Tag Archives: spinner

England beat New Zealand by five wickets to win ODI series

England clinch ODI series win as Finn blows away Black Caps in Auckland

By
David Clough, Press Association

PUBLISHED:

07:59 GMT, 23 February 2013

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UPDATED:

08:06 GMT, 23 February 2013

England cashed in on a fine performance with the ball and in the field to coast to victory at Eden Park and wrap up the one-day international series 2-1 against New Zealand.

Steven Finn was the driving force as the tourists bowled their hosts out for 185, and today's decider turned into a mis-match.

Even Brendon McCullum's third successive half-century was unable to rescue a defendable total for New Zealand, albeit on a pitch which had offered plenty early on to well directed seam bowling after Alastair Cook had won the toss.

Finn when you're winning: The England fast bowler (left) picked up three wickets

Finn when you're winning: The England fast bowler (left) picked up three wickets

England's two premier exponents, Finn and James Anderson, soon reduced the hosts to a hapless 11 for three.

McCullum (79) refused to let England have it all their own way with six
fours and five sixes but, without significant support, could not turn
the tide on his own.

It seemed a foregone conclusion that England would make light work of their target.

In the event they were not flattered by a five-wicket margin, and it was
more instructive that they also had 12.3 overs to spare.

More to follow…

Swann dive: England spinner Graeme Swann swoops to catch James Franklin out

Swann dive: England spinner Graeme Swann swoops to catch James Franklin out

Shane Warne and Marlon Samuels involved in spat in Melbourne

It's the Big Bash (and swearing) League! Warne involved in altercation with Samuels in Melbourne Twenty20 clash

By
Paul Newman

PUBLISHED:

12:12 GMT, 6 January 2013

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UPDATED:

21:14 GMT, 6 January 2013

Shane Warne is in danger of bringing an ignominious end to his distinguished career after an ugly spat with Marlon Samuels.

Sunday's Melbourne derby in front of a record Australian domestic Twenty20 crowd of 46,581 in the Big Bash was marred by one of the worst incidents seen in top cricket in years.

And while Samuels was most at fault for hurling his bat in scenes reminiscent of the infamous clash between Dennis Lillee and Javed Miandad, Warne first lobbed the ball at his opponent.

Finger of blame: Warne directs some fruity language towards Samuels

Finger of blame: Warne directs some fruity language towards Samuels

Bats your lot: Samuels lobbed his bat in Warne's direction after being hit on the shoulder

Bats your lot: Samuels lobbed his bat in Warne's direction after being hit on the shoulder

Bats your lot: Samuels lobbed his bat in Warne's direction after being hit on the shoulder

It all started when Samuels seemed to pull David Hussey back by his shirt as the Melbourne Stars batsman considered a second run after joining the Renegades bowler at the non-striker’s end.

Then when Samuels came in to bat, Warne wagged his finger at the West Indian and said: ‘F*** you, mate.’

In the next over, Warne ran in to
field a ball defended by Samuels and, with the batsman making no effort
to run, the leg-spinner lobbed the ball at his opponent, hitting him on
the arm.

In a spin: Samuel's team were victorious, despite Warne's best efforts

In a spin: Samuel's team were victorious, despite Warne's best efforts

Samuels hurled his bat down the pitch, fortunately without it hitting Warne.

The umpires calmed the pair down but
Warne, wearing a microphone in the field, told Fox Sports: ‘What do you
expect when someone throws a bat at you’

Samuels was later struck in the face
trying to pull Lasith Malinga and may be out of the competition with a
fractured eye socket.

Danish Kaneria spot-fixing appeal hearing adjourned

Spot-fixing appeal hearing for Kaneria's lifetime ban adjourned

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UPDATED:

18:16 GMT, 10 December 2012

Adjourned: Danish Kaneria will discover the outcome of his case next year

Adjourned: Danish Kaneria will discover the outcome of his case next year

The hearing for Danish Kaneria's appeal against the lifetime ban handed down to him by an England and Wales Cricket Board Disciplinary Panel was today adjourned, with the case expected to resume in the new year.

