Tag Archives: stumps

MS Dhoni gives India an injury scare ahead of third ODI against England

Dhoni gives India a scare after being hit on thumb ahead of his homecoming ODI in Ranchi

By
Paul Newman

PUBLISHED:

20:40 GMT, 17 January 2013

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UPDATED:

08:19 GMT, 18 January 2013

MS Dhoni gave his fanatical home city of Ranchi a scare yesterday after being hit on the thumb in the nets.

The India captain, a god-like figure here, was seen with an ice-pack over his hand after the incident, giving rise to fears he could miss the pivotal third one-day international tomorrow.

However, it transpired that he did not need an X-ray and should be fit to lead India.

Thumbs up: Dhoni (right) was hit on the hand in the nets but will play tomorrow

Thumbs up: Dhoni (right) was hit on the hand in the nets but will play tomorrow

That is a good thing for this city, because rarely can any match have been more
about one person. This is the MS Dhoni ODI and it seems as though every
one of the million-plus people who live in his home city want to be at
the brand new 40,000-capacity JSCA International Stadium.

The India captain welcomed the all of his team to the house he has had built here for a reception on Wednesday but now England, who were not invited, have to try to gatecrash the festivities.

When asked if a victory would feel like raining on Dhoni’s parade, England assistant coach Richard Halsall said: ‘It’s his home town, but our players are cold and clinical enough not to think about that.’

The centre of attention: MS Dhoni takes on England in his home town of Ranchi with India looking to take a series lead

The centre of attention: MS Dhoni takes on England in his home town of Ranchi with India looking to take a series lead

It is to Dhoni’s credit that he had a house built in this far from glamorous part of north-eastern India, particularly as the building was attacked by a mob during construction in 2007 simply because he got out for a duck in the World Cup against Bangladesh.

If England are going to take a 2-1 lead, they know the best way is to silence the crowd by quickly dismissing the game’s most destructive ODI batsman.

‘If you bowl at Dhoni’s stumps the ball goes significant distances,’ said Halsall.

Big hitter: Dhoni is a dangerman

Big hitter: Dhoni is a dangerman

‘But when you bowl really well at him, as we did in the powerplay the other night, he has to change his tactics. That wasn’t the usual MS Dhoni during those five overs. He did things we wanted him to do and that’s what we must get him to do again.’

Halsall was succinct in assessing where England had gone wrong in the Kochi crash.

‘We had two very bad patches, in the last 10 overs of their innings and from the 10th to the 15th of ours, and you don’t win ODIs if you go for more than a hundred in the last 10 and lose three of your top five in six overs.’

And there was a defence of Craig Kieswetter, who looked unable to work the gaps during England’s innings.

‘Craig needed to suck up the pressure when we were 70 for four. He held his nerve when people were saying, “We’ve only scored three runs in four overs”. The disappointing thing was he (then) got out.

‘People have short memories. A couple of games ago he and Samit Patel put us in a position to win that first match.’

It is the other keeper who will occupy England’s thoughts.

England relish their role as MS Dhoni party poopers as Ranchi plays host to crucial third ODI

England relish their role as Dhoni party poopers as Ranchi plays host to crucial third ODI

By
Paul Newman

PUBLISHED:

20:40 GMT, 17 January 2013

|

UPDATED:

20:41 GMT, 17 January 2013

England can be forgiven for feeling like unwanted guests at a party when they step out for the pivotal third one-day international in the giant shadow cast over the whole of Ranchi by the local hero.

Rarely can any match have been more about one person. This is the MS Dhoni ODI and it seems as though every one of the million-plus people who live in his home city want to be at the brand new 40,000-capacity JSCA International Stadium.

The India captain welcomed the all of his team to the house he has had built here for a reception on Wednesday but now England, who were not invited, have to try to gatecrash the festivities.

When asked if a victory would feel like raining on Dhoni’s parade, England assistant coach Richard Halsall said: ‘It’s his home town, but our players are cold and clinical enough not to think about that.’

The centre of attention: MS Dhoni takes on England in his home town of Ranchi with India looking to take a series lead

The centre of attention: MS Dhoni takes on England in his home town of Ranchi with India looking to take a series lead

It is to Dhoni’s credit that he had a house built in this far from glamorous part of north-eastern India, particularly as the building was attacked by a mob during construction in 2007 simply because he got out for a duck in the World Cup against Bangladesh.

If England are going to take a 2-1 lead, they know the best way is to silence the crowd by quickly dismissing the game’s most destructive ODI batsman.

‘If you bowl at Dhoni’s stumps the ball goes significant distances,’ said Halsall.

Big hitter: Dhoni is a dangerman

Big hitter: Dhoni is a dangerman

‘But when you bowl really well at him, as we did in the powerplay the other night, he has to change his tactics. That wasn’t the usual MS Dhoni during those five overs. He did things we wanted him to do and that’s what we must get him to do again.’

Halsall was succinct in assessing where England had gone wrong in the Kochi crash.

‘We had two very bad patches, in the last 10 overs of their innings and from the 10th to the 15th of ours, and you don’t win ODIs if you go for more than a hundred in the last 10 and lose three of your top five in six overs.’

And there was a defence of Craig Kieswetter, who looked unable to work the gaps during England’s innings.

