Tag Archives: technology

Hawk-eye awarded Premier League contract for goalline technology – Exclusive

EXCLUSIVE: Hawk-eye awarded Premier League contract for goal-line technology from next season

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Net gains: John Terry makes a controversial clearance in England's 1-0 win over Ukraine at Euro 2012

FA General Secretary Alex Horne told BBC Sport earlier this week: ‘I always thought it was an ideal piece of technology to allow into the game. The (Premier League) club meeting is on Thursday so I'm expecting it to go through at that meeting.’

‘There are occasions (when GLT is needed) and we've seen them here at Wembley, we've seen them in World Cups, we've seen them 11 or 12 times in the Premier League this season alone.

Over Geoff Hurst scores England's controversial third goal in the 1966 World Cup final

Over Geoff Hurst scores England's controversial third goal in the 1966 World Cup final

Support: FA secretary Alex Horne is behind the idea of goal-line technology

Support: FA secretary Alex Horne is behind the idea of goal-line technology

‘So technology that says 'yes, the ball has crossed the line' and lets the referee know makes an awful lot of sense to me.

‘Particularly where it's a knock-out situation, incorrect decisions have less opportunity to even themselves out over a season.’

The Premier League are likely to ‘centrally fund’ GLT for its member clubs and the FA will pay for cameras to be installed at Wembley.

Martin O"Neill tells Sunderland winger James McClean to forget about Twitter

Sunderland players given social media lesson after McClean's latest Twitter row

By
Colin Young

PUBLISHED:

16:31 GMT, 1 March 2013

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UPDATED:

00:13 GMT, 2 March 2013

Sunderland manager Martin O’Neill has called on a technology expert to teach his players the pitfalls of Twitter and other social networking sites.

The briefing follows James McClean’s latest Twitter row, which led to the Republic of Ireland winger deleting his account this week.

Last Friday, McClean professed his love for The Broad Black Brimmer by the Wolfe Tones. The song tells of a boy whose father is killed while fighting for the IRA, with the title referring to the wide-brimmed hat worn by many of the group’s members in the 1920s during the Irish War of Independence and Civil War.

Ill-advised: James McClean's controversial tweets have got him into trouble

Ill-advised: James McClean's controversial tweets have got him into trouble

One DUP MP called for McClean to be sacked but O’Neill, who has repeatedly warned his players about Twitter, is hoping the midfielder’s decision to stay off the site can help him concentrate on re-establishing himself in the Sunderland team after losing his place following Danny Graham’s arrival.

O’Neill said: ‘We have had someone in to talk to the younger boys about the social media thing and he’s going to have a chat with the senior boys for them to keep an eye on it.

‘He can tell you all the ills and woes and the possibility of what might happen if you were sending out a normal message to your friend, how people can log into these things, and it goes global. It will be a real eye-opener for me because I want to be in the meeting.

Unhappy: Martin O'Neill wants McClean to forget about Twitter and concentrate on his football

Unhappy: Martin O'Neill wants McClean to forget about Twitter and concentrate on his football

‘It’s just getting back to trying to be a bit more responsible for your own actions. I’d never have believed even five years ago that we’d be having this conversation.’

Meanwhile, goalkeeper Simon Mignolet will open talks on a new contract, just days after his agent claimed he would have to quit Sunderland to enhance his international career.

Captain Lee Cattermole has had an injection in his knee but still faces a lengthy lay-off.

Mercedes under pressure to give Lewis Hamilton a winning car after Michael Schumacher failure

We've got to give Lew a winning car! Mercedes under pressure to deliver for new star Hamilton after Schuey's failure

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UPDATED:

12:50 GMT, 19 December 2012

Mercedes have conceded they are under even more pressure to produce a winning car for Lewis Hamilton than they were during Michael Schumacher's three-year stint with the team.

Seven-time world champion Schumacher was persuaded out of retirement in 2010 with the promise he could add to his drivers' championship tally if he signed for Mercedes.

But by the time Schumacher decided to bow out of Formula One for a second time at the end of last season he had failed to win a single race, his best result being third at Valencia's European Grand Prix.