The adjournment came following legal submissions from both sides in London and a new date for the hearing will be agreed in due course.

Kaneria was given the ban in June for his role in a spot-fixing plot.

The 31-year-old Pakistan leg-spinner was found guilty of 'cajoling and pressurising' former Essex team-mate Mervyn Westfield into accepting cash in return for trying to concede a set number of runs in an over during a Pro 40 match in 2009.

Kaneria denies all involvement in the plot and after the hearing in June he immediately indicated his intention to appeal.

Top Spin

The Pakistan Cricket Board said in
July that he would be suspended from playing in his home country until
the outcome of the appeal was known.

Witnesses are yet to be called in the appeal hearing.

Patrick Collins: England"s miracle workers have everyone believing again

England's sensational miracle workers have everyone believing again

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UPDATED:

22:50 GMT, 8 December 2012


In control: Alastair Cook's team look set to take a 2-1 lead

In control: Alastair Cook's team look set to take a 2-1 lead

The sporting year of 2012 is the gift that just keeps giving. And we watch in grateful wonder as the miracles descend in delicious profusion.

Never was there such a year, never such an outpouring of glory. From the Super Olympic Saturdays in Stratford to the golden days on lake and velodrome.

From the evening in Munich when European football turned Chelsea blue to the Sunday afternoon at Medinah when the Ryder Cup yielded to Europe's irresistible charge, to the epic at the Etihad when the title was won with the last kick of the season.

Just one week ago, there was the
chill afternoon at Twickenham when the All Blacks were thrashed and we
told ourselves that 2012 had eked out its last, improbable bonus. And
then came Kolkata.

To appreciate how far England's
cricketers have travelled, it is necessary to remember where they
started. In late March, Andrew Strauss sat in a bleak back room in Galle
and attempted to rationalise England's fourth consecutive Test match
defeat.

Whitewashed 3–0 by Pakistan in the
United Arab Emirates, then bemused by Sri Lanka's spinner Rangana
Herath, there was a growing conviction that England's hapless inability
to play spin rendered them hopelessly uncompetitive in sub-continental
conditions.

Spin king: Graeme Swann had a good session after lunch

Spin king: Graeme Swann had a good session after lunch

They chipped out a 1–1 draw in the Sri Lanka series, but come the first Test of this India tour and the roof fell in.

To lose by nine wickets in Ahmedabad was one thing, but to lose in such a clueless, calamitous fashion was quite another.

The statistics read like a long and
darkly threatening letter: India had not lost a Test series at home
since Australia beat them in 2004-05; England had not won a series in
India since David Gower's team came from behind in 1984-85; England had
won only 11 Test matches in India since 1933; India had lost only six
home Tests in a decade.

Had you been looking for a word to describe England's prospects, then 'unpromising' was probably the kindest.

It was at Mumbai that the transformation came to pass. Suddenly, almost irrationally, England began to believe in themselves.

Monty Panesar, happily restored, came
through in a clatter of wickets, Kevin Pietersen played one of
history's finest Test innings and Alastair Cook batted like a prince.

Victory was wholly unexpected and Kolkata was vigorously anticipated. It did not disappoint.

Led once again by Cook in his most
majestic form, England raised their game to another level and now the
questions were being asked of India. What shall we do with MS Dhoni

How long can Duncan Fletcher continue to coach a patently unresponsive team

And, most dramatically, who tells
Sachin Tendulkar that the golden years have run their course None of
which will concern England, whose restoration to form and confidence has
been quite sensational.

In any other year we might have been
speaking in almost disbelieving terms. In this gloriously bewildering
year of 2012, it ranks as just another miracle.

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Top Spin at the Test: Compton is all out of glove as Tucker puts premature end to partnership

Top Spin at the Test: Tucker's luck for Nick as Compton is all out of glove

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UPDATED:

21:08 GMT, 6 December 2012

Nick Compton had already reached the non-striker’s end by the time umpire Rod Tucker — after a bizarre shake of the head — gave him out lbw on the sweep to Pragyan Ojha. But replays suggested Compton had gloved the ball and the batsman himself said later: ‘It hit my glove. It’s one of those things. I’m a bit disappointed, but from his position it was a very difficult decision, so that’s the way it goes.’

