Tag Archives: shearer

Loic Remy denies he signed for QPR for money

I'm not here for the money! Remy denies he snubbed Newcastle to cash in at QPR

By
Duncan Bech, Press Association

PUBLISHED:

11:36 GMT, 18 January 2013

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UPDATED:

11:48 GMT, 18 January 2013

Loic Remy has denied he chose QPR over Newcastle for monetary reasons.

The France striker looked set to move to St James' Park after manager Alan Pardew made what he described as a 'fantastic offer', only to instead move to Rangers who are reported to have offered him 80,000 per week.

Newcastle great Alan Shearer expressed his surprise at Remy's decision and suggested that money was the motivating factor but the 8million capture from Marseille revealed the influence of QPR manager Harry Redknapp was key.

Got his man: Loic Remy (left) has joined manager Harry Redknapp at Queens Park Rangers

Got his man: Loic Remy (left) has joined manager Harry Redknapp at Queens Park Rangers

'The finance doesn't come into it at all because Newcastle offered me a very good contract as well,' Remy said.

'I've seen that a lot of people are surprised I came to QPR and say that I came here for money, but my decision was no way based on financial reasons.

'I could have stayed at Marseille because I had a good contract there. There are a number of reasons for why I had to leave Marseille for here.

'QPR were very open, they wanted me and it's great to be here.

Denial: Remy insists he has not moved to QPR for the money after snubbing a move to Newcastle

Denial: Remy insists he has not moved to QPR for the money after snubbing a move to Newcastle

'It's true that I hesitated between Newcastle and QPR. I went to meet the staff at Newcastle and there came a time to make a decision and I made that decision based on two factors.

'Firstly I already knew the coach Harry Redknapp and secondly, I'm very excited by the project QPR have here for the future.

'It's a big challenge and the team are in a difficult situation, but since Harry Redknapp has been here things have changed a great deal.'

Redknapp monitored Remy when he was Tottenham manager and went to Marseille to meet him, only to be put off by the 20m price tag being quoted at the time.

Main man: Remy (left) has been brought in from Marseille to rescue QPR from relegation

Main man: Remy (left) has been brought in from Marseille to rescue QPR from relegation

Vincent Kompany tackle: Video special of the football"s challenges

VIDEO: As we face up to a world without tackling, Sportsmail looks back at some memorable challenges

PUBLISHED:

15:49 GMT, 15 January 2013

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UPDATED:

16:12 GMT, 15 January 2013

There was an outcry of disapproval after Vincent Kompany was given a straight red card for his full-blooded challenge on Jack Wilshere.

The Manchester City captain’s challenge was robust but he won the ball, sending out the message that players will be handed their marching orders for aggressive challenges.

Does this signal the death-knell for the old-fashioned tackle And if the letter of the law is followed, we may never see the likes of these challenges – as nominated by Sportsmail’s reporters – again…

Bad Kompany: The Belgian harshly saw red for this challenge on Arsenal's Jack Wilshere

Bad Kompany: The Belgian harshly saw red for this challenge on Arsenal's Jack Wilshere

COLIN YOUNG

KEVIN BALL (Sunderland) on Duncan Ferguson (Newcastle United), St James’ Park, August, 1999

Very few players in the game, never mind the North East, have relished a tackle as much as former Sunderland captain Kevin Ball. And they certainly like a tackle up here.

But on the night Sunderland pulled off a rare win on enemy territory and with the game in the dying minutes, ‘Bally’ pulled off a typically well-timed, hard but fair challenge on Duncan Ferguson. Only the ball flew from the pair who were 30 yards from goal, over Thomas Sorensen and hit his bar, denying Newcastle an equaliser.

This one of the most memorable Tyne-Wear derbies – Ruud Gullit put Alan Shearer and Ferguson on the bench and paid the price in the endless rain. But if Bally of all people had scored the equaliser, even Sunderland’s former manager and current reserve-team boss wouldn’t have been able to live it down.

