Tag Archives: taipei

Roger Federer says he does not lack ambition despite taking two months off

Don't view my break as a lack of ambition… I still want to win more titles, warns Federer

By
Mike Dickson

PUBLISHED:

18:46 GMT, 12 March 2013

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UPDATED:

18:46 GMT, 12 March 2013

Roger Federer’s back is creaking again and soon he will be taking nearly two months off, but the Wimbledon champion insists that neither of these factors should be seen as his ambition waning for more titles.

Once he is finished at this week’s $10 million BNP Paribas Open Federer will retreat until May for practice and family time, and byhis return he is unlikely to still be world No 2.

Andy Murray, who earlier this morning was due to face Taipei’s Yen Hsun Lu in the third round, is closing and could usurp the great Swiss if he were to significantly outperform him at this first Masters event of the season.

Fully focused: Roger Federer says he does not lack ambition

Fully focused: Roger Federer says he does not lack ambition

Federer concedes that the forthcoming break will not help his ranking in the short term but believes it will make him more dangerous for the summer’s three Grand Slams: 'If you play well then you can manage your schedule, but with the rankings you do need to win the tournaments you actually play. I know when I’m playing well I always have a shot.

'My schedule is not in set in stone, maybe if I lost early here or won the tournament it could change my mindset but I doubt it because what I want to do is practise hard. I’m really eager for that because I haven’t been able to practise as much as I would have liked in the last two years.

Taking a break: Federer is set to take two months off

Taking a break: Federer is set to take two months off

'This year the priority is a big build up then coming back really strong for the Masters events in Madrid and Rome before Roland Garros.'

Federer’s back suffered one of its periodic tweaks during his third round victory over Ivan Dodig, but he feels he will be fine to face compatriot Stanislas Wawrinka today.

Victory in that could give him a much-anticipated clash with Rafael Nadal, but first the Spaniard has to overcome the season’s most improved player in Ernests Gulbis.

The colourful Latvian is very talented but has revelled in being an international playboy for the past three years. Now pledging to at least cut down on the drinking, smoking and carousing he has got himself fitter, and the result has been a 12-match winning streak.

Australian Open 2013: Venus Williams wins first round

Venus powers through to continue fine form after recovering from illness

and improved her
ranking to No 24 by year's end.

Easy does it: Venus Williams cruised into the second round of the Australian Open with a comfortable win

Easy does it: Venus Williams cruised into the second round of the Australian Open with a comfortable win

Williams could meet Maria Sharapova in the third round at Melbourne Park and was pleased to have negotiated the first hurdle with the minimum of fuss.

The American said: 'It's nice to spend less time on court and not be in long sets.

'A win is a win no matter what it is, but it's nice when it's more routine.'

Good game: Williams shakes hands with Galina Voskoboeva and was watched by sister Serena (below)

Good game: Williams shakes hands with Galina Voskoboeva and was watched by sister Serena (below)

Serena Williams

There were also wins for in-form fourth seed Agnieszka Radwanska, sixth seed Li Na and home favourite Sam Stosur.

Radwanska, the winner of the warm-up events in Auckland and Sydney, looked in danger of dropping her first set of 2013 when Australian wild card Bojana Bobusic served for the opener at 5-4 but the Pole upped her level and rattled off the next nine games to go through 7-5 6-0.

Nervy moments: Agnieszka Radwanska overcame a sluggish start to beat Bojana Bobusic in straight sets

Nervy moments: Agnieszka Radwanska overcame a sluggish start to beat Bojana Bobusic in straight sets

Li, the runner-up here in 2011, eased past Kazakhstan's Sesil Karatantcheva 6-1 6-3 but Stosur was made to work harder by Chang Kai-Chen of Chinese Taipei.

Ninth seed Stosur has only managed to reach the fourth round of her home grand slam and had her nervy moments once again before securing a 7-6 (7/3) 6-3 triumph.

Heather Watson reaches Osaka HP Open singles final

First for Watson as Brit reaches singles final at Osaka HP Open with narrow win

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UPDATED:

09:23 GMT, 13 October 2012

Great Britain's Heather Watson and Kai-Chen Chang of Chinese Taipei both reached their first ever singles final on the WTA Tour at the HP Open in Osaka.

The 20-year-old from Guernsey beat Japan's Misaki Doi in two tight sets – and Chang then stunned top seed Sam Stosur in a third-set tie-break.

Watson took her first set against Doi, winning 7/2 in a tie-break after each player broke serve once.

Further than ever: Heather Watson has reached her first ever singles final

Further than ever: Heather Watson has reached her first ever singles final

But like Watson's quarter-final win
over Pauline Parmentier on Friday, Saturday's second set was littered
with service breaks – an area Watson will surely have to improve on in
the final.

