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THE MASTERS: Hole-by-hole guide

THE MASTERS: Hole-by-hole guide to Augusta National

PUBLISHED:

08:55 GMT, 8 April 2013

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UPDATED:

13:02 GMT, 8 April 2013

The waiting is over for the year's first Major as the best players in the world arrive at Augusta National for The Masters.

Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy stroll down Magnolia Lane as the top two in the world while Bubba Watson is defending the Green Jacket he won 12 months ago.

Woods is the man to beat with three wins under his belt already in 2013 while McIlroy looks like he's finally getting used to his Nike clubs following a fine display finishing second at the Texas Open.

But this is Augusta National where anything can happen and here, Sportsmail has everything you need to know in our hole-by-hole guide.

The Masters: Hole by hole

Hole-by-hole guide to Augusta National – everything you need to know ahead of the season's first major

*Holes ranked from 1 (most difficult) to 18 (least difficult) based on how the course played in 2012

1st (Tea Olive), 445 yards, par four: A deep bunker on the right of the fairway and trees both sides make for a daunting start, while long and left of the undulating green both spell big trouble. Unsurprisingly played the hardest hole on the course last year. 2012 average: 4.39 (rank 1)

2nd (Pink Dogwood), 575 yards, par five: Driving into the trees on the left cost Padraig Harrington a nine in 2009, but Louis Oosthuizen memorably holed his second shot for an albatross in the final round last year before losing in a play-off to Bubba Watson. Important early birdie chance.
2012 average: 4.64 (rank 18)

3rd (Flowering Peach), 350 yards, par four: Shortest par four on the course but a pear-shaped green with steep slope in front allows for some wicked pin positions. 2011 winner Charl Schwartzel pitched in for eagle in the final round. 2012 average: 3.90 (rank 14)

4th (Flowering Crab Apple), 240 yards, par three: The back tee – not always used – turns it into a beast with the green sloping from back to front. Phil Mickelson took six here in the final round last year and finished two shots outside the play-off. Jeff Sluman's ace in 1992 remains the only hole-in-one here in Masters history. 2012 average: 3.22 (rank 6)

5th (Magnolia), 455 yards, par four: Jack Nicklaus twice holed his second shot in 1995 and Colin Montgomerie did it in 2000, but it is another devilishly difficult green. To clear the fairway bunkers requires a 315-yard carry. 2012 average: 4.21 (rank 7)

6th (Juniper), 180 yards, par three: From a high tee to a green with a huge slope in it. Four holes-in-one, but Jose Maria Olazabal took seven in 1991 and lost by one to Ian Woosnam, while Arnold Palmer has also run up a seven. 2012 average: 3.17 (rank 8)

Say your prayers: Amen Corner claims many victims each year - the 11th green is on the left with the 12th in the distance towards the back right

Say your prayers: Amen Corner claims many victims each year – the 11th green is on the left with the 12th in the distance towards the back right

7th (Pampas), 450 yards, par four: What used to be a real birdie chance has been lengthened by 35-40 yards, while trees were also added and the putting surface reshaped. More bunkers – five – around the green than any other hole. 2012 average: 4.17 (rank 9)

8th (Yellow Jasmine), 570 yards, par five: The bunker on the right, about 300 yards out, pushes players left and from there it is harder to find the green in two up the steep hill. Still a good birdie chance and Bruce Devlin made an albatross two in 1967. 2012 average: 4.86 (rank 15)

9th (Carolina Cherry), 460 yards, par four: The tee was pushed back 30 yards in 2002. The raised green, with two bunkers on the left, tilts sharply from the back and anything rolling off the front can continue down for 50-60 yards. 2012 average: 4.25 (rank 4)

10th (Camellia), 495 yards, par four: A huge drop from tee to green on this dogleg left and over all the years of the Masters the most difficult hole. It was here that Rory McIlroy began to fall apart in 2011 with a seven, while Watson clinched the title 12 months ago by making par in the play-off from the trees. 2012 average: 4.249 (rank 5)

11th (White Dogwood), 505 yards, par four: The start of Amen Corner. Toughest hole in 2011, with the water front and left scaring many. Best remembered for Larry Mize's chip-in in 1987 and Nick Faldo's back-to-back play-off wins. 2012 average: 4.32 (rank 2)

12th (Golden Bell), 155 yards, par three: Probably the most famous par three in golf. Narrow target, water in front, trouble at the back, it has seen everything from a one to Tom Weiskopf's 13 in 1980. McIlroy four-putted it in 2011. 2012 average: 3.06 (rank 13)