Openers look a dynamic duo

Alastair Cook and Andrew Strauss are comfortably England’s most prolific opening pairing, adding 5,253 Test runs together in 132 innings at an average of 40, with 14 century stands. Cook and Compton have already put on 438 runs together at an average of nearly 110 in only three Tests. On only four occasions did Cook and Strauss put on more than the 165 managed yesterday between the new England captain and his equally new opening partner.

In the runs: Alastair Cook and Andrew Strauss are England's most prolific openers

In the runs: Alastair Cook and Andrew Strauss are England's most prolific openers

Finn delivers on demand

A glimpse of why England were so keen for Steven Finn to play from the start of the series. With MS Dhoni threatening to extend India’s first innings, Cook turned to Finn, who responded by removing him in his first over. The nature of the ball — dug in short of a length, before climbing to take the shoulder of the bat — was just how England imagined it before Finn picked up the thigh injury that ruled him out of the first two Tests.

Ashwin’s turn to look average

India may be wondering what has happened to Ravichandran Ashwin. Feted as a mystery spinner before the start of the series, he briefly appeared to fit the bill with two early wickets on the second evening at Ahmedabad. But since England’s first innings there, he has looked ordinary, taking only three more wickets by stumps on the second day at an average of 115. His line to the right-handers has been especially poor.

Panesar excels on the subcontinent

England would dearly love to pick Monty Panesar in every Test they play, home and away, but continue to regard him as an Asian specialist because of his non-existent batting and fallible fielding. But the two wickets he took on the second morning lifted his tally for the series to 15 at 20 apiece. Graeme Swann has managed 15 at 23 — but in one more Test. The other England bowlers combined, meanwhile, have picked up eight wickets between them, five going to Jimmy Anderson.

Spearheading the attack: Monty Panesar

Spearheading the attack: Monty Panesar (FILE PHOTO)

India v England: Alastair Cook takes command of third Test with record 23rd century

Cook breaks records and Indian hearts as England take command of the third Test thanks to skipper's 23rd Test century

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UPDATED:

11:13 GMT, 6 December 2012

Alastair Cook became England's most prolific Test centurion when he completed his 23rd – and third in successive matches – at Eden Gardens today.

Cook (136 not out) is also the youngest batsman in history to 7,000 runs, a milestone he passed with his 88th this afternoon as he and Nick Compton took control in an opening stand of 165 on day two of the third Test against India.

/12/06/article-2243830-02374BA100000514-789_468x324.jpg” width=”468″ height=”324″ alt=”In command: Record-breaker Alastair Cook (right) and Nick Compton (left)” class=”blkBorder” />

In command: Record-breaker Alastair Cook (right) and Nick Compton (left)

Cook was dropped on 17 when he edged Zaheer Khan low to slip, where Cheteshwar Pujara could not hold the catch.

Otherwise, though, the most likely mode of dismissal appeared to be a run-out as Cook and his apprentice partner took chances with scampered singles and more than once were in danger of mid-wicket collisions as they kept holding the same line.

Cook is the greatest!

Captain Marvel breaks record for most Test tons aged just 27 – Read more…

Lawrence Booth: Pujara left to ponder drop on just 17 – Read more…

There were to be no such mishaps, though, and Cook duly reached his 179-ball century with a leg-glance off Ravichandran Ashwin – having previously also hit the off-spinner for one memorable straight six to go with his 14 fours.

Compton (57) had fewer obvious scoring options but also profited from using his feet, hitting Pragyan Ojha for a six of his own over long-on, on his way to a maiden Test half-century in 123 balls.

Grandson of Denis, and two years Cook's senior, Compton therefore claimed a notable milestone of his own – albeit on a reduced scale to his captain's – before Ojha got his revenge.

