Tag Archives: seconds

Mark Cavendish wins Tour of Qatar stage

Qatar hero! British star Cavendish storms to victory on stage three

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

15:55 GMT, 5 February 2013

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UPDATED:

16:04 GMT, 5 February 2013

Mark Cavendish claimed his second win for Omega Pharma-QuickStep on stage three of the Tour of Qatar today.

The 27-year-old from the Isle of Man, who joined Omega Pharma-QuickStep following one year at Team Sky, opened his account for the Belgian squad in the Tour de San Luis and added another victory on the 143-kilometre route from Al Wakra to Mesaieed.

A 10-second time bonus accompanied the win and moved Cavendish to fourth overall, eight seconds behind American Brent Bookwalter (BMC Racing), who retained the lead.

All smiles: Mark Cavendish celebrates his stage win in Qatar

All smiles: Mark Cavendish celebrates his stage win in Qatar

Mark Cavendish

Two of Bookwalter's team-mates – American Taylor Phinney and Briton Adam Blythe – remained second and third overall, respectively.

Tomorrow's fourth stage is the 160km route from Camel Race Track to Al Khor Corniche.Cavendish wrote on Twitter:

'Nice to get the win here today in Tour Of Qatar! '@opqscyclingteam just chaperoned me the whole day. Machines! BIG machines! Thanks guys.'

Over the line: Cavendish powers to victory on stage three of the Qatar Tour

Over the line: Cavendish powers to victory on stage three of the Qatar Tour

Mark Cavendish

In an Omega Pharma-QuickStep media release, the Manxman added: 'I felt really strong, so I have to thank my team. They really kept me protected, kept me out of trouble the whole time and gave me energy for the sprint.

'I really had to kick at 350 meters, I was so far back.'

On the prospect of taking overall victory on Friday's final day, he added: 'I think it's best to come here, focus on the stage wins, and hope the GC (general classification) can come from that.'

Chris Foy: England have a great deal to learn after South Africa defeat

180 seconds of madness! But England have much more to put right than just scrambled thinking

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UPDATED:

01:16 GMT, 26 November 2012

Each week there is a different focus for the England inquest. This time, Stuart Lancaster was asked to identify the principal shortcoming in his side's game.

'Composure' was the response. The national coach is growing weary of the so-near-yet-so-far routine.

Another single-digit defeat against weakened southern-hemisphere opposition leaves England in grave danger of concluding this QBE International campaign with a dire return of one win and three defeats.

Madness: Captain Chris Robshaw made the wrong call in the latter stages of the game

Madness: Captain Chris Robshaw made the wrong call in the latter stages of the game

Crucial score: Willem Alberts goes over the line for the only try of the game despite the attentions of Joe Launchbury

Crucial score: Willem Alberts goes over the line for the only try of the game despite the attentions of Joe Launchbury

That supposes the host nation cannot possibly upset the world champions on Saturday.

On the basis of the latest evidence,
that is a fair assumption. The All Blacks swatted Wales aside while
England were picking through the rubble of this latest setback.

Put aside the debate about 'that'
penalty and Lancaster's observation about composure stands up to closer
scrutiny on various levels.

This result was not solely a
consequence of scrambled thinking in the dying seconds, it was founded
on a lack of composed execution too. While a piercing spotlight is
trained on captain Chris Robshaw's decision making, a telling example of
the fundamental shortcomings hindering England actually took place
seconds earlier.

With referee Nigel Owens playing
advantage, the home side worked an overlap on the right, Alex Goode
jinked forward but his pass was high and in front of Chris Ashton, who
fumbled.

Manu Tuilagi was lurking outside and
would have taken some stopping if released.

When the pressure was
stifling, the composure to execute accurately was lacking.

Earlier, in the 53rd minute, came an
even more glaring example. Tuilagi seized an interception and burst out
of defence before calmly waiting for support and releasing Ashton.