Having been incapable of providing
Schumacher with a car capable of victory in the twilight of his career,
Mercedes chief executive Nick Fry admitted the pressure to ensure
history is not repeated with Hamilton, a driver at the peak of his
powers, is enormous.

See you later: Hamilton ended his long association with McLaren this season to move to Mercedes

See you later: Hamilton ended his long association with McLaren this season to move to Mercedes

I'm joining you, pal: Hamilton will team up with old friend Rosberg

I'm joining you, pal: Hamilton will team up with old friend Rosberg

Disappointing: Schuey's Mercedes comeback didn't go according to plan

Disappointing: Schuey's Mercedes comeback didn't go according to plan

'We've had probably one of the greatest drivers of all time driving for us, who was clearly in age terms reaching the later part of his career when he arrived with us,' said Fry in an interview with Autosport.

'In order to do well in Formula 1, you've got to do well in every respect. You've got to have the best technology, you've got to have the best teamwork, you've got to have the best management and you have to have the best drivers. (Hamilton's) arrival is very exciting for the team and also puts a lot of pressure on because Ross (Brawn) has to provide him with a very good car.

'He can't win with a car which is duff. He can win with a car that is not quite the best, but the competition is such that you can't bridge a huge gap.'

Many believe that cutting the gap to the likes of Red Bull, Ferrari and Hamilton's former team McLaren will be nigh on impossible for Mercedes in the coming campaign. Indeed, their lack of success last week prompted a parting of the ways with long-time head of motorsport Norbert Haug.

But Fry insisted Mercedes has sent out a strong message to the rest of the grid regarding their ambition to put things right by capturing Hamilton, a driver who he ranks alongside Ferrari's Fernando Alonso as the best in the world.

Fry added: 'Certainly in my view, Lewis and Fernando Alonso are the two best drivers. Fernando this year, when the Ferrari has not been the best car by any stretch of the imagination, has still done an exceptional job.

'And I think Lewis is still in that category of being a driver you could give not quite the best car and he could still win races, whereas most of the other drivers in the Formula 1 field will probably win the race if you give them the best car.'

Cowboy: Lewis won the US Grand Prix in Texas in his penultimate race for Mclaren

Cowboy: Lewis won the US Grand Prix in Texas in his penultimate race for Mclaren

Fry claimed that having had the benefit of the fastest car on the grid during his three championship winning campaigns, it is impossible to judge whether Red Bull's Sebastian Vettel is in the same class as Hamilton and Alonso.

Vettel, no short of self-confidence, would doubtless disagree. And the Red Bull star has revealed he was equally confident he would not be stripped of this most recent title as Ferrari asked for clarification over an overtaking manoeuvre during last month's season finale in Brazil.

Addressing the speculation he had illegally passed Toro Rosso's Jean-Eric Vergne under yellow flag conditions while beating Alonso to the title by three points, Vettel told the official Formula 1 website: 'To be honest, I never wasted one single thought that an irregularity was involved from my side.

'Even if it was an eventful race I definitely saw all the flags – and their colours! I only got information that Ferrari was up to something after Christian (Horner) called me saying that obviously Ferrari was not too happy with the outcome of the race.

'After the FIA had checked every single inch of the recording of the situation in question – and confirmed that everything was according to rules – Ferrari renounced any protests. But believe it or not I knew since the chequered flag that there was not a single movement wrong from my side.'

Wimbledon dog race ends in 30million-to-one triple dead heat

Anyone have a pound on that Three dogs cross line at same time in 30million-to-one finish

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UPDATED:

11:18 GMT, 17 December 2012

We've heard of finishing neck-and-neck, but the London's Wimbledon track saw something different on Friday, as three dogs crossed the line nose-and-nose-and-nose in a 30million-to-one finish.

There was nothing between Murlens Houdini, Lightning Speed and Tinas Luke, not even one-hundredth of a second. They finished so close to one another that not even computer technology could pick a clear winner.

And amazingly this isn’t the first time that three greyhounds have finished in a trio. It was only in January last year that the first ever triple dead heat occurred at Romford, with Killishan Masai, Ayamzagirl and Droopys Djokovic all finishing at the same time, over an even longer distance.