NEIL MOXLEY

PAUL McGRATH (Aston Villa) against Helsingborg, Olympia, September, 1996

The big man had just been dropped by Brian Little. If memory serves, he came on as a substitute in this game and was seriously peeved. With about five minutes to go, the ball broke down the right, just in front of the dug-outs. McGrath wasn’t the quickest but, my life, he shifted to make his mark. He took ball, man, trainer’s bag, the lot, right in front of Little – and me, sat in the press box towards the back of a small stand.

It was fair. But it wasn’t so much a tackle as a statement. I remember nothing else about this game. The thought of that challenge has stayed with me throughout my career.

McGrath was a solid bloke and I felt a tinge of sympathy for his opponent that night. Honestly, he absolutely cleaned this guy out.

Hardman: McGrath (left) was known for his tackling prowess

Hardman: McGrath (left) was known for his tackling prowess

JOHN EDWARDS

STEVEN GERRARD (Liverpool) on Phil Jagielka (Everton), Anfield, March, 2008

Never one to do things by halves, Gerrard ignited the home crowd with a typically uncompromising double tackle on Jagielka. An initial block challenge near the halfway line sent the ball spinning towards the corner flag, with Jagielka sprinting after it and Gerrard scrambling to his feet and setting off in hot pursuit.

As Jagielka caught up with the ball, Gerrard was a good four or five yards behind but that didn’t stop him hurling himself into a full-length studs-first tackle that sent the ball flying into the Kop. A blur of red, the Liverpool skipper might have been inviting trouble in the current climate but there were no repercussions then.

Neither should there have been. It was the cleanest of contacts and Jagielka was rattled but unharmed. Gerrard at his most committed, and it soon spread to his team-mates, who dominated and should have won by more than an early Fernando Torres goal.

LAURIE WHITWELL

PHIL NEVILLE (Everton) on Cristiano Ronaldo (Man Utd) Goodison Park, October, 2008

Not many tackles can lay claim to changing the course of a team’s season – but, according to Everton manager David Moyes, this one did. United were cruising at Goodison Park, 1-0 up thanks to a Darren Fletcher goal, but on the hour Phil Neville launched a ferocious challenge on ex-team mate Cristiano Ronaldo, who had already been half-felled by Steven Pienaar. Neville’s lunge sparked fury in the away section and he was booked by Alan Wiley. Later replays showed he got the ball but the whistle had already gone.

The incident (48 seconds into this video) whipped up the crowd and Everton began playing with increased vigour. Soon after, Marouane Fellaini scored an equaliser. They had lost three of four at home up to that point but won their next three Premier League games to finish fifth in May. As for the best overall tackler I have seen – Ryan Giggs takes that accolade. His slides are always silky smooth and generally he wins the ball.

LEE CLAYTON

STUART PEARCE (Wealdstone)

Bobby Gould said he went to watch Stuart Pearce playing for Wealdstone and left after the first tackle when the part-time electrician sent the winger flying. Legend has it the winger ended up closer to Bobby and his wife in the stand than the pitch and Coventry, where Gould was manager, soon paid 300,000 for the player who went on to become England’s greatest left back.

It was a huge amount of money to pay for non-League part-timer but money well spent as Pearce went on to play 78 games for his country (even if most of his success came with Nottingham Forest).

Psycho: Pearce wasn't one to shy away from a challenge

Psycho: Pearce wasn't one to shy away from a challenge

Psycho: Pearce wasn't one to shy away from a challenge

Anyway, I guess that’s Bobby’s favourite tackle, not mine. I’m going to pick a player I liked watching tackle for England and that’s Paul Ince. I was there in France, during the World Cup, when he was asked about it. He said this: ‘I love tackling, I really love it. It’s better than sex. My wife is not going to be too pleased, but I love the sound of it, the crunch, the noise, the act of tackling. I was born to tackle.’ I think he was too. I wish I could have tackled like Paul Ince.

DOMINIC KING

JAMIE CARRAGHER (Liverpool) on Andriy Shevchenko (AC Milan), Istanbul, May, 2005

The memory of how Liverpool came back from the dead to win their fifth European Cup remains as fresh as ever, with that incredible three goals-in-six minutes flurry, but it sometimes tends to be forgotten that they also had to withstand a late siege from Milan.

