Tag Archives: selectors

James Anderson and Jonathan Trott rested as England call up Chris Woakes and Jos Buttler to ODI squad

Anderson and Trott to sit out one-day series in India as England call up Woakes and Buttler

PUBLISHED:

06:30 GMT, 18 December 2012

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UPDATED:

06:30 GMT, 18 December 2012

James Anderson and Jonathan Trott have been replaced in England's one-day squad to face India by Chris Woakes and Jos Buttler.

Woakes and Buttler get their chance
as two of the stars of England's Test series victory are given a rest,
the ECB confirmed this morning, while another man who impressed in
Nagpur, Joe Root, has been added to the Twenty20 squad.

Called up: Chris Woakes

Called up: Chris Woakes

Root, more known for his prowess in the longer form of the game, helps to pad out a threadbare squad which will be captained by Eoin Morgan in the absence of the injured Stuart Broad for this week's two T20 games.

The decision to rest in particular Anderson, who was only due to play in the first two of five one-day internationals scheduled for January, was perhaps no great surprise given his heavy workload in sapping conditions in the Test series.

An ECB statement read: 'Woakes and Buttler replace Anderson and Trott in [the] India ODI squad as [the] selectors look to manage workloads.'

Buttler, already a member of the T20 squad, has one ODI cap to his name, while Woakes memorably took six wickets against Australia in Brisbane in 2011.

Rested: James Anderson

Rested: James Anderson

India drop Yuvraj Singh, Zaheer Khan and Harbhajan Singh for final Test v England in Nagpur

India drop Yuvraj, Zaheer and Harbhajan ahead of do-or-die final Test in Nagpur

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UPDATED:

10:17 GMT, 9 December 2012

Dropped: Yuvraj

Dropped: Yuvraj

India's selectors have responded to their seven-wicket defeat against England in Kolkata by dropping three of their squad for the final match of the series starting in Nagpur next week.

From the third Test XI batsman Yuvraj Singh and seamer Zaheer Khan have been dropped, while spinner Harbhajan Singh – who played in the 10-wicket defeat in the second Test in Mumbai – is also out of the squad.

Called up in place of the trio are all-rounder Ravindra Jadeja, seamer Parvinda Awana and leg spinner Piyush Chawla.

The timing of the announcement in the immediate aftermath of another humiliating defeat is bound to raise further questions over the leadership of the side, with captain MS Dhoni coming under increasing pressure from the country's media.

India are trailing the four-match series 2-1 and need to win in Nagpur to avoid defeat.

Dhoni made it clear after the defeat that he was happy to defer to the wisdom of the Board of Control for Cricket, but that he relishes the opportunity to try to put his team back on track.

'The selectors are here to decide,' said the wicketkeeper-batsman.

'It's always fine to lead a side when they're doing really well, and everyone's performing.

'But that's not the time when you need a leader.

'Leading a side is all about (doing it) when the team is not doing well, trying to gel them together, back the youngsters and the senior guys.

'The easiest thing for me to do right now is to give up the captaincy and be part of the side, because that's just running away from the responsibility.

Off the pace: Zaheer Khan has been replaced by Parvinda AwanaOff the pace: Zaheer Khan has been replaced by Parvinda Awana

Off the pace: Zaheer Khan has been replaced by Parvinda Awana

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

'I have to get the team together, and be prepared for the next Test match.'

Dhoni does not believe either that India are at their lowest ebb in his tenure, citing instead whitewash defeats away to both Australia and England.

'We were not really able to compete (then).

'We know what our faults are here, and I think we should be able to rectify them.'

He believes a lack of collective productivity among India's frontline batsmen in back-to-back defeats in Mumbai and Kolkata is the main problem.

'I think the batting order will have to take the responsibility.

'We need to score more runs, on a very good wicket to bat on like this.

'Of course, the bowlers will bowl a few good deliveries that you need to keep out.

'But in the top seven, most of us need to score at the same time to give the bowlers a par total to defend.

'Otherwise, it's very difficult and you find yourself under pressure.'

