Tag Archives: stories

Maroune Fellaini wanted by Everton

He's the Fella-ini for us! Chelsea target 20m raid for Everton midfielder

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UPDATED:

14:53 GMT, 17 December 2012

Chelsea are planning a 20million raid for Everton midfielder Marouane Fellaini when the January transfer window opens.

Fellaini has been one of the Barclays Premier League success stories this season afetr a run of eight goals in 16 appearances for the Toffees this season.

Wanted man: The Everton midfielder is being tracked by Chelsea

Wanted man: The Everton midfielder is being tracked by Chelsea

But he hit the headlines at the weekend after head-butting Stoke's Ryan Shawcross in an off-the-ball incident at the Britannia Stadium.

This has not deterred the Blues who want the Belgium international to shore-up their midfield, according to the Evening Standard.

Head boy: Fellaini has landed himself in hot water over this incident

Head boy: Fellaini has landed himself in hot water over this incident

Fellaini signed a new five-year deal at Goodison Park a year ago, but could be tempted away by an offers from Stamford Bridge.

The 25-year-old joins Radamel Falcao and Theo Walcott on the Roman Abramovich's shopping list to ensure the club's already faltering season doesn't totally collapse.

Women"s British Open suspended due to wind

Wind blows Women's British Open off course as play is suspended at Hoylake

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UPDATED:

09:51 GMT, 14 September 2012

Strong winds forced play to be suspended on the second day of the Ricoh Women's British Open at Hoylake – but not before some real horror stories.

Gusts of up to 50mph had been predicted, but officials deemed conditions good enough to resume the championship at 7am.

England's Felicity Johnson, who had been
joint leader early in her first round, set off with a quintuple bogey
nine, dropped another shot at the second and then two more on the third.

Blown away: Cristie Kerr walks off the course after play was suspended

Blown away: Cristie Kerr walks off the course after play was suspended

It sent her next-to-last on 14 over par before she and the other early starters were brought in. German Caroline Masson double-bogeyed the opening three holes to stand 10 over and there was also a change at the top of the leaderboard.

Last year's US Women's Open champion So Yeon Ryu, who shared the overnight pace on two under with fellow South Korean Haeji Kang, bogeyed the long 10th, the only hole she had time for before the suspension.

Johnson and Masson were the worst sufferers, but the 18 players who teed off on the front nine were a cumulative 52 over par at the time of the suspension – and none of them had even completed five holes.

Tee trouble: Kerr's ball was blown away before she could drive on the 12th hole

Tee trouble: Kerr's ball was blown away before she could drive on the 12th hole

England's last winner of the title Karen Stupples had two double bogeys and a birdie, while amateur Holly Clyburn – joint third following her level par 72 – bogeyed the first and double-bogeyed the fourth.

The scoring was better for those who resumed on the 10th tee, but there were still some furious players before the decision was taken to halt the action.

American star Cristie Kerr saw her ball blown off the tee three times at the 12th, but she, Norwegian Suzann Pettersen and Japan's Erina Hara were told to play on for a while longer.

Once at the green Hara's ball was two feet from the hole, but then blew eight feet past.

Strong: A flag shows the force of the wind before play was stopped

Strong: A flag shows the force of the wind before play was stopped

Mo Farah hopes for future success on track

More Mobots to come! Farah promises future track glory before turning attention to marathons

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UPDATED:

19:20 GMT, 20 August 2012

Britain's double Olympic champion Mo Farah still has plenty more he would like to achieve on the track before turning his attention to competing in marathons.

Farah became one of London 2012's biggest success stories after capturing gold in the 10,000 metres before returning a week later to emerge victorious in the 5,000m.

Those triumphs are the jewels in a collection that go alongside his long distance double at the European Championships in Barcelona in 2010 as well as the two medals he won at last year's World Championships in Daegu.