As the Italians tried to pilfer a win late on, Shevchenko powered into the Liverpool area and had skipped past Sami Hyypia but just as he was about to pull the trigger, Carragher swept in to spirit the ball from his toe with immaculate timing. Given what was at stake, it has to go down as the best, most important tackle I’ve seen.

That game was also responsible for the best save I have ever seen, too, with Jerzy Dudek’s scarcely believable parry from the hapless Shevchenko.

Master of the art: Carragher dives in to challenge Mark Viduka

Master of the art: Carragher dives in to challenge Mark Viduka

MARK ALFORD

STEVEN GERRARD (Liverpool) on Cristiano Ronaldo (Manchester United), Anfield, March, 2007

Ronaldo – soon to become the most expensive player in the world – and the best tackler on the planet. Gerrard nicks possession just when United are in a threatening position with Ronaldo in possession. Minimum fuss, goes to ground for a split second, nicks the ball and Liverpool are on their way up the field. Pure class.

PHIL GRADWELL

MARK FISH (Bolton) on Michael Owen (Liverpool), Reebok Stadium, November, 1997

The 17-year-old Owen was lightning and nobody could catch him. So when he went through on goal, home fans feared the worst. But Fish, playing one of his first games for Bolton, somehow managed to keep within an outstretched leg of the Liverpool striker and just as Owen was about to shoot slid in, scooped back the ball, got up and played the ball to a midfielder. Easy.

Mark-ed man: Fish (left) gets to grip with Owen once more while at Charlton later in his career

Mark-ed man: Fish (left) gets to grip with Owen once more while at Charlton later in his career

SAM CUNNINGHAM

CHRIS SOLLY (Charlton) on Steve Morison (Millwall), The Valley, March, 2010

Nine minutes into this fierce south London derby Morison, one of the most prolific strikers in League One that season, was sent through on goal by a long ball that caught out centre backs Jose Semedo and Miguel Llera. But 19-year-old left back Solly hurtled towards the middle and produced an unbelievable recovery tackle taking the ball first, then the man, and a large chunk of the turf in the process.

CHRIS CUTMORE

BORIS JOHNSON (England) on Maurizio Gaudino (Germany), Madejski Stadium, May 2006

They say great tackles can change games but this one changed an entire career. Boris was seen as a bumbling buffoon before this remarkable rugby-style tackle. Now he’s still seen as a bumbling buffoon but is somehow in his second term as Mayor of London.

OK, it’s not a proper tackle, so don’t try this one at home, kids (or on the training pitch) – it won’t get your football career very far. But it was very funny.

Wayne Rooney says Sir Alex Ferguson was right to substitute him against Swansea

I'll bounce back from Swans flop! Rooney vows to show his true colours against Toon

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 25 December 2012

For Wayne Rooney, recent Christmas and New Year experiences have not been good.

Last season, for example, the Manchester United centre forward was a substitute as his team beat Wigan 5-0 on Boxing Day before being dropped completely for the following home defeat to Blackburn after spending too long – in his manager's opinion at least – out on the town with team mate Darron Gibson.

Twelve months on and Rooney has found himself having to apologise again. Not for any social misdemeanours this time, merely a performance at Swansea on Sunday that Match of the Day pundit Alan Shearer labelled his worst for years.

Bad day at the office: Wayne Rooney admits he was not at his best against Swansea

Bad day at the office: Wayne Rooney admits he was not at his best against Swansea

That may be exaggerating things a little but Rooney still heads in to today's game with Newcastle at Old Trafford feeling that he has a little making up to do.

'I could feel it on the pitch that things weren't right at Swansea,' said Rooney.

'Some days you have an off day I could feel that and I couldn't complain at being substituted.

'But the good thing I think about football, and especially over the Christmas period, is that you have lots of games and the Swansea game has gone for me and it is certainly not one I will remember.

'I will relish the next one, though.

'The position we are in at the minute, it is a great opportunity to make that gap even bigger between us and Manchester City at the top of the league.

'Obviously against Swansea we couldn't do it but, as I say, hopefully we will get six points from the next two games and see what happens.'

