Tag Archives: stroke

London 2012 Olympics: Gold for women rowers Helen Glover and Heather Stanning

At last! Stanning and Glover make history with stunning gold at Eton Dorney

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UPDATED:

11:00 GMT, 1 August 2012

Helen Glover and Heather Stanning have made British history by claiming Team GB's first gold medal of the Olympic Games, and the first of any women rowers ever.

The pair fought off competition from defending champions Romania as well as world champions New Zealand and clinched glory by a stretch.

The duo, who have been unbeaten all year, flew out of the blocks and never relinquished the lead.

At the halfway stage they had clear water between them and the chasing pack and maintained their stunning stroke rate to the end.

Australia claimed silver, while the Kiwis took bronze.

More to follow…

Glory: Helen Glover and Heather Stanning won Team GB's first gold of London 2012

Glory: Helen Glover and Heather Stanning won Team GB's first gold of London 2012

Fred Couples wins Senior Open at Turnberry

Freddie finishes in style to see off Langer and clinch Senior Open at Turnberry

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UPDATED:

20:33 GMT, 29 July 2012

A three-under-par 67 earned Fred Couples a two-shot victory at the Senior Open Championship at Turnberry.

The 52-year-old American, who trailed overnight leader Bernhard Langer by one stroke heading into the final round, closed with back-to-back birdies to secure the win.

Couples' compatriot Gary Hallberg, the 36-hole leader, finished two shots back in second after carding 66 on a windy and testing Ailsa Course.

King of Turnberry: Fred Couples celebrates winning the Senior Open

King of Turnberry: Fred Couples celebrates winning the Senior Open

Winning putt: Couples on the 18th green

Winning putt: Couples on the 18th green

'It was a very fun day,' Couples told the European Tour's website. 'Being paired with Bernhard, you've got to play great and for a long time there, we were neck and neck.

'But for me I felt like I was hitting the ball very strong, very solid, and I was really lucky that it didn't rain because I'm not very good in the rain!

'That was a big birdie on 17 to make 18 play easier and then when I hit the last putt, the hole got in the way and I won by two.

'I'm very happy and excited to have won this.'

English duo Barry Lane and Carl Mason ended the tournament tied for third place alongside American Dick Mast, with the trio finishing on four under par.

Langer, however, could only a card a round of 75 and had to settle for a share of sixth place.

The Open 2012: Slow play will cost golfers a shot

Get a move on! Slow play will cost you a shot, Open stars told

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UPDATED:

22:49 GMT, 18 July 2012

Golfers guilty of slow play could face penalty strokes, organisers of the Open Championship warned on Wednesday.

That was the stark message given to Tiger Woods, Luke Donald, Lee Westwood and the rest of the field ahead of today’s opening round at Royal Lytham.

The R&A are determined to crack down on the sport’s slowcoaches and their warning came in the wake of Englishman Ross Fisher incurring a one-stroke penalty for slow play in the Wales Open last month.

At risk: Padraig Harrington could be caught out

At risk: Padraig Harrington could be caught out

Among the players who could be at risk from the new get-tough policy at Lytham are Padraig Harrington, a two-time Open champion, and Americans Kevin Na and Keegan Bradley.

Jim McArthur, chairman of the championship committee, said: ‘We have a pace‑of‑play policy which we intend to apply stringently. This year we are putting slow play as a priority.

‘We would have no hesitation if we felt the players were over time to take the appropriate action, although we’ve obviously got to take into account the weather conditions and other mitigating circumstances.

‘We give each group a time schedule for each hole and we monitor that very stringently. If a group is out of position with the game in front or over the time schedule, we start with words of encouragement to communicate with them and tell them that they are over the schedule or out of position.

Hurry: Kevin Na must also watch his timings

Hurry: Kevin Na must also watch his timings

‘Thereafter, if they don’t respond to that, we then put them on to the clock and deal with them that way. A second “bad time”, as the terminology goes, would precipitate the one-stroke penalty.’

The R&A are looking for three-ball groups to complete their rounds in four-and-a-half hours both today and tomorrow and for two-balls to take no more than three hours 45 minutes at the weekend.