More to come: Mo Farah hopes to win more medals on the track before competing in marathons

More to come: Mo Farah hopes to win more medals on the track before competing in marathons

But any thoughts of resting on his laurels are dismissed by the 29-year-old, who revealed he would relish participating on the track at the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

'I've still got a long way to go, there are always more things to achieve and when everything's going well, it's good to get as many gold medals as you can,' he said.

'I feel like I would like to carry on on the track and then after that go on the road.

'I've never won a title at a Commonwealth Games so it would be good to have another win.

'You can't have too many medals, you've got to take what you can.'

Farah, however, makes no secret of his aim to eventually make the switch to marathon running but added much will depend on the advice of his coach Alberto Salazar.

You've done it: Farah took gold in the 5,000 and 10,000m at the Olympics

You've done it: Farah took gold in the 5,000 and 10,000m at the Olympics

The Cuban – who was a successful long-distance runner in his prime, winning the New York marathon for three successive years from 1980 – has made a great impact on Farah, who has described Salazar as a 'genius'.

But the Londoner is a driven individual and is determined to push himself to his limits.

'It's definitely true, I'll definitely be stepping up to the marathon at some point but I've not decided when yet,” said Farah, who will perhaps be testing the waters when he runs a half-marathon in the Great North Run on September 16.

'We'll just have to wait and see what the coach says – he hasn't said much.

'He's said to take it one race at a time, see how it goes, see how we recover and then go into next year.

'I'm always wanting to try new events and test myself to see what I can do.'

While Farah is still hungry to add to his medal haul over the next few years, he admitted becoming just the seventh man to win the long-distance Olympic double in London will take some beating.

'To have the Olympics in your hometown was the dream,' he said. 'It's exciting, being a London man and growing up here and winning two gold medals at the Olympics means a lot.

A couple more Farah hopes to add to his two Olympic gold medals

A couple more Farah hopes to add to his two Olympic gold medals

'There's nothing out there that means more than an Olympic medal unless I can became an Olympic champion at a different event.'

Farah was speaking as part of the nationwide grassroots Join In campaign, which aims to encourage new participants to harness their enthusiasm for sport off the back of the successful Olympic Games.

'We're trying to get as many volunteers as we can for the clubs; it could be a rowing club, it could be a football club it could be anything,' Farah said.

'If we can just give the kids enough support then hopefully they'll get involved.

'When I was younger, I got motivated by footballers and seeing football on TV so having the Olympics here has helped a lot.

'I hope we can inspire the next generation and teach them hard work and dedication.'

Unsurprisingly, Farah has become a much heralded figure after capturing his second goal medal in the 5,000m on the final day of the Games, with his celebration – the 'Mobot' – taking the nation by storm.

Asked if he has adapted to his new status, he added: 'Yeah it's sunk in, I've just been chilling out and relaxing.

'I haven't really done much. I've been all over the place doing media stuff and shows.'

Proud: Farah celebrated with his family at the Olympic Park after taking gold

Proud: Farah celebrated with his family at the Olympic Park after taking gold

London 2012 Olympics: Clare Balding is BBC"s best presenter – Mark Alford"s Goggle Eyes

Mark Alford's Goggle Eyes: Balding leads the way when comes to BBC anchors

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UPDATED:

22:13 GMT, 8 August 2012

An emerging rule of these Games is that if Clare Balding’s anchoring an event, it must be important. Wednesday she brought her enthusiasm and knowledge to Greenwich for the showjumping. It’s between Clare and Gary Lineker for the Beeb’s best in show.

Magic moment

Pride of Yorkshire Nicola Adams, from Leeds, was interviewed after reaching today’s women’s flyweight boxing final. She melted hearts when she said: ‘All I want to do is make my mum proud.’

Fight star: Nicola Adams beat India's Chungneijang Mery Kom Hmangte

Fight star: Nicola Adams beat India's Chungneijang Mery Kom Hmangte

Thumbs up for…

STAYING WITH BACKMARKERS: The director at the athletics resisted the urge to cut away from the action after the winners crossed the line in the 800 metres heats. Viewers saw three uplifting stories as a result. First, tearful Merve Aydin from Turkey hobbled home more than a minute after the field. Then Palestinian Woroud Sawalha, in a white hijab, ran a personal best time. And finally, Sarah Attar, the first Saudi woman to compete in athletics at the Olympics (left), trailed home. Top television.

