Tag Archives: shields

FA Cup semi-finals: Phone camera photographers given same accreditation as professionals

Think you can do better than this Prove it! Smartphone snappers get FA Cup chance at Wembley

By
Alex Horlock

PUBLISHED:

10:11 GMT, 10 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

11:06 GMT, 10 April 2013

A Newcastle fan tweeted a snap of Papiss Cisse leaping into the stands to celebrate his stoppage-time winner against Fulham on Sunday which eased the Toon Army’s relegation fears.

Jonny Robson, from South Shields, has received praise galore on Twitter after taking the extraordinary photo of the wild scenes at St James’ Park – and has even been messaged by Cisse himself and Gary Lineker.

But it may just be the first of many. Smartphones will battle with long lenses at The FA Cup this weekend as, for the first time, some of the web’s best amateur photographers are given the same level of accreditation as their professional counterparts.

Amateur This photograph of Papiss Cisse was tweeted by a Newcastle fan after his last-minute winner

Amateur This photograph of Papiss Cisse was tweeted by a Newcastle fan after his last-minute winner

Winner: Cisse struck late in the game to sink Fulham at St James' Park at the weekend

Winner: Cisse struck late in the game to sink Fulham at St James' Park at the weekend

Impressed: Cisse tweeted about the picture after seeing it on the social networking site

Impressed: Cisse tweeted about the picture after seeing it on the social networking site

FA Cup sponsor Budweiser will select 'Phoneographers' – amateur photographers who shoot solely on smartphones – to become the tournament’s first official social reporters capturing, editing and sharing all the action from the semi-finals.

The lucky Phoneographers will shoot pitch-side alongside professional sports photographers, getting a perspective of the game that an amateur photographer can only dream about.

The Phoneographer’s images will be shared on Twitter under the hashtag #tothedream.

Stiff competition: There have been some stunning pictures in this season's FA Cup, including Demba Ba's goal

Stiff competition: There have been some stunning pictures in this season's FA Cup, including Demba Ba's goal

In focus: The 'phoneographers' will get the chance to capture images of the likes of Manchester City's Carlos Tevez

In focus: The 'phoneographers' will get the chance to capture images of the likes of Manchester City's Carlos Tevez

Iain Newell, Budweiser’s UK Marketing Director, said: ‘We’re thrilled to be bringing these avid football and photography fans closer to the game they love in a way they can share with other fans in stadium and at home.

It reflects the changing way people get their football updates and our desire to bring the magic of The FA Cup even closer to the fans, which social media certainly has the potential to do.’

Phil Brown set for Hartlepool job

Former Hull and Preston boss Brown to be unveiled by League One strugglers Hartlepool

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UPDATED:

22:31 GMT, 12 November 2012

Former Hull boss Phil Brown is set to be unveiled as the new manager of bottom-placed League One side Hartlepool United on Tuesday.

Brown is staying in Hartlepool on Monday night having watched their reserves beat Gateshead reserves 2-1 with Brian Horton – his former No 2 at Hull who is expected to join him at Victoria Park.

The 53-year-old – first interviewed for the job two weeks ago – will hold further talks on Tuesday but is expected to be announced before the day is out.

New job: Phil Brown is set to take over at Hartlepool

New job: Phil Brown is set to take over at Hartlepool

Hartlepool, nine points adrift of
safety and without a win in 16 games all competitions, have been
managerless since the departure of Neale Cooper last month.

The club have chosen Brown
over a list of candidates including Craig Short, Colin Cooper and Sailsbury City boss Darrell Clarke.

South Shields-born Brown played more than 250 games for Hartlepool – his first club – and he remains a popular figure at Victoria Park.

Brown has been out of a job since leaving Preston in December 2011 after a disappointing 11-month spell in charge.

He won promotion to the Premier League with Hull in 2008 via the play-offs but was sacked after four years at the club during their relegation season in 2010.

Brown should be unveiled in time to prepare his new side for the visit of Coventry on Saturday.

FA Cup first round: Cambridge City v MK Dons kicks-off action

A Cantona style kung-fu kick, world beaters and a touch of glamour… it must be the FA Cup proper

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UPDATED:

09:54 GMT, 2 November 2012

It's FA Cup time again. The first round proper begins on Friday night when Cambridge City host MK Dons. But this is not the first round for many.

There have been six rounds so far and Sportsmail's MICHAEL WALKER has been at each one, starting at North Shields back in August.

We have followed the winners of each round and will do so through to next May's final.

On Saturday it is Torquay United v Harrogate Town. Here's how we got there.