Rooney's season has been one of sporadic performances so for. Having returned from his summer break slightly overweight, the England international then picked up a nasty injury to his thigh in early win over Fulham.

In a recent Sportsmail interview, United ambassador Sir Bobby Charlton suggested that there was improvement yet to come from Rooney's relationship with Robin van Persie and certainly in South Wales on Sunday they two have them seemed to be speaking a different language.

Right decision: Rooney had no complaints about being substituted against Swansea

Right decision: Rooney had no complaints about being substituted against Swansea

The worry form Wednesday's opponents Newcastle is that a Christmas home game against struggling opposition presents a perfect opportunity for things to come together. After all, Rooney rarely plays poorly for two games running.

'We are four points clear in the Premier League and of course we are happy with that,' he said.

'We are still in a good position with two home games coming up now.

'We need to make sure we take maximum points from them.

'We know it's early days and there is a long way to go but we are in a healthy position at the moment.

'And so we need to try and keep on.'

Finding his form: Rooney is aiming to be back to his best against Newcastle

Finding his form: Rooney is aiming to be back to his best against Newcastle

Newcastle contributed to a difficult festive period for United last season by beating them 3-0 at St James' Park. Today, however, they arrive in poor shape with Alan Pardew fretting over a run of two wins in twelve games in all competitions and worrying also about the future of star striker Demba Ba.

As far as United manager Sir Alex Ferguson is concerned, the root cause of Newcastle's problems is not difficult to locate.

Ferguson said: 'The new players they brought in last season caught us all by surprise.

'We didn't really know a lot about them.

'I knew about Ba, of course, but I didn't know anything about Cabaye or Cisse to be honest with you.

'They had fantastic seasons.

'Second time round, clubs are starting to analyse them a bit different, plus, more importantly, he's had some injuries.

Caught out: Newcastle beat Manchester United last season

Caught out: Newcastle beat Manchester United last season

'Cabaye's out till next year, Tiote is out to next year, he's had one or two important players injured, and that does make a difference when you've not got a squad as strong as the likes of ourselves or City or Chelsea.

'I'm not entirely surprised, although I am surprised they are so low down the table.'

Ferguson is sure to make some changes for today's game and it is expected that captain Nemanja Vidic will step down again after a difficult first start since September at the weekend.

Rooney, however, is expecting the club captain to make a significant difference to United's uncertain defending over the coming weeks and months.

'It was good to see him get 90 minutes at Swansea,' added Rooney.

'He has been out for a while and he has been working hard in the gym and at the training ground.

'He has done well to come back and he will be a massive player for us between now and the end of the season.

'He is a great defender and great to have in the team and a great leader.

'We have a few players in the team who can lead from the back or the front and he is our captain and does that.'

Alan Shearer blames Mike Ashley for Newcastle"s poor performances this season

Shearer: Stingy Ashley to blame for Newcastle's failure to challenge title contenders

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UPDATED:

10:40 GMT, 17 December 2012

Alan Shearer has launched a stinging attack on Newcastle owner Mike Ashley's over his apparent failure to improve the squad to capitalise on last season's fifth-place finish in the Barclays Premier League.

Alan Pardew's side have failed replicate the form which saw them finish fifth last term and are currently languishing just two points above the relegation positions at the half way stage.

The St James' Park legend believes the club have missed the opportunity to firmly establish themselves among the top flight's elite.

Given the run around: Newcastle were beaten 3-1 by City at the weekend

Given the run around: Newcastle were beaten 3-1 by City at the weekend

Shearer told The Sun: 'Newcastle missed a huge opportunity in the summer.

'Having punched above their weight last season and almost made it into the top four, this was the time to spend.

'The club was up and running again after so many years mired in uncertainty.

'There was once again a feel-good factor and even Mike Ashley was enjoying it.

'But he needed to put his hand in his pocket and strengthen with two or three quality players.'

Defeat in Saturday's early kick-off to Manchester City means the club have won just one of their last ten games in all competitions.

And while Shearer concedes the Toon do not have the spending might of City or Chelsea, they can achieve the same as Tottenham – who finished fourth last season.