Awesome foursome: Monty Panesar (left) took another two wickets on day two

Awesome foursome: Monty Panesar (left) took another two wickets on day two

Cook was safely past his hundred when Compton missed an attempted sweep at the slow left-armer and was, eventually, given out lbw by umpire Rod Tucker just as the batsmen completed what they thought by then was a leg-bye.

Jonathan Trott had made two ducks in his last three Test innings, but did enough here to help Cook consolidate an advantage which gives England clear prospects of pushing for a second successive win over their hosts.

Monty Panesar had earlier finished with four for 90, to add to his 11 wickets in the series-levelling victory in Mumbai, as England picked up the last three Indian wickets for 43 runs this morning – despite some late belligerence from Mahendra Singh Dhoni (52).

The home captain made his intent clear immediately, up the wicket to the second ball of the day to crunch James Anderson past mid-off.

His overnight partner Zaheer was dropped by Graeme Swann off Anderson, but was soon gone anyway – lbw to a Panesar arm ball.

Thinking to do: India captain MS Dhoni hit a half-century but is now under the cosh

Thinking to do: India captain MS Dhoni hit a half-century but is now under the cosh

Panesar also made short work of Ishant Sharma, but the last-wicket pair frustrated England for more than half an hour.

Ojha made no runs but kept out 19 balls, allowing Dhoni to club Panesar for successive sixes over long-off and long-on as England brought the field up for the final two deliveries of one over.

The cat-and-mouse continued, with four consecutive maidens at one point, until Cook had to rest Anderson for Steven Finn.

It was a change which brought Dhoni's 50, with his fifth four from 113 balls crashed past cover, but then the end too when he gloved the next ball and Swann did well to make ground from slip to complete a diving catch.

England had done well to restrict Dhoni's attempt to alter the momentum of a match which was to swing still further the tourists' way thanks to the next historic tour de force from Cook's remorseless repertoire.

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

James Tredwell called into England squad for India tour

Tredwell called into England squad as cover for spin kings Swann and Panesar

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UPDATED:

10:49 GMT, 29 November 2012

As if further confirmation was needed of England's error in selecting just one spinner for the first Test in Ahmedabad earlier this month, James Tredwell has now been added to the squad for the ongoing tour of India.

The 30-year-old Kent off spinner will join up with Alastair Cook's side on Saturday ahead of the third Test starting in Kolkata next Wednesday.

Cover: Tredwell has been called into England's squad

Cover: Tredwell has been called into England's squad

Having been comprehensively beaten fielding just one spinner in Ahmedabad, England called Monty Panesar into their side to partner first-choice Graeme Swann for the second Test in Mumbai last week and were duly rewarded with a series-levelling 10-wicket win as the pair picked up 19 of the 20 Indian wickets to fall.

Tredwell is unlikely to play in the remaining two Tests unless either Swann or Panesar are injured, though he provides much needed cover in the slow bowling department as no other specialist spinners are in the touring party.

Spin kings: Swann (left) and Panesar (right) took 19 wickets in Mumbai

Spin kings: Swann (left) and Panesar (right) took 19 wickets in Mumbai

'Tredwell has performed really well for us,' said England team director Andy Flower. 'He can make a real impact as a spin bowler. He is arriving in Kolkata on December 1 as cover.

'We have some spinners with the Performance Programme. But Tredwell is a senior spinner and will stay with us for the Tests.'

Tredwell, who was recently named as Kent's new captain, has played just one Test previously – taking six wickets as England beat Bangladesh in Dhaka in March 2010.

Andy Flower quits as England one-day coach; Ashley Giles takes over

Flower steps down as England limited overs coach with Giles to take over

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UPDATED:

12:51 GMT, 28 November 2012

Ashley Giles has stepped up to become England’s limited overs coach in a shock move which sees Andy Flower remain in charge of just Test cricket.

The former England spinner, who has been both Warwickshire coach and England selector since retiring, had been expected to step in for Flower for just the Indian one-day series in January to give the Team Director a break.

But in a surprising and significant development Giles will now leave Edgbaston to take on the coach’s role for all 50-over and Twenty20 cricket and is clearly the heir apparent to Flower when he eventually calls it a day.