Family affair: Tom Youngs (left) attempts to intervene as Eben Etzebeth grapples with brother Ben

Family affair: Tom Youngs (left) attempts to intervene as Eben Etzebeth grapples with brother Ben

The Saracen appeared ready to reprise
his wonder try against Australia two years ago with an arcing run clear
of the covering defence, but instead he tried to release Mike Brown and
the pass was woefully inadequate.

A rare scoring chance was wasted. In a
day of debate about decision making Ashton admitted he may have taken
the wrong option, saying: 'Hindsight is a wonderful thing. I thought he
was a lot closer.

'I'm thinking now I probably should have had a go.'

While the wet conditions did nothing
to aid handling precision, England also lost lineout composure, with the
towering Eben Etzebeth managing to poach several home throws.

England had plenty of possession, but
it was squandered with aimless kicks – too deep and without the back-up
of an effective chase.

Toby Flood missed two shots at goal before he was replaced by Owen Farrell.

Hands up: Chris Robshaw is closed down by Adriaan Strauss (left) and Francois Louw

Hands up: Chris Robshaw is closed down by Adriaan Strauss (left) and Francois Louw

The first-choice No 10 left
Twickenham in a protective boot after suffering a toe injury and,
although a scan revealed no broken bones, he is seemingly destined to
miss the clash with New Zealand.

In that event Farrell is the man
most likely to take over at fly-half, but he could not conjure an
opening as England's replacement playmaker during a second half when
Lancaster's men swarmed forward but didn't appear capable of unlocking a
robust Springbok defence.

Gloucester's Freddie Burns re-joined the squad last night as the form stand-off in the country and he will be considered.

Bath wing Tom Biggs and, with Alex
Corbisiero struggling because of a knee injury, Gloucester prop Nick
Wood were also summoned.

It is fitting to note that the
attacking platform this week was made of sturdier stuff as the home pack
rose to the challenge posed by South Africa's imposing forwards.

After being out-muscled by Australia this was a stirring riposte.

Running free: Alex Goode breaks away from the clutches of Jannie du Plessis

Running free: Alex Goode breaks away from the clutches of Jannie du Plessis

Lock Geoff Parling was magnificent,
Joe Launchbury showed power and aggression on his full debut, Tom Wood
galvanised the improved breakdown operation and Alex Corbisiero led a
dominant scrum.

The visitors somehow led 9-6 at
half-time then took a firm grip on proceedings by snatching one of the
most fortuitous tries in memory.

Juandre Kruger fumbled near England's
line but, when Ben Youngs tried to kick the ball clear, it ricocheted
off JP Pietersen towards the line, Wood was unable to hold it and Willem
Alberts dropped on it.

Are you sure Owen Farrell remonstrates with Robshaw

Are you sure Owen Farrell remonstrates with Robshaw

Breaking away: Manu Tuilagi skips past Jean de Villiers

Breaking away: Manu Tuilagi skips past Jean de Villiers

Pat Lambie converted for 16-6. Three
penalties by Farrell took England to within a point but the last of
those provided the major talking point and left Robshaw defending himsel
f against accusations of losing composure.

Lancaster backed his captain, saying:
'International sport is tough for people if they make a mistake. You've
got to make sure people are supported.'

Players also spoke up for Robshaw but not even an adherence to the party line could disguise their frustration.

'Chris has the final decision but there are other guys on the field who should be assisting,' said prop Dan Cole.

'Sometimes the right decision is the
quick decision. We live and learn.' England will have to learn fast. In
five days' time they must try to smash the All Black juggernaut off
course.

If composure is lacking again,
Lancaster's side will be heavily beaten and this autumn campaign will be
damned as an abject failure.