‘Craig needed to suck up the pressure when we were 70 for four. He held his nerve when people were saying, “We’ve only scored three runs in four overs”. The disappointing thing was he (then) got out.

‘People have short memories. A couple of games ago he and Samit Patel put us in a position to win that first match.’

It is the other keeper who will occupy England’s thoughts.

Tony Greig dies: Patrick Collins tribute

Brash and tactless he may have been but Greig was also cricket's saviour

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 29 December 2012

The MCC flag on the clock tower at Lord’s is flying at half-mast in memory of Tony Greig.

The former England captain, who died aged 66 following a heart attack at his home in Sydney on Saturday, would have smiled at this tribute from Official England. For no cricketer ever attracted such vituperation from those who ruled the game. Yet no cricketer ever succeeded so completely in transforming the game they once ruled.

Brash and combative, truculent and tactless, Greig will be recalled as much for his role in celebrated controversies as for his status as one of cricket’s finest all-rounders.

66 and out: Former England captain and popular television commentator Tony Greig has died in Sydney at the age of 66

66 and out: Former England captain and popular television commentator Tony Greig has died in Sydney at the age of 66

Job well done: Greig, then captain of England, relaxes with a pint after a Test match at Old Trafford in 1972

Job well done: Greig, then captain of England, relaxes with a pint after a Test match at Old Trafford in 1972

There was his foolhardy promise to make
the 1976 West Indies tourists ‘grovel’. It was a crassly offensive term
in any circumstances; spoken by a white South African at a time when
apartheid still oppressed that benighted country, it was catastrophic.

There was the day in Trinidad when he threw down the stumps of Alvin
Kallicharran as the West Indies batsman walked off the field at the
close of play. Greig appealed, the umpire raised his finger and a major
riot ensued. On the following morning, the appeal was revoked. But the
memory lingered.

Then there was Packer. Most of all, there was Packer. Some 35 years on, it is impossible to convey the depth of the outrage.

All-rounder: Greig scored 3,599 Test runs at an average of 40.43 and was also more than handy with the ball, claiming 141 wickets at an average of 32.20

All-rounder: Greig scored 3,599 Test runs at an average of 40.43 and was also more than handy with the ball, claiming 141 wickets at an average of 32.20

Mentor: Greig offers some words of advice for players of the future during a match for Brighton and Hove CC at Basingstoke in 1978

Mentor: Greig offers some words of advice for players of the future during a match for Brighton and Hove CC at Basingstoke in 1978

Leaders: Deposed England cricket captain Tony Greig (right) and his successor, Mike Brearley, during practice prior to the 1st ODI against Australia at Old Trafford in Manchester on 22nd June 1977

Leaders: Deposed England cricket captain Tony Greig (right) and his successor, Mike Brearley, during practice prior to the 1st ODI against Australia at Old Trafford in Manchester on 22nd June 1977

In 1977, cricketers were seen as being fortunate to play the game. Their
wages were meagre, their financial prospects precarious. Greig had been
captain of England for two years, a popular figure who seemed capable
of regenerating English cricket. But he had signed a secret agreement
with Kerry Packer, the owner of Nine Network in Australia, to set up a
‘rebel’ troupe of international cricketers.

He then — while still captain — began to recruit English and foreign cricketers for the Packer ‘circus’.

The plot became public and, within a week, Greig had lost the captaincy.
He was retained for an Ashes series as an England player, but his
international career then expired. He threw his energies behind Packer’s
successful attempt to popularise the game, especially the one-day
version with its coloured clothing and tumultuous crowds. The sport was
truly transformed.

Meeting of minds: Greig chats with Pakistan cricketer of the sixties Saeed Ahmed in the United Arab Emirates in 1997

Meeting of minds: Greig chats with Pakistan cricketer of the sixties Saeed Ahmed in the United Arab Emirates in 1997

Controversial times: Greig as captain of the World Series Cricket World XI in the 1979 Supertest Grand Final match with Australia in Sydney

Controversial times: Greig as captain of the World Series Cricket World XI in the 1979 Supertest Grand Final match with Australia in Sydney

It all tended to obscure the fact that he was a blissfully talented
cricketer. Six feet six inches in height, he scored 3,599 Test runs at
40.43 and took 141 wickets at 32.20. Once in the West Indies, with
England needing to win to save the series, he experimented with
off-spin. He took 13 wickets, scored a six and three-quarter-hour
century and England won by 26 runs.

An extraordinary talent.

He later moved to Australia and built a career as a commentator on
Packer’s television channel. The energy never dimmed until these last
few weeks, when he was diagnosed with lung cancer and his health swiftly
failed.

Memorabilia: Greig studies the ball used by Indian spinner Harbhajan Singh when he became the first Indian to take a hat-trick in Test cricket at an auction in Bangalore in 2003

Memorabilia: Greig studies the ball used by Indian spinner Harbhajan Singh when he became the first Indian to take a hat-trick in Test cricket at an auction in Bangalore in 2003

He has received a number of glowing obituaries, but many years ago his
former England colleague, Pat ‘Percy’ Pocock, wrote: ‘When the whole
Packer business erupted, the popular cry was that Tony Greig had
betrayed the game. I never believed that, and I think history will be
kind to him. Far from betraying it, I fancy he may just have saved it.’

