Tag Archives: stroll

Louis Oosthuizen hits 500-yard tee-shot at Ballantine"s Championship

Happy Gilmore! Oosthuizen hits 500-yard tee-shot but can only manage par as the ball takes a long stroll down country path

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

11:24 GMT, 26 April 2013

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UPDATED:

15:02 GMT, 26 April 2013

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Louis Oosthuizen already averages more than 300 yards per drive on the European Tour this season, but not usually in the manner he did in the Ballantine's Championship today.

Oosthuizen's tee-shot on the 583-yard first hole at Blackstone Golf Club was pushed right of the fairway and bounced onto a winding cart path running down the side of the hole.

Scroll down for video

Big hitter: Oosthuizen regularly hits over 300 yards on the European TourEuropean

Big hitter: Oosthuizen regularly hits over 300 yards on the European Tour

It then rolled downhill for more than a minute and a half, picking up speed after almost coming to a halt at one point and trundling past two bemused spectators before coming to a halt against a kerb – around 500 yards from the tee.

From there the world number seven took a free drop and pitched back onto the fairway, eventually recording a par five on his way to a round of 71 and four-under-par halfway total of 140.

It is still not known whether Oosthuizen's drive ended up further than the previous longest hit in tournament history – courtesy of 64-year-old Mike Austin, who hit 515 yards on a 450-yard par 4 in Las Vegas.

Stroll: The South African's drive rolled for a minute and a half down a path, and he ended up making par

Stroll: The South African's drive rolled for a minute and a half down a path, and he ended up making par

That way! Oosthuizen stands with his caddie Wynand Stander on the tenth hole in South Korea

That way! Oosthuizen stands with his caddie Wynand Stander on the tenth hole in South Korea

THE MASTERS: Hole-by-hole guide

THE MASTERS: Hole-by-hole guide to Augusta National

PUBLISHED:

08:55 GMT, 8 April 2013

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UPDATED:

13:02 GMT, 8 April 2013

The waiting is over for the year's first Major as the best players in the world arrive at Augusta National for The Masters.

Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy stroll down Magnolia Lane as the top two in the world while Bubba Watson is defending the Green Jacket he won 12 months ago.

Woods is the man to beat with three wins under his belt already in 2013 while McIlroy looks like he's finally getting used to his Nike clubs following a fine display finishing second at the Texas Open.

But this is Augusta National where anything can happen and here, Sportsmail has everything you need to know in our hole-by-hole guide.

The Masters: Hole by hole

Hole-by-hole guide to Augusta National – everything you need to know ahead of the season's first major

*Holes ranked from 1 (most difficult) to 18 (least difficult) based on how the course played in 2012

1st (Tea Olive), 445 yards, par four: A deep bunker on the right of the fairway and trees both sides make for a daunting start, while long and left of the undulating green both spell big trouble. Unsurprisingly played the hardest hole on the course last year. 2012 average: 4.39 (rank 1)

2nd (Pink Dogwood), 575 yards, par five: Driving into the trees on the left cost Padraig Harrington a nine in 2009, but Louis Oosthuizen memorably holed his second shot for an albatross in the final round last year before losing in a play-off to Bubba Watson. Important early birdie chance.
2012 average: 4.64 (rank 18)

3rd (Flowering Peach), 350 yards, par four: Shortest par four on the course but a pear-shaped green with steep slope in front allows for some wicked pin positions. 2011 winner Charl Schwartzel pitched in for eagle in the final round. 2012 average: 3.90 (rank 14)

4th (Flowering Crab Apple), 240 yards, par three: The back tee – not always used – turns it into a beast with the green sloping from back to front. Phil Mickelson took six here in the final round last year and finished two shots outside the play-off. Jeff Sluman's ace in 1992 remains the only hole-in-one here in Masters history. 2012 average: 3.22 (rank 6)

5th (Magnolia), 455 yards, par four: Jack Nicklaus twice holed his second shot in 1995 and Colin Montgomerie did it in 2000, but it is another devilishly difficult green. To clear the fairway bunkers requires a 315-yard carry. 2012 average: 4.21 (rank 7)

6th (Juniper), 180 yards, par three: From a high tee to a green with a huge slope in it. Four holes-in-one, but Jose Maria Olazabal took seven in 1991 and lost by one to Ian Woosnam, while Arnold Palmer has also run up a seven. 2012 average: 3.17 (rank 8)