Honours even: Hyde (in red) take on Harrogate, a game which ended 1-1

Honours even: Hyde (in red) take on
Harrogate, a game which ended 1-1

August 11, FA Cup Extra Preliminary Round
North Shields 1 Birtley Town 1
Venue: Ralph Gardner Park, Attendance: 134, Entry fee: 4 , Match programme: 50p, Prize-money: 1,000

So this is it: the last day of the Olympics, the start of the FA Cup. Down in east London, Mo Farah is about to win his second gold medal of the Games in the 5,000 metres; up on sunny Tyneside, the amateur sport is real.

The FA Cup has 758 entrants, and at this stage 400 are involved. It is regional, but nationwide. There are matches from Cornwall to Northumberland.

It is 98 days since the last FA Cup final, when Chelsea beat Liverpool 2-1, if you recall. North Shields' ground, where the main sponsor is a local funeral director, feels as far from Wembley as it does from the Olympians in Stratford.

These are two teams from the Northern League's second division. But it is good. The banter among the watching lads would fill a northern, kitchen-sink novel, a sample line being: 'He didn't stop it until wor Davy stabbed him.'

There is a touch of glamour, too, from the presence of England fast bowler Steve Harmison in the crowd. Harmison's brother James is a North Shields centre half. The pitch is hairy, the standard is rusty – it's the first game of the season – and Birtley, from Gateshead, deserve their equaliser.

That means a replay the following Tuesday. South of the Tyne, Birtley Town win. They are officially on an FA Cup run. For North Shields there will be no return to Wembley, where they won the FA Amateur Cup in 1969, beating Sutton United in front of 47,000. Those were the days.

Hyde and seek: fans sample the culinary delights on offer at Hyde FC

Hyde and seek: fans sample the culinary delights on offer at Hyde FC

August 25, FA Cup Preliminary Round
Birtley Town 1 West Auckland Town 4
Venue: Birtley Sports Complex, Attendance: 135, Entry fee: 5, Match programme 1, Prize-money: 1,750

It is the sodden August day when, 10 miles away, Sunderland postpone their first home match of the season, against Reading. Across in Birtley, tucked away at the foot of a housing estate, it's game on.

Anyone who has ever been on the east coast mainline can have seen Birtley Town's ground. South of Newcastle, amid the low-rise industry of the Team Valley, the pitch is beside the railway line. As Birtley take a surprise lead against the famous West Auckland – who hail from the Northern League's first division as well as football's history books – trains hurtle by, followed by those of Virgin.

The crowd seems almost entirely from County Durham – that is, West Auckland – and when 'West' equalise in the second half there is a roar. 'West' are clearly the more accomplished footballers but Birtley have excelled. Quality tells though in the next 20 minutes as the County Durham team rattle in three more.

Birtley's Cup run has ended but their players can always console themselves at a takeaway advertising in the match programme. It has speciality pizza costing 3 called 'Geordie Delight' – 'tomato, kebab and cheese.'

Gentle touch: groundsman opts for the light workout

Gentle touch: groundsman opts for the light workout

September 8, FA Cup 1st Qualifying Round
Ashington 2 West Auckland Town 3
Venue: Woodhorn Lane, Attendance: 277, Entry fee: 6, Programme: 1, Prize-money: 3,000

A fixture with a history and a half delivered a game and a half.

The West Auckland team bus in the Ashington car park has a sign on the front with 'Winners of the World Cup' on it.

This refers to the Sir Thomas Lipton trophy, a precursor of the World Cup and West Auckland's dual triumphs of 1909 and 1911.

These were the first, embryonic international tournaments. They were held in Turin and the miners from West Auckland beat a Swiss club, FC Winterthur, in the first final and Juventus (6-1) in the second final. And in West Auckland they haven't forgotten. Nor in Turin – 'West' were invited back by Juventus for the 1909 centenary three years ago.

Ashington, also of the Northern League's first division, will always have a place in the history of English football as the two framed England shirts in the clubhouse show. One is signed by Bobby Charlton, the other by Jack Charlton.

Ashington gave the world, and the World Cup, the Charlton brothers. The town was built on coal, but while the National Union of Mineworkers are among the sponsors at the ground, Ashington is now referred to as an 'unemployment blackspot'. Dole not coal.

Outside Woodhorn Lane, young lads are saddling up a pony and trap. It's like something out of Kes. Inside, the banter, which later spills over, reflects modern life. It is dominated by rival chants concerning which town has the greater number of 'smackheads'.

But first a proper FA Cup tie breaks out. In hot sunshine, the scoring goes 1-0, 1-1, 2-1, 2-2 until, in the 87th minute, John Parker makes it 2-3 to the visitors. It is a deserved win for West Auckland.

For Ashington midfielder Andy Dugdale, it gets too much. He commits another foul and sees a second yellow card.