Watson finally came through with a
late fourth break against three for her opponent, wrapping up a 7-6
(7/2) 7-5 win in just over two hours to end the hopes of the home fans.

Stosur was the only woman among the
final four who had previously reached a tour semi-final but quickly
found herself a set down against world No 134 Chang.

The world No 9 from Australia levelled
the match but Chang, who knocked out Watson's fellow Briton Laura
Robson on Friday, was not to be denied.

After a break apiece in the final set she forced four match-points in the breaker, taking the second to win 6-2 4-6 7-6 (7/3).

Heather Watson through but Laura Robson out in Osaka

Watson cruises through in Japan but Robson crashes out at quarter-final stage

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UPDATED:

08:03 GMT, 12 October 2012

There were mixed fortunes for Britain's two quarter-finalists as Heather Watson was left to fly the flag in the HP Open in Osaka.

Watson needed only two sets but almost two hours to overcome France's Pauline Parmentier – ranked two places below her at 73rd in the world.

But Laura Robson, seeded eighth for the tournament, was beaten in a third-set tie-break by Kai-Chen Chang of Chinese Taipei.

Lone hope: Heather Watson reached the semi-finals in Osaka

Lone hope: Heather Watson reached the semi-finals in Osaka

Watson's match featured 12 breaks of serve in 21 games, with the Guernsey player grabbing her fourth late in the first set to win it 7-5.

Three more followed for the 20-year-old in the second set as she wrapped up a 7-5 6-3 win.

Robson dropped her serve twice as she lost her first set to the world No 134, but battled back to win the second and level the match.

The third set went with serve all the way, with not even a break point for either player, but Chang took the deciding tie-break to complete a 6-4 3-6 7-6 (7/4) win.

There was another upset as Misaki Doi ensured a Japanese presence in the semi-finals with a 2-6 6-1 6-3 win over seventh seed Chanelle Scheepers of South Africa. Doi will face Watson in the last four.

Top seed Sam Stosur will provide Chang's semi-final opposition after cruising past American Jamie Hampton 6-2 6-4.

The Australian, ranked ninth in the world, broke twice in the first set and once more in the second, never facing a break point on her own serve as she sealed victory in an hour and four minutes.

Jamie Murray and Andre Sa crash out of Thailand Open

Murray and Sa crash out of Thailand Open after last-eight defeat

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UPDATED:

11:33 GMT, 27 September 2012

Jamie Murray and Andre Sa were eliminated at the quarter-final stage in the men's doubles at the Thailand Open on Thursday.

The Scot and his Brazilian partner were beaten 6-4, 7-5 by Lu Yen-Hsun of Chinese Taipei and Thailand's Danai Udomchoke.

The match lasted one hour and 33 minutes, with Murray and Sa winning just three of 13 break point opportunities which came their way.

Exit: Murray and his partner Sa have fallen at the quarter-final stage

Exit: Murray and his partner Sa have fallen at the quarter-final stage

London 2012 archery: The British struggle

Off target Archers now rank outsiders after Brits struggle on opening day

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UPDATED:

10:00 GMT, 28 July 2012

Olympics 2012

Great Britain's chances of a medal in the women’s archery were hit by a faulty bow during a disappointing ranking round at Lord’s.

Naomi Folkard was Britain’s highest-ranked participant in 42nd place as the archers earned their seedings for the individual and team events.

The Kidderminster-based 28-year-old scored 637 from a maximum of 720, with six-time Olympian Alison Williamson 47th on 629 and Amy Oliver 57th with 608.

Best of British: Naomi Folkard fared best on what was a poor day overall for the home contingent

Best of British: Naomi Folkard fared best on what was a poor day overall for the home contingent

Great Britain finished seeded 11th out of 12 nations in the team event, which takes place on Sunday, leaving them to face Russia in the round of 16 and, potentially, third seeds Chinese Taipei in the quarter-finals.

South Korea’s Bo Bae Ki and Ya-Ting Tan of Chinese Taipei led the rankings, tied on 671 points.

Rotherham-born Oliver, the world No 37, claimed that a technical fault with her bow contributed to her lowly position.

‘Halfway through the round I found that my bow wasn’t working correctly,’ she said. ‘I had to change it and then after that I felt better and they were going where I was aiming them. After that I shot really well so at least I know it isn’t me.

‘It was a little bit distracting because I didn’t know why I wasn’t shooting as well as I have been all week. I was feeling strong but the arrows weren’t going where they were meant to.’

Williamson, who became the third British Olympian to appear in six Games, insisted the home trio could still make it on to the podium.

Add them up: Great Britain's Alison Williamson checks her arrows during the ranking round

Add them up: Great Britain's Alison Williamson checks her arrows during the ranking round

Williamson, 40, and Folkard, along with Charlotte Burgess, just missed out on a medal in Beijing four years ago, losing by two points to France in the bronze medal match.