Thumbs down for…

TALKING NOT SHOWING: Matt Baker was waxing lyrical about Flying Dutchman Epke Zonderland, who took gold on the high bar with an outrageous routine. The footage has become an internet sensation but the main BBC1 feed failed to show it at any point throughout the day.

Gold: Epke Zonderland's routine became an internet sensation

Gold: Epke Zonderland's routine became an internet sensation

Corner cam

Boxing coverage has rightly been criticised for not carrying on-screen scores during bouts — it still rankles! But praise is due for the camera and microphone bringing us the cornermen’s briefings between rounds. Fascinating stuff.

The Pundits' podium

GOLD: Andy Austin, showjumping: Same course, lots of different horses — it’s a tough job making it sound exciting but Austin and main commentator Mike Tucker do just that. Flawless.

SILVER: Brendan Foster, athletics: As passionate as ever. ‘Mo Farah, Olympic champion. I just love saying it,’ said Foster. We love hearing it, keep up the good work.

BRONZE: Jamie Staff, BMX: Impressed at the Velodrome but his ‘woop that time’ cry was a low point at the BMX track.

Jolly hockey sticks

The best thing on TV The thrilling women’s hockey semi-final penalty shootout in which Holland beat New Zealand. Each player was given eight seconds to beat the goalkeeper. Look and learn, football, this was proper drama.

Ian Ladyman"s Open all hours: Els understates remarkable Championship victory

Ian Ladyman's Open all hours: Els understates remarkable Championship victory

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 22 July 2012

Good riddance

Not all Lytham members have been so happy to lose their course to the build-up and staging of The Open over the last few weeks.

Indeed, one stick-in-the-mud complained at a recent committee meeting that Tiger, Rory and their pals would take too many divots out of the precious fairways.

I would imagine the income generated here this week would pay for a few bags of grass seed.

Humble: Ernie Els said he was feeling 'pretty groovy' after he won the Open at Royal Lytham

Humble: Ernie Els said he was feeling 'pretty groovy' after he won the Open at Royal Lytham

Gary's bacon-free

Open legend Gary Player charmed his guests at an HSBC-sponsored breakfast at Lytham but surprised everybody by bringing his own food along.

Now 76, the South African (right) is notoriously obsessed with exercise and diet and arrived at the event on Saturday morning with his own serving of Kiwi fruit.

'My message is “beware the bacon”,' he said with an impish smile.

Back to work

The return of 1994 Silver Medal winner Warren Bennett has provided one of the more romantic stories of the week and he finished tied with the great Tom Watson.

Bennett will be back on the anonymous Jamega Tour from next Monday and will use 230 of his 10,000 Open prize-money to enter a two-day 'pay and play' event in Chipping Norton.

Romance isn't dead: Warren Bennett scored equal to the great Tom Watson

Romance isn't dead: Warren Bennett scored equal to the great Tom Watson

Thumbs up for…

The world's best golfers for showing us all on Sunday just how difficult this game really is.

They spend most of the season making golf look incredibly easy but there was some error-ridden, twitchy stuff on display.

Seeing them struggle means that the next time I stand over a three-foot putt and push it wide of the hole (this will be today) I for one know that I will feel a whole let better.

Fluffing your lines: Adam Scott was amongst the many golfers who struggled at Lytham

Fluffing your lines: Adam Scott was amongst the many golfers who struggled at Lytham

Thumbs down for…

The ticket touts who were busy desperately trying to flog entry tickets at below face-value prices outside the entrances to the course yesterday morning.

It was hardly the brightest move to buy up tickets in advance for an event that – due to the vast expanses of the course – is never likely to sell out.

Stick to fleecing people at football matches and pop concerts, lads.