Something is said on the sidelines as Dugdale departs and he stops, turns and leaps over the perimeter barrier kung-fu style and plants an Eric Cantona Selhurst Park-style boot on a West fan. For a minute it gets ugly and threatens to run out of control. Who says the FA Cup doesn't matter any more

Afterwards a detour leads to Beatrice Street where Bobby Charlton returned after the Munich air crash to recuperate. There is a famous back-lane photograph of Charlton with some local children. But outside the front of 114 there is no blue plaque. But then what did the Charltons ever do for England

Hyde FC V Harrogate FC in the FA Cup 4th round pre qualifier

September 22, FA Cup 2nd Qualifying Round
West Auckland Town 2 Harrogate Town 2
Venue: Darlington Road, West Auckland, Attendance: 194, Entrance: 8, Programme: 1, Raffle prize: four cans of lager, Prize-money: 4,500

Turning off the Durham Road in Bishop Auckland, a shiny new stadium comes into view and anticipation rises. The car park is full and there is an FA Cup tie soon to begin. But this is Bishop Auckland v Fylde.

West Auckland is further on. There you park on the grass and walk down a back lane to a sloping pitch that presumably was once a farmer's field. It is massive.

But the welcome is warm and West Auckland are far from agricultural. They have a reputation for aggression but there is not much evidence here. Against Harrogate Town, three divisions higher in the Conference North, West keep playing pass-and-go even when they fall 2-0 behind with 15 minutes left.

But West have two stars on their badge – those World Cup wins – and more than two on the pitch. Ten minutes from the end, John Campbell strikes home a penalty and, in injury time, captain and centre forward Mattie Moffat spears in the equaliser. Fans are on the pitch.

Moffat is one of those natural ball-players that populate the Northern League and their ilk. There are a few who could play higher and West showed that again in the replay. Though they lost 5-1 it was 1-1 in the 66th minute. Jose da Veiga, the Harrogate goalkeeper who began at Benfica and who was first choice for Levante in La Liga II for three seasons, made vital saves.

West reached Wembley last season in the FA Vase but there will be no FA Cup to add to those two stars next May.

October 6, FA Cup 3rd Qualifying Round
Harrogate Town 3 Frickley Athletic 2
Venue: Wetherby Road, Attendance: 349, Entry: 12, Programme: 2.50, Prize-money: 7,500

Autumnal sunshine gives picturesque Wetherby Road a yellowish hue. The pitch is heavy with the rain that has swamped Yorkshire. But an end-to-end county derby unfolds.

Harrogate manager Simon Weaver was a youth player at Sheffield Wednesday. His programme notes refer back to the West Auckland replay, when West had a man sent off late on.

'I was pleased that (our) players did not get sucked into a fight as the players of West Auckland seemed determined to 'snap' some lads in two, according to instructions from their dug-out.'

There will be another red card in this game, for Harrogate's Lee Elam.

The two teams had met in the previous round last season when there needed to be a replay, won by Frickley. They are now 'Athletic', they used to be 'Colliery'; they bring a bunch of fans north to leafy Harrogate who chant: 'You're so posh it's unbelievable.'

Frickley, of the Evo-Stik League Northern Premier, are 1-0 up in three minutes. The scoring then goes 1-1, 2-1 and 2-2 when, with 15 minutes left, Adam Bolder scores a beauty. Bolder, 31, scored two for Wednesday in a Sheffield derby in the Championship four years ago.

But Frickley, 100 years old last season, come again. You can almost touch the commitment as they pursue an equaliser. But no, it will be Harrogate Town going to Hyde to seek progress to the first round proper.

October 20, FA Cup 4th Qualifying Round
Hyde 1 Harrogate Town 1
Venue: Ewen Fields, Attendance: 393, Entry: 14, Programme: 2.50, Prize-money 12,500

'Let's make it official, Hyde,' shouts an especially eager fan at kick-off. 'In the FA Cup, First Round Proper.'

You can tell he really enjoys saying 'proper'. There has been no shortage of competitiveness in any round to date, but the prize here – beyond the 12,500 winners' money – is status. The FA Cup's first round proper is even called the FA Cup First Round Proper. It's proper status.

Unfortunately for the Hyde fan, this is the first match in this series when the most striking thing about the FA Cup is its apparent irrelevance. This is 90 minutes lacking traditional values. It is polite, coached football.

Hyde have a seat at the top table of FA Cup history. They hold the record defeat – 26-0 to Preston in 1887. They are one up early through Phil Jevons, who replaced Nick Barmby when making his Everton Premier League debut 13 years ago. It is a soft penalty.