Penny pinching Shearer has lambasted Newcastle owner Ashley

Penny pinching Shearer has lambasted Newcastle owner Ashley

He said: 'Just look what Manchester United, Manchester City and Chelsea did this summer, even if City couldn't get their main targets.

'I know Newcastle do not have the spending power of those three, but they most certainly could have found the cash to significantly strengthen that squad.

'It's up to Ashley how much he spends — but just look at what Spurs did.

'They pipped Newcastle to fourth place and went out and spent 57million on six players. Newcastle spent 8.1m on three and got a fourth in on a free.'

Best foot forward: Shearer believes Ashley should have splashed the cash

Best foot forward: Shearer believes Ashley should have splashed the cash

Burnley"s Jack Errington recovering from heart surgery after Fabrice Muamba inspired tests revealed problem

Burnley youngster Errington recovering from heart surgery after Muamba-inspired tests revealed problem

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UPDATED:

14:21 GMT, 11 December 2012

Burnley's teenage defender Jack Errington has undergone heart surgery as a result of a scan prompted by Fabrice Muamba suffering a cardiac arrest on the pitch.

Sportsmail revealed in October that the 17-year-old defender was found to have an enlarged aorta during routine heart screening and further tests confirmed he would require an operation to safeguard his future well-being.

Under the knife: Jack Errington (left) with Alan Shearer at the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle

Under the knife: Jack Errington (left) with Alan Shearer at the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle

In action: Errington is a defender at Burnley

In action: Errington is a defender at Burnley

Errington, a graduate of the famous
Wallsend Boys Club, signed his first professional deal in the summer and
returned to the north east to undergo the procedure and begin his
rehabilitation.

Former Bolton midfielder Muamba suffered a cardiac arrest during an FA Cup match against Tottenham Hotspur in March.

Errington said he was ‘dead shocked’ when he was told.

He said: ‘At first they said it wasn’t too bad but something could happen in 20 years and since I was a footballer I had to get it done as soon as.’

Errington met former England captain
Alan Shearer while recovering at the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle where
Shearer has been made patron of the specialist Children’s Heart Unit.

Shearer said: ‘He actually said to me when they gave him his results he thought they were joking.

‘Now
he’s had the operation, he’s back on the mend and hopefully he’ll be
back playing professional football in a few months’ time.

‘It
shows that a little good has come out of Muamba’s situation, which was
unfortunate for Fabrice but in a way he’s helped someone else.’

Second chance: Fabrice Muamba shows how to use a defibrillator at St Simon & St Jude Primary School in Bolton

Second chance: Fabrice Muamba demonstrates how to use a defibrillator at a school in Bolton

Dreadful day: Muamba's on-pitch cardiac arrest at White Hart Lane in March shocked the world of football

Dreadful day: Muamba's on-pitch cardiac arrest at White Hart Lane in March shocked the world of football

Alan Shearer: Sunderland boss Martin O"Neill has one game to save his job

Lose to Reading and it could be the end for Sunderland boss O'Neill, says Toon hero Shearer

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UPDATED:

12:11 GMT, 10 December 2012

Alan Shearer believes Sunderland manager Martin O’Neill has one last game to save his job.

The former Newcastle legend turned BBC pundit says the visit of Reading on Tuesday night in the Barclays Premier League will be crucial to O’Neill’s survival.

Sunderland have lost five of their last seven Premier League matches while O’Neill’s side have won only one of their last 11 league fixtures at the Stadium of Light.

Under pressure: Martin O'Neill watched his Sunderland side slump to defeat at home to Chelsea at the weekend

Under pressure: Martin O'Neill watched his Sunderland side slump to defeat at home to Chelsea at the weekend (below)

Spot of bother: Two goals from Chelsea's Fernando Torres helped see-off Sunderland at the Stadium of Light

Writing in his column in The Sun, Shearer said: ‘Martin O’Neill has faced some mighty games as a player and manager in his career. None, however, in his 12 months in charge at the Stadium of Light will be bigger than tomorrow night’s visit of Reading.

‘The fans have not turned but they are on the brink. If they don’t beat Reading at home tomorrow their patience will snap.