Lord Ted Dexter said first defeat to India was "great"

First series defeat to India was 'great', says Lord Ted Dexter 50 years on

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UPDATED:

23:22 GMT, 4 December 2012

Ted Dexter, looking fit enough at 77 to still be riding his beloved motorbike, sat in a plush office at Eden Gardens and remembered the winter when he led a desperately below-strength England in India 50 years ago.

'As a cricket experience it was fantastic,' said 'Lord Ted', back here in Kolkata as guest of honour for Wednesday's third Test.

'We had wonderful crowds, garlands, and local dignitaries. As a grounding for me as a young captain on his travels it was great. I've got the scorecards of all five Tests from that tour and I'm going to present them to Nari Contractor.'

Memories: Lord Ted Dexter remembers the first Test series against India fondly

Memories: Lord Ted Dexter remembers the first Test series against India fondly

On the eve of this match, Dexter gave them to his Indian opposite number 50 years on at a ceremony the Cricket Association of Bengal laid on to celebrate 80 years of Anglo-Indian clashes and the half-century since that first, famous Indian series victory over England.

Both Dexter and Contractor were due to be presented to the Eden Gardens crowd on Wednesday.

'I've got the scorecards of all five Tests from that tour and I'm going to present them to Nari Contractor.'

– Lord Ted Dexter

'It's wonderful to be here,' he added. 'My wife was born here and loves coming to India.'

Dexter speaks with the gushing enthusiasm of a man who could be excused for being scarred by his time in India.

His series as a sort of interim captain in 1961-62, with Peter May, Tom Graveney, Jim Laker, Fred Trueman, Colin Cowdrey and Brian Statham missing, ended in a 2-0 defeat.

Worse followed more than 30 years later when, as chairman of selectors, Dexter presided over a 3-0 'brownwash' for Graham Gooch's England.

That was the tour of dodgy prawns, smog in Calcutta and 'a study into facial hair'.

Dexter, for a man who was lampooned for muddling his words – 'Who could forget Malcolm Devon' he once said – was both lucid and articulate as he spoke to Sportsmail.

'Our side were in a terrible state,' the former chairman remembered.

Man in the middle: From l to r Tom Graveney, Fred Trueman, Lord Ted, Don Brennan and Fred Titmus

Man in the middle: From l to r Tom Graveney, Fred Trueman, Lord Ted, Don Brennan and Fred Titmus

'Air India had gone on strike so they did all their travelling by train or bus. I invited Graham Gooch for dinner first night and halfway through the soup he went . . . bonk. Out for the count.'

Then there was that report into the pollution. 'I got into terrible trouble about the smog,' winced Dexter.

'This professor said he was making a study of pollution and its effects on athletes. I told him a couple of ours were coughing and perhaps he could let us have a proof.

'I don't think I ever saw it but I mentioned it in a press conference. Two guys heard some rumour and gave me a hard time.'

'Air India had gone on strike so they did
all their travelling by train or bus. I invited Graham Gooch for dinner
first night and halfway through the soup he went . . . bonk. Out for
the count.'

– Lord Ted

England, in particular manager Bob Bennett, were criticised for being unshaven after an arduous train journey.

'Oh yes, we had all that business too,' he said. 'It went with the territory I suppose.'

This dashing batsman, one of England's best post-war, and innovative chairman of selectors whose legacy remains in the form of rankings and a four-day County Championship, should not be remembered for slips of the tongue.

'I still follow cricket,' said a man now living in the south of France. 'You can read my blog. It's teddexter.com.' He always was a modern thinker.

DAVID LLOYD TEST DIARY: Rolling Stones fan Bumble says – It"s only an England Test victory in India… but I like it, like it, yes I dooo!

BUMBLE TEST DIARY: Rolling Stones fan Bumble says – It's only an England Test victory in India… but I like it, like it, yes I do!

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UPDATED:

12:57 GMT, 26 November 2012

MOVE OVER LOCK AND LAKER, IT'S THE MONTY AND SWANNY SHOW

Well, everyone is thrilled. You win some and lose some in Test cricket but that was a fabulous performance from England, individually and collectively. The two spinners bowling in tandem was reminiscent of Laker and Lock in their prime. Monty and Swann took 19 wickets in the match between them! Magic. England are sitting pretty and now have 10 days to absorb everything.