Hyde won the Conference North division that Harrogate finished 12th in last season. But Harrogate deserve the 88th- minute equaliser from substitute Leon Osborne. That means a replay, by which time the clubs know the Proper prize is a trip to League Two Torquay United.

Harrogate feel this a 'cruel irony'. In 2005 they got the same first-round prize. But they won it again, 1-0 on Wednesday night, deep into injury time. A replay that was postponed twice finally took place on Harrogate's neighbours' pitch. The Yorkshiremen are off to Devon.

A Cantona style kung-fu kick, world beaters and a touch of glamour… it must be the FA Cup proper

A Cantona style kung-fu kick, world beaters and a touch of glamour… it must be the FA Cup proper

|

UPDATED:

22:48 GMT, 1 November 2012

It's FA Cup time again. The first round proper begins on Friday night when Cambridge City host MK Dons. But this is not the first round for many. There have been six rounds so far and Sportsmail's MICHAEL WALKER has been at each one, starting at North Shields back in August. We have followed the winners of each round and will do so through to next May's final. On Saturday it is Torquay United v Harrogate Town. Here's how we got there.

Honours even: Hyde (in red) take on Harrogate, a game which ended 1-1

Honours even: Hyde (in red) take on
Harrogate, a game which ended 1-1

August 11, FA Cup Extra Preliminary Round
North Shields 1 Birtley Town 1
Venue: Ralph Gardner Park, Attendance: 134, Entry fee: 4 , Match programme: 50p, Prize-money: 1,000

So this is it: the last day of the Olympics, the start of the FA Cup. Down in east London, Mo Farah is about to win his second gold medal of the Games in the 5,000 metres; up on sunny Tyneside, the amateur sport is real.

The FA Cup has 758 entrants, and at this stage 400 are involved. It is regional, but nationwide. There are matches from Cornwall to Northumberland.

It is 98 days since the last FA Cup final, when Chelsea beat Liverpool 2-1, if you recall. North Shields' ground, where the main sponsor is a local funeral director, feels as far from Wembley as it does from the Olympians in Stratford.

These are two teams from the Northern League's second division. But it is good. The banter among the watching lads would fill a northern, kitchen-sink novel, a sample line being: 'He didn't stop it until wor Davy stabbed him.'

There is a touch of glamour, too, from the presence of England fast bowler Steve Harmison in the crowd. Harmison's brother James is a North Shields centre half. The pitch is hairy, the standard is rusty – it's the first game of the season – and Birtley, from Gateshead, deserve their equaliser.

That means a replay the following Tuesday. South of the Tyne, Birtley Town win. They are officially on an FA Cup run. For North Shields there will be no return to Wembley, where they won the FA Amateur Cup in 1969, beating Sutton United in front of 47,000. Those were the days.

Hyde and seek: fans sample the culinary delights on offer at Hyde FC

Hyde and seek: fans sample the culinary delights on offer at Hyde FC

August 25, FA Cup Preliminary Round
Birtley Town 1 West Auckland Town 4
Venue: Birtley Sports Complex, Attendance: 135, Entry fee: 5, Match programme 1, Prize-money: 1,750

It is the sodden August day when, 10 miles away, Sunderland postpone their first home match of the season, against Reading. Across in Birtley, tucked away at the foot of a housing estate, it's game on.

Anyone who has ever been on the east coast mainline can have seen Birtley Town's ground. South of Newcastle, amid the low-rise industry of the Team Valley, the pitch is beside the railway line. As Birtley take a surprise lead against the famous West Auckland – who hail from the Northern League's first division as well as football's history books – trains hurtle by, followed by those of Virgin.

The crowd seems almost entirely from County Durham – that is, West Auckland – and when 'West' equalise in the second half there is a roar. 'West' are clearly the more accomplished footballers but Birtley have excelled. Quality tells though in the next 20 minutes as the County Durham team rattle in three more.

Birtley's Cup run has ended but their players can always console themselves at a takeaway advertising in the match programme. It has speciality pizza costing 3 called 'Geordie Delight' – 'tomato, kebab and cheese.'

Gentle touch: groundsman opts for the light workout

Gentle touch: groundsman opts for the light workout

September 8, FA Cup 1st Qualifying Round
Ashington 2 West Auckland Town 3
Venue: Woodhorn Lane, Attendance: 277, Entry fee: 6, Programme: 1, Prize-money: 3,000

A fixture with a history and a half delivered a game and a half.

The West Auckland team bus in the Ashington car park has a sign on the front with 'Winners of the World Cup' on it.

This refers to the Sir Thomas Lipton trophy, a precursor of the World Cup and West Auckland's dual triumphs of 1909 and 1911.