They are anxious to make a wider impact in the game by eradicating the curse of slow play.

McArthur said: ‘Maybe not so much at professional golf but certainly amateur golf, slow play is, in some ways, if not killing the game, killing the club membership because of the time it takes to play.

Warning: Jim McArthur talked the talk

Warning: Jim McArthur talked the talk

‘It needs to be a concerted effort, not just the R&A, not just the Tours, but the golf unions and other golf organisations too.’

It has to be said that none of the R&A hierarchy yesterday could recall an occasion when a player has been penalised a stroke during an Open — despite rounds frequently taking more than five hours.

It is also 17 years since anyone was pulled up for slow play in the United States, when the suitably named Glen ‘All’ Day crawled to a penalty in the third round of the Honda Classic.

Open 2012: Tiger Woods hopes to summon spirit of Nelson Mandela

Born again Tiger hopes to summon spirit of Mandela at Royal Lytham

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 17 July 2012

Tiger Woods tells in almost spiritual terms the story of the day he and his late father first met Nelson Mandela in his South African home.

'It was incredible, because my dad and I, we walk into this living room,' Woods recalled yesterday on the eve of the former president's 94th birthday.

'I look at my Dad and I said, “Hey, Pops, do you feel that It feels different in here”. He said, “Yeah, I feel the same way”. We're standing there looking at some of the things on the wall. And over in the corner was President Mandela.

Chip off the old block Woods wants to dominate golf again

Chip off the old block Woods wants to dominate golf again

'He was over there just meditating in the corner and there was a different feeling in the room. He has such a presence and aura about him, unlike anyone I've ever met.'

That was back in 1998, an occasion which prompted Earl Woods, somewhat grotesquely, to suggest 'it was the first time that Tiger met a human being equal to him'.

That is the kind of notion that makes Oasis's claim that they were 'bigger' than the Beatles look almost plausible. Only a blinkered fool would have even contemplated comparing Woods with Mandela in the three years since the golfer's world – and game – fell apart amid lurid tales of extra-extra-curricular activity.

Back in '98, however, in the wake of his 12-stroke victory in the 1997 Masters at Augusta, Woods was developing an aura of invincibility which would intimidate a generation of golfers.

Ready to roar: Tiger fans follow their hero at a wet and windy Royal Lytham

Ready to roar: Tiger fans follow their hero at a wet and windy Royal Lytham

There was, too, a presence which stemmed from the combination of his uniqueness as a role model, his unmatched earning power as a sportsman and the influence he wielded over golf.

Woods, now 36, will have to win not just one major but more, and soon, if he is to recreate the aura so feared by players and held in awe by the many fans who have remained loyal.

While he has yet to transfer his rediscovered form in regular PGA-tournament play into the more testing examination of a championship like The Open, there were in his imperious performance at yesterday's press conference distinct signs of the Woods of old.

The confidence born of increasing familiarity with his restructured swing and his current freedom from injury shone as headlights alongside an almost innate arrogance.

Centre of attention: Woods remains a big draw

Centre of attention: Woods remains a big draw

Asked if he would be surprised to regain the No 1 spot in the world rankings this weekend so soon after the depths of last year, he replied: 'No. Does that help you out'

Woods will return to the position he has held for 623 weeks of his career with victory on Sunday provided Luke Donald does not finish either second or third.

There was similar conviction in Woods' response to a question about the four-year gap since his last major success. Did he ever feel a sense of anxiety over when or if the next one was going to come Impatience, perhaps

All smiles: The American appears in relaxed mood

All smiles: The American appears in relaxed mood

'No, no,' he replied. 'I just try and put myself there. I think that if I continue putting myself there enough times then I'll win major championships.

'First of all, I had to go through that process of just getting healthy again. Missing major championships wasn't a whole lot of fun. I think I missed four majors because I was injured.

'I figure if I'm healthy, I can prepare properly for major championships and I can get myself there.'