Tony Greig would have appreciated the MCC flag on the clock tower. But I
suspect that Percy’s tribute would be the one he valued most of all.

WORLD OF CRICKET UNITES TO PAY TRIBUTE TO GREIG

England wicketkeeper, Matt Prior: 'Can't believe one of my heroes Tony Greig has passed away. One of the greatest voices in cricket and will be sorely missed. #RIPGreigy.'

England batsman Jonny Bairstow: 'Today we lost a fabulous man, a family friend and someone who was respected by all not only as a cricketer but a true gentleman RIPTonyGreig'

England opener, Nick Compton:
'Sad day – RIP Tony Greig a fantastic player and a good man, loved his
commentary was one of the best! Cricket world will miss u.'

Legendary Aussie fast bowler, Brett Lee: 'OMG Poor Tony Greig. I feel so sad and shocked right now. Can't believe it.'

England all-rounder, Luke Wright: 'Gutted to hear that Tony Greig has passed away. A legend on and off the field. Our thoughts are with his family and friends #RIPGreigy.'

Australia captain Michael Clarke on www.cricket.com.au: 'I was only speaking with Tony a couple of days ago so news of his passing is absolutely devastating.

'Tony has a long and decorated history with international cricket both as a player and commentator and cricket will be much poorer for his loss.

'Personally, he has also been a great mentor for me, providing great advice through the good times and the bad.'

Former Australian paceman Glen McGrath: My thoughts are with Tony Greig's family today. RIP Tony Greig'

Long-serving Nine Network cricket commentator and former Australia captain Richie Benaud recalled Greig's 'fearless' reaction to the English public following his decision to join the Packer team in 1977.
'There was an enormous amount of pressure on him,' Benaud told the Sydney Morning Herald.

'He was captain of England at the time and played against Australia at Lord's. The English people turned against him.

'He wasn't just a fearless cricketer but a fearless thinker as well. He would not just jump in boots first, but it wouldn't matter how much pressure it put on him, he would stick with it.'

Former Australia fast bowler Dennis Lillee told the same publication: 'Tony was a tough opponent who took on all opposition with aggression and a determination to win.

'We will not forget the way he stirred the viewers in a similar vein to the way he did to opposition teams.'

ICC chief executive David Richardson: 'This is extremely sad news for cricket and the ICC send their condolences to Tony's family and in particular his wife Vivian.

'Tony played a significant part in shaping modern cricket as a player in the 1970s and then provided millions of cricket lovers with a unique insight as a thoughtful and knowledgeable commentator – primarily for the Nine Network in Australia.

'I met with him on several occasions during the recent ICC World Twenty20 in Sri Lanka where he was a senior commentator for our broadcast partner ESS.

'He was also a regular visitor to the ICC offices in Dubai when commentating for Ten Sports.

'I am sure that I will not be alone in saying that he and his wise words will be missed by cricketers, administrators and spectators around the world.

'His figures in Test matches show that he was one of the leading all-rounders of his generation with a batting average of above 40 and a bowling average around 32.'

BUMBLE TEST DIARY: Revealed – Anderson swings both ways and young Root is no monumental blocker

BUMBLE TEST DIARY: Revealed – Anderson swings both ways and Nasser is the ice man

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UPDATED:

18:26 GMT, 14 December 2012

JIMMY HAPPY TO BE STUCK IN THE MIDDLE WITH KP

Jimmy Anderson was awesome. He is an exceptional performer, an artist with the ball. He bowls natural swing, then reverse swing, he's accurate, he's got pace. He also hit the middle stumps of Sachin Tendulkar and Virender Sehwag. When he celebrated that Sehwag dismissal, it was obvious there was a lot of lurve between Anderson and Kevin Pietersen – they had come up with a plan to bowl an early inswinger at Sehwag and it worked. So it's official, Anderson swings both ways!

James Anderson

James Anderson

King of the swingers: James Anderson took phenomenal figures of three for 24 in Nagpur today

ROOT'S NO CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCKER

Joe Root has made a memorable start to his Test career. He looked so assured, but don't think for a minute that he's just a monumental blocker. He's an attractive player in county cricket. He simply played the situation here, and the way he opened his hands and played spin reminded me of Geoffrey Boycott. The fact he's playing so well in India at just 21 is down to natural talent plus the great people round him in England's camp. They wanted him in the team and it's a terrific selection.

Howzat: England No 6 Joe Root posted a picture of his early batting career yesterday. He was no dummy...

Howzat: England No 6 Joe Root posted a picture of his early batting career yesterday. He was no dummy…

SHAME CHAMPION SACHIN ISN'T GOING OUT ON A HIGH

Sachin Tendulkar is an icon, a complete champion. The whole of India wanted him to succeed and he was simply trying to stay in on what is not an easy pitch but he got a perfect delivery from Anderson. When he was in his pomp, England had no idea where to bowl at Sachin – now they know they can get at him. It's sad because you want to see a champion go out on a real high.

CAPTAIN COOK IS FIVE OVERS AHEAD OF THE GAME

We all thought Alastair Cook would be a clone of Andrew Strauss as captain, be fairly cautious and wait for things to happen but he is showing real signs of being his own man and coming up with innovative plans. He looks as though he is five overs ahead of the game and that is an invaluable asset as skipper.