Stepping aside: Flower is to continue as Test head coach

Stepping aside: Flower is to continue as Test head coach

Flower said: 'I’m very excited by these changes and very much looking forward to working with Ashley Giles as we look to build on the success England cricket has had in the last few years.

'The changes in my role will provide me with new challenges and the time to allow me to focus on areas that are important if England cricket is to continually improve.

'These include developing strategies to give us an opportunity for sustaining success in all three formats of the game. The change in role will also allow me to thoroughly plan and prepare for each of our international series whilst spending the right amount of time at home with my young family.'

Giles, who appeared in 54 Tests and 62 one-day internationals for England, added: 'I am delighted to have been appointed England ODI and T20 Head Coach and to be given an opportunity to coach at international level.

Shock: The announcement was unexpected

Shock: The announcement was unexpected

'I have worked closely with Andy in recent years as a selector and am looking forward to continuing to work together and to build on the progress that has been made with the ODI and T20 sides in recent years.'

Flower has endured a difficult year,
with poor results and the drawn-out Kevin Pietersen saga dominating his
time, and concern had grown that the most successful coach in England’s
history may be hastened towards the exit door.

Yet the ECB vowed to do everything in
their power to keep Flower at the helm as long as possible and seemed
set to give him a break early next year.

Now that has been extended to all
limited overs cricket and Giles, who led Warwickshire to the county
championship title last summer, will start his new role as soon as
England’s thoughts turn to limited overs cricket in the new year.

The hope now is that the move
prolongs Flower’s involvement at the head of the England team for as
long as possible as he turns his thoughts to the back to back Ashes
series that will dominate next year.

Up for the cup: Giles lifts the County Championship earlier this year

Up for the cup: Giles lifts the County Championship earlier this year

Giles, meanwhile, will have the
immediate challenge of the Champions Trophy in England next summer which
gives England a realistic chance of their first global 50-over trophy.
He will then turn his attention to the 2015 World Cup.

The popular member of the 2005
Ashes-winning side has clearly been identified as the best English coach
around and jumps ahead of Flower’s assistant Richard Halsall, who
filled in when Flower was ill during the last Ashes tour and for a
one-day international assignment in Ireland last year.

Halsall, who began as specialist
fielding coach, is expected to return to the world of teaching when his
time with England ends and it was unclear today where he fits in with
the new arrangement.

Giles has attracted some criticism
for having the dual role of county coach and England selector but now he
will throw in his lot completely with England. He will still answer to
Flower but clearly, unless something goes drastically wrong, he is now
destined to succeed him. That process started today.

David Lloyd: Kevin Pietersen is a genius

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: Atherton is right, KP is a genius… but Monty and Co proved England can beat India at their own game

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UPDATED:

13:13 GMT, 25 November 2012

Atherton right on the money when it comes to KP

Michael Atherton used the word and he is completely correct – Kevin Pietersen is a genius.

India did not bowl badly and the pitch is still doing plenty but it was simply magical batting on an enthralling day.

And do not forget Alastair Cook’s magnificent innings, the captain has been terrific in this second Test.

Genius: Kevin Pietersen was in dazzling form in the Mumbai Test

Genius: Kevin Pietersen was in dazzling form in the Mumbai Test

Is Pietersen worth all the trouble Well, let’s put it this way.

There had been a breakdown between him and the team. They went to see a marriage guidance counsellor but there was still an uneasy truce at Ahmedabad.

However, they are now on speaking terms again in Mumbai and, after this brilliant innings, KP is back in the bedroom!

Monty proves why he should always be considered

After the KP and Cook show it was ‘over to you Monty’. And he gets a massive tick after becoming the first English spinner since Hedley Verity in 1934 to take 10 wickets in a match.

He is a Test match bowler, simple as that, and England have to find a way to get him in the team all the time.

Shoo-in: David Lloyd believes Monty Panesar should be played in all conditions

Shoo-in: David Lloyd believes Monty Panesar should be played in all conditions

That would mean Matt Prior batting at six and playing three seamers (pick three from Anderson, Broad, Finn and Bresnan) and two spinners.