Say your prayers: Amen Corner claims many victims each year - the 11th green is on the left with the 12th in the distance towards the back right

Say your prayers: Amen Corner claims many victims each year – the 11th green is on the left with the 12th in the distance towards the back right

7th (Pampas), 450 yards, par four: What used to be a real birdie chance has been lengthened by 35-40 yards, while trees were also added and the putting surface reshaped. More bunkers – five – around the green than any other hole. 2012 average: 4.17 (rank 9)

8th (Yellow Jasmine), 570 yards, par five: The bunker on the right, about 300 yards out, pushes players left and from there it is harder to find the green in two up the steep hill. Still a good birdie chance and Bruce Devlin made an albatross two in 1967. 2012 average: 4.86 (rank 15)

9th (Carolina Cherry), 460 yards, par four: The tee was pushed back 30 yards in 2002. The raised green, with two bunkers on the left, tilts sharply from the back and anything rolling off the front can continue down for 50-60 yards. 2012 average: 4.25 (rank 4)

10th (Camellia), 495 yards, par four: A huge drop from tee to green on this dogleg left and over all the years of the Masters the most difficult hole. It was here that Rory McIlroy began to fall apart in 2011 with a seven, while Watson clinched the title 12 months ago by making par in the play-off from the trees. 2012 average: 4.249 (rank 5)

11th (White Dogwood), 505 yards, par four: The start of Amen Corner. Toughest hole in 2011, with the water front and left scaring many. Best remembered for Larry Mize's chip-in in 1987 and Nick Faldo's back-to-back play-off wins. 2012 average: 4.32 (rank 2)

12th (Golden Bell), 155 yards, par three: Probably the most famous par three in golf. Narrow target, water in front, trouble at the back, it has seen everything from a one to Tom Weiskopf's 13 in 1980. McIlroy four-putted it in 2011. 2012 average: 3.06 (rank 13)

Dangerous: The 12th hole at Augusta National - measuring just 155 yards - is probably the most famous par three in golf

Dangerous: The 12th hole at Augusta National – measuring just 155 yards – is probably the most famous par three in golf

13th (Azalea), 510 yards, par five: The end of Amen Corner. Massive dogleg left with scores ranging from Jeff Maggert's albatross two in 1994 to Tommy Nakajima's 13 in 1978. Watson's crucial run of four birdies in succession last year started here. 2012 average: 4.72 (rank 16)

14th (Chinese Fir), 440 yards, par four: The only hole on the course without a bunker, but three putts are common on the wickedly difficult green. Course record holder Nick Price took eight here in 1993, while Phil Mickelson holed his approach en route to 2010 victory. 2012 average: 4.09 (rank 12)

15th (Firethorn), 530 yards, par five: Often a tough decision whether to go for the green in two across the pond on the hole where Gene Sarazen sank his 235-yard four-wood shot for an albatross in 1935. There have also been three 11s here. 2012 average: 4.67 (rank 17)

16th (Redbud), 170 yards, par three: Tiger Woods' memorable chip-in in 2005 came the same year as 73-year-old Billy Casper's 14, while Padraig Harrington and Ian Poulter are among 15 players to record holes-in-one. 2012 average: 3.11 (rank 11)

17th (Nandina), 440 yards, par four: Tee shot is played over the Eisenhower Tree on the hole Justin Rose double-bogeyed when one off the lead in 2007. Jack Nicklaus birdied here to take the lead as he won his 18th major in 1986. 2012 average: 4.16 (rank 10)

18th (Holly), 465 yards, par four: The drive through an avenue of trees was made much harder when the tee was moved back 60 yards in 2002. The fairway bunker from which Sandy Lyle got up and down to win in 1988 is now 300 yards away. 2012 average: 4.31 (rank 3)

Manchester City walk around Amsterdam before Ajax match

City boys check out Amsterdam's cafes as Mancini leads his stars on walkabout ahead of showdown with Ajax

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UPDATED:

16:24 GMT, 24 October 2012

Follow the big game live!

Join Sportsmail HERE for live coverage of tonight's Champions League action from 7pm

If you catch Premier League footballers having a stroll around Amsterdam, you might start asking some questions.

Wearing their club colours, they aimed a longing glance at some of the city's famous cafes.

But Manchester City fans can breathe easy – their stars were just enjoying a gentle stroll before tonight's big game with Ajax.