Spin twins I: Australian Jimmy Burke, caught Tony Lock (first slip) bowled Jim Laker for 33. The pair bowling in tandem was an effective weapon for England

Spin twins I: Australian Jimmy Burke, caught Tony Lock (first slip) bowled Jim Laker for 33. The pair bowling in tandem was an effective weapon for England

Spin twins II: England's Monty Panesar (left) is congratulated by team-mate Graeme Swann after taking his fifth wicket during the third cricket Test against India in Dubai on February 5, 2012 (FILE IMAGE)

Spin twins II: England's Monty Panesar (left) is congratulated by team-mate Graeme Swann after taking his fifth wicket during the third cricket Test against India in Dubai on February 5, 2012 (FILE IMAGE)
REUTERS/Philip Brown (UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – Tags: SPORT CRICKET)

BROAD IS STRUGGLING AND I'D KEEP BELL OUT

England will look at making two changes. Ian Bell could come straight back in but I would want assurances that his mind is in India and not back in Birmingham with his baby boy. And the selectors need to talk to Stuart Broad, who is under the weather and looks as though he needs a break. He is trying his guts out but is only bowling at 80mph when he can reach 90mph. Stuart is vice-captain, so he is part of the management team – therefore he will be part of the final decision but he is honest enough to admit when he is struggling.

HARBHAJAN AND DHONI IN A SPIN AT BACKLASH

There will be an almighty backlash in India. All the newspapers will be selecting the team for the next Test and questioning the captain, MS Dhoni, and the living legend that is Sachin Tendulkar. The Indian team will be confused now because they have just produced a raging turner and been shaken to their boots by English spin! And they played three spinners themselves in Mumbai but it didn’t work.Harbhajan Singh looks a shadow of his former self and expect him to make way.

MS Dhoni

Harbhajan Singh

Under pressure: Captain MS Dhoni (left) and Harbhajan (right) are facing a backlash in India follow defeat

LIVING IN A BATSMAN'S PARADISE

India are now likely to produce a batsman’s paradise for the Third Test in 10 days’ time in Kolkata, where India have made 600 in their last three Tests. When it’s flat as a pancake, England’s bowlers can struggle but even if it is a draw, England would have snapped your hand off for 1-1 going in to a decider. If it is flat, there should be confidence in the England batting line-up that they can just be selfish and help themselves to big runs.

VICTORY I LIKE IT, LIKE IT, YES I DO!

I’ve got to finish with the Rolling Stones. I’ve seen them three times now in London and Cardiff and they are simply awesome, the greatest rock ‘n’ roll band in the world! My favourite tracks Gimme Shelter and It’s Only Rock n Roll…and I like it, like it, yes I do!

Mick Jagger

Mick Jagger

Keith Richards

Keith Richards

Ronnie Wood

Ronnie Wood

Wannabe rocker: Sportsmail's David 'Bumble' Lloyd

Wannabe rocker: Sportsmail's David 'Bumble' Lloyd

More from David Lloyd…

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: Atherton is right, KP is a genius… but Monty and Co proved England can beat India at their own game
25/11/12

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: Why Monty bowling on this pitch is 'Satisfaction' guaranteed… but unlike that old rocker Beefy, 'Wild Horses' can't drag me away from the cricket

23/11/12

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: Drop Trott, it's time to wield the axe because India are having England for breakfast
19/11/12

Bumble's diary: Cook doesn't perspire and never changes his gloves, magnificent
18/11/12

Bumble's Test diary: England finally wake up and join the Test series
18/11/12

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: How the utter madness of England sending in Jimmy left me calling for Sunny and Cher
16/11/12

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: England have picked the wrong team… but why I'm in a tizz over Chas
15/11/12

Bumble's guide to Twenty20 Finals day: Yorkshire v Sussex, Somerset v Hampshire
23/08/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

Stuart Broad and Steven Finn pass nets test as England draw with Haryana

Broad and Finn pass nets test as England's final warm-up in India ends in a draw

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UPDATED:

11:07 GMT, 11 November 2012

England's final warm-up match before Thursday's first Test against India finished in a predictable draw here in Ahmedabad today – but not before their bowlers had claimed six of Haryana's second-innings wickets and both Stuart Broad and Steven Finn emerged unscathed from a session in the nearby nets.