Quote of the day

'At the moment, everything feels pretty groovy.' Ernie Els gives us his thoughts after winning his second Open Championship.

Something of an understatement, you might say.

Not the brightest idea: Ticket touts attempted to sell cut-price tickets for the event, which was never likely to be a sell-out

Not the brightest idea: Ticket touts attempted to sell cut-price tickets for the event, which was never likely to be a sell-out

Ireland hope to banish ghosts "91 Poznan loss

Chance to do new Poznan as Ireland hope to banish ghosts '91 loss

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UPDATED:

00:45 GMT, 9 June 2012

The defining nine days of Giovanni Trapattoni's reign as Republic of Ireland manager begin on Sunday in an ancient Polish city associated with a wacky goal celebration and a costly Irish collapse in 1991.

Before 'doing a Poznan' went global, 'doing a Poznan' among Irish fans referred to a grim implosion by the Irish side in the final 20 minutes of a European qualifier.

Still working: (l-r) Richard Dunne and Paul McShane are edged out by Keiren Westwood in training

Still working: (l-r) Richard Dunne and Paul McShane are edged out by Keiren Westwood in training

Blowing a 3-1 lead cost the team qualification for the finals of the 1992 European Championship and sparked off a succession of horror stories about trying to make the Euro finals – the Irish fell agonisingly short in 1996 and 2000.

Euro 2012

Returning to the scene of the crime, where Croatia await in the Municipal Stadium (7.45), gives the class of 2012 the opportunity to exorcise the demons of Poznan past and point the way towards extending their Euro adventure beyond the group stage.

Trapattoni says it is 'silly' to think Ireland can win the tournament as 'too many situations must go in our favour', but escaping from a group containing the last two World Cup winners would represent success for a team of Ireland's status.

Trapattoni said he feels forever young but he has shaped the team in the image of old Italian sides – difficult to beat and difficult to love.

Talking tactics: Giovanni Trapattoni chats with Richard Dunne

Talking tactics: Giovanni Trapattoni chats with Richard Dunne

After four years of 'drill, drill, drill' as Richard Dunne observed, every Irish player 'knows his jobs' as Trapattoni quaintly puts it.

Watch on Sunday.

Shay Given won't roll the ball once to his fullbacks; the full-backs will only cross the half-way line with written permission; one of the central midfielders will stay behind the ball; Dunne won't go up for every corner.

This is the team that Trapattoni has built, a pragmatic platoon, obedient to a fault to their Little General's commands.

Not everyone likes the way we play but Trapattoni's philosophy and strategy have taken Ireland further than many believed possible and he won't change now, despite his philosophising that 'it's an old man who isn't curious about the next news'.

At 73, some 30 years older than Croatia coach Slaven Bilic, Trapattoni remains besotted by the game that has consumed his life for more than 50 years.

His teenage kicks have lasted longer than The Undertones.

Talking down chances: Trapattoni knows the pain of an early exit

Talking down chances: Trapattoni knows the pain of an early exit

Yet, for all his achievements, the dapper Italian has a little devil on his shoulder which he can't shake off.

Twice, he took highly-rated Italian squads to the major finals; twice he failed to leave an imprint – even if he was hard done by in 2002.

Those early exits still sting and Trapattoni can only banish the baby Beelzebub on his clavicle by leading his squad of blue-collar workers out of Group C.

Can it be done

Yes, but it will require a lot of cards to fall Ireland's way.

Trapattoni can't afford injuries or red cards to the cornerstones of his team – Given, Dunne, and Robbie Keane.

The leg-wary looseness we saw in Hungary can't be repeated either and Ireland must be as tight as a miser's fist from the off on Sunday night.

In with a shout: Shay Given had his first full training session on Friday

In with a shout: Shay Given had his first full training session on Friday

The longer it stays scoreless, the more likely Croatia will become frustrated.

Staying behind a bolted door all night won't be enough from the Irish who must look to win the game, ideally with a late goal, as it would give them bargaining power for the other games to come.

In all of Ireland's previous opening games in major finals, they have never lost; that trend must continue on Sunday.