Dangerous: The 12th hole at Augusta National - measuring just 155 yards - is probably the most famous par three in golf

Dangerous: The 12th hole at Augusta National – measuring just 155 yards – is probably the most famous par three in golf

13th (Azalea), 510 yards, par five: The end of Amen Corner. Massive dogleg left with scores ranging from Jeff Maggert's albatross two in 1994 to Tommy Nakajima's 13 in 1978. Watson's crucial run of four birdies in succession last year started here. 2012 average: 4.72 (rank 16)

14th (Chinese Fir), 440 yards, par four: The only hole on the course without a bunker, but three putts are common on the wickedly difficult green. Course record holder Nick Price took eight here in 1993, while Phil Mickelson holed his approach en route to 2010 victory. 2012 average: 4.09 (rank 12)

15th (Firethorn), 530 yards, par five: Often a tough decision whether to go for the green in two across the pond on the hole where Gene Sarazen sank his 235-yard four-wood shot for an albatross in 1935. There have also been three 11s here. 2012 average: 4.67 (rank 17)

16th (Redbud), 170 yards, par three: Tiger Woods' memorable chip-in in 2005 came the same year as 73-year-old Billy Casper's 14, while Padraig Harrington and Ian Poulter are among 15 players to record holes-in-one. 2012 average: 3.11 (rank 11)

17th (Nandina), 440 yards, par four: Tee shot is played over the Eisenhower Tree on the hole Justin Rose double-bogeyed when one off the lead in 2007. Jack Nicklaus birdied here to take the lead as he won his 18th major in 1986. 2012 average: 4.16 (rank 10)

18th (Holly), 465 yards, par four: The drive through an avenue of trees was made much harder when the tee was moved back 60 yards in 2002. The fairway bunker from which Sandy Lyle got up and down to win in 1988 is now 300 yards away. 2012 average: 4.31 (rank 3)

Nacional unfurl world"s largest flag during Copa Libertadores win over Toluca

Now that is what you call a banner! South Americans unfurl giant 600m sign that needed an army of fans to march it into stadium

By
Matt Fortune

PUBLISHED:

14:58 GMT, 5 April 2013

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UPDATED:

15:08 GMT, 5 April 2013

Three years after the first seeds of a world record idea were planted in the minds of Nacional fans, the Uruguayan club have made history.

On Thursday, during their Copa Libertadores tie against Mexican club Toluca, fans around three-quarters of the 25,000-capacity stadium were engulfed by a 600mx50m flag, the largest ever unfurled at a football match.

Record breakers: Fans of Uruguay's Nacional display the biggest flag ever seen at a football match during their Copa Libertadores

Record breakers: Fans of Uruguay's Nacional display the biggest flag ever seen at a football match during their Copa Libertadores

Record breakers: Fans of Uruguay's Nacional display the biggest flag ever seen at a football match during their Copa Libertadores

Record breakers: Fans of Uruguay's Nacional display the biggest flag ever seen at a football match during their Copa Libertadores

The white, red and blue banner swept down the steep banks of the Parque Central stadium in Montevideo, covering the Colombes, Olympic and Amsterdam stands, setting the tone for a pulsating match, won 4-0 by the hosts.

Festivities started earlier in the afternoon when fans gathered in the city to help carry the enormous flag, which took a year and half to make once a design had been decided upon, to the stadium.

Whole day's work: Fans spent much of the afternoon carrying the banner to the stadium through Montevideo

Whole day's work: Fans spent much of the afternoon carrying the banner to the stadium through Montevideo

Whole day's work: Fans spent much of the afternoon carrying the banner to the stadium through Montevideo

Whole day's work: Fans spent much of the afternoon carrying the banner to the stadium through Montevideo

Whole day's work: Fans spent much of the afternoon carrying the banner to the stadium through Montevideo

Maria Sharapova launches candy brand before Australian Open

Serving up a treat: Maria launches sweet brand as she gears up for Australian Open

By
Liv Lee

PUBLISHED:

16:47 GMT, 10 January 2013

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UPDATED:

17:22 GMT, 10 January 2013

Maria Sharapova’s premium sweet brand is set to fly off the shelves in 2013 if they taste as good as they look.

Sugarpova, the tennis ace’s own creation, will launch in the UK, Japan, Canada, Russia, India and China this year. It has already done well in the America, selling a quarter of a million bags in three months.

This week she’ll be promoting the product in Australia, as she makes her final preparations for the opening Grand Slam of the year.