The last three days of practice, in fair weather and foul, have gone well. He sounds as if he's there. Noises can be deceptive. The fact remains that in a year which has produced three victories, his worst finishes – other than a couple of missed cuts – have come at the Masters and the US Open.

Highs have been accompanied by lows which never used to be the case. Only in trying to explain the disparity in performance did Woods exhibit any uncertainty.

'If I knew the answer I'd tell you, but I don't. I just keep trying to work, to get better, get more consistent. And that's something I'm looking forward to.'

The last 15 majors have been won by 15 different players, dating back to Padraig Harrington's victory in the 2008 US PGA Championship. A Woods triumph this weekend would extend the sequence to 16.

He won the Silver Medal as the leading amateur at Royal Lytham in 1996, a performance of some significance according to Woods.

'The Open Championship that year pushed me towards turning pro versus going back to college,' he explained.

'I was still kind of iffy about whether I should turn pro or not. But that gave me so much confidence that I could play against the top players in the world on a very difficult track.'

There would be a certain symmetry in victory here firing up the next stage of his career.

Eusebio responding "well" to treatment after stroke

Eusebio responding 'well' to treatment after stroke

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UPDATED:

20:31 GMT, 8 July 2012

Benfica says Eusebio is recovering and responding 'well' to hospital treatment as the former Portuguese playing great recovers from a stroke.

The 70-year-old Eusebio has been in a Lisbon hospital receiving treatment since suffering a stroke at the European Championship last month.

Legend improves: Former Portugal and Benfica great Eusebio

Legend improves: Former Portugal and Benfica great Eusebio

Benfica says its former player
continues to undergo treatment and could be discharged by the end of the
week depending on the latest assessment of his health.

Eusebio has been hospitalized four times since December with a variety of ailments.

Eusebio
da Silva Ferreira, nicknamed [The Black Panther,[ became a Portuguese
superstar after standout performances in the 1960s and was named one of
FIFA's 10 best football players of all time in 1998.

Euro 2012 results: Greece 1 Russia 0

Greece 1 Russia 0: Greek tragedy for Russians as Arshavin and Co crash out of Euros

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UPDATED:

20:38 GMT, 16 June 2012

Russia have crashed out of the European Championships after Giorgos Karagounis's strike on the stroke of half-time handed Greece a shock place in the quarter-finals.

The Greeks were completely outclassed in Warsaw but defended stoutly and produced the kind of sucker-punch that saw them crowned 2004 champions with the final kick of the half.

It was fitting that the goal came from the only surviving member of Greece's surprise triumph eight years ago, with captain Karagounis also equalling a national record with his 120th cap.

Greek tragedy: Karagounis scored the decider which sent his country through to the quarter-finals

Greek tragedy: Karagounis scored the decider which sent his country through to the quarter-finals

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Russia went into the the game in the dangerous position of knowing they needed only a draw to reach the quarter-finals, with even a defeat not necessarily fatal.

They join the Czech Republic in the next round after co-hosts Poland also exited the competition after losing their final Group A game 1-0.

More to follow…

Stunner: Russia had no reply to Karagounis's strike right on the stroke of half-time

Stunner: Russia had no reply to Karagounis's strike right on the stroke of half-time

Stunner: Russia had no reply to Karagounis's strike right on the stroke of half-time

Euro joy: The victory comes as a huge boost for the beleaguered country

Euro joy: The victory comes as a huge boost for the beleaguered country

St Jude Classic: Rory McIlroy hooks into a lake as Dustin Johnson wins

McIlroy messes up at Memphis and Johnson capitalises to win St Jude Classic

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UPDATED:

19:36 GMT, 10 June 2012

One bad swing ended Rory McIlroy's hopes of going into his US Open title defence with a fourth PGA Tour victory.

The 23-year-old world number two was joint leader at the FedEx St Jude Classic in Memphis when he hooked into the middle of a lake off the final tee.

Then, by missing a four-foot putt, McIlroy double-bogeyed and dropped all the way to joint seventh place.

Mistake: Rory McIlroy threw away his lead

Mistake: Rory McIlroy threw away his lead

LEADERBOARD

Click here for the final standings

The title went instead to American
Ryder Cup player Dustin Johnson in only his second event back from a
back injury that kept him out of golf for over two months.