These were the first, embryonic international tournaments. They were held in Turin and the miners from West Auckland beat a Swiss club, FC Winterthur, in the first final and Juventus (6-1) in the second final. And in West Auckland they haven't forgotten. Nor in Turin – 'West' were invited back by Juventus for the 1909 centenary three years ago.

Ashington, also of the Northern League's first division, will always have a place in the history of English football as the two framed England shirts in the clubhouse show. One is signed by Bobby Charlton, the other by Jack Charlton.

Ashington gave the world, and the World Cup, the Charlton brothers. The town was built on coal, but while the National Union of Mineworkers are among the sponsors at the ground, Ashington is now referred to as an 'unemployment blackspot'. Dole not coal.

Outside Woodhorn Lane, young lads are saddling up a pony and trap. It's like something out of Kes. Inside, the banter, which later spills over, reflects modern life. It is dominated by rival chants concerning which town has the greater number of 'smackheads'.

But first a proper FA Cup tie breaks out. In hot sunshine, the scoring goes 1-0, 1-1, 2-1, 2-2 until, in the 87th minute, John Parker makes it 2-3 to the visitors. It is a deserved win for West Auckland.

For Ashington midfielder Andy Dugdale, it gets too much. He commits another foul and sees a second yellow card.

Something is said on the sidelines as Dugdale departs and he stops, turns and leaps over the perimeter barrier kung-fu style and plants an Eric Cantona Selhurst Park-style boot on a West fan. For a minute it gets ugly and threatens to run out of control. Who says the FA Cup doesn't matter any more

Afterwards a detour leads to Beatrice Street where Bobby Charlton returned after the Munich air crash to recuperate. There is a famous back-lane photograph of Charlton with some local children. But outside the front of 114 there is no blue plaque. But then what did the Charltons ever do for England

Hyde FC V Harrogate FC in the FA Cup 4th round pre qualifier

September 22, FA Cup 2nd Qualifying Round
West Auckland Town 2 Harrogate Town 2
Venue: Darlington Road, West Auckland, Attendance: 194, Entrance: 8, Programme: 1, Raffle prize: four cans of lager, Prize-money: 4,500

Turning off the Durham Road in Bishop Auckland, a shiny new stadium comes into view and anticipation rises. The car park is full and there is an FA Cup tie soon to begin. But this is Bishop Auckland v Fylde.

West Auckland is further on. There you park on the grass and walk down a back lane to a sloping pitch that presumably was once a farmer's field. It is massive.

But the welcome is warm and West Auckland are far from agricultural. They have a reputation for aggression but there is not much evidence here. Against Harrogate Town, three divisions higher in the Conference North, West keep playing pass-and-go even when they fall 2-0 behind with 15 minutes left.

But West have two stars on their badge – those World Cup wins – and more than two on the pitch. Ten minutes from the end, John Campbell strikes home a penalty and, in injury time, captain and centre forward Mattie Moffat spears in the equaliser. Fans are on the pitch.

Moffat is one of those natural ball-players that populate the Northern League and their ilk. There are a few who could play higher and West showed that again in the replay. Though they lost 5-1 it was 1-1 in the 66th minute. Jose da Veiga, the Harrogate goalkeeper who began at Benfica and who was first choice for Levante in La Liga II for three seasons, made vital saves.

West reached Wembley last season in the FA Vase but there will be no FA Cup to add to those two stars next May.

October 6, FA Cup 3rd Qualifying Round
Harrogate Town 3 Frickley Athletic 2
Venue: Wetherby Road, Attendance: 349, Entry: 12, Programme: 2.50, Prize-money: 7,500

Autumnal sunshine gives picturesque Wetherby Road a yellowish hue. The pitch is heavy with the rain that has swamped Yorkshire. But an end-to-end county derby unfolds.

Harrogate manager Simon Weaver was a youth player at Sheffield Wednesday. His programme notes refer back to the West Auckland replay, when West had a man sent off late on.

'I was pleased that (our) players did not get sucked into a fight as the players of West Auckland seemed determined to 'snap' some lads in two, according to instructions from their dug-out.'

There will be another red card in this game, for Harrogate's Lee Elam.

The two teams had met in the previous round last season when there needed to be a replay, won by Frickley. They are now 'Athletic', they used to be 'Colliery'; they bring a bunch of fans north to leafy Harrogate who chant: 'You're so posh it's unbelievable.'

Frickley, of the Evo-Stik League Northern Premier, are 1-0 up in three minutes. The scoring then goes 1-1, 2-1 and 2-2 when, with 15 minutes left, Adam Bolder scores a beauty. Bolder, 31, scored two for Wednesday in a Sheffield derby in the Championship four years ago.

But Frickley, 100 years old last season, come again. You can almost touch the commitment as they pursue an equaliser. But no, it will be Harrogate Town going to Hyde to seek progress to the first round proper.