Keep walking, lads: Roberto Mancini leads his players past the temptations of the cafe

Keep walking, lads: Roberto Mancini leads his players past the temptations of the cafe

Stroll: Gareth Barry (centre) and Joe Hart were among the City squad out and about

Stroll: Gareth Barry (centre) and Joe Hart were among the City squad out and about

In a bid to relax his players ahead of the Champions League showdown, boss Roberto Mancini led his players in a short afternoon walk around Holland's capital – although he insisted they wore their traditional blue colours as Mancini believes the purple trim tracksuits are bad luck.

Joe Hart, Sergio Ageuro and Edin Dzeko were among the famous faces walking part the locals.

Mario Balotelli was also spotted – although it's unlikely he saw many people with his black beanie hat pulled over his eyes (with shocking pink headphones over the top).

Moneybags: City's players had to bypass Amsterdam's branch of Louis Vuitton

Moneybags: City's players had to bypass Amsterdam's branch of Louis Vuitton

Should have hired a bike! City's players made sure they stayed well on the pavement

Should have hired a bike! City's players made sure they stayed well on the pavement

City, who have just one point from their opening two group matches, are desperate for victory against the Dutch giants.

Should they fail to gain anything other than three points, they will face an uphill challenge to progress into the knockout stages.

Mancini may have won the Barclays Premier League in May but he may find himself under pressure if they can't make it work in Europe.

Chilling out may be the name of the game in Amsterdam but it'll be work, work, work at the Amsterdan ArenA.

Feeling blue: Joleon Lescott, Micah Richards, Aleksandar Kolarov and Edin Dzeko enjoy fresh air

Feeling blue: Joleon Lescott, Micah Richards, Aleksandar Kolarov and Edin Dzeko enjoy fresh air

Can you guess who it is Clue - his initials are MB and he's a bit of a prankster

Can you guess who it is Clue – his initials are MB and he's a bit of a prankster

VIDEO: Kompany and Mancini relaxed ahead of Ajax…

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World Twenty20 2012: Zimbabwe eliminated after South Africa defeat

Zimbabwe eliminated after 10-wicket thrashing at hands of South Africa

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UPDATED:

18:13 GMT, 20 September 2012

Jacques Kallis starred with the ball as South Africa cruised to a comprehensive 10-wicket victory over Zimbabwe in their World Twenty20 opener in Hambantota today, sealing their berth in the Super Eights in the process.

Kallis took four for 15 off his four overs as Zimbabwe were limited to 93 for eight and South Africa's openers Richard Levi (50 not out) and Hashim Amla (32no) easily knocked off the target with 44 balls remaining.

The result means South Africa and Sri Lanka have both qualified for the Super Eights from Group C as Zimbabwe bow out of the competition having also been heavily beaten by hosts Sri Lanka on Tuesday.

Stroll in the park: Kallis starred for the Proteas as they hammered Zimbabwe

Stroll in the park: Kallis starred for the Proteas as they hammered Zimbabwe

South Africa v Zimbabwe

Click here for a full scoreboard

After winning the toss and putting
Zimbabwe in, South Africa were soon establishing a suffocating
stranglehold on their African rivals thanks to some miserly bowling
right from the start.

Dale Steyn (one for nine) conceded
just a single off the first over, and then Morne Morkel (two for 16)
leaked just two off the second, which included South Africa's first
breakthrough when Vusi Sibanda was bowled for a duck.

Thanks for coming: Zimbabwe have been sent out of the competition at the first hurdle

Thanks for coming: Zimbabwe have been sent out of the competition at the first hurdle

Thanks for coming: Zimbabwe have been sent out of the competition at the first hurdle

The dangerous Brendan Taylor quickly
came and went for four, also dismissed by Morne Morkel, and when Albie
Morkel snared Hamilton Masakadza for six, Zimbabwe were in all sorts of
trouble on 16 for three.

Craig Ervine (37) and Stuart
Matsikenyeri (11) stemmed the tide for a while with a fourth-wicket
stand worth 35, but they were the only two Zimbabwe batsmen to reach
double figures as man-of-the-match Kallis made short work of the middle
order.

Kallis sent back Matsikenyeri and
Elton Chigumbura in successive balls in a double-wicket maiden before
also snaring Graeme Cremer (six) and Ervine as Zimbabwe limped to 77 for
eight.