What a finish! The three dogs cross the line at the same time at Wimbledon

What a finish! The three dogs cross the line at the same time at Wimbledon

They raced over 925m, the furthest distance used for greyhounds, making it even more astounding that they finished together.

The event was unlikely the first time around, but the chances of it happening again were 30million-to-one.

On Friday the dogs were racing in the third heat of the John White Christmas Cracker over a shorter distance of 480m.

With six in the race, it was Murlens Houdini that took an early lead. The other two soon caught up though and they all crossed the line at a speed of over 40mph.

They covered the distance in less than half a minute, with a finishing time of 28.87 seconds. Punters received a third of their stake at full odds.

Gone to the dogs: The incredible finish also happened at Romford in 2011

Gone to the dogs: The incredible finish also happened at Romford in 2011

Unfortunately the final can only include
two dogs. After a draw it was decided that Tinas Luke will be the
reserve while Murlens Houdini and Lightning Speed will race in Friday’s
final.

'I doubt we'll ever seen another one like that,' said Gary Matthews, Wimbledon's racing manager.

'When we announced the triple dead heat a huge roar went up.'

A spokesman for the Greyhound Board of England likened the event to someone winning the lottery and being hit by a meteorite in the same day.

2.5 billion is wagered on greyhound racing each year in Britain, on over 70,000 races.

FA"s 92-point action plan to rid football of racism with quotas for referees and coaches

SPORTSMAIL EXCLUSIVE: We'll kick out the bigots… FA's 92-point action plan to rid football of the scourge of racism
The Football Association will introduce ethnic quotas for referees and coaches early in the new year
The latest video technology, including spy cameras, will be used to catch racist fansTough crackdown on offending clubsMoves to increase the involvement of women, ethnic minorities and disabled people

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UPDATED:

23:42 GMT, 12 December 2012

English football will introduce quotas for referees and coaches as part of an unprecedented campaign to tackle racism.

The plan will be adopted early in the new year and include the demand that at least 10 per cent of entry level officials and coaches throughout the game are from ethnic minorities.

There will also be moves to increase the involvement of women, ethnic minorities and disabled people in all forms of football, while Asian role models will be sought to encourage Asian children to play the game.

Confidential hotlines will be set up for players to report any form of bullying and discrimination, and fans will be able to text, email or maybe even tweet their complaints about any form of racism.

Race disgrace: John Terry (covering mouth) was banned for abusing Anton Ferdinand

Race disgrace: John Terry (covering mouth) was banned for abusing Anton Ferdinand

In addition, the latest video and audio technology will be used to identify supporters guilty of racist gestures or chanting at matches.

The far-reaching plan comes after a period in which football has been scarred by the racist behaviour of John Terry and Luis Suarez, and by the false accusation of racial abuse levelled at referee Mark Clattenburg.

PFA back ban call

The Professional Footballers’ Association will support the FA proposal of a minimum five-game ban for racist abuse.

PFA chief executive Gordon Taylor said: ‘We want to illustrate the seriousness of our approach to this issue.’

The extent of the fight against racism can be revealed by Sportsmail, who have seen the FA’s 92-point Football Inclusion and Anti-Discrimination Action Plan.

FA chairman David Bernstein has also given his personal guarantee in a letter to Culture Secretary Maria Miller, copied to Prime Minister David Cameron, that all the recommendations will be carried out once they have been rubber-stamped by football’s stakeholders.

The anti-racism education process being introduced will not just involve cultural lessons for overseas players and managers coming to England.

All sections of the game, including match stewards, will be given advice on how best to combat discrimination and the procedures to follow when it happens.

The FA will also establish an Inclusion Advisory Board to provide guidance on all equality matters and monitor the implementation of the plan.

Flashpoint: Luis Suarez (left) was in an ugly clash with Patrice Evra last season

Flashpoint: Luis Suarez (left) was in an ugly clash with Patrice Evra last season

The document has been distributed to all 92 League clubs, who will be expected to sign the charter for action against homophobia and transphobia launched by the Government last year.

Contracts with players and managers will have a mandatory reference to behaving in an inclusive and non-discriminatory manner.

A timetable has been set out as far ahead as the 2017-18 season as to when the 92 points will be implemented.