Making a packet: The Russian launched her sweet brand, Sugarpova, last year and sold a quarter of a million bags within three months

Making a packet: The Russian launched her sweet brand, Sugarpova, last year and sold a quarter of a million bags within three months

You can choose from flavours that include Spooky Sour, Splashy, Silly, Cheeky and Flirty

You can choose from flavours that include Spooky Sour, Splashy, Silly, Cheeky and Flirty

Tasty: You can choose from flavours that include Spooky Sour, Splashy, Silly, Cheeky Flirty, Silly Sour and Chic

The Russian, who claims to have a sweet tooth, invested half a million dollars in the brand. Each bag retails at around 3.70 a bag, a steep price in comparison to a bag of Haribo which is less than half that.

It’s not the first time she has ventured into design, having previously teamed up with Nike and watch-makers Tag Heuer. But this solo project has been more of a challenge for the world No 2.

The brand offers 12 varieties, such as Sporty, which are in the shape of tennis balls, and Chic, which features mini gummy handbags and heels. There is also Splashy, in the shape of turtles and squid, and Sassy Sour.

One of Sugapova's variations features gumballs in the shape of tennis balls

Sporty: One of Sugapova's variations features gumballs in the shape of tennis balls

Sugarpova consultant Jeff Rubin said that Sharapova has been very committed to the business, and that only the day after winning the French Open she was at the factory conducting taste tests for the product.

The 25-year-old has not ruled out expanding the brand into other areas once her tennis career ends, such as fashion and cosmetics.

US Open 2012: Webb Simpson triumphs at the Olympic Club

D'oh! McDowell and Westwood blow it as homer Simpson claims US Open glory

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UPDATED:

03:03 GMT, 18 June 2012

Twenty five years ago it was Scott Simpson who won the United States Open at Olympic. This time it’s Webb Simpson.

After a crazy weekend on the funkiest venue in major championship golf, filled with ‘D'oh!’ moments, it seemed only appropriate that we ended up congratulating another member of the Simpsons.

Credit the young American, who just lost out to Luke Donald in the race for the US Tour money list last year, he showed his class at the weekend with two wonderful closing rounds of 68.

Champion: Webb Simpson holds up the trophy after his triumph in the U.S. Open at the Olympic Club

Champion: Webb Simpson holds up the trophy after his triumph in the U.S. Open at the Olympic Club

US Open Leaderboard

Click here to see the final leaderboard

But it was hard not to feel for Jim Furyk, the pacemaker for almost the entire last 36 holes before he was worn down in the end. Ben Hogan, Arnold Palmer, Tom Watson, Payne Stewart and now Furyk and his fellow co-third round leader McDowell. This is the glittering cast list of players who were out in front with a round to play of a US Open at Olympic, only to fall short in the final analysis and see an unheralded player lift the trophy.

McDowell lost his swing in the middle of the round, missing eight consecutive fairways at one point but he fell back on that admirable mental fortitude that has served him so well in recent years. When a long birdie putt at the 17th found the bottom of the hole he found himself alongside Furyk, with both men needing a birdie at the last to tie Simpson.

Not his day: Graeme McDowell battled hard but came up short in his bid for a second major championship

Not his day: Graeme McDowell battled hard but came up short in his bid for a second major championship

Furyk was the first to fall. He missed the green with a gap wedge and left himself an impossible bunker shot. So to G-Mac, whose wedge approach left him with a 25ft birdie putt to force an 18 hole play-off on Monday.

This green, with a steep bank filled with fans, was not unlike the 16th hole at Celtic Manor a couple of years back. Alas, unlike that unforgettable final day at the Ryder Cup, McDowell could not find a putt to match, the ball slipping past the left edge.

Simpson, watching in the locker room alongside his wife, couldn’t hide his joy, his face breaking into the broadest of smiles before sealing his triumph with a kiss. He becomes the first winner of the Jack Nicklaus Gold Medal.

‘It feels incredible to win my national Open,’ said the devout Simpson. ‘I just had an inner peace all day and prayed hard on those final three holes.’

Where's it gone Lee Westwood (centre) looks up for his ball believed to be in a tree on the fifth hole

Where's it gone Lee Westwood (centre) looks up for his ball believed to be in a tree on the fifth hole

Sight for sore eyes: Westwood attempts to locate his golf ball in a tree using binoculars

Sight for sore eyes: Westwood attempts to locate his golf ball in a tree using binoculars

Long drive back: Westwood is carted back to the fifth tee as his challenge falters after the bad break

Long drive back: Westwood is carted back to the fifth tee as his challenge falters after the bad break

So many other players had their chance on a course that proved the great leveller. There was another unsung American Michael Thompson, the first day leader who shot 67 to fall a shot short. There was Ernie Els, who came to the last four holes featuring two par fives needing a birdie to tie Simpson but finished instead with a couple of bogeys.

