs

Spectator sport: Cook (right) was bowled out for just two runs

Get in! James Tredwell bowled South Africa captain AB de Villiers

Get in! James Tredwell bowled South Africa captain AB de Villiers

Tredwell erred again in this summer of inexplicably poor England
fielding when he reprieved Smith but Graeme Swann’s stand-in displayed
his character in putting those lapses behind him to play a leading role
with the ball.

Ravi Bopara bowled Amla with a beauty and forced Faf du Plessis to chop
on, celebrating both with an old-fashioned handshake. But Tredwell did
the bulk of the damage with three wickets, all of them enlisting the
help of Craig Kieswetter, who became the first England keeper to make
three stumpings in a one-day international.

Cook’s lean spell going back to the first Test continued when England
batted, while Bopara’s repeated misfortunes with the willow are in
contrast to his increasing importance with the ball. Trott’s probable
absence should mean Jonny Bairstow gets his chance at Trent Bridge
without the Essex man being dropped but Bopara could do with some runs
in that game.

On the day it did not matter, Eoin Morgan and Kieswetter hurrying
England home with 20 balls to spare in another one-sided match which did
little for 50-over cricket. England will not worry about that. They
were professional and, more importantly, dominant.

Graham Onions takes nine wickets and a run out as Notts are savaged by Durham seamer

Onions takes nine wickets and a run out as Notts are savaged by Durham seamer

|

UPDATED:

22:19 GMT, 16 August 2012

Seamer Graham Onions had a hand in all 10 wickets to fall as Durham took a narrow lead over LV= County Championship title hopefuls Nottinghamshire.

Onions – released from the England squad at Lord's in the third and final Test against South Africa – drove up from London to take the new ball for the visitors and finished with a career-best nine for 67.

The 29-year-old looked set for the first 10-wicket innings haul in English cricket since 2007 until he ran out Luke Fletcher with a direct hit from backward square leg.

Fantastic day: Onions

Fantastic day: Onions

Onions' stunning display left Notts all out for 154, Paul Franks making 53, after Durham had earlier been bowled out for 194, and Durham closed the day on 27 without loss in their second innings.

Sixteen wickets fell on a highly eventful day at Trent Bridge, with Notts requiring less than 39 overs to dismiss Durham from their overnight 85 for four, before they themselves were sent packing by Onions in 42.3 overs.

Fletcher added to his two overnight wickets when Paul Collingwood was caught at gully before Ben Phillips had Dale Benkenstein caught in the slips edging a loose drive.

The wickets continued to fall at regular intervals and it was left to last pair Mark Wood and Chris Rushworth to post the highest partnership of the innings, Rushworth sweeping Graeme White for six before Wood was caught behind off the spinner on the stroke of lunch.

Onions appeared to replace Mitch Claydon at the start of the afternoon session and immediately settled into the perfect rhythm, finding a good line and length and seeing off Alex Hales lbw with the sixth ball of the innings.

That delivery kept low and the right-arm fast bowler also picked up Riki Wessels with a similar delivery, having already sent Michael Lumb and Adam Voges back to the pavilion.

Onions also benefited from some poor shots from the Notts batsmen as well as some generous umpiring decisions from Stephen Gale.

Steven Mullaney was particularly aggrieved to be given lbw to a ball that looked like it was going high while Franks' bold, counter-attacking half-century was also ended lbw, although the delivery appeared to pitch outside leg.

Having picked up the first eight wickets, Onions then ran out Fletcher at the non-striker's end after the Notts seamer hesitated about a single to square leg.

Andy Carter was then cleaned up to leave Durham 40 ahead, an advantage which openers Will Smith and Mark Stone extended to 67 by the close.

Stuart Broad confident England can cope without Kevin Pietersen

Twenty20 skipper Broad confident England can cope without retiring KP

|

UPDATED:

12:58 GMT, 23 June 2012

Captain Stuart Broad believes England can cover the loss of the recently-retired Kevin Pietersen with their World Twenty20 defence looming large on the horizon.

England will begin life after Pietersen, man of the series when they won the Twenty20 title two years ago, in a one-off match against West Indies at Trent Bridge on Sunday.