They start this month with the football organisations publicising the roles and responsibilities of each body — FA, Premier League, Football League, clubs, League Managers’ Associations, Professional Footballers’ Association and County FAs — in promoting inclusion and dealing with discrimination in football.

Also beginning immediately is the FA mandate that the proportion of ethnic minority coaches starting at the lowest level of qualification does not fall below 10 per cent.

And by season 2015-16: ‘The FA in conjunction with county FAs will ensure that 10 per cent of the referee workforce is from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities, which is reflective of national demographics.’

Shirt shrift: Manchester City's Joleon Lescott refuses to wear a Kick It Out top

Shirt shrift: Manchester City's Joleon Lescott refuses to wear a Kick It Out top

The proposals are the FA’s response to
the Prime Minister calling for the game to take tougher action after an
anti-racism-in-football summit last February.

Bernstein is making the fight against racism his personal FA legacy before he stands down next May. In his letter to Miller he writes: ‘Let me give you my own personal reassurance that this is an issue at the very top of my agenda.

‘It is one that I know we are all determined to address both speedily and collaboratively subject to the approvals processes of our respective organisations.

‘There is no doubt that recent events have brought into sharp relief the impact that race and other forms of discrimination can still have on the game. Incidents involving high-profile players cast a shadow over the sport and can undermine much of the collective good work achieved.

‘Despite the substantial progress English football has made in this area over many years we fully recognise that the work to eliminate discrimination based on race, ethnic origin, colour and nationality is still not complete.’

Official inquiry: The FA want more non-white referees to follow Uriah Rennie

Official inquiry: The FA want more non-white referees to follow Uriah Rennie

Bernstein was referring to the Terry, Suarez and Clattenburg cases and the FA plan seeks to prevent any repetition.

The hotline strategy follows Jason Roberts’ complaints about some black players not trusting the authorities to fight racism.

To counter that lack of faith in the authorities, the planned support structure will ‘ensure those who wish to report incidents of discrimination or bullying within the game, whether trainees, players, coaches, managers, other employees or fans, can do so in confidence and receive the support they may require’.

Ironically Bernstein also puts on record his strong support for anti-racism group Kick It Out, whose chairman Lord Ouseley has threatened to quit the FA Council in protest at their ‘mealy- mouthed’ response to the Terry and Suarez issues.

The recommendations may be tweaked after feedback from stakeholders. But they are broadly expected to be introduced following club meetings next February. It is envisaged that the final version will be presented in a ‘more user friendly and punchy format’.

Crackdown: Chelsea banned this supporter for making a gesture at Manchester United's Danny Welbeck

Crackdown: Chelsea banned this supporter for making a gesture at Manchester United's Danny Welbeck

Other key proposals include:

The Football League introducing mandatory minimum standard club codes of conduct.Social media guidelines for players and club staff to follow throughout professional football.Crowd management measures to guide professional and semi- professional clubs.Mandatory lessons for all to educate and change attitudes and ensure they are informed of the procedures to follow when incidents occur.Closer working relationships with police over hate crime in football incidents.Football authorities to discipline clubs who repeatedly fail to sanction employers who breach code of conduct, or deal adequately with fans in relation to discriminatory language or behaviour.A review of the recruitment process for managers and coaches at the top level.New programmes to help black and Asian coaches gain qualifications to challenge for top professional roles.Talent programmes specifically for Asian men and boys and the promotion of Asian male and female role models.Improve the reporting and analysis of in-stadium offences.

The FA are not just attempting to eradicate racism in their grand plan.

The commitment is to ‘promote inclusion and eliminate discrimination whether by reason of race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, age, gender, gender reassignment, sexual orientation, marital status, religion or belief, ability or disability’.

Ugliness has tarnished football: month-by-month

Lewis Hamilton says fond farewell to McLaren on last official outing

Tears shed as Hamilton says fond farewell to McLaren on last official outing… and he does not rule out emotional return

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UPDATED:

15:53 GMT, 11 December 2012

Lewis Hamilton left the door open to a possible return to McLaren after saying an emotional farewell to the F1 team.

Tears were shed as the British driver hugged his colleagues and thanked them for their support during his last official official outing.