Despite their ranking of eighth in the world, there is no reason the Irish should feel inferior to the Croats – especially not after going 14 games unbeaten.

In six previous meetings, the Irish had two wins and three draws, the most recent being a tame 0-0 affair in Dublin last August.

The only loss came after a goal deep into stoppage time against a weakened Irish side in a Zagreb Euro qualifier in '99.

It's not just history that is on Ireland's side. Croatia may have a fancy ranking, but they didn't create fireworks in the qualifiers.

Standing in Ireland's way: Croatia head coach Slaven Bilic (right) and Luca Modric (left)

Standing in Ireland's way: Croatia head coach Slaven Bilic (right) and Luca Modric (left)

Standing in Ireland's way: Croatia head coach Slaven Bilic (right) and Luca Modric (left)

In a weak group, they managed no goals and only one point against a Greek side which should have been buried without trace by Poland by half-time in Warsaw on Friday night.

True, they are superior technicians than the Irish but most teams are, and they have Luka Modric to pull the strings.

Modric is a class act but is no stranger to Glenn Whelan and Keith Andrews, who will look to close him down and deny him space to tee up powerful spearhead, Nikica Jelavic.

A big plus for the Irish has been the preparations which have run far smoother than before.

Ten years ago, Irish heads were spinning over the fallout to the Roy Keane affair and the focus only returned when the team fell behind against Cameroon in the opening game.

The unity in this squad is as strong as any at a major final before and that sense of togetherness cannot be underestimated as the players would run through a brick wall for each other.

It's a massive bonus too that all of Trapattoni's prayers have been answered and his front-line players will strip fit for battle.

In contrast, Croatia are without experienced striker Ivica Olic.

The most eagerly-awaited international since Ireland went toe to toe with Spain in a sweat box in Suwon is almost upon us and a nation turns its lonely eyes to the little man from Milan and the players he has placed his trust in.

From Budapest to the Baltic Sea, thunderstorms have followed Ireland all week – Friday night's tempest was a right belter.

It's time to stir up a squall on the field of play, or risk being becalmed when the Spanish galleons drop anchor off Gdansk on Thursday night.

Tony Pulis wants Wolves" Matt Jarvis to strengthen Stoke

Wolves face battle to keep 10m Jarvis as Stoke are first to declare interest

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UPDATED:

11:05 GMT, 26 May 2012

Tony Pulis is hoping to make Wolves winger Matt Jarvis his marquee summer signing for Stoke – if he can find 10million to splash.

Wolves were relegated from the Premier League after enduring a disastrous campaign, but Jarvis has been one of the success stories at the West Midlands club.

Sought after: Matt Jarvis is being courted by Stoke

Sought after: Matt Jarvis is being courted by Stoke

According to The Mirror, Pulis has made an inquiry into signing the wide-man, and Jarvis will have to leave Wolves if he wants to play in the top-flight next term.

Jarvis was fleetingly included int he England set up, but has been omitted from Roy Hodgson's Euro 2012 squad.

Wolves have valued their talisman at 10million, and will battle to keep Jarvis.

Pulis – who believes Jarvis is only worth half of Wolves' valuation – will still have to do some trading of his own if he is to raise the money to buy the midfielder.

Wolves manager Stale Solbakken will be hoping to keep his star men and try to bounce straight back in to the Premier League.

Unless Jarvis forces a move, it remains a likelihood that he will ply at least some of his trade in the Championship next season.

Stoke, meanwhile, are looking to add two or three players to their squad, and Pulis is likely to sanction one or two departures to strengthen the side.

Gary Neville: Reading must stick to core values – just like Norwich

Reading must stick to core values – just like Norwich

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UPDATED:

23:56 GMT, 21 April 2012

It has been a momentous week
for Reading, who secured their
return to the Premier League
after four years outside the top
flight. It was great to see such a
well run club. who have kept
faith in their manager Brian
McDermott, reap their just
rewards.

