Tag Archives: secs

Perri Shakes-Drayton wins gold in 400 metres at the European Indoor Championships

Shakes-Drayton leads GB one-two as she wins 400m gold ahead of team-mate Child

By
Laura Williamson

PUBLISHED:

10:50 GMT, 3 March 2013

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UPDATED:

11:04 GMT, 3 March 2013

Perri Shakes-Drayton won 400-metre European indoor gold in Gothenburg this morning with a scintillating personal best of 50.85 seconds – the fastest time in the world this year.

The 400m hurdles specialist, 24, led at the bell and took gold in emphatic fashion, with fellow Brit and hurdler Eilidh Child setting a new Scottish record of 51.45 secs to win silver. Shana Cox, 28, finished sixth in 53.15 seconds.

Shakes-Drayton said: 'I’m really
happy with that. Everyone had expectations of me getting gold and in my
heart of hearts I wanted gold. To be able to deliver and run a world
lead – I didn’t expect that. I’m going to take that, it gives me
confidence and hopefully I can transfer it over the hurdles.

In a league of her own: Perri Shakes-Drayton celebrates winning the 400m

In a league of her own: Perri Shakes-Drayton celebrates winning the 400m

'I still want to achieve over the
400m hurdles and I haven’t fulfilled my potential so to me I’m still a
400m hurdler and I think that gave me an advantage because I’m used to
running over ten hurdles in a 400m so I’m a lot stronger.'

Child said: 'I’m over the moon, I
knew it would be hard but I was lucky to get a good lane draw after
yesterday’s qualification.

Race to the line: Shakes-Drayton lead fellow Brit Edith Child in the 400m final

Race to the line: Shakes-Drayton lead fellow Brit Edith Child in the 400m final

Crossing the line: Shakes-Drayton wins the 400m final ahead of Eilidh Child in second

Crossing the line: Shakes-Drayton wins the 400m final ahead of Eilidh Child in second

'I knew everybody would be out for me
because I was out in lane six so I thought I would just go out like a
bullet and hopefully get that break.

'Once I saw Perri ahead of me, I just
thought “sit on her shoulder and try and work with her the whole way
round”. I’m delighted that I got a medal.'

Usain Bolt wins 200m – London 2012 Olympics

Lightning Bolt strikes twice: Usain storms to 200m to leave Blake trailing in Olympics showdown

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UPDATED:

20:03 GMT, 9 August 2012

How they finished…

1 Usain Bolt GOLD

2 Yohan Blake SILVER

3 Warren Weir BRONZE

Usain Bolt beat his Jamaican training partner Yohan Blake once again to add the 200metres gold medal to his 100m title in London.

Bolt became the only man to have ever defended the Olympic 200m title by winning in 19.32 secs.

Blake took the silver medal while Warren Weir won bronze to complete a Jamaican clean sweep.

Champion: Usain Bolt stormed to victory in the 200m at the Olympics Stadium on Thursday night

Champion: Usain Bolt stormed to victory in the 200m at the Olympics Stadium on Thursday night

More to follow…

London 2012 Olympics: Ellen Gandy and Jemma Lowe seal 200m fly place

Gandy and Lowe fight the pain to seal 200m butterfly Olympic place

Ellen Gandy and Jemma Lowe both pushed through the pain barrier to qualify for the Olympic team in a 200 metres butterfly race where the final 25m felt like 'swimming uphill' at the Aquatics Centre.

World silver medallist Gandy flew through the first 150m and was 1.84 seconds inside Katinka Hosszu's European record from 2009 at the final turn.

However, the 20-year-old paid for such a pace and the last 25m were excruciating with Lowe catching her, but ultimately Gandy held on to touch in two minutes 06.01 seconds, adding a berth in the 200m to the two-length race she won earlier this week.

See you there: Ellen Gandy and Jemma Lowe have secured their London 2012 place

See you there: Ellen Gandy and Jemma Lowe have secured their London 2012 place

Double world finalist Lowe was 0.36 secs adrift with both women well within the qualifying time, with Jess Dickons placing third.

Gandy admitted the race pace had not been planned, saying: 'I was so unbelievably nervous before that race. I thought I'd be more relaxed because I was on the team for the 100m and I felt I was going to faint in the call room.

'My nerves must have taken me out really fast and I absolutely paid for that on the last 50m – I don't think my coach is going to be happy with that at all. I've just got to go back and analyse what happened and hopefully it won't happen again.'

Her pain in the final metres was evident and the Bromley-born swimmer added: 'If you swim it properly it (the last 25m) shouldn't be too bad, but that was suicide. I just wished the wall was closer, I felt like I was swimming uphill. It was very painful.'

For Lowe, qualification came as a relief after she missed out over two lengths.

Flying through the water: At one stage, Gandy was on for the European record

Flying through the water: At one stage, Gandy was on for the European record

She said: 'It has been such an emotional week for me and I am just really happy I managed to get my place on the team. I was so nervous, I knew I had to keep relaxed and I'd be able to do it.

'I just concentrated on myself and had the confidence I could come back on the second 100m and finish hard.'

Of the last 25m, the Swansea ITC swimmer said: 'I was thinking about the Olympics and how hard I've worked and it got me to the end.'

Bath ITC training partners Andrew Willis and Michael Jamieson made the team in the 200m breaststroke after they produced the form that saw them to last year's World Championships final.

There too: Michael Jamieson

There too: Michael Jamieson

Jamieson was fifth in Shanghai last summer, three places ahead of his team-mate, and he led at the final turn tonight, but Willis paced his race perfectly, swimming the last 50m 0.9 faster than Jamieson to edge past and touch in 2:09.33.

His time was just 0.32 off Kris Gilchrist's British record set in 2009 during the turbo-suit era and would have been the sixth fastest in the world last year.

Jamieson was 0.51 adrift with both men setting new personal bests some way inside the qualification time, but for Gilchrist third position meant only that he had missed the cut.

Willis said: 'I was not expecting it to be that quick. I always knew my goal was to go under 2.10 and my coach said 'go for it' and I went for it from the start. The last 50m, it was just everything hard.'

Jamieson said: 'It was a real fear of failure that drove me on tonight because I was crawling home in that last 50m. I was ready to fight for my place tonight.'