October 20, FA Cup 4th Qualifying Round
Hyde 1 Harrogate Town 1
Venue: Ewen Fields, Attendance: 393, Entry: 14, Programme: 2.50, Prize-money 12,500

'Let's make it official, Hyde,' shouts an especially eager fan at kick-off. 'In the FA Cup, First Round Proper.'

You can tell he really enjoys saying 'proper'. There has been no shortage of competitiveness in any round to date, but the prize here – beyond the 12,500 winners' money – is status. The FA Cup's first round proper is even called the FA Cup First Round Proper. It's proper status.

Unfortunately for the Hyde fan, this is the first match in this series when the most striking thing about the FA Cup is its apparent irrelevance. This is 90 minutes lacking traditional values. It is polite, coached football.

Hyde have a seat at the top table of FA Cup history. They hold the record defeat – 26-0 to Preston in 1887. They are one up early through Phil Jevons, who replaced Nick Barmby when making his Everton Premier League debut 13 years ago. It is a soft penalty.

Hyde won the Conference North division that Harrogate finished 12th in last season. But Harrogate deserve the 88th- minute equaliser from substitute Leon Osborne. That means a replay, by which time the clubs know the Proper prize is a trip to League Two Torquay United.

Harrogate feel this a 'cruel irony'. In 2005 they got the same first-round prize. But they won it again, 1-0 on Wednesday night, deep into injury time. A replay that was postponed twice finally took place on Harrogate's neighbours' pitch. The Yorkshiremen are off to Devon.

Phil Brown set to take charge at League One Hartlepool

Former Hull and Preston boss Brown set to take charge at League One Hartlepool

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UPDATED:

18:03 GMT, 1 November 2012

Former Hull City boss Phil Brown is favourite to take over League One strugglers Hartlepool United.

Brown, who played for Pools, has been interviewed for the vacancy left by Neale Cooper last week.

Interest: Phil Brown has applied for Hartlepool job

Interest: Phil Brown has applied for Hartlepool job

Former Leeds and Celtic coach Alan Thompson, Salisbury City boss Darrell Clarke and first-team coach Micky Barron, who will be in charge for their FA Cup first round tie with Chesterfield on Saturday, have also met the Hartlepool board.

South Shields-born Brown, who played more than 250 games for Hartlepool, is keen to get back into management.

He left Hull after four years in their relegation season, having won promotion to the Premier League, and had an unhappy spell at Preston North End for a year which ended last season.

Since then the 53-year-old, who is still a popular figure at Victoria Park, has been working as a media pundit and he was linked with a return to Hull in the summer before Steve Bruce's appointment.

London 2012 Olympics: Josef Craig sets world record in S7 400m freestyle

Teenage kicks for Craig as 15-year-old sets new 400m freestyle world record in the pool

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UPDATED:

10:56 GMT, 6 September 2012

Josef Craig was staggered to have defied his tender years as he set a new world record in the S7 400 metres freestyle as ParalympicsGB continued to sizzle in the pool.

The 15-year-old cut his own best by nine seconds as he hurled down a marker on Thursday morning in four minutes 45.79 seconds.

The South Shields-born teenager's time saw him dip 1.37secs inside team-mate Jonathan Fox's world record set at last year's European Championships in Berlin.

Rising star: Josef Craig celebrates winning the men's 400m freestyle S7 heat at the Aquatics Centre

Rising star: Josef Craig celebrates winning the men's 400m freestyle S7 heat at the Aquatics Centre

Making a splash: Craig was taken aback after setting his new world record time in the S7 400m freestyle

Making a splash: Craig was taken aback after setting a new world record time in the S7 400m freestyle

Craig was completely taken aback and said: 'I thought “God I've just done a massive PB, that will be my achievements done for this competition” but then I got my focus back and saw it was a world record next to the time and I just thought there's a problem with the clock here.

'I can't break a world record yet, I'm still 15, just take it one step at a time but I just don't know what to say about that, it's just amazing.'

Craig added: 'I've been training really hard but I never thought there would be a world record time in there but it just goes to show what amazing help I've got up at Manchester.'

Water sight: (left-right) Josef Craig, Shiyun Pan of China, Matthew Levy of Australia, Lantz Lamback of the United States, Matthew Walker of Great Britain, Yevheniy Bohodayko of Ukraine and Jonathan Fox of Great Britain

Water sight: (left-right) Craig, Shiyun Pan of China, Matthew Levy
of Australia, Lantz Lamback of the United States, Matthew Walker of
Great Britain, Yevheniy Bohodayko of Ukraine and Jonathan Fox of Great
Britain

Fox was second fastest through in 4mins 49.91secs with the possibility of two Britons on the podium tonight a very real prospect.