With just four games to go before Broad's side fly out to Sri Lanka to defend their world crown in September, there is little time to plug the gap of one of the world's most feared batsmen.

Looking to the future: Broad will lead England in Sri Lanka

Looking to the future: Broad will lead England in Sri Lanka

To do so England will rely on a group of inexperienced batsmen with Alex Hales, Jonny Bairstow, Jos Buttler and Samit Patel having no more than eight Twenty20 international appearances.

Broad, who with 34 appearances is England's most capped Twenty20 player, is confident in his young charges can fill the breach though.

'Kevin is a world-class Twenty20 player so of course it is disappointing that he is not with us, but it's a great opportunity for someone else to put their hand up and stake a claim for that spot,' said Broad, who will celebrate turning 26 on Sunday by captaining his country in front of his home crowd.

'We've got an exciting group of players in that changing room and everyone is really excited about getting on that field and doing the job.

'We have quite a short period of time and a short number of games until that World Cup so you want to make as much use of that as possible when we do get the opportunity.'

End of an era: Pietersen has called time on his ODI career

End of an era: Pietersen has called time on his ODI career

Broad admitted he would look to the likes of Eoin Morgan to lead his young batting unit, despite the left-hander's lack of cricket this summer.

After falling out of favour in the Test side, and limited opportunities in the one-day series due to the form of openers Alastair Cook and Ian Bell, Morgan has become a forgotten man in the England side.

But Broad believes he can remind all of his undoubted class and take a lead role on Sunday.

'Very much so. We've seen some amazing performances from Eoin in Twenty20 cricket and one-dayers for a long time,' he said.

'He's now probably our most experienced batsman in that set-up.

Key man: England are expecting big things from Eoin Morgan

Key man: England are expecting big things from Eoin Morgan

'Obviously we'll be looking to him to make big contributions and share his experiences with the guys in the squad.

'He's a key cog for us now in this England team and I'm looking forward to seeing what he can do tomorrow.

'He's always played a more prominent role, he's up there as one of the best Twenty20 batsmen in the world.

'I think the role he has done for us over the past two years has been fantastic with his variety against the spin and his death hitting. He'll be looking to continue that on.'

Hull KR 10 Catalan Dragons 13: Dureau holds his nerve in tense finish

Hull KR 10 Catalan Dragons 13: Dureau holds his nerve in tense finish

|

UPDATED:

22:49 GMT, 22 June 2012

Catalan Dragons strengthened their grip on third place in Stobart Super League with a thrilling if not entertaining win over Hull KR at Craven Park.

It extended the French side's run over the Robins to four games and saw them return to winning ways after successive defeats to Salford and Wigan.

Trent Robinson labelled his side's performance against the Reds as disgraceful, but he would have been pleased with their overall display in east Hull.

Few sides have kept the Dragons to 20 points or less, but Rovers have done it twice this season. However, a third time was asking a little too much from the Robins.

The last time the Dragons visited Craven Park in April, they were outscored by four tries to three but escaped with a Challenge Cup victory thanks to a rare off-day by Rovers goalkicker Michael Dobson.

Tonight they had Scott Dureau on form with the boot with a superb drop goal and penalty at the death to secure the win.

Rovers were dealt an injury blow just five minutes into the game when Kris Welham was stretchered off with a serious leg injury after slipping unchallenged on the wet turf. After a cagey start by both sides, it was the Dragons that broke the deadlock. Video referee Ian Smith found no fault with Daryl Millard's high leap and knock back for Clint Greenshields, who in turn sent Setaimata Sa over for the score.

Dureau, whose kick caused the confusion in the first place, missed the conversion but Catalan led 4-0 after 17 minutes.

Rovers' response was impressive and prompt. Jake Webster had little room to ground Blake Green's kick but he did to level the scores, and Dobson's conversion gave the home side a 6-4 advantage after 20 minutes.

Chances were few and far between after that as defences came to the fore close to the respective try lines.

Ben Galea and Dobson twice squandered try-scoring opportunities before the end of the first half.

Just before the hooter sounded Dureau attempted a 40-metres drop goal, but the connection was not as good as he would have liked and it had neither the height nor direction to trouble the scorers.