I GOT HIT ON THE BONCE A LOT… WHICH EXPLAINS A LOT

Cook started off with young Joe Root stationed at short leg. It's always the same, the young pro gets thrust in there and it's not right. It's a specialist position and you need someone with a feel for standing there – like Ian Bell. So Cook replaced Root with Bell who then took a stunning reflex catch. You've got to be a bit daft to stand at short leg – I fielded there for 19 years! I didn't wear any protective equipment either but I never got hit in the crown jewels…although I did got hit lots on the bonce, which may explain a bit.

Nasser Hussain

Nasser Hussain

Grin and bear it: Bumble's Sportsmail colleague Nasser Hussain and family have been wrapping up warm…

ICE-COOL NASSER… AND MRS NASSER

With all this inclement weather in
England, the boiler has packed up at Hussain Towers! There was lots of
Twitter advice saying his condenser pipe had frozen and it needed a
kettle of hot water poured on to release the ice and kick-start the
boiler. All well and good, but when the 100 call-out fee was mentioned,
Nasser turned white as a sheet. He then said he'll leave it for now and
has advised Mrs Hussain to put on another jacket or go for a brisk
walk.

More from David Lloyd…

BUMBLE TEST DIARY: On your bikes, lads… Get on with the flipping game, India… You're 2-1 down!I was expecting someone to bring you tea and sarnies
13/12/12

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: A billion reasons why India must improve… (and leave Samit alone)
09/12/12

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: It's a case of 'after you Claude' for captain Cook but England can rely on their attack
07/12/12

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: Cook and Compo are good neighbours (they have the perfect blend)… but Che Pujara won't revolutionise fielding
06/12/12

BUMBLE TEST DIARY: How I nodded off and woke up dreaming of Monty and Bruno (but Beefy's wrong, it had nothing to do with Timothy Taylor)
05/12/12

BUMBLE TEST DIARY: Rolling Stones fan Bumble says – It's only an England Test victory in India… but I like it, like it, yes I do!
26/11/12

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: Atherton is right, KP is a genius… but Monty and Co proved England can beat India at their own game
25/11/12

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: Why Monty bowling on this pitch is 'Satisfaction' guaranteed… but unlike that old rocker Beefy, 'Wild Horses' can't drag me away from the cricket

23/11/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

England on verge of winning third Test in India

England on verge of victory but Ashwin frustrates tourists as India dig in

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UPDATED:

11:35 GMT, 8 December 2012

England inflicted a telling collapse on India to put themselves on the verge of victory, and an unassailable 2-1 series lead, after day four of the third Test at Eden Gardens.

The tourists took six wickets for 36 runs this afternoon but, with an innings win almost within their grasp in the final session, Ravichandran Ashwin (83 not out) prevented them finishing the job.

Number eight Ashwin even took India into a 32-run credit by stumps on 239 for nine, and forced England to take a second new ball under floodlights, as the contest somehow limped into a final day.

There was no way past Ashwin and Ishant Sharma for more than an hour in a ninth-wicket stand of 38.

Ashwin escaped a stumping chance on 22, and Sharma was dropped by wicketkeeper Matt Prior on nought – both off Monty Panesar.

Then even after Panesar at last got the number 10, toppling over to be bowled, Ashwin stayed to complete his 111-ball 50 with successive fours off Graeme Swann which also ensured England must bat again.

England just did not have the leeway they needed as Ashwin stood firm, in company with last man Pragyan Ojha.

After dominating the first three days thanks to Alastair Cook's batting and James Anderson and Panesar's bowling, the tourists first had to overcome a chastening morning before India's collapse.

England's own last four wickets could muster only 14 on the way to 523 all out and then they were unable to take any of India's before lunch.

But after Graeme Swann kickstarted the hosts' troubles by bowling Virender Sehwag with the first ball of the afternoon, the rest of the frontline batting simply folded.

Sehwag and Gautam Gambhir sowed some doubts in an opening stand of 86 in just 28 overs, during which England had a half-chance to see off each of the openers.

But Sehwag escaped on seven when Swann could not hang on to a low one-handed catch to his left at second slip off Anderson, then Gambhir pushed Panesar off the face of the bat to short-leg, where Ian Bell could not quite react in time.

Ball rolling: Graeme Swann took the first wicket of India's second innings

Ball rolling: Graeme Swann took the first wicket of India's second innings

The most worrying aspect for the tourists was the increasing ease with which Sehwag in particular was playing their spinners.

But they need not have been concerned because Swann produced the perfect off-break to draw the drive, beat the bat and hit the outside of off-stump straight after the break.

Gambhir had accepted the blame in the first innings for Sehwag's run-out, and perhaps will need to do likewise for his part in a faulty single which saw off Cheteshwar Pujara thanks to Bell's direct hit from midwicket.

Transient controversy followed when Gambhir escaped on 36, umpire Rod Tucker apparently initially satisfied he had edged to slip but unsure whether the ball had carried to a diving Jonathan Trott.

It had, but third umpire Vineet Kulkarni also seemed to convey the fact Gambhir had not got bat on ball after all.

The right decision had been reached via a grey area in the established process for series not involving DRS.