End of the road: Lewis Hamilton on his last official outing with McLaren

End of the road: Lewis Hamilton on his last official outing with McLaren

Sad ending: Tears were shed as Hamilton made emotional farewell

Sad ending: Tears were shed as Hamilton made emotional farewell

Hamilton, who will join Mercedes in January, took part in a demonstration event in Malta at the weekend, his last drive in a McLaren car.

And the 2008 World Champion did not rule out a return to the Woking-based outfit in the future.

'My time at McLaren has been fantastic,' he told staff at the
McLaren Technology Centre.

'When I arrived in Formula One in 2007, I now
realise I never really grasped what I was taking on. Ron [Dennis] had
told me: “Don't be surprised if you're 0.5sec slower than Fernando
[Alonso]”, and I just smiled because I knew it wouldn't be the case.
But, even so, that year was very hard, for many reasons.

Driving seat: Hamilton took part in a demonstration event in Malta

Driving seat: Hamilton took part in a demonstration event in Malta

Can't stop partying: Instead of having a night in after a hectic weekend, X Factor judge Nicole Scherzinger shows up to the premiere with Lewis Hamilton in tow

Night out: Hamilton and girlfriend, X Factor judge Nicole Scherzinger, at the Jack Reacher premiere in Leicester Square on Monday

'You were brilliant – you still are. I have so much affection and love
for this team. And that's why McLaren has always felt like home,' he
added.

McLaren's sporting director Sam Michael admitted Hamilton's departure would be 'a loss to McLaren' but the team will 'move on quickly'.

Hamilton leaves to join Mercedes following six seasons with the team in Formula One and a further seven as part of the team's driver development programme.

'Of course it's a loss to McLaren but just like if anybody leaves, whether it's a driver – there have been some very big, famous names leave McLaren before in terms of drivers – and you don't dwell on it,' Michael told James Allen on F1. 'You move on quickly because Formula One's all about change management.”

Michael also said that Hamilton leaves on good terms.

'I think the whole team gets on very well with Lewis, and we still do. He's a great guy, he's a fantastic racing driver; he's possibly the quickest driver on the grid at the moment in terms of pure natural talent.'

Hamilton is backing Sebastian Vettel to maintain his stranglehold on the Formula One drivers’ championship for a fourth successive season.

Hamilton, who has left McLaren to race for Mercedes in the coming campaign, admitted he expects the combination of Vettel’s pace and the genius of Red Bull’ s chief designer Adrian Newey to be unbeatable once more.

‘It's going to be hard to beat Sebastian next year,’ Hamilton said. ‘I think Sebastian's going to have another amazing car. The car he had this year was fantastic. It's going to be an evolution of that next year. Adrian only seems to get better with age; I think he's going to do something pretty special next year as well.’

Laid back: Lewis looked rather coy as he relaxed in the back of his car and headed home

Back seat driver: Lewis looked relaxed as he headed home

Hamilton faces an uphill battle to
turn Mercedes into frontrunners next year but is eagerly anticipating
racing for his new team – even if he is forced to battle in the
midfield.

Hamilton added: ‘I like that people
know that I'm a racer and I'm a winner. But it doesn't matter where you
are on the grid, you can still race. But I want to win – of course.
That's my goal. I can't wait to get my hands on the team and the car and
just try to work as quickly as possible.

‘It doesn't matter how many days, how
many hours it takes. I'm willing to put all the effort in. I feel like
I've got a new breath of life in me, so I'm ready for it.’

Meanwhile Hamilton’s former teammate, Jenson Button, is looking forward
to being the main focus at McLaren now that he is sharing the garage
with Mexican youngster Sergio Perez.

Button said of his team leader status: ‘It's not the first time I've
done that. When I got to BAR and Jacques [Villeneuve] left it was
exactly the same situation.

‘I was there to lead the team and it's something I really look forward
to and it's something where the best comes out of me in that situation.’

Determined to drive the design process of next year’s car in a direction
which can give him a machine capable of consistently challenge the
likes of Vettel and Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso, Button added: ‘I can
really build that team around me and direct the team in a direction I
like with the car.