McDermott took over when
Brendan Rodgers was sacked and
while he may not have be among the
biggest names in management when
he was appointed, he had been at the
club for 12 years, rising from chief
scout, and he knew the place inside
out.

When he lost the play-off final last
year, ironically to Rodgers's Swansea side, the club simply regrouped
and started over again with the same manager. Which is why I cringed
when this week I saw the headline: 'I want Reading in Europe.'

Going up: Reading celebrate promotion to Premier League with an enormous pitch invasion

Going up: Reading celebrate promotion to Premier League with an enormous pitch invasion

When you read down the article, current club owner John Madejski was promising that the club would still be careful and not go mad and bring in lots of big-name signings. But he is on the verge of selling to a multi-millionaire owner, Anton Zingarevich.

I wonder if the philosophy of the club will now change. I hope not because the financial collapses of Portsmouth and Rangers show just how vulnerable clubs are when in the wrong hands or pursuing the wrong philosophy. If Reading wanted an example of how to grow in the Premier League, they don't have to look far.

This year has been a real eyeopener for me, watching more football than ever before around the grounds in my role with Sky. And when I've watched clubs such as Norwich and Swansea this season, I've enjoyed myself more than I could imagine.

Net gains: Reading surged up the table playing football in a way that was true to their club ethos

Net gains: Reading surged up the table playing football in a way that was true to their club ethos

It's not just because those two clubs have been the unexpected success stories of the season, both coming from League One in recent years to be a force in the Premier League. And it's not just because both play good football, with Swansea doing so in a style I never expected to see in the top flight.

But what strikes you about those clubs is that they are connected to their local communities, they have a plan that is sustainable and they know where they're going.

They have achieved their success
this season with the core of the
squad that got them promoted. How
can that be Surely players such as
Grant Holt – until this season a
journeyman in the lower leagues –
and Leon Britton – released by
West Ham as he was deemed not good enough and spending his life in the
lower leagues – cannot be good enough for the Premier League

Three wise men: Anton Zingarevich, chairman Sir John Madejski and manager Brian McDermott

Three wise men: Anton Zingarevich, chairman Sir John Madejski and manager Brian McDermott

Or John Ruddy, a player who has been on loan at Motherwell, Crewe, Stockport and Bristol City and is now watched by England scouts But they and other players have proved an important point. There are still players down the divisions with the quality to play in the Premier League. You're not telling me there aren't another six or seven like Holt or Britton out there.

Sometimes clubs just aren't looking in the right places. Then there are those players who they have brought in to supplement their squads. Swansea's Michel Vorm has been one of the best goalkeepers in the Premier League since signing from Utrecht, but who else was interested in him

Newcastle are another team who have done exceptionally well with unheralded signings. Yohan Cabaye may have come from French champions Lille but no one wanted to take a risk. Likewise, Demba Ba, who had half a season at West Ham. But Newcastle did and they now have one of the most effective midfielders and prolific strikers in the Premier League.

The other factor so important when recruiting players is the academy. We were reminded of it when Barcelona took on Chelsea, starting with seven home-grown players. For too long this has been ignored by too many clubs who prefer to sign big-name stars.

Success story: Norwich and Grant Holt have both exceeded expectation in the Premier League

Success story: Norwich and Grant Holt have both exceeded expectation in the Premier League

Last week we saw Chelsea take a
4-0 lead in the first leg of the FA
Youth Cup final. My hope is that this
generation will be given the chance
to play in the first team. It is vital
for clubs who want to retain a link
with their community to nurture
boys the fans can relate to.

As football gets more globalised,
it's probably more important than
ever to have one or two players in
your team who have grown up in the
same streets or been to the same
schools as the hard-core fans.

Lean on me: Brendan Rodgers

Lean on me: Brendan Rodgers

With good coaching, proper motivation
and the right club structure
with organic growth, you can
achieve an awful lot in football. On the other hand, take QPR, who came up as champions, well clear of Norwich and Swansea. Instead of sticking to the core of their promoted squad and making one or two smart additions, they decided to splash out and buy big.