Supervised by fielding coach Richard Halsall, the two fast bowlers got through about five overs each as they seek to recover from niggles in time for the Test.

For Broad, it was a first run-out since bruising his left heel seven days ago during the game against Mumbai A. Finn, meanwhile, has now bowled practice overs on three successive days, and showed no ill-effects from the thigh strain that interrupted his tour on the first morning against India A.

Full Monty: Panesar took a wicket as England ended their last warm-up match in a positive manner

Full Monty: Panesar took a wicket as England ended their last warm-up match in a positive manner

Haryana v England

Click here for full scorecard

To play both men in the first Test would be a risk. Finn has sent down only four first-class overs on this trip, and Broad 10. But it is a risk England may decide to take as they look to hit India hard at the start of the four-match series.

The hosts' perceived weakness against the short ball – and these things are relative – is one of the few comfort blankets for England to cling on to. Without Broad or Finn, that tactic becomes non-starter.

One certainty is that Graeme Swann will take his place in the Ahmedabad Test. England's No 1 spinner is due to return to India tomorrow morning after spending some time back home with his wife and baby daughter, who has been unwell.

Events on the field on the last day of four felt suitably low-key, with Tim Bresnan taking the chance to remind the selectors that he is ready to step in should others not make it in time.

After taking three wickets in the first
innings, Bresnan added two more after tea as Haryana closed on 133 for 6
when the teams shook hands shortly after 4pm local time. There was a
successful lbw shout apiece for Stuart Meaker, Samit Patel and Monty
Panesar, while Graham Onions chipped in late on.

Final preparations: England took six wickets on the final day of their last warm-up

Final preparations: England took six wickets on the last day of their last warm-up

Final preparations: England took six wickets on the last day of their last warm-up

Earlier, Jonathan Trott became the fifth England batsman to score a century out here before he retired on 101. He even hit a six – something he is yet to manage from the 5,626 deliveries he has faced in Test cricket. No wonder the bowler, Haryana’s stocky medium-pacer Chanderpal Saini, looked put out.

Each of the Test top seven has now made at least one fifty, with additional hundreds for Alastair Cook and Patel in the first match, Jonny Bairstow in the second, and Kevin Pietersen here.

Thrown into the mix today was 79 from Nick Compton, who was 54 overnight, and has now hit three fifties in a row after beginning the tour with 0 and 1; and 48 from Ian Bell, who continues to look elegant in patches.

There was a flurry of wickets ahead of England’s declaration on 254 for 7, including second-ball ducks for both Patel and Pietersen. But the pieces may just be starting to fall into place for Cook’s team. We’ll know more when the first Test finally gets under way on Thursday.

Net result: Broad and Finn showed no ill-effects during their bowling session

Net result: Broad and Finn showed no ill-effects during their bowling session

Net result: Broad and Finn showed no ill-effects during their bowling session

james Anderson: Kevin Pietersen"s back? No problem for this England dressing room

Pietersen's back No problem for this England dressing room

PUBLISHED:

21:03 GMT, 3 November 2012

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UPDATED:

21:03 GMT, 3 November 2012

To be honest, no one really knew how Kevin Pietersen's reintegration into the team environment was going to work.

We had meetings in England before we departed to break the ice, get the awkwardness out of the way and start afresh.

But people still wondered how things would be in the dressing room when he came back.

Scroll down for more

Back in the fold: Kevin Pietersen is getting on well in the England dressing room

Back in the fold: Kevin Pietersen is getting on well in the England dressing room

So far on this tour, from the way we
have been getting on, banter and all, it would be difficult for a
newcomer to believe there had ever been a problem.

More from James Anderson…

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11/08/12

No other batsman in the world could have done what Pietersen did
04/08/12

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James Anderson: Winning at The Oval was our tribute to tragic Tom
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VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

That says a lot about the strength of the spirit in the group and also reflects well on Kevin's frame of mind.

As Swanny said this week, the mickey-taking is still coming as thick and fast as ever, but Kevin has been fantastic and giving as good as he is getting, which is vital.