Johnson birdied two of the last three
for a four under par 66 and on nine under a one-stroke victory over
compatriot John Merrick, whose chip to force a play-off lipped out.

'I was at home for 10 weeks or something – it was tough,' said Johnson, who now moves back into the world's top 10.

'Last week I was a little rusty and didn't finish off my rounds, but this week I finished a lot better.'

Halfway leader McIlroy had resumed one
behind Merrick, Davis Love and Nick O'Hern, but after birdies at the
second, fourth, seventh and short 11th, where he almost holed-in-one, he
found himself two in front.

After three successive missed cuts it
was shaping up to be the perfect comeback, but it was not to be on a day
when the top of the leaderboard changed 26 times.

Disappointment: McIlroy will not be happy with his final day

Disappointment: McIlroy will not be happy with his final day

The Northern Irishman found water on
the next and three-putted the 14th for another bogey before conjuring up
a brilliant birdie at the penultimate hole.

Finding the left rough forced him to
go under a tree with his approach, but he ran the ball up to 20 feet and
sank the birdie putt to move alongside Johnson, Chad Campbell and
Merrick.

Johnson had holed from 11 feet at the
long 16th and as he followed that with an eight-footer both McIlroy and
Campbell both dumped their final drives into the drink.

Campbell made bogey and ended up joint
third with Ryder Cup captain Love, Ryan Palmer and Australian
left-hander O'Hern, another to find the water on the last.

England's Greg Owen closed with a 65
for joint 11th, while Dubliner Padraig Harrington and Scot Martin Laird
shot 69s to be 13th and 24th respectively.

The final round tee-off times had been brought forward because of the threat of bad weather.

Spencer Levin holds one shot lead at Memorial Tournament in Ohio

Levin holds one shot lead in Ohio as Tiger struggles to stay in contention

By
Sportsmail Reporter

PUBLISHED:

07:18 GMT, 3 June 2012

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UPDATED:

07:18 GMT, 3 June 2012

Spencer Levin shot a three-under-par 69 to lead by one at the end of the third round of the Memorial Tournament as Tiger Woods battled to stay in contention.

LEADERBOARD

Keep up to date with the latest scores from the Memorial Tournament here

On a day when low scores were few and far between at Muirfield Village, with only 14 of the 71 remaining players going under par, Levin carded four birdies and an eagle against three bogeys to sit eight under overall, one stroke ahead of overnight leader Rory Sabbatini.

But it could have been even better for Levin, who turned in 32 and was five under for his round after 10, before bogeying the 12th and 16th.

Narrow lead: Spencer Levin leads by one shot

Narrow lead: Spencer Levin leads by one shot

'I had some really good breaks, so I'll take it,' Levin said. 'I played pretty solid, but it's nice to have a couple good breaks.

'But if you're going to shoot the low round of the day out here on the Tour, or any day, you're going to have a couple good breaks or make long putts or chip in generally.'

Sabbatini was one under today to lie seven under overall, two strokes ahead of Rickie Fowler and three ahead of Woods.

In contention: Tiger Woods reacts after missing a birdie putt but is just four shots off the lead

In contention: Tiger Woods reacts after missing a birdie putt but is just four shots off the lead

While Fowler equalled Levin's best-of-the-day 69 with four birdies and a bogey, Woods carded four bogeys on the back nine to more than cancel out his three birdies in a one-over 73.

'I certainly probably shot the highest score I could have shot today considering the way I hit it,” Woods said.

'But I'm only four back, and out here with the conditions, supposed to be like this tomorrow again, anything can happen.'

Sweden's Henrik Stenson was leading the European challenge as a 71 left him three under, alongside Japan's Ryo Ishikawa and American Jonathan Byrd.

First-round leader Scott Stallings was in a group seven on two under after a 75, while England's Justin Rose was level par and a trio of his compatriots – Brian Davis, Greg Owen and world number one Luke Donald – were three over.