But we’ve got to get Monty playing in all conditions. He’s got Tendulkar out twice and has bowled out India in India. He’s some performer.

Let's not get ahead of ourselves…

Finally a word of caution. We are English after all and always fear the worst.

England were bowled out for 72 in the UAE earlier this year and do not want to be chasing anything in three figures.

But they should win and it will be a case of India being beaten at their own game after winning the toss.

Don't forget: Alastair Cook also put in a stellar display at the crease

Don't forget: Alastair Cook also put in a stellar display at the crease

BUMBLE TEST DIARY:David Lloyd says England should drop Jonathan Trott because India are having England for breakfast

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: Drop Trott, it's time to wield the axe because India are having England for breakfast

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UPDATED:

12:59 GMT, 19 November 2012

JONATHAN'S ON A BAD TROTT

Controversial call: England need to consider axing Jonathan Trott

Controversial call: England need to consider axing Jonathan Trott for Friday's second Test

I want to freshen things up with England’s batting so that is why I would take the bold step of dropping Jonathan Trott. He has been a brilliant No 3 for England in the last few years and averages almost 50 in Test cricket but I’d give him a break. He only averages 32 in his last 15 Tests and has struggled here, as well as in Sri Lanka, and in the UAE against Pakistan. As for Samit Patel, I’d stick with him. He got two shocking lbw decisions so he deserves another chance with the bat and he can be a useful third spinner behind Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann.

TIME FOR ENGLAND'S SPIN TWINS

As for the bowling, England need to do some positive thinking…and to ‘think Indian’. It was a thoroughly deserved win for India but England must now get the team right for the second Test. Monty Panesar has to come in, and England must forget about seamers. Zaheer Khan, who is India’s spearhead, bowled only two out of 40 overs in the second innings! There has been some talk about England not winning a Test when Panesar and Graeme Swann have been in the same side but don’t blame them, blame England’s batters.

Dynamic duo: Graeme Swann (right) shares a joke with Monty Panesar during the 2010 tour of South Africa

Dynamic duo: Graeme Swann (right) shares a joke with Monty Panesar during the 2010 tour of South Africa

BROADLY SPEAKING, ENGLAND ARE OFF THE PACE

England also need some pace. It was alarming that Umesh Yadav was comfortably the quickest bowler on show in the first Test. Jimmy Anderson, Stuart Broad and Tim Bresnan are all capable of bowling close to 90mph, but they were barely above 80mph in Ahmedabad. England need Steven Finn, who consistently hits 90mph. If he has to replace Stuart Broad, who is vice-captain, then so be it

England's cricketer Samit Patel bats during a warm-up match against India A in Mumbai, India, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012

England's Tim Bresnan jumps over a rope during a cricket training session at Lord's Cricket Ground, in London, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012.

In the slow lane: Samit Patel (left) deserves another crack after two shoddy LBW decisions, but Tim Bresnan (right) and his fellow seamers have not been testing the speed gun enough (FILE IMAGES)

ENGLAND TEST SERIES

Second Test
Mumbai, begins Friday (4,30am)

Third Test
Kolkata, December 5-9

Fourth Test
Nagpur, December 13-17

WIN TOSS, BAT FIRST, SCORE BIG. SIMPLE

If England are to get back on level terms
in this series, they also need a bit of luck. We spoke to former India
captain Sourav Ganguly after the Test and he said it is imperative that
Alastair Cook wins the toss. Then England must bat first and bat big.
Get at least 400, preferably 500, and then you are controlling the game.
They say India’s batsmen play spin very well but let’s see how good
they are when they are playing catch-up…

BUMBLE DOES THE FULL MONTY (TWICE)

I’m not sure these early starts are doing much for my waistline. I had a fry-up in the studio at 5.30am…then another on the train home at 11am!

Full english breakfast, fried egg, sausages,tomatoes,fried bread, baked beans, scrambled egg, black pudding,

Full English breakfast with tea and white bread toasted

Breakfasts of a champion: Bumble has been wading his way through two full English breakfasts