But the fact that Gambhir followed some reverse-swing from Finn (three for 37) to edge behind just four runs later relegated the discussion, and it was less relevant still when Sachin Tendulkar was next out, edging a Swann arm ball to slip.

Flying Finn: England's bowlers all chipped in to dismantle India

Flying Finn: England's bowlers all chipped in to dismantle India

Yuvraj Singh and Virat Kohli's attempt to stop the rot did not last long before the left-hander was bowled by one from Anderson that snaked in from round the wicket and kept low, and India captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni edged the same bowler low to his opposite number Cook at slip.

Kohli edged behind flailing at some more outswing from Finn after tea, and it seemed certain England were on the home straight – until Ashwin got set.

England had arrived this morning in the hope of maximising the pressure and an hour's profitable batting would have been their first wish.

Instead, their innings was finished in under five overs.

Prior and Swann could add only a single between them to their existing seventh-wicket stand of 56.

Prior drove the first ball of the day for a single, only for Swann to then immediately become Ojha's fourth victim – edging another attempted drive to slip.

Tail end: Monty Panesar took the final wicket of the day

Tail end: Monty Panesar took the final wicket of the day

Then Prior went to cut Zaheer Khan at the other end and edged behind – England's second departure in the space of seven balls.

Finn and Anderson managed a boundary each but the introduction of Ashwin for Ojha (four for 142) brought two wickets in two balls to conclude the innings.

Ashwin had previously conceded 183 runs for his one success but, after Anderson edged to slip and Monty Panesar went lbw first ball, despite an apparent inside-edge, the off-spinner had two more at no further cost.

It seemed the mid-match momentum had perhaps switched, all the more so when Sehwag and Gambhir tried to seize the initiative too.

But it was a short-lived illusion.

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures
from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of
Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news
organisations.

The BCCI
has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty
Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.
MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and
supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Alistair Cook"s bizarre dismissal the latest in a long line of unusual wickets

Captain Cook will be kicking himself for his freak dismissal in Kolkata… but he's not the first batsman to be left scratching his head

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UPDATED:

11:21 GMT, 7 December 2012

England captain Alastair Cook lost his wicket in bizarre circumstances on day three of the third Test in Kolkata.

He failed to ground his bat on returning to his crease and jumped out of the way of Virat Kohli's shy at the stumps.

Cook hung low on his bat for a second as the realisation of what he had done sank in.

And he joins the list of batsmen – including a couple of fellow England captains – to lose their wickets in bizarre circumstances after looking well set at the crease.

Bizarre dismissal: Alistair Cook, ten shy of a double hundred, forgot to ground his bat when leaping out of the way of Virat Kohli's throw at the stumps

Bizarre dismissal: Alistair Cook, ten shy of a double hundred, forgot to ground his bat when leaping out of the way of Virat Kohli's throw at the stumps

Graham Gooch v Australia – Old Trafford (1993)

The England opener was on 133 in the opening Ashes Test in Manchester and slowly but surely was guiding England towards an improbable draw when he was undone by a steep riser from Merv Hughes.

As the ball bounced down towards the stumps, Gooch brushed the ball away with his glove and umpire Dickie Bird had no option but to raise his finger.

His dismissal made him only the fifth batsman in history to be given out for handling the ball and ended any remaining hope of England saving the Test.

Decent fist of it: Graham Gooch punches the ball away as a Merv Hughes bouncer heads for the stumps in the second innings of England's Ashes first test defeat in 1993

Decent fist of it: Graham Gooch punches the ball away as a Merv Hughes bouncer heads for the stumps in the second innings of England's Ashes first test defeat in 1993

Michael Vaughan v India (2001-02)

Needing a win to level the series on their 2001 tour of India, England weren't helped when Michael Vaughan was given out for handling the ball in their first innings.

Attempting to sweep Sarandeep Singh, the Yorkshire batsman, who was well set on 64, missed completely and the ball trickled underneath his pads towards the stumps.

Without thinking, Vaughan knocked the ball away with his right hand to prevent it hitting. It didn't fool Virender Sehwag at short leg and Vaughan became the seventh batsman to be dismissed for handling the ball in Test cricket.

The Test was eventually drawn and the series lost 1-0.

Not much comfort: Mark Ramprakash tries to find the right words for Michael Vaughan after the latter knocks the ball away with his hand to stop it hitting the stumps on England's 2001 tour of India

Not much comfort: Mark Ramprakash tries to find the right words for Michael Vaughan after the latter knocks the ball away with his hand to stop it hitting the stumps on England's 2001 tour of India

Wayne Phillips v England (1985)

An incident that cost Australia the fifth Test of the 1985 Ashes series and many believe should never have been given out.

Wayne Phillips, offering stout final day resistance on 59, hit a ball from Phil Edmonds onto the instep of Allan Lamb, who was trying to get out of the way at silly point.

The ball ricocheted tamely for David Gower, standing a couple of yards away, to take a simple catch.
Umpire David Shepherd, not having a clear view of the incident, asked square leg umpire David Constant for his version of events. He said conclusively that the ball had not touched the ground.

England had wrapped up victory 48 minutes later when it seemed an Old Trafford Test full of rain delays would fizzle out into a draw.