If he cannot be himself around the guys then he cannot be himself on the field and that is what we need him to be if we want to try to become the team we want to be, with him in it making shedloads of runs.

I have been happy with the way we are getting into the tour, but I've been amused at how the captaincy has obviously gone to Cooky's head.

He made an excellent century in our first match, then promptly sat out the second game.

Funny, but I don't seem to recall he ever missed a game when he was one of us foot soldiers.

Cricket culture

To say Indians are fanatical about their cricket is like saying Homer Simpson quite likes Duff beer.

Entire TV channels are devoted to the game.

Everywhere you look, either on the box, in the papers or out on the street, you are confronted by giant images of Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, Yuvraj Singh, MS Dhoni and Virat Kohli, explaining how they can't live without this deodorant or that motor oil.

Hero: Sachin Tendulkar is idolised in India

Hero: Sachin Tendulkar is idolised in India

And the kind of attention we have been getting offers a small window into the world they live in when they are at home.

Everyone seems to want to meet you, shake hands, have their photo taken with you then take you home to meet the wife and kids.

On a more serious note, you never quite get over the sight of the beggars.

We have been advised not to give, but it takes a hard heart to say no and it never gets any easier.

Nick Compton and Joe Root in straight knockout to partner Alastair Cook

It's a straight knockout between Compton and Root to partner Cook

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 2 November 2012

England will move a step closer to resolving the identity of Alastair Cook’s Test opening partner in India as Nick Compton and Joe Root go head to head over the next three days.

With Cook sitting out the tourists’ second warm-up match against Mumbai A following his watchful 119 against India A earlier this week, the scene is set for a shootout between Compton and Root as both men aim to win their first Test cap at Ahmedabad on November 15.

Compton was out third ball for a duck on Wednesday, while Root has been selected for his first game of the tour. And Cook – whose absence means the captaincy passes to Stuart Broad – will be following events with interest.

Ton-derful: Cook (left) will sit out the second warm-up after a century against India A

Ton-derful: Cook (left) will sit out the second warm-up after a century against India A

‘We will decide on the basis of this game and the next,’ he said. ‘It’s a cut-throat business. You’re trying to pick the best player to do the job, and they’ve both got a chance to score runs and push their claim.’

England say they arrived in India with no pecking order in mind – not least because neither Cook nor coach Andy Flower have seen much of the two candidates.

The possibility of moving Jonathan Trott up to open from No 3 has been ruled out. But, even so, the choice is not straightforward.

The 29-year-old Compton was the leading run-scorer in English first-class cricket last summer, averaging nearly 100 for Somerset.

In contrast, Root has been picked mainly on potential: at 21, his c.v. is limited to four first-class hundreds for Yorkshire and England Lions.

Potential: Root has impressed the selectors with his form for Yorkshire

Potential: Root has impressed the selectors with his form for Yorkshire

‘Joe wouldn’t be in the squad if we didn’t think he was ready to play,’ said Cook.

‘But they’re at different stages of their career. One’s far more experienced and has got more runs behind him. The other one’s a lot younger and has impressed everyone at every stage of his career. We’re still waiting to see.’

It’s to England’s credit that only the second opener’s role and the make-up of their seam attack remain potential headaches.

Cook claimed that Steven Finn, who is undergoing rehab on a thigh strain, could yet play in the first Test even if he fails to recover in time for the third and final warm-up game in Ahmedabad starting on Thursday – but only if he bowls sufficient overs in the nets.

That leaves the inevitable question of Kevin Pietersen, who has received backing from Graeme Swann.

Duck: Compton failed to trouble the scorers in the warm-up match against India A

Duck: Compton failed to trouble the scorers in the warm-up match against India A

Not one to count himself among
Pietersen’s closest friends, Swann claimed: ‘Kevin’s reintegration has
been a seamless process and it needed to happen.

‘Everyone was wondering how it would go and whether it would be as easy as it has been, but a lot of credit has to be given to Kevin for the way he has come in. The dressing room has been a very happy place this week. And that’s what we need to be if we are going to have a chance of beating India.’

That task will not have been made any easier by the news that Sachin Tendulkar cast aside a run of bad form on Friday with a superb 137 off 136 balls in the Ranji Trophy for Mumbai against Railways.