‘I hate to suggest people are facing the sack. But his next two games after tomorrow are Manchester United away then Southampton away.’

Making his point: Newcastle legend Alan Shearer believes O'Neill has one game to save his job at Sunderland

Making his point: Newcastle legend Alan Shearer believes O'Neill has one game to save his job at Sunderland

Sunderland have attempted only 46 shots on target in the Premier League this season; the fewest of all sides.

But there is hope — No side have kept fewer clean sheets in the Premier League this season than Reading.

Mick McCarthy to be named new Ipswich manager

Mick's back! McCarthy lands Ipswich job and charged with leading Tractor Boys to safety

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UPDATED:

19:01 GMT, 30 October 2012

Mick McCarthy is set to be named as the new Ipswich Town manager.

McCarthy has been keen to make a return to the game after being sacked by Wolves back in February and was strongly linked with the Nottingham Forest job during the summer.

The former Republic of Ireland manager was the favourite to take over from Paul Jewell who left the club last week.

Back in business: Mick McCarthy is set to be named as new manager of Ipswich

Back in business: Mick McCarthy is set to be named as new manager of Ipswich

Ipswich are currently bottom of the Championship and have gone 12 games without a win.

Both Alan Curbishley and Alan Shearer were also linked with the position, but the Ipswich board feel McCarthy is the right choice to revive the club's fortunes and hope he can steer the club away from the danger zone.

McCarthy is set to take charge of his first game when Ipswich face Birmingham on Saturday.

Bad run: Ipswich sunk to bottom of the table under Paul Jewell

Bad run: Ipswich sunk to bottom of the table under Paul Jewell

Alan Shearer to Ipswich would be a big risk – John Edwards

Chasing Shearer a big risk by Ipswich's mystery man Evans

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UPDATED:

11:08 GMT, 26 October 2012

Whatever convinced Marcus Evans he should venture into football and buy control of his local club Ipswich Town, it was not publicity. In 2006, Money Week reported there were no publicly available photographs of him, and clicking on to the internet confirms as much.

Enter Evans’ name on search engine Google, and, bizarrely an image of FIFA president Sepp Blatter appears alongside his personal details. He is painfully shy of promoting himself, but promotion for his beloved Ipswich, in every sense of the word, is clearly a different matter.

When Paul Jewell paid the price for Ipswich occupying bottom place in the Championship earlier this week, the quest for a replacement threw up a list of predictable candidates and one that may have been less easy to forecast.

Gone: Jewell paid the price for Ipswich's slow start to the season

Gone: Jewell paid the price for Ipswich's slow start to the season

Alongside the likes of Mick McCarthy and Alan Curbishley, Alan Shearer found himself jostling for position at the club that launched his mentor Sir Bobby Robson towards worldwide managerial renown.

It is even being reported he has already been interviewed, in a development that is reflected in betting trends on who might succeed Jewell. The bookmakers are all over sport these days, laying odds on every eventuality, and football management is no exception.

To borrow a phrase from their original sporting pursuit, though, wouldn’t Evans be better embracing the horses for courses philosophy, rather than considering a punt on a big-name personality with precious little managerial experience

History suggests he might, and so does logic, a fundamental tool of the business world that is so rarely applied when high-flying entrepreneurs turn their attention to football.

There may be a superficial appeal to having one of the game’s greats at the helm, but prowess as a player is no guarantee of effectiveness as a manager. The past is littered with examples, from Graeme Souness and Terry Butcher, in their early days, to Chris Waddle and David Platt.

Rock bottom: Ipswich are propping up the Championship table

Rock bottom: Ipswich are propping up the Championship table

When Souness found the going hard, in his first English managerial post at Liverpool, the case for the defence was always based on the premise that he was a winner. As a player, perhaps. Undoubtedly, in fact, given his haul of winner’s medals and thoroughly-merited reputation as one of the game’s most fearsome midfield enforcers.

As Liverpool were finally forced to concede, though, after sacking him in January, 1994, following an ignominious FA Cup defeat by Bristol City, that has no bearing on whether the same applied as a manager.