Williamson’s bronze medal in Athens eight years ago was the last British archery medal. Despite their poor showing on Friday, she has clearly not discounted the prospect of winning another.

‘We’ve done it now. We can’t change the results,’ said Williamson. ‘Most people, when they look at their score at the end, will think, “I could have done this or that” but that’s archery.

‘If we reach the level we can then we’re more than capable of a medal. If we’re all shooting our best on the day we can do it.’

Folkard confessed to also being left frustrated at the home of cricket, having not shot to her best. But, like Williamson, she insisted there was still every reason to be positive.

Better luck next time: Amy Oliver suffered a fault in her bow

Better luck next time: Amy Oliver suffered a fault in her bow

As well as meeting the Russians in the team event, Folkard will line up against Russia’s Kristina Timofeeva in the singles and is content with her frame of mind ahead of those matches.

‘The score wasn’t ideal, so I’m a bit disappointed, but I kept going through the right mental processes and I’m pleased with the way I shot,’ she said.

‘There were just a couple of ends where I wasn’t good enough. I have a day to work on it then we go again in the team event.

‘You have to be confident going into the head to heads and if you’re feeling good that’s going to give you more confidence.

‘Feeling good about my game, for me, gives more confidence than just a good score. I know I’m shooting really well, I just have to put it all together.’

London 2012 Olympics: British archers struggle

Off target Archers now rank outsiders after Brits struggle on opening day

|

UPDATED:

01:55 GMT, 28 July 2012

Olympics 2012

Great Britain's chances of a medal in the women’s archery were hit by a faulty bow during a disappointing ranking round at Lord’s.

Naomi Folkard was Britain’s highest-ranked participant in 42nd place as the archers earned their seedings for the individual and team events.

The Kidderminster-based 28-year-old scored 637 from a maximum of 720, with six-time Olympian Alison Williamson 47th on 629 and Amy Oliver 57th with 608.

Best of British: Naomi Folkard fared best on what was a poor day overall for the home contingent

Best of British: Naomi Folkard fared best on what was a poor day overall for the home contingent

Great Britain finished seeded 11th out of 12 nations in the team event, which takes place on Sunday, leaving them to face Russia in the round of 16 and, potentially, third seeds Chinese Taipei in the quarter-finals.

South Korea’s Bo Bae Ki and Ya-Ting Tan of Chinese Taipei led the rankings, tied on 671 points.

Rotherham-born Oliver, the world No 37, claimed that a technical fault with her bow contributed to her lowly position.

‘Halfway through the round I found that my bow wasn’t working correctly,’ she said. ‘I had to change it and then after that I felt better and they were going where I was aiming them. After that I shot really well so at least I know it isn’t me.

‘It was a little bit distracting because I didn’t know why I wasn’t shooting as well as I have been all week. I was feeling strong but the arrows weren’t going where they were meant to.’

Williamson, who became the third British Olympian to appear in six Games, insisted the home trio could still make it on to the podium.

Add them up: Great Britain's Alison Williamson checks her arrows during the ranking round

Add them up: Great Britain's Alison Williamson checks her arrows during the ranking round

Williamson, 40, and Folkard, along with Charlotte Burgess, just missed out on a medal in Beijing four years ago, losing by two points to France in the bronze medal match.

Williamson’s bronze medal in Athens eight years ago was the last British archery medal. Despite their poor showing on Friday, she has clearly not discounted the prospect of winning another.

‘We’ve done it now. We can’t change the results,’ said Williamson. ‘Most people, when they look at their score at the end, will think, “I could have done this or that” but that’s archery.

‘If we reach the level we can then we’re more than capable of a medal. If we’re all shooting our best on the day we can do it.’

Folkard confessed to also being left frustrated at the home of cricket, having not shot to her best. But, like Williamson, she insisted there was still every reason to be positive.

Better luck next time: Amy Oliver suffered a fault in her bow

Better luck next time: Amy Oliver suffered a fault in her bow

As well as meeting the Russians in the team event, Folkard will line up against Russia’s Kristina Timofeeva in the singles and is content with her frame of mind ahead of those matches.

‘The score wasn’t ideal, so I’m a bit disappointed, but I kept going through the right mental processes and I’m pleased with the way I shot,’ she said.

‘There were just a couple of ends where I wasn’t good enough. I have a day to work on it then we go again in the team event.

‘You have to be confident going into the head to heads and if you’re feeling good that’s going to give you more confidence.

‘Feeling good about my game, for me, gives more confidence than just a good score. I know I’m shooting really well, I just have to put it all together.’