Catalan would have been the happier of the two sides with the score 6-4 at the break. The Dragons should have been behind at the start of the second half when Graeme Horne went very close.

However, video referee Smith ruled out his try for a knock on over the line. Craig Hall could also has scored but an unfortunate knock on when the ball bounced up and hit his hand ruled the play dead.

Dureau equalised for the Dragons with a 55th-minute penalty, but the sides did not stay on level terms for long.

Five minutes later, Scott Murrell found himself on the left wing to ground Lincoln Withers' inch perfect kick through.

Dobson was off target with the conversion, but Rovers held a 10-6 lead which, in the wet conditions, was a good one until Greenshields scored an unconverted try to level matters with five minutes to go before Dureau dropped a goal three minutes later to break the 10-10 deadlock.

A Dureau penalty after the hooter added gloss to the score for the French side.

Tom Maynard death: A sudden descent into the painful and brutal world of reality – The Top Spin

Maynard's shocking death is a sudden and painful descent into the world of reality

|

UPDATED:

12:59 GMT, 19 June 2012

Cricket is full of scripts. You can usually spot them a mile off: the carefree debut, the two-fingers-up return to form, the sinus-loosening last hurrah. And in their familiarity resides a certain comfort.

It matters not that you may already know, to an unhealthy degree, the prescribed possibilities of this diversionary world. Because you also know that, despite your better judgment, you’ll never get bored of them.

They're always just different enough to keep you interested, and besides – they're a damn sight less troublesome than those we meet in real life.

Tributes: Fans left flowers and messages of sympathy for Maynard outside the Kia Oval

Tributes: Fans left flowers and messages of sympathy for Maynard outside the Kia Oval

More from Lawrence Booth…

Top Spin: There's still plenty to take from Edgbaston despite the rain
12/06/12

Top Spin: If Pietersen can afford to retire, we know where we stand
05/06/12

Top Spin: Forget 'competing', it's time West Indies had a touch of class…
29/05/12

The Top Spin: England must reacquaint themselves with what they do best at Trent Bridge
22/05/12

The Top Spin: Late bloomer Anderson is England's man for all seasons
15/05/12

The Top Spin: Come in No 6! Five pressing questions for England to answer this summer
07/05/12

The Top Spin: Forget the rain… the lack of Gayle-force Windies dampens series
30/04/12

The Top Spin: Come what May tortured batsmen will weather cruel April's storm
24/04/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

So it feels shocking when sport departs from its unwritten pledge to distract us a little, and to do it in terms we can all understand, if not necessarily emulate.

Tom Maynard was tall, dark, handsome, and talented. He could hit the ball a long way, and he could hit it often. His script may have been highly promising rather than once-in-a-blue-moon exceptional. But it was his script, his life, and it was well under way.

Hell, he'd deviate from it from time to time. He had already done so the previous weekend. But there was fun to be had – his and ours. Sport shouldn't be so demanding as to ask for much more than that.

Tom's story has ended differently now, on the tracks of a tube station while most of us were sleeping through the dawn chorus of Monday morning. Family and friends mourn a loved one. The rest of us respectfully wonder what might have been.

Not many hours earlier, he had been playing for Surrey against Kent at Beckenham. The day before that, he had appeared on Sky's Cricket AM, full of mischief. He was going places.

And he was striking. My girlfriend,
no great sports fan, asked me not about the slightly shy figures of
Jason Roy on one side of the Cricket AM sofa and Stuart Meaker on the
other, but about the swarthy brunette in the middle. If he hadn’t played
for Surrey, you might be tempted to say he had a strut.

His death is an unmitigated tragedy.
It is no more or less tragic than if the body found at Wimbledon Park
station had belonged to a prince or a pauper. But the escapism of sport –
and the significance society ascribes it – is such that any sudden
descent into brutal reality can be especially painful.

Silence: The England and West Indies players paid a fitting tribute at Maynard's home ground

Silence: The England and West Indies players paid a fitting tribute at Maynard's home ground

Silence: The England and West Indies players paid a fitting tribute at Maynard's home ground

Sportsmen are not supposed to die young. They may lapse into premature decline once their careers are over; they may be taken too soon from us by injury. But to die young is the preserve of the rock star. It is not part of the sporting deal, with its emphasis on athleticism and gilded youth.