‘We all drive differently and have different styles. For me, I need a
car I can develop beneath me and feel comfortable in. If the car feels
neutral and unbalanced it doesn't work for me.

‘I need to develop a car and engineer a car in a position that feels
comfortable for me, and I don't think anyone can do a better job than I
can in that position. The problem for me is if I can't get the car there
I do struggle more than some.'

Lewis Hamilton says fond farwell to McLaren on last official outing

Tears shed as Hamilton says fond farewell to McLaren on last official outing… and he does not rule out emotional return

|

UPDATED:

13:22 GMT, 11 December 2012

Lewis Hamilton left the door open to a possible return to McLaren after saying an emotional farewell to the F1 team.

Tears were shed as the British driver hugged his colleagues and thanked them for their support during his last official official outing.

End of the road: Lewis Hamilton on his last official outing with McLaren

End of the road: Lewis Hamilton on his last official outing with McLaren

Sad ending: Tears were shed as Hamilton made emotional farewell

Sad ending: Tears were shed as Hamilton made emotional farewell

Hamilton, who will join Mercedes in January, took part in a demonstration event in Malta at the weekend, his last drive in a McLaren car.

And the 2008 World Champion did not rule out a return to the Woking-based outfit in the future.

'My time at McLaren has been fantastic,' he told staff at the
McLaren Technology Centre.

'When I arrived in Formula One in 2007, I now
realise I never really grasped what I was taking on. Ron [Dennis] had
told me: “Don't be surprised if you're 0.5sec slower than Fernando
[Alonso]”, and I just smiled because I knew it wouldn't be the case.
But, even so, that year was very hard, for many reasons.

Driving seat: Hamilton took part in a demonstration event in Malta

Driving seat: Hamilton took part in a demonstration event in Malta

Can't stop partying: Instead of having a night in after a hectic weekend, X Factor judge Nicole Scherzinger shows up to the premiere with Lewis Hamilton in tow

Night out: Hamilton and girlfriend, X Factor judge Nicole Scherzinger, at the Jack Reacher premiere in Leicester Square on Monday

'You were brilliant – you still are. I have so much affection and love
for this team. And that's why McLaren has always felt like home,' he
added.

McLaren's sporting director Sam Michael admitted Hamilton's departure would be 'a loss to McLaren' but the team will 'move on quickly'.

Hamilton leaves to join Mercedes following six seasons with the team in Formula One and a further seven as part of the team's driver development programme.

'Of course it's a loss to McLaren but just like if anybody leaves, whether it's a driver – there have been some very big, famous names leave McLaren before in terms of drivers – and you don't dwell on it,' Michael told James Allen on F1. 'You move on quickly because Formula One's all about change management.”

Michael also said that Hamilton leaves on good terms.

'I think the whole team gets on very well with Lewis, and we still do. He's a great guy, he's a fantastic racing driver; he's possibly the quickest driver on the grid at the moment in terms of pure natural talent.'

Hamilton is backing Sebastian Vettel to maintain his stranglehold on the Formula One drivers’ championship for a fourth successive season.

Hamilton, who has left McLaren to race for Mercedes in the coming campaign, admitted he expects the combination of Vettel’s pace and the genius of Red Bull’ s chief designer Adrian Newey to be unbeatable once more.

‘It's going to be hard to beat Sebastian next year,’ Hamilton said. ‘I think Sebastian's going to have another amazing car. The car he had this year was fantastic. It's going to be an evolution of that next year. Adrian only seems to get better with age; I think he's going to do something pretty special next year as well.’

Laid back: Lewis looked rather coy as he relaxed in the back of his car and headed home

Back seat driver: Lewis looked relaxed as he headed home

Hamilton faces an uphill battle to
turn Mercedes into frontrunners next year but is eagerly anticipating
racing for his new team – even if he is forced to battle in the
midfield.

Hamilton added: ‘I like that people
know that I'm a racer and I'm a winner. But it doesn't matter where you
are on the grid, you can still race. But I want to win – of course.
That's my goal. I can't wait to get my hands on the team and the car and
just try to work as quickly as possible.

‘It doesn't matter how many days, how
many hours it takes. I'm willing to put all the effort in. I feel like
I've got a new breath of life in me, so I'm ready for it.’