Bowled over: Morkel was in the wickets as Zimbabwe posted a woeful total of 93

Bowled over: Morkel was in the wickets as Zimbabwe posted a woeful total of 93

Bowled over: Morkel was in the wickets as Zimbabwe posted a woeful total of 93

Bowled over: Morkel was in the wickets as Zimbabwe posted a woeful total of 93

Zimbabwe at least managed to avoid
their lowest T20 total of 84 but they did not make much more as South
Africa were set a target of 93 to win.

The Proteas achieved that with few
serious concerns, with the only clear opportunity seeing Amla dropped by
Sibanda at point, although South Africa were 88 without loss at that
stage.

All smiles: Kallis finished with figures of 4-15 from his allotted four overs

All smiles: Kallis finished with figures of 4-15 from his allotted four overs

Brian Clough is still a son of Middlesbrough but Don Revie is forgotten

Clough is still a son of Boro… Revie is forgotten

By
Michael Walker

PUBLISHED:

21:30 GMT, 16 September 2012

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 16 September 2012

One o'clock, Friday, and at the cafe in Middlesbrough's Albert Park about 20 men have gathered for an afternoon stroll. But this is one with an enjoyable, educational difference.

It begins nearby, outside No 11 Valley Road. This is the house in which Brian Clough was born and raised. There is a green plaque notifying the proud fact.

The route then returns to Albert Park to take in the engaging statue of the young Clough there, boots over his shoulder, on the way to work.

Home favourite: Clough was born and raised in Middlesbrough

Home favourite: Clough was born and raised in Middlesbrough

Across the road from the park, where there is now an estate agents and a pawnbroker, there used to be Rea's cafe, where Clough met one of the great loves of his life, his wife Barbara, and where he talked intently with another, Peter Taylor.

From there it is the length of two pitches to where the old Ayresome Park stood. Clough scored 197 goals in 213 League games for Middlesbrough.

Tarnished figure: Most people didn't realise Revie was from Middlesbrough

Tarnished figure: Most people didn't realise Revie was from Middlesbrough

The treasured ground disappeared in 1997. There are still cobbles on Warwick Street. Down at the bottom of Ayresome Street, the walk then turns.

In the space of around a mile, we have reached a different part of Middlesbrough and soon there is Bell Street, quiet, modest and usually bypassed.

There is no plaque on this street, not even outside pebble- dashed No 20. But there should be. Because here, so close to where Brian Clough grew up and matured as a footballer, is where Don Revie was born.

In 1969, aged 41, Revie led Leeds United to the first league title in the club's history. In 1972, aged 37, Clough led Derby County to their first league title in the club's history.

In 1974, Revie led Leeds to the title again. In 1978, Clough led Nottingham Forest to the club's one and only league title in their history. In between, before and after, there was plenty more.

By the way…

Another Middlesbrough man was Harold Shepherdson, Alf Ramsey's assistant with England in 1966. Harold also has a street named after him: Shepherdson Way leads to the Riverside.

Not least was that Revie became manager of England – successor to Sir Alf Ramsey – at a time when the man who thought he should have that job, who always thought he should have that job, was Brian Clough.

A couple of reasons for Clough's self-confidence came in the shape of Forest's two European Cups, in 1979 and 1980. Clough did not get the England job, but Leeds needed a manager after Revie. They chose – for 44 infamous days – Clough.

That two of the greatest English managers of the 20th century should come from opposite sides of Ayresome Park makes this an exceptional slice of the landscape. That they were opposites in other ways – first rivals, then harsh enemies – is fascinating.

As is the fact that their home town celebrates only one of them. Clough has a plaque, a statue and a street named after him. Don Revie Most people in Middlesbrough don't even know Revie came from Middlesbrough.

In part it is because Revie left for Leicester City at 17 having never played for Boro. But as Roger Hermiston, author of Clough and Revie, explained: 'Not playing for Boro meant no legacy, but also Revie rarely mentioned Middlesbrough. That's understandable.

'Sometimes people put their past behind them. From the town, Revie became a somewhat tarnished figure, the way the England job ended. And they were different characters. As Austin Mitchell said, Clough was like JFK, Revie was like Richard Nixon.'

Hermiston was our guide on Friday, along with Rob Nichols, as part of 'Discover Middlesbrough'. 'But I have great admiration for Revie,' added Hermiston.