How else to explain the astonishing
response to the on-field collapse of Bolton midfielder Fabrice Muamba
Thousands perish every day in grim circumstances, yet it was the fate of
a man most of us knew only distantly through the prism of Match of the
Day that dominated the headlines.

Clearly,
there was a very human empathy in the outpouring of concern for Muamba
that day. But how much of it jostled for space with disbelief that a
supposedly inviolate world had suffered an intrusion more commonly
reserved for you or me When a footballer has a weak heart, what hope is
there for the rest of us

Muamba
survived, thank God, but Tom Maynard was less fortunate. A son, a
team-mate, a hope and a dream. And above all, a human being.

Tragedy: Maynard had a promising future with club and country to look forward to

Tragedy: Maynard had a promising future with club and country to look forward to

Tragedy: Maynard had a promising future with club and country to look forward to

England West Indies ends in draw after play is abadoned due to rain

It's another washout at Edgbaston as third Test ends in frustrating draw

|

UPDATED:

14:23 GMT, 11 June 2012

The final day of the third Test between England and West Indies at Edgbaston was abandoned due to rain, ending any slim hopes the tourists had of a consolation victory.

Tino Best's magnificent 95 – the highest ever score by a No 11 batsman – and two his wickets late on day four had left West Indies 205 runs ahead heading into the day, but the draw was always inevitable after the first two days were also lost to rain.

Washout: Monday was the third day of the Test to be abandoned

Washout: Monday was the third day of the Test to be abandoned

Washout: Monday was the third day of the Test to be abandoned

England had already secured the series heading into the match after victories in the opening two Tests at Lord's and Trent Bridge.

The two sides now play a three-match one-day series followed by a single Twenty20 international.

The series win means that England's three Tests against South Africa in July and August become a shootout for the world No 1 spot, with incumbents England needing to avoid defeat to hold onto their crown.

England v West Indies washed out again

The worst weather for a Test since 1964! England and West Indies made to wait again

|

UPDATED:

14:09 GMT, 8 June 2012

The third Investec Test at Edgbaston became the first in England for almost half-a-century to suffer a washout for each of the first two days.

As persistent rain showed no signs of moving away from Birmingham, umpires Kumar Dharmasena and Tony Hill abandoned play shortly after lunch without a ball bowled for the second successive day.

Washout: Edgbaston was rain-soaked once more on day two

Washout: Edgbaston was rain-soaked once more on day two

No toss or exchange of teams has yet taken place in this final Test of a series England have already won – after victories over the West Indies at Lord's and then Trent Bridge.

The last time a home Test failed to start before day three was in 1964, when England and Australia were kept off the field at Lord's.

This double washout means there is still a chance the tourists' lynchpin batsman Shivnarine Chanderpaul may be able to take part after all, despite a side injury.

Chanderpaul had a scan on Thursday, and a slight side strain rather than a tear has been diagnosed.

Frustration: The groundstaff worked tirelessly through the night

Frustration: The groundstaff worked tirelessly through the night

It will be the end of this tour for the left-hander if he does not feature here.
Chanderpaul has not played limited-overs cricket for his country since last year's World Cup, and is not in the Windies' squad for either three NatWest Series one-day internationals or a one-off Twenty20 against England.

Back to this final Test, a minimum of 156 overs have been lost – with only eight extra overs permitted on each of the final three days, assuming no further interruption from the weather.

Saturday's forecast is significantly better.

England will have precious little time nonetheless to try to close out a 3-0 whitewash – although there is minor encouragement in the reduction of the follow-on from an initial 200 to 100 for what has become a three-day match, at best.

James Anderson rested by England for third Test against West Indies

EXCLUSIVE: Anderson rested for third Test… and Broad next to go as Onions waits

|

UPDATED:

21:00 GMT, 1 June 2012

Jimmy Anderson, the leader of England’s attack, is to be left out of the squad for the third Test against West Indies as Andy Flower attempts to protect his leading players from a crippling workload.