There was Padraig Harrington, making a welcome return to the white heat of major championship Sunday. How well he played to reach the 18th three under for his round and needing a birdie, he felt to have a chance. How right he was to prove. The bad news, alas, is he bogeyed it to fall two short.

Then there was Lee Westwood, seemingly destined to always be the nearly man at the majors. Perhaps it is just as well he has vowed to keep a relaxed attitude when it comes to the slings and arrows of major championship golf. Otherwise, after what happened at the Olympic club, he might have been tempted to fling himself off the Golden Gate Bridge.

Consider the circumstances. Three behind at the start of play, the Englishman, still seeking his first major championship, had made a good start at level par for his round after four holes.

Bitter taste: Jim Furyk bites his club after seeing his challenge falter on the final day

Bitter taste: Jim Furyk bites his club after seeing his challenge falter on the final day

At the 5th, his drive was perhaps a fraction off to the right. What happened next Well, there was one lone cypress tree that could affect the flight of his ball. Westwood’s tee shot duly caught the branches. Did it throw it back on to the fairway Just the grotesque opposite. The ball was never seen again. Eventually a ball was spotted high up the tree but even with a pair of binoculars Westwood could not identify it.

This desperate break meant he had to declare the ball lost and be driven back to the tee. The resultant double bogey took him five off the lead.

Ironically, this was the same hole where in 1998 Lee Janzen’s tee shot finished up a cypress tree, before falling to earth just before the five minute deadline. He went on to win. It couldn’t happen to Westwood, could it

Janzen’s tree was taken out after the championship. Perhaps they will do the same to Westwood’s, before he does it for them.

There was one wonderfully defiant iron shot at the par five 17th, which almost went into the hole for an albatross before settling three inches away for a tap-in eagle. Wouldn’t you know it, now he needed to make a birdie at the 18th to miss out on the winning score by the sum of that lost ball. In going for it, he ran up a bogey five.

Nearly there: Simpson fist bumps with his caddie Paul Tesori after chipping onto the 18th green

Nearly there: Simpson fist bumps with his caddie Paul Tesori after chipping onto the 18th green

That's the way to do it: Simpson had six consecutive one putts in the middle of his round

That's the way to do it: Simpson had six consecutive one putts in the middle of his round

The action was played out against the dramatic backdrop of mist rolling in from nearby San Francisco Bay. If truth be told, some of the play was so scrappy it deserved to be hidden from view. It looked as if many players had had their fill of this brutal test. Like Tiger Woods, the halfway leader, but a peripheral figure long before the close following a bitterly disappointing weekend.

Woods’s long game remained in reasonable shape over the final two days but his touch around the greens deserted him completely. There were two stubbed chips and what felt like a million putts.

On nine previous occasions when he was leading at the halfway stage in a major he went on to win eight of them. Here, he did not even finish in the top 20. Afterwards he sounded like a man in denial.

‘There were plenty of positives for me to take out of this event,’ he said, repeating the words, presumably in case he thought people had misheard.

Still, even without Tiger and Phil, that’s three majors in a row for players from the US. The great American golf revival continues.

MASTERS 2012: Hole-by-hole guide to Augusta National

MASTERS 2012: Sportsmail's hole-by-hole guide to Augusta National

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UPDATED:

07:51 GMT, 2 April 2012

Augusta National is the home of The Masters. Here, Sportsmail gives you the rundown on each hole ahead of the 76th playing of golf's most famous tournament.

This guide contains information on how the course has played in Masters history (key to ranking 1=hardest, 18=easiest) and how some of the greats have tackled these famous holes in years gone by.

Home to The Masters: Augusta National

AUGUSTA NATIONAL

1st (Tea Olive) 445 yards, par four

Deep right bunker and trees both sides, while long and left of the
undulating green both spell big trouble.

Reigning champion Charl
Schwartzel chipped in from the right on the final day last year.

2011
average: 4.24 (rank 2)

2nd (Pink Dogwood) 575 yards, par five

Driving into the trees on the left cost Padraig Harrington a nine in
2009. Reachable in two and Nick Faldo once holed a 100-foot eagle putt,
but bunkers short of the green see a lot of action.

2011 average: 4.67
(rank 16).