Butcher was just as forceful a character and equally revered as a player, yet his first stint in management, at Coventry, lasted barely 14 months.

In the running: Shearer

In the running: Shearer

They may be in the doldrums now, but, when former England centre-half Butcher was appointed, Coventry had won the FA Cup three years earlier and finished seventh in the old First Division the previous season.

He was seen as the driving force to take them on to even greater heights, and he has subsequently earned plaudits in humbler surroundings in Scotland. His first managerial experience left its scars, however, and only reinforced the view that giants of the pitch do not always assume the same proportions in a dug-out.

Burnley were similarly seduced by
thoughts of Waddle’s genius with the ball at his feet and assumed he
could weave the same magic with a clipboard in his hand. It lasted one
season. Nottingham Forest were left with plummeting finances and
fortunes after allowing Platt to spend millions in an ill-fated two-year
reign at the City Ground.

Still clubs flirt with the idea of
A-list players moving seamlessly into management. Evans is following
just such a path now, it would seem, by toying with the idea of
appointing Shearer, even though it may fly in the face of reason, in
some quarters.

Playing legend though he was, his managerial CV contains just one entry, a brief spell at Newcastle, where he won just one game out of eight and failed to save them from relegation. Contrast that with McCarthy’s record of steering Sunderland and Wolves to promotion to the Barclays Premier League.

Dour, blunt-talking McCarthy is not big box office, though, and that may prove decisive in the final analysis. Evans evidently wants to raise the profile of his club, which is fine – and long as it doesn’t lower their League status in the process.

Alan Curbishley declares interest in Ipswich Town job

Curbishley ready to rival Shearer for Ipswich job after declaring interest

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UPDATED:

10:25 GMT, 26 October 2012

Interested: Curbishley

Interested: Curbishley

Alan Curbishley has declared himself available for talks should Ipswich Town want him to take over their vacant managerial post.

The former Charlton boss – who has been out of work since leaving West Ham in 2008 – is among the favourites to succeed Paul Jewell, who departed Portman Road earlier this week.

The 54-year-old told Sky Sports that he is surprised to be among the favourites for the job, but welcomed the news.

'I am amazed when you look at the betting and I am up there with the frontrunners,' Curbishley said.

'Ipswich have been inundated with people who would like that job and I think they have a very important decision to make.

'The last two or three years have been tough as they have been in decline a little bit.

'They have to take their time, sift through the people that are available and come up with the right answer.

'I am available, obviously, and if they want to talk to me, I would talk to them.'

Struggling: Jewell (below) departed after Ipswich's disastrous start to the season

Struggling: Jewell (below) departed after Ipswich's disastrous start to the season

Struggling: Jewell (below) departed after Ipswich's disastrous start to the season

Alan Shearer in for Ipswich job

Ipswich weigh up Toon hero Shearer as they widen search to replace sacked Jewell

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UPDATED:

22:37 GMT, 25 October 2012

Alan Shearer has become one of the frontrunner for the vacant manager’s job at Ipswich.

Alan Curbishley is favourite for the post at Portman Road after the sacking of Paul Jewell on Wednesday.

Ipswich are bottom of the Championship but the club insist they have received plenty of applications. The shortlist also includes Mick McCarthy, Steve Cotterill, Owen Coyle and club legend Terry Butcher.

Fancy Ipswich, Alan Shearer, who is on holiday in Barbados, was interview about the vacant managerial job at Portman Road

Fancy Ipswich, Alan Shearer, who is on holiday in Barbados, was interview about the vacant managerial job at Portman Road

Shearer’s only managerial experience was with Newcastle in 2009.

The former England striker was in caretaker charge for the final eight games of the 2008-09 season as Newcastle tried to stay in the Premier League.

He could not manage it, however and they were relegated after losing at Aston Villa.

Shearer almost took the reigns at Portman Road when Roy Keane was sacked in January 2011, before owner Marcus Evans turned to the experience of Jewell.

A team-mate of Shearer’s at Newcastle, Michael Chopra, has already backed his former captain for the job.

He said: 'I would love to see Alan Shearer as manager, such a good person and worked, played under some great managers including Sir Bobby Robson.'