Meanwhile Hamilton’s former teammate, Jenson Button, is looking forward
to being the main focus at McLaren now that he is sharing the garage
with Mexican youngster Sergio Perez.

Button said of his team leader status: ‘It's not the first time I've
done that. When I got to BAR and Jacques [Villeneuve] left it was
exactly the same situation.

‘I was there to lead the team and it's something I really look forward
to and it's something where the best comes out of me in that situation.’

Determined to drive the design process of next year’s car in a direction
which can give him a machine capable of consistently challenge the
likes of Vettel and Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso, Button added: ‘I can
really build that team around me and direct the team in a direction I
like with the car.

‘We all drive differently and have different styles. For me, I need a
car I can develop beneath me and feel comfortable in. If the car feels
neutral and unbalanced it doesn't work for me.

‘I need to develop a car and engineer a car in a position that feels
comfortable for me, and I don't think anyone can do a better job than I
can in that position. The problem for me is if I can't get the car there
I do struggle more than some.'

Goal-line technology tested at Club World Cup match Sanfrecce Hiroshima v Auckland City

Goal-line technology tested in a match for the first time at Club World Cup (shame that absolutely nothing exciting happened then!)

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UPDATED:

14:23 GMT, 6 December 2012

The opening match of the Club World Cup between Sanfrecce Hiroshima and Auckland City may not have set the pulses racing, but it marked the first time FIFA has employed goal-line technology during a match.

The magnetic-field-based system GoalRef was used in Yokohama, while the matches at Toyota Stadium will be equipped with the camera-based Hawk-Eye system.

I spy: Goal-line technology was used for the first time during the FIFA Club World Cup in Yokohama on Thursday

I spy: Goal-line technology was used for the first time during the FIFA Club World Cup in Yokohama on Thursday

GoalRef sensors are set up in the goal

GoalRef uses a microchip in the ball and low magnetic waves around the goal

The ninth Club World Cup features the champions from FIFA's six confederations, plus a team from the host nation. Champions League winners Chelsea and Copa Libertadoes champions Corinthians have a bye into the semi-finals.

Toshihiro Aoyama scored a second-half
goal on Thursday to help J-League champions Hiroshima beat
Auckland 1-0 in the opening match.

Aoyama scored in the 66th minute with
a hard shot from 20 yards. Ryota Moriwaki nearly doubled Sanfrecce's
advantage in the 85th with a shot that hit the crossbar.

Matchwinner: Sanfrecce Hiroshima's Toshihiro Aoyama (second left) celebrates scoring the only goal

Matchwinner: Sanfrecce Hiroshima's Toshihiro Aoyama (second left) celebrates scoring the only goal

Back of the net: Auckland City goalkeeper Tamati Williams (right) reacts after Hiroshima's goal

Back of the net: Auckland City goalkeeper Tamati Williams (right) reacts after Hiroshima's goal

Shame it's come too late for these blatant gaffes…

Over the line: Frank Lampard's shot against Germany crossed the line but it was not given at the 2010 World Cup finals

Over the line: Frank Lampard's shot against Germany crossed the line but it was not given at the 2010 World Cup finals

Embarrassing: Manchester United keeper Roy Carroll dropped Pedro Mendes' 45-yard punt over the line but the ref didn't spot it

Embarrassing: Manchester United keeper Roy Carroll dropped Pedro Mendes' 45-yard punt over the line but the ref didn't spot it

Goal-line technology finally makes its debut on Thursday

It's too late for Lampard, Mendes and the Germans… but goal-line technology finally makes its debut on Thursday

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UPDATED:

09:55 GMT, 5 December 2012

FIFA secretary general Jerome Valcke
hailed 'a kind of revolution' as the football world prepared for Thursday's introduction of goal-line technology.

The governing body was staunchly
against the use of any form of technology for many years but the winds
changed in the wake of the 2010 World Cup, where England were denied a
clear goal against Germany when Frank Lampard's shot crossed the line.