The 21-year-old won the S7 100m backstroke on the opening night but since then has not made the top three in his 50m and 100m freestyle races.

He was magnanimous about his younger team-mate wresting his world record and said: 'Josef is 15 and has been training really well and hats off to him for breaking it.

'I am a good team player, I take a defeat when I get one and we'll see – I'll come back fighting tonight and hopefully there will be two Britons on the podium so we'll see what happens.'

Cheick Tiote returns ten times better – Alan Pardew

Pardew warns Premier League Tiote has returned 'ten times better' than last summer

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UPDATED:

15:03 GMT, 6 August 2012

Ready to rumble: Cheick Tiote has come back strong

Ready to rumble: Cheick Tiote has come back strong

Cheick Tiote is looking fomidable after the summer break according to Newcastle manager Alan Pardew.

The destructive Ivorian midfielder was superb last season and the Toon's opponents need to watch out as Pardew has confirmed Tiote means business from the start.

He played well as Newcastle drew 0-0 with Dutch side ADO Den Haag on Saturday.

‘Cheick looks ten times better than he did last year, and I absolutely mean that,' Pardew told the Shields Gazette.

‘He did not come back well last summer, if I am honest. However, he has summered well this time and is in great physical shape.

‘It is going to be a big season for Cheick. All my, what I would call big players, are important if we are to progress as a team, and Cheick fails into that category. He is in a good place.’

Tiote had been linked with a big money move away from Newcastle but the rumours died down after the player announced he was looking forward to tackling the Europa League with his current side.

London 2012 Olympics: Sarah Clark loses to Automne Pavia in judo

Brit Clark falls at the first hurdle after golden score defeat… and Williams loses, too

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UPDATED:

10:33 GMT, 30 July 2012

Britain's Sarah Clark lost her first-round contest against Automne Pavia of France on golden score in the women's judo under-57kgs at ExCeL.

The atmosphere was again electric as the Team GB fighter entered North Arena 2. However, Pavia would provide a stern test, having lost only three times in 2012.

Over and out: Clarke was eliminated in the first round

Over and out: Clarke was eliminated in the first round

The crowd did their best to spur the South Shields judoka on, but Clark picked up a passivity penalty midway through the contest. To her credit, the Edinburgh Judo Club fighter, 34, then went on the attack to put pressure on the European bronze medallist.

The bout went into golden score, which the Frenchwoman got with a somewhat controversial wazari throw to end Clark's Olympic hopes at the first hurdle.

All white on the night: Pavia knocked out the Britain

All white on the night: Pavia knocked out the Britain

Later Camberley judoka Daniel Williams fights in the men's under-73kgs and has been handed a bye into the second round, where he meets 2008 Beijing Olympic bronze medallist Rasul Boqiev of Tajikistan.

Clark at first felt she managed to turn out of the throw, and fall on her front. However, on review she accepted the defeat.

'It was definitely a score. Initially you think you have gotten off the technique, but that is why the video referees are there,' said the three-time Olympian, who has dropped down a weight since the Beijing Games.

'I was positive with my performance until that point, unfortunately a slight error at the end cost me the match.

'The crowd helped massively and I used it to my advantage, but unfortunately it was not to be.'

Clark felt she could have made an impact on the latter stages, and deliver a first British Judo medal since 2000.

She said: 'You have got to put everything in otherwise you have doubts. I had none going into this, I was in the best shape of my life.

'There is nothing more I could have done. In the fight, I made one small mistake which has unfortunately cost me possibly an Olympic gold medal.'

Daniel Williams, 23, also came out to a rousing reception for his contest against the experienced Tajikistan fighter and 2008 Beijing bronze medaillist Rasul Boqiev in the second round of the men's under-73kgs.

Dan and out: Williams lost to the 2008 Beijing bronze medallist

Dan and out: Williams lost to the 2008 Beijing bronze medallist

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However, the British judoka showed little trepidation, immediately going on the offensive. There was little to choose between the fighters heading into the last 90 seconds, when Boqiev collected a shido passivity penalty.

However, his experience told when he caught the Briton with a sweep to record an ippon score to end the contest with 21 seconds left.

Williams did not stop to speak to waiting reporters as he walked out of the arena in bitter disappointment. His coach Luke Preston, however, felt the young fighter could take great credit from an unexpected Olympic chance, awarded on home nation places.

'Danny did everything right really and he just got caught when the guy got his chance, but that is judo,' Preston said.

'He was fighting an Olympic bronze medallist and just got caught that one second and it was all over.'