England have decided that, with the Wisden Trophy already retained, it is in their interests to rest their best bowler and instead give a well-earned opportunity to Steven Finn at Edgbaston.

It could well be that Stuart Broad, another bowler at the peak of his powers, joins Anderson on the sidelines but England have not yet decided whether Broad needs a break and will name him in a 12-man squad. Then he will be monitored when England begin practice at Edgbaston on Tuesday ahead of the final Investec Test, which starts on Thursday.

Well earned rest: Jimmy Anderson will sit out the third Test at Edgbaston

Well earned rest: Jimmy Anderson will sit out the third Test at Edgbaston

England squad (probable)

Andrew Strauss (capt), Alastair Cook, Jonathan Trott, Kevin Pietersen, Ian Bell, Jonny Bairstow, Matt Prior (wkt), Tim Bresnan, Stuart Broad, Graeme Swann, Steven Finn, Graham Onions.

The news will disappoint Anderson, who is desperate to carry on while at the top of his game even though he has bowled 111 overs in the two Tests against West Indies so far and ended the second match at Trent Bridge with stiffness in a thigh.

Broad is another frontline England player who, as he told Sportsmail this week, is keen not to stand down for even one game while bowling so well but he could well be replaced by the equally deserving Graham Onions in Birmingham.

Flower, the England team director, has decided to risk being unpopular with his spearheads for what he considers are the best of reasons, keeping them fresh for the tougher assignments ahead.

Back in the runs: England's No 6 Jonny Bairstow, retained for next week's Third Investec Test despite a working over by West Indies paceman Kemar Roach at Trent Bridge, hit 68 for Yorkshire against Northants at Headingley

Back in the runs: England's No 6 Jonny
Bairstow, retained for next week's Third Investec Test despite a working over by West Indies paceman Kemar
Roach at Trent Bridge, hit 68 for Yorkshire against Northants at Headingley

Chance to shine: Steven Finn

Chance to shine: Steven Finn

England lost one key player from all limited-overs cricket this week in Kevin Pietersen and Flower is desperate that the non-stop cricket over the next two years will not claim any other casualties. It is a fair argument with England facing a congested calendar which features one-day series against West Indies and Australia before the Test showdown with South Africa.

In truth the move should not reduce England’s chances of winning again and defeating West Indies 3-0, even though the tourists have been far more competitive than expected.

Finn has become the fastest of all England bowlers and a regular in the one-day side but has been consistently kept out of Tests because of the excellence of those in front of him. He deserves a chance now and can be expected to take it.

Onions, too, has proved himself ready to return to international cricket after recovering from a serious back injury and has been in exceptional form for Durham this season, taking five for 43 in their current match against Lancashire.

Tim Bresnan, man of the match for his eight wickets at Trent Bridge, will carry on because he is only just back to his best after elbow surgery and will be given the chance to record his 14th Test victory out of 14.

Another who will be told to carry on is Jonny Bairstow, despite the working over he received from Kemar Roach at Trent Bridge.

Something to ponder: Andy Flower (right) could also rest Stuart Broad (left)

Something to ponder: Andy Flower (right) could also rest Stuart Broad (left)

England know Bairstow will have to work on his technique against the short ball but are confident he will come through the problem, particularly as his tormentor-in-chief Roach has been ruled out of the rest of the tour.

Bairstow was back in form for Yorkshire, scoring 68 against Northants in front of selector James Whitaker, and will retain his place at six, particularly as his main rival Ravi Bopara is yet to play for Essex after recovering from a thigh injury.

Pietersen, meanwhile, has told Surrey that he will commit to playing for them far more often now he has become simply a Test player. Surrey expect a man who has rarely shown much appetite for county cricket before to be available for their Twenty20 campaign from the end of June and beyond.

It raises the possibility of Pietersen being dominant for Surrey in Twenty20 while being denied the chance to play in the shortest format internationally, England having decided that as he wants to retire from 50-over cricket he will not be picked for their Twenty20 matches either.