Out! Australia's Wayne Phillips lost his wicket in a freak incident that saw his shot rebound off the foot of Allan Lamb into the grateful hands of David Gower

Out! Australia's Wayne Phillips lost his wicket in a freak incident that saw his shot rebound off the foot of Allan Lamb into the grateful hands of David Gower

Kevin Pietersen v West Indies (2007)

Pietersen was going well on 68, punishing the West Indian bowlers in the third Test at Old Trafford in 2007, when he was removed in the most bizarre way.

A Dwayne Bravo bouncer struck Pietersen on the helmet, dislodging it and sending it flying onto the stumps.

The look on KP's face as he staggered round is one of pure disbelief, but he had no choice but to walk. It didn't affect the result too badly – England won the Test by 60 runs and the series 3-0.

Disbelief: Kevin Pietersen looks on in horror after a Dwayne Bravo bouncer dislodges his helmet onto the stumps in the third test with the West Indies at Old Trafford in 2007

Disbelief: Kevin Pietersen looks on in horror after a Dwayne Bravo bouncer dislodges his helmet onto the stumps in the third test with the West Indies at Old Trafford in 2007

Ian Bell v India (2011)

Bell was on 137 when Eoin Morgan had played the ball towards the long leg boundary where the fielder made a diving attempt to stop the ball, before falling over the boundary rope.

The fielder in question, Praveen Kumar, thought the ball had gone for four and threw it back towards the stumps. The ball ended up in the hands of Abhinav Mukund, who broke the wicket.

But by this time Bell and Morgan were about to make their way up the steps, back to the pavilion for tea, thinking 'over' had been called.

Cue much lobbying during the break where India captain MS Dhoni and coach Duncan Fletcher agreed to reinstate Bell who scored another 12 runs.


Run out: Ian Bell and Eoin Morgan (bottom left) are already heading in for the tea interval, unaware that Bell has been run out

Run out: Ian Bell and Eoin Morgan (bottom left) are already heading in for the tea interval, unaware that Bell has been run out

Debate: Bell and Morgan are prevented from leaving the pitch for tea as the decision is reviewed

Debate: Bell and Morgan are prevented from leaving the pitch for tea as the decision is reviewed

Top Spin at the Test: Compton is all out of glove as Tucker puts premature end to partnership

Top Spin at the Test: Tucker's luck for Nick as Compton is all out of glove

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UPDATED:

21:08 GMT, 6 December 2012

Nick Compton had already reached the non-striker’s end by the time umpire Rod Tucker — after a bizarre shake of the head — gave him out lbw on the sweep to Pragyan Ojha. But replays suggested Compton had gloved the ball and the batsman himself said later: ‘It hit my glove. It’s one of those things. I’m a bit disappointed, but from his position it was a very difficult decision, so that’s the way it goes.’

Openers look a dynamic duo

Alastair Cook and Andrew Strauss are comfortably England’s most prolific opening pairing, adding 5,253 Test runs together in 132 innings at an average of 40, with 14 century stands. Cook and Compton have already put on 438 runs together at an average of nearly 110 in only three Tests. On only four occasions did Cook and Strauss put on more than the 165 managed yesterday between the new England captain and his equally new opening partner.

In the runs: Alastair Cook and Andrew Strauss are England's most prolific openers

In the runs: Alastair Cook and Andrew Strauss are England's most prolific openers

Finn delivers on demand

A glimpse of why England were so keen for Steven Finn to play from the start of the series. With MS Dhoni threatening to extend India’s first innings, Cook turned to Finn, who responded by removing him in his first over. The nature of the ball — dug in short of a length, before climbing to take the shoulder of the bat — was just how England imagined it before Finn picked up the thigh injury that ruled him out of the first two Tests.

Ashwin’s turn to look average

India may be wondering what has happened to Ravichandran Ashwin. Feted as a mystery spinner before the start of the series, he briefly appeared to fit the bill with two early wickets on the second evening at Ahmedabad. But since England’s first innings there, he has looked ordinary, taking only three more wickets by stumps on the second day at an average of 115. His line to the right-handers has been especially poor.

Panesar excels on the subcontinent

England would dearly love to pick Monty Panesar in every Test they play, home and away, but continue to regard him as an Asian specialist because of his non-existent batting and fallible fielding. But the two wickets he took on the second morning lifted his tally for the series to 15 at 20 apiece. Graeme Swann has managed 15 at 23 — but in one more Test. The other England bowlers combined, meanwhile, have picked up eight wickets between them, five going to Jimmy Anderson.

Spearheading the attack: Monty Panesar

Spearheading the attack: Monty Panesar (FILE PHOTO)

MS Dhoni says Kolkata pitch for third Test will suit seam

Pull the other one, MS… Dhoni says that seam will prosper during third Test in Kolkata

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UPDATED:

13:42 GMT, 4 December 2012

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures from England's tour of India due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

India captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni kept the mixed messages coming on the state of the pitch for the third Test against England.

Thousands of inconclusive words have been written and spoken over the past week about the conditions to be expected when play at last gets under way on Wednesday with the series level at 1-1.

It is hard to escape the likely conclusion that a slow turner – closer to Ahmedabad, where England lost the first Test, than Mumbai, where they won the second – will be presented at Eden Gardens.

If it was Dhoni's intention to confuse the opposition, however, he could hardly have chosen much more effective language than at his pre-match press conference.