3rd (Flowering Peach) 350 yards, par
four

Shortest par four on the course and a real teaser. The pear-shaped
green with steep slope in front allows for some wicked pin placings.

Schwartzel pitched in for eagle here.

2011 average: 3.89 (rank 14)

4th (Flowering Crab Apple) 240 yards,
par three

The back tee – not always used – turns it into a beast with
the green sloping from back to front. Jeff Sluman's ace in 1992 remains
the only hole-in-one here in Masters history.

2011 average: 3.22 (rank
4)

5th (Magnolia) 455 yards, par four

Jack Nicklaus twice holed his second shot in 1995 and Colin Montgomerie
did it in 2000, but it's another devilishly difficult green. To clear
the fairway bunkers requires a 315-yard carry.

2011 average: 4.16 (rank
8)

6th (Juniper) 180 yards, par three

From a high tee to a green with a huge slope in it. Four holes-in-one,
but Jose Maria Olazabal took seven in 1991 and lost by one to Ian
Woosnam, while Arnold Palmer has also run up a seven.

2011 average: 3.09
(rank 10)

7th (Pampas) 450 yards, par four

What
used to be a real birdie chance has been lengthened by 35-40 yards,
while trees were also added and the putting surface reshaped.

More
bunkers – five – around the green than any other hole.

2011 average:
4.16 (rank 7)

8th (Yellow Jasmine) 570 yards, par
five

The bunker on the right, about 300 yards out, pushes players left
and from there it's harder to find the green in two up the steep hill.
Bruce Devlin made an albatross two in 1967.

2011 average: 4.75 (rank 15)

9th (Carolina Cherry) 460 yards, par
four

The tee was pushed back 30 yards in 2002. The raised green, with
two bunkers on the left, tilts sharply from the back and anything
rolling off the front can go down for 50-60 yards.

2011 average:
4.03 (average 12)

10th (Camellia) 495 yards, par four

A huge drop from tee to green on this dogleg left and over all the
years of the Masters the most difficult hole. It was here that Rory
McIlroy began to fall apart last year with a seven.

2011 average: 4.17
(rank 6)

11th (White Dogwood) 505 yards, par four

The start of Amen
Corner. Toughest hole last year, with the water front and left scaring
many. Best remembered for Larry Mize's chip-in in 1987 and Nick Faldo's
back-to-back play-off wins.

2011 average: 4.33 (rank 1)

12th (Golden
Bell) 155 yards, par three

Probably the most famous par three in golf.
Narrow target, water in front, trouble at the back, it's seen
everything from a one to Tom Weiskopf's 13 in 1980. McIlroy four-putted
it last year.

2011 average: 3.23 (rank 3)

13th (Azalea) 510 yards, par
five

The end of Amen Corner. Massive dogleg left with scores ranging
from Jeff Maggert's albatross two in 1994 to Tommy Nakajima's 13 in
1978. Rae's Creek runs down the left and then in front of the green.

2011 average: 4.58 (rank 18)

14th (Chinese Fir) 440 yards, par four

No
bunkers, but three putts are common on the wickedly difficult green.
Course record holder Nick Price took eight here in 1993, while Phil
Mickelson holed his approach en route to 2010 victory.

2011 average:
3.94 (rank 13)

15th (Firethorn) 530 yards, par five

Often a tough
decision whether to go for the green in two across the pond on the hole
where Gene Sarazen sank his 235-yard four-wood shot for an albatross in
1935. There have also been three 11s here.

2011 average: 4.59 (rank 17)

16th (Redbud) 170 yards, par three

Tiger Woods' memorable chip-in in
2005 came the same year as 73-year-old Billy
Casper's 14, while Padraig Harrington and Ian Poulter are among 13
players to record holes-in-one.

2011 average: 3.08 (rank 11)

17th
(Nandina) 440 yards, par four

Tee shot is played over the Eisenhower
Tree on the hole Justin Rose double-bogeyed when one off the lead in
2007. Jack Nicklaus birdied here to take the lead as he won his 18th
major in 1986.

2011 average: 4.17 (rank 5)

18th (Holly) 465 yards, par
four

The drive through an avenue of trees was made much harder when the
tee was moved back 60 yards in 2002. The fairway bunker from which
Sandy Lyle got up and down to win in 1988 is now 300 yards away.

2011
average: 4.13 (rank 9)

Golden Bell: Rory McIlroy and Jason Day walk to the 12th green during the third round of the 2011 Masters

Golden Bell: Rory McIlroy and Jason Day walk to the 12th green during the third round of the 2011 Masters