Wimbledon 2012: Maria Sharapova beats Su-Wei Hsieh

Maria's on the move! Sharapova cruises into fourth-round after beating Hsieh

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UPDATED:

15:46 GMT, 29 June 2012

Top seed Maria Sharapova secured her passage into Wimbledon's second week with a regulation win over Su-Wei Hsieh on Friday afternoon.

The French Open champion broke serve three times in the opening set and then recovered from a break in the first game of the second to take the match 6-1 6-4.

Her reward is a fourth-round meeting with Germany's Sabine Lisicki – the woman she beat at the semi-final stage last year.

See you soon: Maria Sharapova waves after winning

See you soon: Maria Sharapova waves after winning

No match: Su-Wei Hsieh could not handle Sharapova

No match: Su-Wei Hsieh could not handle Sharapova

Sharapova will need to serve better against the German on Monday, having offered up five double faults today, but her unheralded opponent was rarely in a position to cash in.

When Hsieh did break to go 1-0 up in the second she had already succumbed to a heavy first-set loss, losing serve three out of the four times she had the ball in hand.

The 26-year-old Chinese Taipei player, competing in her fourth Wimbledon singles, did move 4-2 ahead in the second set, but Sharapova quickly broke back and then sped away with the match on a windy Court One.

'She was a tricky opponent,' Sharapova said afterwards.

'She changed the pace really well and her serve is really tricky. The conditions were tough, I had to face a lot out there and be patient. The wind was tricky but I knew I had to handle it.'

Power: Sharapova is through to the fourth-round

Power: Sharapova is through to the fourth-round

Andy Murray: Olympics bigger than Grand Slams

Olympics 'bigger than Grand Slams': Murray ranks gold medal as his No 1 priority

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 10 April 2012

Andy Murray believes winning a gold medal at the Olympics would be a bigger achievement than a maiden Grand Slam title.

The British No 1 has three times been runner-up in a Grand Slam but has said standing on top of the podium at London 2012 would
provide the 'ultimate' moment.

Eyes on the prize: Andy Murray with the AEGEON Championships Trophy

Eyes on the prize: Andy Murray with the AEGEON Championships Trophy

The 24-year-old is preparing for a hectic summer which sees the Olympic
tournament, at the All England Club from July 28 to August 5, sandwiched
between the end of Wimbledon on July 8 and the start of the US Open on
August 27.

'This summer's going to be huge,' said world No 4 Murray.

'I'd be
desperate to win Olympic gold. I think either winning a Slam or Olympic
gold would be celebrated by the nation but winning an Olympic medal is
something that belongs to your country as well. In sporting terms I
would say the Olympics is bigger than winning a Grand Slam because
everybody knows what Olympic gold is, whereas not everybody knows what a
Grand Slam is.

Early exit: Murray lost in the first-round at the Beijing Olympics in 2008

Early exit: Murray lost in the first-round at the Beijing Olympics in 2008

'The Olympics is bigger than tennis, bigger than the Slams for sure.
It's a huge competition. In tennis, when you've finished playing people
would probably look at a Grand Slam before an Olympic gold, but in
sporting terms an Olympic gold is pretty much the ultimate achievement.'

Murray competed in Beijing four years ago but crashed out in the first
round of the singles to Lu Yen-hsun of Chinese Taipei and was eliminated
along with brother Jamie at the second-round stage of the doubles.

'The Olympics is just different,' he added.

Return date: Murray will be back at SW19 three weeks after Wimbledon ends

Return date: Murray will be back at SW19 three weeks after Wimbledon ends

'You feel like you're
playing for other people, playing for your country. A lot of times when
you're on tour you're playing for yourself.

'In Beijing I didn't really play well but it's one of the best
experiences I've had as an athlete, being around all the top athletes in
the world. You don't get that chance often because tennis is such an
individual sport.

'Tennis at the Olympics has become a big deal, everybody plays it now,
whereas 10, 15 years ago people would skip it. You see the emotion of
the guys. (Novak) Djokovic won bronze and it was a huge thing for him.
If he'd lost in the semi-finals of a Grand Slam, he'd be disappointed.'

Come on Andy!: Murray's girlfriend Kim Sears and coach Ivan Lendl at last month's Sony Ericsson Open

Come on Andy!: Murray's girlfriend Kim Sears and coach Ivan Lendl at last month's Sony Ericsson Open

Murray has confirmed he will defend his AEGON Championships title in
June. He has committed to playing at Queen's Club for the next five
years in
an arrangement which coincides with the event's new broadcasting deal
with the BBC, which runs to 2016.

Meanwhile, Britain's Anne Keothavong
yesterday beat Melinda Czink 4-6, 6-2, 6-3 in the first round of the
E-Boks Open in Copenhagen.

Dressed for success: Murray modelling the Stella McCartney-designed 2012 kit with other Team GB members

Dressed for success: Murray modelling the Stella McCartney-designed 2012 kit with other Team GB members