His opposite number Alastair Cook, and England's remaining batsmen, may do best in fact to turn down the volume and just trust the evidence of their own eyes.

Under pressure: Dhoni's side were beaten by 10 wickets in Mumbai

Under pressure: Dhoni's side were beaten by 10 wickets in Mumbai

'The wicket looks good. I don't think there will be much help for the spinners initially,' said Dhoni.

'The fast bowlers get a bit of swing at this time of year, both at start of play and then close to stumps. So I think the role of fast bowlers will be very crucial in this game.'

Dhoni's thesis is that home advantage is a fundamental part of international cricket and one that should be fostered rather than mistrusted because it creates one of his sport's great challenges and fascinations.

'When you come to India you want to play on turning tracks, irrespective of the result,' said the wicketkeeper-batsman.

'We lost the last game, but still we want to play on wickets that suit the sub-continent – what the sub-continental challenge is all about.

'If you're not really doing that then that concept of playing around the world, and facing different challenges, goes down the drain.

'If you come to India, why do you want to play on wickets that are flat for the first three or four days

'And sometimes even five days is not enough to get a result.

'I feel the challenge is to play on tracks that turn, and assist the spinners.'

Spin kings: Swann (right) and Panesar took 19 Indian wickets in Mumbai

Spin kings: Swann (right) and Panesar took 19 Indian wickets in Mumbai

England could perhaps boast – they have been careful not to – that they beat India at their own game on a spinners' pitch in Mumbai last week.

But Dhoni added: 'It doesn't matter if we lose a few games, or if we win the series …

'The crucial thing is that a cricketer who has played five or six years can say 'I went to the sub-continent and the wickets were turning and bouncing and I scored runs or I failed'.

'We should still stick to turning tracks because that's what our strength is.

'That's what home advantage means.

'It doesn't mean that when Australia play in Australia and England play in England they win all the games – but they still stick to the speciality they have.

'It's the same for the sub-continental teams.

'Whatever the result, we'll stick to the kind of wicket that is our speciality.'

To that end, India can be expected – despite Dhoni's initial contention that pace will play a big part – to major on spin again.

Off-spinner Harbhajan Singh missed net practice because of flu today, and Yuvraj Singh took a blow in the nets.

But the indications from the home camp were that both should be fit for selection.

Ricky Ponting scores just four runs in farewell match in Australia v South Africa

Ponting falls for just four runs as Australia collapse against South Africa in his farewell Test match

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UPDATED:

10:47 GMT, 1 December 2012

A final session rich with runs put South
Africa in complete control on the second day of their third and
deciding Test with Australia in Perth, with the retiring Ricky Ponting among the home side's failures.

With both sides having been dismissed cheaply first up, the Proteas headed back to the crease just before tea with a lead of 62. Come stumps their card read 230 for two, an overall advantage of 292.

They helped themselves to 206 runs in the final session, with Hashim Amla walking off unbeaten on 99 while Graeme Smith (84) was only stopped on his way to a century by a brilliant catch from Nathan Lyon.

On his way out: Ricky Ponting heads to the crease at WACA on Saturday

On his way out: Ricky Ponting heads to the crease at WACA on Saturday

And on his way OUT: Ponting walks away after being dismissed by South Africa's Vernon Philander

And on his way OUT: Ponting walks away after being dismissed by South Africa's Vernon Philander

The same player would drop Jacques
Kallis shortly after, though, although with a lead of close to 300
already and with plenty of time on their side, South Africa would have
no doubt remained in command regardless.

Their riotous session overshadowed
the grand farewell of Australian batsman Ponting, although the retiring
Tasmanian will probably be glad of that.

He contributed just four to a
first-innings total of 163 all out which left South Africa in credit
before they even started their second innings.

It was their rousing bowling
performance that gave them the platform, on a morning when fans had
flocked to the WACA in anticipation of one last masterclass from the
departing Ponting, but instead it was the Proteas attack who grabbed the
limelight as they took eight wickets for 130.

Australia, who need to win to return
to top spot in the ICC rankings, would have been in more trouble had
wicketkeeper Matthew Wade not made a fluent 68.

The hosts resumed on 33 for two in
the morning session but David Warner fell to the first ball of the
second over, aiming a swipe at Dale Steyn's loosener to feed AB de
Villiers a catch.

Got him! Philander celebrates dismissing Ponting for lbw on day two of the third Test

[caption

That brought Ponting to the crease to
a rousing ovation and the clapping had scarcely abated when he scooped
his first ball just short of mid-wicket.

A nervy single got him going but
nightwatchman Lyon was gone inside the same over, Steyn and Faf Du
Plessis combining for the wicket.

Vernon Philander then played the role
of party pooper, Ponting tucking bat behind pad before being struck on
the knee-roll after some late inswing.

Asad Rauf raised the finger and Ponting's unsuccessful use of DRS screamed of hope rather than judgement.

Australia were desperate to take the
sting out of the situation but instead things went from bad to worse as
in-form skipper Michael Clarke (five) was undone by another brute of a
ball from Steyn.

That left Clarke's side reeling at 45 for six and Wade decided to launch the counter-attack.
He hooked Philander for six and then nicked him through an empty third
slip for four and from there was looking to score from most balls.