Fine form: Graham Onions has been bowling well for Durham this year

Fine form: Graham Onions has been bowling well for Durham this year

At least Pietersen will be able to carry on playing the shot he pioneered, the left-handed switch-hit, without restrictions for now as the ICC’s cricket committee announced that they will recommend no changes to the lbw law to be ‘fairer’ to bowlers. Instead they have asked MCC, custodians of the laws of the game, for further direction.

The world governing body’s cricket committee, which has made a number of recommendations to the ICC executive board, also issued a vote of confidence in the accuracy of HawkEye and the new improved Hot Spot as part of the decision-review system.

The ICC will retain the Duckworth-Lewis method for revising targets in rain-affected matches and also suggested yet more tinkering to the 50-over format in an attempt to make it less formulaic.

The bottom line is that one-day internationals all too often provide predictable, tired cricket, however much tinkering is made to the rules, as Pietersen would undoubtedly agree.

James Anderson: It can get fierce but don"t kill off our aggression

It can get fierce but don't kill off our aggression

|

UPDATED:

22:52 GMT, 26 May 2012

There may be those who felt I overstepped the mark when I vented my frustration on the field at Trent Bridge on Friday.

There is no doubt the first day of the second Test ranks among the toughest I’ve experienced.
On the plus side, I managed two wickets and a feeling that I had bowled well. On the minus, a couple of edges flying through the slips and one lbw shout against Darren Sammy, which I thought was extremely close.

I reacted. I let Sammy and Marlon Samuels know exactly what I thought of my luck and though my discussion with umpire Aleem Dar was friendly, he did warn me to be careful not to get too carried away.

Flashpoint: Aleem Dar speaks to James Anderson at Trent Bridge

Flashpoint: Aleem Dar speaks to James Anderson at Trent Bridge

I appreciated Aleem Dar was passing on what he saw as helpful advice and was doing his job.
My view on showing emotion on the pitch is that the authorities need to be careful not to discourage aggression completely as this is the very lifeblood of the game.

Indeed, I fear there is a real danger of the game becoming over-sanitised should it continue to try to discourage people expressing their passion and fight.

Some people just want us to play a nice game of cricket, out in the sun, in the park — but the players in the middle are not like that.

Exchange of views: Anderson and Darren Sammy discuss matters at the crease

Exchange of views: Anderson and Darren Sammy discuss matters at the crease

To me, along with all the skill, athleticism and tactical awareness that make this the best of all games, there has to be a place in the game for good old- fashioned aggression.

All sides know it, expect it and actually relish it. Marlon certainly understood.

He knows there is nothing personal between us. But when you have batted in the series as long as he has, you are bound to be on the end of more chat than those who come and go more quickly.
We are in fierce competition out there, we are both trying to win a game of cricket for our country and sometimes tensions run high.

Reaction: James Anderson cannot hide his dismay as Marlon Samuels adds to his run tally

Reaction: Anderson cannot hide his dismay as Marlon Samuels adds to his run tally

There is no point in playing the game if you are not going to throw yourself into it heart and soul. But when you are out there in the thick of it, you are not thinking about the cameras being on you. You are not thinking about anything except the battle you are in.

Surely the crowd want passion and aggression in their cricket. They don’t want players to be robots.
The game has to have that red-blooded element or it can become bland, sanitised and boring.
Of course, I’m not advocating full scale punch-ups.

But when Marlon Samuels came off at the end of his innings on Friday night, though every single one of us had been into him and ‘chirped’ him and his team-mates on the field, every single one of us shook his hand and said ‘well done’ — and that is the way the game should be played.

James Anderson in bust-up with Marlon Samuels

Anderson in bust-up with West Indies hero Samuels over sledging row

|

UPDATED:

21:37 GMT, 25 May 2012

England fast bowler James Anderson was involved in a sledging row with West Indies centurion Marlon Samuels on day one of the second Test at Trent Bridge.

After his 107 not out had helped the tourists to reach 304 for six, Samuels hit out at the verbal barrage he had endured, saying: ‘Anderson gets frustrated very easily.’

Anderson played down the row as ‘part of the game’.

Row: James Anderson (left) and West Indies Marlon Samuels (right)

Row: James Anderson (left) and West Indies Marlon Samuels (right)