There has been speculation about Tendulkar’s future, especially after he was bowled three times out of three in the recent home Test series against New Zealand, then managed only 52 runs in five innings for Mumbai Indians in the Twenty20 Champions League in South Africa.

Chewing the fat: Cook and Swann (above right) were speaking alongside Indian batting legend Sourav Ganguly (below left)

Chewing the fat: Cook and Swann (above right) were speaking alongside Indian batting legend Sourav Ganguly (below left)

Chewing the fat: Cook and Swann (above right) were speaking alongside Indian batting legend Sourav Ganguly (below left)

Former Indian captain Sourav Ganguly has weighed into the debate, insisting it is up to Tendulkar, 39, to make the call himself.

‘We all know he doesn’t have a lot of cricket left, but I think after everything he’s achieved – with 100 international hundreds – we should let him take that call,’ said Ganguly.

Tendulkar looked in excellent form at the Wankhede Stadium, crashing 21 fours and three sixes in his first hundred in first-class cricket since January 2011.

If England were hoping the most prolific Test batsman of all time had become a weak link, they can think again.

Alastair Cook, Graeme Swann and Sourav Ganguly were speaking at a business event in Mumbai to promote Jaguar www.jaguar.com and Castrol Edge www.castrolcricket.com

Tim Bresnan says England can cope with India"s spinners

Bresnan puts positive spin on England's chances and says they can handle India's twirlers

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UPDATED:

21:45 GMT, 25 October 2012

Tim Bresnan has defended England's record against spin as Alastair Cook's tourists prepare to tackle India's slow bowlers in their own back yard.

Each of England's three trips to Asia in 2012 has exposed their old achilles heel of batting against spin on lifeless tracks.

The Indian selectors have acknowledged as much by not naming a single front-line slow bowler for the India A side who take on England in the first of three warm-up games, starting in Mumbai on Tuesday.

Defence: Tim Bresnan (left) believes England will cope with India's spinners, as he left for the tour with Stuart Broad (right) on Thursday

Defence: Tim Bresnan (left) believes England will cope with India's spinners, as he left for the tour with Stuart Broad (right) on Thursday

But Bresnan, who will be fighting for the No 8 position for the first Test in Ahmedabad on November 15, told Sportsmail: 'I think our struggles against spin have been massively exaggerated.

'I don't think there's anything too wrong about the way we play when it comes to spinners.

'It's one of those things that you know can become an issue if you get out to them.

'But we have to accept that spinners sometimes get wickets on spinning tracks, and not let that put us off our gameplan.'

The evidence so far this year suggests that the gameplan needs some work.

England were humiliated by Pakistani spinners Saeed Ajmal and Abdur Rehman in the UAE in January and February, when they lost the Test series 3-0.

They then allowed Sri Lanka's slow left-armer Rangana Herath to take 12 wickets during the defeat at Galle in March, before Kevin Pietersen's superb 151 squared the series in Colombo.

Not that bad: Bresnan believes England's woes against spinners in Asia has been 'exaggerated'

Not that bad: Bresnan believes England's woes against spinners in Asia has been 'exaggerated'

Not that bad: Bresnan believes England's woes against spinners in Asia has been 'exaggerated'

And they looked clueless in the World Twenty20 last month against India's second-choice spinners, Harbhajan Singh and Piyush Chawla, who took six for 25 between them in eight overs. England were dismissed for 80.

Four county spin bowlers – James Tredwell (Kent), Scott Borthwick (Durham), Simon Kerrigan ( Lancashire) and Azeem Rafiq (Yorkshire) – have been sent to the England training camp in Dubai to help Cook's side prepare.

But Bresnan, who arrived in Dubai yesterday with his team-mates for the threeday training camp before arriving in Mumbai, insisted England could draw strength from Samit Patel's stylish 67 off 48 balls in the World Twenty20 Super Eight defeat by Sri Lanka.

Mystery spinner Ajantha Mendi s took none for 40 in four overs, with Patel hitting the Sri Lankan for 26 from only 15 balls.