Over the line: Frank Lampard's shot against Germany crossed the line but it was not given at the 2010 World Cup finals

Over the line: Frank Lampard's shot against Germany crossed the line but it was not given at the 2010 World Cup finals

Since then the journey has been a relatively rapid one and FIFA will try out two systems – UK-based Hawk-Eye and GoalRef, from Germany – at the Club World Cup in Japan, starting with the match between Sanfrecce Hiroshima and Auckland City.

'It's a big day,' Valcke said on fifa.com. 'Tomorrow will be the first time that goal-line technology will be officially used in a game. The tests are done; and the instillation tests were successful.

'This is also an important day for us, because we will use one of the two systems we are using here in the FIFA Confederations Cup next year.'

He added: 'This is a kind of revolution. It is the first time that this kind of technology is coming into football.

Embarrassing: Manchester United keeper Roy Carroll dropped Pedro Mendes' 45-yard punt over the line but the ref didn't spot it

Embarrassing: Manchester United keeper Roy Carroll dropped Pedro Mendes' 45-yard punt over the line but the ref didn't spot it

'It will be restricted to the goal-line specifically. The IFAB (International Football Association Board) is there to ensure the 17 laws of the game are protected.

'It was their decision, and they were clear, to say that the technology is limited to the goal-line.

'We must ensure that when the ball goes into the goal, the referee must get the information that the ball has gone in. The referee has the final decision.

'The technology won't change the speed, value or spirit of the game.

'There is no reason to be against this technology.'

Infamous: Geoff Hurst's shot crosses the line in 1966 World Cup final... or did it

Infamous: Geoff Hurst's shot crosses the line in 1966 World Cup final… or did it

The Hawk-Eye system is the same as that used in cricket and tennis, which relies on a series of seven cameras to create a 3D picture of each goal, while GoalRef uses electro-magnetic sensors.

Valcke also said he had full confidence there would be no errors from the technology.

'It needs to be the most accurate system we can have at the moment,' he said. 'There can be no mistakes with this and that is why the IFAB took two years to make sure the system was perfect.'

UEFA president Michel Platini considering goal-line technology

Platini in video technology U-turn as UEFA chief admits he's considering replays to rule on offside decisions

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UPDATED:

16:03 GMT, 28 November 2012

UEFA president Michel Platini has admitted he is considering the use of video replays to help referees rule on offside decisions for the first time.

It marks a dramatic turnaround from the head of European football, who has long been opposed to the use of goal-line technology and video in football to help referees make correct decisions, arguing they are unnecessary and slow the game down.

In fact, it was believed that even if English clubs had goal-line technology in place, he would insist that any clubs playing in the Champions League and Europa League turn OFF the hi-tech systems for those games.

Centre of attention: Platini is considering the use of video replays

Centre of attention: Platini is considering the use of video replays

Asked if he had changed his mind on the use of video by French newspaper Ouest France, Platini said: 'There is a complicated thing for which we might, and I say might, need video, it's offside. Because it is very difficult for the referees to rule on that.'

Since the European Championships in the summer, FIFA have jumped ahead of UEFA in their openness to using technology.

For FIFA president Sepp Blatter, the final straw came in Donetsk this summer, when it was not spotted by the officials that a shot from Ukraine forward Marko Devic had crossed the line before it was hooked away by John Terry.

Replays have established Devic had been offside earlier in the move, and that had not been spotted either. Yet at the time Platini uses that incident to underline why he does not want technology in the game.

Speaking in June Platini said: 'The goal between England and Ukraine: it was a goal. It was a mistake from the referee. But there was an offside before then.

'If the officials had given offside there wouldn't have been a goal. So why don't we have technology for offside decisions as well Where does it stop' 'It's not goal-line technology in itself,' said Platini.

'I am against technology coming into force to actually make decisions.

'It invades every single area. If tomorrow someone handballs it on the line and the referee doesn't see it, what then

'We can't just have goal-line technology. We also need sensors to see if someone has handballed it.

'We need cameras to see if it should be a goal or not.' During the summer it seemed there was even the possibility that Platini might look to prevent technology being used in UEFA's flagship tournaments even if FIFA decide to pursue the venture.

'We are going to see if this is suggested and proposed to all federations,' he said. 'The national federations will have then have the chance to decide whether they want goal-line technology.

'Mr Blatter knows what I think of this and I know his thoughts on the issue.'