London 2012 Olympics: Haile Gebrselassie and Brendan Foster join forces in relay

Gebrselassie and Foster join forces as Olympic Torch lights up South Shields

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UPDATED:

14:52 GMT, 16 June 2012

Double 10,000m gold winner Haile Gebrselassie got into the Olympic spirit as he carried the torch during the relay around the UK.

Gebrselassie was in South Shields and ran with the torch to The Leas on the South Tyneside coastline, which is also the finishing line for the Great North Run.

The Ethiopian, who will not run in London after failing to qualify for what would have been his fifth Games, then handed it to Great North Run founder and Olympic bronze winner Brendan Foster.

Too close to call: Haile Gebrselassie and Brendan Foster carry the torch across the finishing line

Too close to call: Haile Gebrselassie and Brendan Foster carry the torch across the finishing line

On the road again: Haile Gebrselassie waves to the crowd as he runs in South Shields

On the road again: Haile Gebrselassie waves to the crowd as he runs in South Shields

He carried the flame to the spot where the famous run – the world's second biggest half marathon – ends on the seafront.

After Gebrselassie and Foster crossed the line together the Ethiopian said: 'I think it was a photo finish.

'It was an amazing atmosphere and a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for everyone involved.

'The Olympics isn't just about winning medals, it's about people coming together and taking part.

'It was fantastic to be back running in the North East in front of these big crowds.'

Foster said: 'It was great to give Haile Gebrselassie such a wonderful taste of the Olympic spirit.

Flaming good time: Gebrselassie and Foster braved the rain in South Sheilds

Flaming good time: Gebrselassie and Foster braved the rain in South Sheilds

Keep on running: Gebrselassie and Foster

'This was an honour and a privilege to cross the Great North Run finishing line with one of the world's leading Olympians and for us both to be carrying the Olympic torch.

'It was a memorable moment for the people of South Tyneside, who will savour this occasion for ever.'

Later Olympic silver winner Steve Cram carried the flame into Sunderland's Aquatic Centre, next to his beloved Stadium of Light.

Lighting the way: Gebrselassie looked as if he enjoyed being part of the Olympic torch relay

Lighting the way: Gebrselassie looked as if he enjoyed being part of the Olympic torch relay

Crowds cheered and young swimmers waved from the 50m pool.

He said afterwards: 'It's lovely to see the reaction of the people in the North East.

'The purpose of the torch relay is to take the Olympics past your front door almost.

'It's one way people can get to the Olympics and feel as if they have just about touched it.'

Hundreds gathered at Gateshead's Angel of the North to watch voluntary worker Iris Hutchinson, 69, carry the torch.

She waved and held the flame aloft for the waiting photographers under the sculpture's imposing span.

Mark Hughes: Keeping QPR in Premier League will be highlight of my career

Forget league titles and European glory, keeping QPR up will top the lot, says Hughes

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UPDATED:

21:45 GMT, 13 April 2012

Mark Hughes has won Premier League titles, FA and League Cups and European honours.

But according to the QPR manager keeping his team in the Premier League will top all of those achievements.

The club dropped into the relegation places under the Welshman but it is now in their own hands to stay up.

Mark my words: Hughes understands the size of the task in hand

Mark my words: Hughes understands the size of the task in hand

They have five games – starting away to West Bromwich Albion on Saturday – to secure top-flight football next year.

At Manchester United Hughes won two league titles, three FA Cups, one League Cup, one Cup Winners' Cup and three Charity Shields.

He won a League Cup at Blackburn and with Chelsea he added another FA Cup, League Cup and Cup Winners' Cup.

But when asked where keeping QPR up would rank he replied: 'Right at the top. It is difficult I haven't done it before coming in halfway through the season.

'There were fundamental problems that we had to address and it takes time.

'Now everybody has a real sense of belonging and a sense things are going to happen positively.'

The 48-year-old said he has hugely changed the club since he joined on January 10 to create that positivity.

Home front: QPR's form at Loftus Road could save their Premier League lives

Home front: QPR's form at Loftus Road could save their Premier League lives

Home front: QPR's form at Loftus Road could save their Premier League lives

He is working on overhauling the training ground and gym to make it a better environment for the players.

He added: 'The gym is a prime example. When we walked into the gym it wasn't fit for purpose. It wasn't a working gym for a professional football club.

'All that's had to change we've ripped things out and changed the whole situation there.

'When the guys come back in the summer they'll see this place different again.

'I don't think there's a great deal of love for [the training ground] and you can understand why. You need to change that and people need to understand this is our place of work and it's got to be a nice environment.

'I've been through this before at Man City when I walked through the door then. It was a club that needed shaping in the right direction. That's what's needed here.'

Bad boy: Barton's off Twitter and in the goals

Bad boy: Barton's off Twitter and in the goals