One to watch: Ravichandran Ashwin (right) will be hoping England's struggle against spinners will continue in India

One to watch: Ravichandran Ashwin (right) will be hoping England's struggle against spinners will continue in India

And another one: Pragyan Ojha will look to bamboozle the English batsmen

And another one: Pragyan Ojha will look to bamboozle the English batsmen

'Samit was phenomenal,' said Bresnan. 'He played Mendis the correct way – and the way we had planned. You've just got to back yourself.

'It's a personal thing. Not everyone can play the way Kevin Pietersen plays but you've got to make sure you stick to the way you feel comfortable with.

'If you're going to attack, it's a crime to get out caught bat-pad. But equally if you're going to defend, you've really got to look at the long game and hold an end up.'

England's mistake in the past has been to get caught somewhere in the middle.

Tim Bresnan is an ambassador for the ASDA Kwik Cricket Competition. Visit: www.asda.com/kwikcricket

India's men to watch

India's men to watch

Brian Clough – best quotes on anniversary of his death

The Life of Brian: Memorable Cloughisms on the 8th anniversary of his death

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UPDATED:

13:41 GMT, 20 September 2012

September 20 marks eight years since the passing of Brian Clough, one of the greatest managers ever to grace the dug-out.

A devastating striker in his playing career, Clough then spent 28 years in management and achieved some remarkable feats – notably guiding Nottingham Forest to back-to-back European Cups in 1979 and 1980.

And, as we all remember, he was never short of an acerbic opinion whatever the subject matter.

In honour of the great man, who died in 2004 at the age of 69, Sportsmail looks at some famous Cloughisms.

Legend: It's eight years since Brian Clough passed away at the age of 69

Legend: It's eight years since Brian Clough passed away at the age of 69

'I wouldn't say I was the best manager in the business. But I was in the top one' – Modestly reflecting on his own success.

'If God had wanted us to play football in the clouds, he'd have put grass up there' – On the importance of passing the ball to feet.

'I only ever hit Roy the once. He got up so I couldn't have hit him very hard' – On dealing with Roy Keane.

'We talk about it for 20 minutes and then we decide I was right' – On dealing with players in general who disagree with him.

'I'm sure the England selectors thought if they took me on and gave me the job, I'd want to run the show. They were shrewd because that's exactly what I would have done' – On not getting the England manager's job.

'Players lose you games, not tactics. There's so much crap talked about tactics by people who barely know how to win at dominoes' – On England's dismal exit from Euro 2000.

'For all his horses, knighthoods and championships, he hasn't got two of what I've got. And I don't mean balls' – Referring to Sir Alex Ferguson's failure to win two successive European Cups.

'I can't even spell spaghetti never mind talk Italian. How could I tell an Italian to get the ball He might grab mine' – On the influx of foreign players into the English game.

'Anybody who can do anything in Leicester but make a jumper has got to be a genius' – His tribute to Martin O'Neill, who used to manage Leicester City.

'That Seaman is a handsome young man but he spends too much time looking in his mirror rather than at the ball. You can't keep goal with hair like that' – On the pony-tailed former England goalkeeper David Seaman.

'I thought it was my next-door neighbour because I think she felt that if I got something like that I would have to move' – Speculating on who nominated him for a knighthood.

'Don't send me flowers when I'm dead. If you like me, send them while I'm alive' – After the liver transplant which saved his life.

'I want no epitaphs of profound history and all that type of thing. I contributed. I would hope they would say that, and I would hope somebody liked me.' – On posterity.

'I bet their dressing room will smell of garlic rather than liniment over the next few months.' – On the number of French players at Arsenal.

'Rome wasn't built in a day. But I wasn't on that particular job.' – On getting things done.

'On occasions I have been big headed. I think most people are when they get in the limelight. I call myself Big Head just to remind myself not to be.' – Old Big 'Ead explains his nickname.

'Stand up straight, get your shoulders back and get your hair cut.' – Advice for John McGovern at Hartlepool.

'Take your hands out of your pockets.' – More advice, this time for a young Trevor Francis as he presents him with an award.

'You don't want roast beef and Yorkshire every night and twice on Sunday.' – On too much football on television (What would he say now)

'I'm not saying he's pale and thin, but the maid in our hotel room pulled back the sheets and remade the bed without realising he was still in it.' – Referring to former Forest player Brian Rice.