Don's mother died when he was 11. Pausing beside a remaining workhouse wall at the Holgate End of Ayresome Park, Hermiston added that 'the fear of ending up here was real for Revie and his father. Revie was two when Wall Street crashed and started the Depression. Fear of unemployment was always on the Revie shoulder. Maybe that explains his later obsession with money.'

Clough, too, liked money. But the walk emphasised his childhood happiness. He wanted to be Wilf Mannion and if not, then Len Hutton. Revie, it seems, wanted away. So many other names and facts stepped forward – in May 1940, Middlesbrough was the first English town to be bombed by the Germans. Living history – so engrossing it was an afterthought that neither Clough nor Revie ever managed Boro.

A club built on localism

York-born Steve McClaren is another Middlesbrough-England managerial connection. In his last league game as Boro boss, at Fulham in May 2006, McClaren named an all-English starting XI. Ross Turnbull, Andrew Davies, Matthew Bates, David Wheater, Andrew Taylor, James Morrison, Jason Kennedy, Lee Cattermole, Malcolm Christie, Danny Graham, Adam Johnson.

They lost 1-0 and none are at the club today. On Saturday Boro beat Ipswich 2-0. Nine of Tony Mowbray's starting XI were English, five of them were born in the north-east. As was Mowbray. Localism.

London 2012 Olympics Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake qualify for 200 metre final

It's the Bolt and Blake show again! Jamaican sprinters cruise into 200m final

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UPDATED:

19:31 GMT, 8 August 2012

Usain Bolt and Yohan Blake will go head-to-head in the 200 metre final on Thursday night after the Jamaica sprinters made light work of their semi-final heats.

More to follow…

Stroll in the park: Bolt eased in the final without breaking sweat

Stroll in the park: Bolt eased in the final without breaking sweat

Final countdown: Blake and Bolt will race for the 200m crown

Final countdown: Blake and Bolt will race for the 200m crown

Novak Djokovic in the mood to clean up

Red-hot Djokovic in the mood to clean up after stroll in the park

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UPDATED:

19:40 GMT, 21 June 2012

Novak Djokovic emerged from his brief
post-French Open break to join in the spirit of the great British summer
and help tackle the effects of the capricious weather.

Midway through a relaxed 6-4, 6-4
victory over Andy Murray at the Boodles tournament, the extrovert Serb
joined groundstaff in drying the court with a blower and towelling the
lines while the skies over Buckinghamshire's Stoke Park did their best
to rain.

On the blower: Novak Djokovic helps dry the court

On the blower: Novak Djokovic helps dry the court

Not much should be read into the result – both men were rushing through the points – except that the world No 1 is clearly ready to defend his Wimbledon title with gusto.

After a few days off at home in Monte Carlo, he arrived in London late last Saturday and has been practising on the grass at the All England Club whenever the elements have permitted.

'I have actually played a lot of tennis in the past five days and in the next few I will be concentrating on playing points,' said Djokovic, who was happy to play up to the garden party crowd.

'The result doesn't really matter too much here, we just got to feel the grass. I felt good on it and I think I will be ready.'

Murray is unlikely to be too concerned that he has lost three matches in the past eight days, two of them exhibitions. Once a couple of rounds have been secured next week, assuming that is the case, what has gone before is quickly forgotten.

Earlier in the day he had been unveiled as the sole British tennis player who has made the Olympic team by right through his ranking, and he will feature in both singles and doubles.

Good spirits: Djokovic also cleared the lines

Good spirits: Djokovic also cleared the lines

His brother, Jamie, is sure to be his partner as their combined ranking is high enough to get in but he could not be introduced officially yesterday as the deadline for entries is next week.

While the singles field will lack the depth of even a Masters event due to restrictions on a country's numbers, all the top players are in and making it a priority. Murray is no different, although he will be putting extra effort into the doubles.

When he won the two-man competition with his sibling at the 2010 Valencia Open he described it as among the most emotional moments of his career.

'That was because there are very few brother/sister combos that have won titles,' he said. 'When I play with Jamie I want to do well, I put a lot of pressure on myself because I know it can help his career.

'Even watching him win the mixed doubles final five years ago at Wimbledon was emotional, so I don't know what it would be like to win the Olympics with him.'

Some other British players are sweating on their places, such as deposed GB women's No 1 Elena Baltacha, and their fate lies in the hands of the Olympic authorities handing out wildcards.