I suppose it was partly because new owner Tony Fernandes only took over in August. They rushed through big buys on deadline days – but these obvious big-name players have not kept them out of the relegation fight. And good though Mark Hughes is, changing managers hasn't made a big impact.

Even last year, when they came up and before Fernandes took over, their wage bill was 29.7million. But the club turned over just 16.2m. What will happen if they go down

There are lots of concerns facing English football but for me the major one is the way in which football clubs are run by owners, whether they are growing organically and sustainably and how that is being policed by the football authorities.

Alongside that, you could add whether clubs are retaining a link to their communities. That link is more essential for football than ever in a time of economic depression, when those communities are under pressure. I just hope Reading know that and take lessons from Norwich and Swansea, rather than QPR.

FA's crown jewel is losing its shine

When I was a child, the FA Cup was one of the crown jewels of the sporting year, along with the Grand National, Wimbledon and The Open.

But with every announcement it seems to lose another piece of its identity. First it was sponsors added to the name, followed by the semi-finals at Wembley.

Then it was no longer the last game of the season and now the kick-off is 5.15pm. And each club still get only 25,000 tickets, a point Kenny Dalglish raised last week.

For me, the Carling Cup has become almost more fun and certainly the equal of the FA Cup. Both are used for rotation and both give you a Europa League place.

The FA have to decide what their cup is for. Either it's a tournament run in the most traditional way, or you might as well rip up the format and start again. Either way, it has to be protected and I would like it to be restored to being a crown jewel again.

Frank Bruno in fresh mental health scare

Ex-world champion Bruno taken into clinic after fresh fears over mental health

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UPDATED:

10:21 GMT, 15 April 2012

Frank Bruno is facing a fresh battle with his mental health after friends called in an expert over worries about the ex-boxer's erratic behaviour.

Bruno, 50, had a breakdown nine years ago and was diagnosed as being bipolar.

And, according to The Sun, he has become paranoid and aggressive, prompting the intervention.

Worry: Frank Bruno (left) talks to Piers Morgan for his TV show

Worry: Frank Bruno (left) talks to Piers Morgan for his TV show

'He was acting really strange. He had become convinced that anyone he talked to was trying to take his money,' a source told the newspaper.

'It’s really sad because everyone loves Frank and we are all hoping he gets better soon.'

Fears: Bruno has been taken into care

Fears: Bruno has been taken into care

Two police officers went to Bruno's house in Leighton Buzzard with medics before taking him to a health unit in the South East.

Bruno was crowned WBC heavyweight champion in 1995 after unexpectedly outpointing American Oliver McCall.

He has just spoken about his fight against mental illness in an emotional interview for the ITV show Piers Morgan’s Life Stories, due to be screened on Friday.

But ITV sources told the Daily Mirror that it had been pulled and it's unclear if it will ever air.

The father of four recalled how his split from wife Laura had ended with him being sectioned.

He said: 'I was completely heartbroken. I had a nervous breakdown. It was the most horrible time.'

Laura — married to the South Londoner for 11 years before they split in 2001 — has been alerted to his deteriorating mental state but declined to comment.

Bruno’s agent Dave Davies said: 'Frank with his condition needs to take more care of himself.

'He went to football last weekend and lots of people said he was fine. But the trouble with that condition is that you never know.

'Frank needs to rest up a while to get back to his old self. He needs some good rest for a couple of weeks. We will have a clearer indication next week when the medical checks have been done.'

Glory days: Frank Bruno beat Oliver McCall to win the world title

Glory days: Frank Bruno beat Oliver McCall to win the world title

Pebble Beach Pro-Am: Live leaderboard

AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am leaderboard: Keep up to date with the latest scores

The PGA Tour is in California this week for the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am.

DA Points took the title last year and you can keep track of all the latest scores right here.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LIVE LEADERBOARD

Success stories: DA Points and actor Bill Murray were winners last year

Success stories: DA Points and actor Bill Murray were winners last year