'I like my women to be feminine, not sliding into tackles and covered in mud.' – Clough on women's football.

'I'd have cut his balls off' – On Eric Cantona's infamous kung fu kick at a fan.

'Walk on water I know most people out there will be saying that instead of walking on it, I should have taken more of it with my drinks. They are absolutely right' – A typically candid reflection on his drink problem.

Brian Clough: 8th anniversary of his death

The Life of Brian: Memorable Cloughisms on the 8th anniversary of his death

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UPDATED:

11:47 GMT, 20 September 2012

September 20 marks eight years since the passing of Brian Clough, one of the greatest managers ever to grace the dug-out.

A devastating striker in his playing career, Clough then spent 28 years in management and achieved some remarkable feats – notably guiding Nottingham Forest to back-to-back European Cups in 1979 and 1980.

And, as we all remember, he was never short of an acerbic opinion whatever the subject matter.

In honour of the great man, who died in 2004 at the age of 69, Sportsmail looks at some famous Cloughisms.

Legend: It's eight years since Brian Clough passed away at the age of 69

Legend: It's eight years since Brian Clough passed away at the age of 69

'I wouldn't say I was the best manager in the business. But I was in the top one' – Modestly reflecting on his own success.

'If God had wanted us to play football in the clouds, he'd have put grass up there' – On the importance of passing the ball to feet.

'I only ever hit Roy the once. He got up so I couldn't have hit him very hard' – On dealing with Roy Keane.

'We talk about it for 20 minutes and then we decide I was right' – On dealing with players in general who disagree with him.

'I'm sure the England selectors thought if they took me on and gave me the job, I'd want to run the show. They were shrewd because that's exactly what I would have done' – On not getting the England manager's job.

'Players lose you games, not tactics. There's so much crap talked about tactics by people who barely know how to win at dominoes' – On England's dismal exit from Euro 2000.

'For all his horses, knighthoods and championships, he hasn't got two of what I've got. And I don't mean balls' – Referring to Sir Alex Ferguson's failure to win two successive European Cups.

'I can't even spell spaghetti never mind talk Italian. How could I tell an Italian to get the ball He might grab mine' – On the influx of foreign players into the English game.

'Anybody who can do anything in Leicester but make a jumper has got to be a genius' – His tribute to Martin O'Neill, who used to manage Leicester City.

'That Seaman is a handsome young man but he spends too much time looking in his mirror rather than at the ball. You can't keep goal with hair like that' – On the pony-tailed former England goalkeeper David Seaman.

'I thought it was my next-door neighbour because I think she felt that if I got something like that I would have to move' – Speculating on who nominated him for a knighthood.

'Don't send me flowers when I'm dead. If you like me, send them while I'm alive' – After the liver transplant which saved his life.

'I want no epitaphs of profound history and all that type of thing. I contributed. I would hope they would say that, and I would hope somebody liked me.' – On posterity.

'I bet their dressing room will smell of garlic rather than liniment over the next few months.' – On the number of French players at Arsenal.

'Rome wasn't built in a day. But I wasn't on that particular job.' – On getting things done.

'On occasions I have been big headed. I think most people are when they get in the limelight. I call myself Big Head just to remind myself not to be.' – Old Big 'Ead explains his nickname.

'Stand up straight, get your shoulders back and get your hair cut.' – Advice for John McGovern at Hartlepool.

'Take your hands out of your pockets.' – More advice, this time for a young Trevor Francis as he presents him with an award.

'You don't want roast beef and Yorkshire every night and twice on Sunday.' – On too much football on television (What would he say now)

'I'm not saying he's pale and thin, but the maid in our hotel room pulled back the sheets and remade the bed without realising he was still in it.' – Referring to former Forest player Brian Rice.

'I like my women to be feminine, not sliding into tackles and covered in mud.' – Clough on women's football.

'I'd have cut his balls off' – On Eric Cantona's infamous kung fu kick at a fan.

'Walk on water I know most people out there will be saying that instead of walking on it, I should have taken more of it with my drinks. They are absolutely right' – A typically candid reflection on his drink problem.