A second six followed off Robin Peterson and he found the boundary again with a couple of cross-bat shots.

Final farewell: Ponting runs out in Perth

Final farewell: Ponting runs out in Perth

Final farewell: Ponting runs out in Perth as Australia bid to stay in touch with South Africa

Michael Hussey made 12 in 40 balls
before edging Morne Morkel to Graeme Smith at slip, but Wade continued
unabashed, bringing up his half-century with a third maximum off
Peterson.

Wade went into his shell somewhat after lunch and was eventually bowled by the left-arm spin of Peterson for 68.

That exposed the tail but John Hastings struck three fours in a row off Peterson to offer hope.
Peterson had more luck against Mitchell Johnson, who he bowled for
seven, and Hastings was last out for 32 when Alviro Petersen took a
smart catch in two movements at long-off.

Some streaky hitting from Petersen
took South Africa to 24 without loss at tea but, after he went to
Johnson, caught and bowled off a riser, the tourists took a firm grip on
proceedings.

Smith brought up his 50 off 67 balls –
Amla outpaced him and did it in 37 – although the hosts thought they
had snared Smith when Starc pinned him and was given out, although his
review proved a correct one as replays showed the ball was going over
the top.

Smith would eventually perish with
the partnership on 178, hooking Starc into the hands of Lyon who did
brilliantly to dive forward running in from the boundary, although he
was unable to cling on when

Kallis did something similar on
three. That was the last real action of the day, with Amla ending one
run shy of an 18th Test century and Kallis on 17.

Tim Bresnan takes two wickets as monkey invades pitch in Ahmedabad

No monkeying around as Bresnan takes two wickets to boost chances of selection for first Test

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UPDATED:

12:57 GMT, 9 November 2012

As the afternoon drew to a close in
Ahmedabad, a monkey held up play as he bounded across the pitch. It may have
been the most energetic moment of an unexceptional day.

Tim Bresnan stayed in the hunt for a place in next week’s first Test against India as England’s bowlers were made to work hard on the second afternoon of their four-day match against Haryana.

With Steven Finn bowling three overs off his full run in the nets for the first time since leaving the field with a thigh strain on the opening day of the tour, Bresnan kept up the pressure on the selectors by bouncing out Haryana opener Nitin Saini, then returning after tea to have Abhimanyu Khod caught in the slips.

King of the swingers: The presence of a langur monkey stops play in Ahmedabad

King of the swingers: The presence of a langur monkey stops play in Ahmedabad

King of the swingers: The presence of a langur monkey stops play in Ahmedabad

King of the swingers: The presence of a langur monkey stops play in Ahmedabad

At stumps, Haryana were 172 for 4 in reply to England’s mammoth 521, but the tourists remain uncertain as to the make-up of their seam attack for Thursday’s first Test in Ahmedabad.

Finn is said to be recovering more quickly than expected and, with England desperate to unleash his pace on India’s batsmen in the Tests, they could be prepared to take a risk on a bowler who sent down only four first-class overs all tour.

Stuart Broad’s recovery from a bruised heel is less clear-cut, since England will not know how well he is faring until he is able to put pressure on his left foot.

Staking a claim: Bresnan took two wickets to keep in contention

Staking a claim: Bresnan took two wickets to keep in contention

Staking a claim: Bresnan took two wickets to keep in contention

In the absence of both men – plus Graeme Swann, who has flown home because his baby daughter is unwell, and James Anderson, who has been rested – England chipped away on a merciless pitch at the Motera B Ground.

Bresnan looks set for selection at Ahmedabad should either Finn or Broad fail to get fit in time, but there was no joy on Friday for either Graham Onions or Stuart Meaker, playing his first game since joining the tour on Tuesday as cover for Finn.

Late arrival: Meaker played his first game of the tour

Late arrival: Meaker played his first game of the tour

Samit Patel and Monty Panesar took a wicket each with their left-arm spin, but there was less good news for Matt Prior, who left the field twice after lunch with an upset stomach and was later replaced behind the stumps by Jonny Bairstow.

The swap, though, was not straightforward. At first the umpires, in consultation with the match referee, would not allow Prior to leave the pitch, citing law 2.2 to England captain Alastair Cook. It reads: ‘No substitute shall act as wicket-keeper.’

Controversy: Cook (left) was originally told that Prior (right) could not leave the field

Controversy: Cook (left) was originally told that Prior (right) could not leave the field

But the match referee spoke to the BCCI, and the Indian board gave England permission to make the change, allowing Prior to recover in the pavilion – although one team-mate was heard to suggest that he was in fact ‘spewing’.

Earlier, England turned their overnight 408 for 4 into a total of 521, with Ian Bell adding only five before edging to slip to depart for 62, and Patel continuing his outstanding form on this trip with a stylish 66.

Prior hit 41 in 35 balls before he was stumped on the charge, and the tail went in a hurry as the last five fell for 14.

For those keen to track England’s progress in the warm-ups against spin, it was worth noting that leg-spinner Amit Mishra and rookie off-spinner Jayant Yadav finished with combined figures of 8 for 177. Haryana’s four seamers claimed 1 for 332.

Monkey business: The animal stole the headlines on an unremarkable day

Monkey business: The animal stole the headlines on an unremarkable day