Nasser Hussain: Hundred sets the tone for England"s summer

Hundred sets the tone for England's summer

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UPDATED:

21:43 GMT, 18 May 2012

It was great to see how much everyone at Lord's enjoyed the moment. When Andrew Strauss reached three figures with a cut for four off Darren Sammy, you could just feel the pleasure. And the relief.

Cricket supporters in this country know how much Strauss has done for England – and they were willing him to succeed.

Ton-derful: Strauss celebrates reaching three figures with Pietersen

Ton-derful: Strauss celebrates reaching three figures with Pietersen

This is the man who has delivered back-to-back Ashes triumphs and taken his team to the top of the Test rankings. Everyone was well aware how important this innings was, not just for Strauss himself, but for the side as a whole.

The players can now put the whole Strauss issue behind them and get on with the rest of their summer. It's as if this is the final piece in the jigsaw ahead of South Africa's visit.

The funny thing is, I never looked at Strauss and thought: 'Here's a bloke out of nick.' I know he'd scored only one hundred in 50 innings, but the problem – basic though it sounds – is that he kept getting in, then getting out.

But it wasn't as if he was walking out to the middle with a scrambled brain. It wasn't as if he was visibly feeling the pressure of all the talk about his form. That's a horrible place to be – I know that from personal experience. But it's not the place he was in.

Eyes on the ball: Strauss prepares to play a stroke

Eyes on the ball: Strauss prepares to play a stroke

As much as anything, this innings was testimony to his mental strength. He was leaving the ball very well, which is the hallmark of a player who's able to isolate himself in his own bubble and leave the fussing to others.

The same thing happened the last time he emerged from a lean spell, when he made that career-saving 177 at Napier in 2008. He knew exactly where his off-stump was that day.

And he did yesterday too – even if one early leave against Fidel Edwards might have been a bit close for comfort.

I'm full of admiration for the way Strauss batted here.

And England will know they've rid themselves of an albatross that was in danger of defining their summer.

London 2012 Olympics: Great Britain miss out on hockey final

Brits denied place in hockey final on goal difference after Australia draw

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UPDATED:

23:55 GMT, 5 May 2012

Great Britain’s men put up a great fight against world No 1 side Australian but a 3-3 draw meant they missed out on a place in the final of the Olympics test event on goal difference.

Surbiton’s James Tindall converted an early penalty corner but Australia soon equalised through Matt Ghodes.

Richard Alexander drilled in another corner on the half-hour but on the stroke of half-time Jason Wilson levelled things up again from close range.

Battle: Robert Hammond (right) competes with Britain's Jonty Clarke

Battle: Robert Hammond (right) competes with Britain's Jonty Clarke

Goalkeeper James Fair kept the Kookaburras at bay after the break but GB went behind for the first time when Simon Orchard converted a penalty stroke and, although East Grinstead’s Ashley Jackson flicked in third set-piece of the evening, the hosts could not force the winner they needed.

'I don’t think we played that well today and quite below our abilities,' said coach Jason Lee.

'I think parts of our play were encouraging at certain points but also quite irritating at times as well.

'There’s some work to be done between now and the Olympics in terms of our approach.'

Devastated: Richard Smith

Devastated: Richard Smith

Great Britain’s women dominated Beijing silver medallists Argentina to win 2-0 but they had already qualified for the final and will meet the same opponents on Sunday.

Coach Danny Kerry criticised the side for lacking 'fire in their bellies' after their second-half performance tailed off.

The hosts took the lead in the 15th minute when striker Alex Danson expertly turned her marker to fire home a trademark reverse-stick shot from the top of the circle and Ashleigh Ball doubled their lead from a penalty corner.

Crista Cullen missed a second-half penalty stroke after which Argentina came back into the game and forced a number of corners but found goalkeeper Beth Storry in good form.

'I thought the first half was okay,' said Kerry.

'We attacked well and had lots of opportunities and there was a bit of spark about us.

'But we can’t just have 45-minute performances. The players have to have fire in their bellies and – apart from the backline which stood firm and Beth who made some good saves – I was looking for people to step up and show what kind of people they are.

'That was disappointing.'