Clearing his lines: Ben Youngs gets a kick away despite the attentions of Duane Vermeulen

Clearing his lines: Ben Youngs gets a kick away despite the attentions of Duane Vermeulen

Locked up: Joe Launchbury is tackled by Gurthro Steenkamp and Duane Vermeulen

Locked up: Joe Launchbury is tackled by Gurthro Steenkamp and Duane Vermeulen

HOW THE KEY FINAL MOMENTS UNFOLDED

Really Owen Farrell (left) argues Chris Robshaw's call

77min 14sec Referee Nigel Owens signals a penalty pending for England, just outside South Africa’s 22, slightly to the left of the posts, but allows the home team to play an advantage.

77.23 England ’s attack to the right breaks down when Chris Ashton is unable to hold on to Alex Goode’s pass, so Owens blows his whistle to award the penalty. Mike Brown and Danny Care can be seen urgently waving their arms for the ball to be passed rapidly back to the penalty mark.

77.34 Chris Robshaw initially points to the posts, but Owens is looking the other way. The England captain then asks Owens if the clock can be stopped, but the referee says ‘No, I can’t’.

77.43 Robshaw instructs Owen Farrell to kick for goal and the Saracens player indicates that he thinks England should kick to the corner. The skipper over-rules (right) him and orders him to go for the posts.

77.49 The discussion between captain and kicker continues for several more seconds, with Farrell turning round to offer a further observation before he begins to line up the penalty.

77.52 Farrell puts the ball on the turf next to Owens, then turns around once more and makes another comment while clearly shaking his head in frustration at the decision.

78.00 With Farrell still waiting for the kicking tee to be brought on and the crowd booing, an evidently concerned Robshaw approaches Owens again and asks ‘Can I change the call’ The referee says ‘No’ so Robshaw shouts to his kicker ‘Faz, quick! Quick!’.

78.30 Farrell quickly composes himself and finally the ball is struck, through the posts to bring England to within one point at 16-15 down.

79.00 South Africa ’s restart flies towards the touchline on England’s right flank, replacement lock Mouritz Botha attempts to catch the kick but spills the ball and it rolls into touch.

80.14 Having claimed the subsequent lineout and recycled the ball at a ruck, the Springboks drive again, Ruan Pienaar passes out to Francois Hougaard and he kicks the ball into touch to end the game.

Adam Gemili top secret

It's top secret: British sprinter Adam Gemili on Messi, Morocco and making stir fry

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UPDATED:

22:31 GMT, 16 November 2012

Who is your sporting hero

Michael Owen. When I was playing football I thought he was such a great player and he was at Liverpool, my team.

What would you be if you weren't a sportsman

Something in sport. Hopefully coaching or teaching.

Which other sportsman would you like to be

I’d love to be Lionel Messi. He’s the best footballer in my lifetime and possibly ever.

Main man: Lionel Messi (left) in action for Argentina

Main man: Lionel Messi (left) in action for Argentina

Career highlight

Winning the World Junior Championship.

And the worst moment

Being disqualified in the relay during the Olympics. It was heartbreaking.

What's the best advice you've ever been given

Always be yourself.

Favourite karaoke song

I don’t do karaoke. I’ve never really done it so I can’t answer that . . .

Three most-listened to songs on your ipod

This Is War by Thirty Seconds to Mars, Rooftops by Lost Prophets and I’m Ready For You by Drake.

Last film you saw

Sinister. It’s weird and messed up.

Bookworm: Usain Bolt won another three gold medals in London

Bookworm: Usain Bolt won another three gold medals in London

Last book you read

Usain Bolt 9.58: Being the World’s Fastest Man. It’s really good.

Favourite pre-match meal

Chicken and pasta. It’s the best thing to eat before competing.

In a film of your life, who would you like to play you

I haven’t got a clue. Ask me in 10 years.

Can you cook Best dish

Yes. I make quite a good stir fry.

Favourite holiday destination

When I go back to Morocco to see family

What's the most expensive thing you've ever bought

Probably an iPhone.

Tell us a secret…

I do yoga. I find it helps a lot, with flexibility and peace of mind.

Northern Exposure: Alan Pardew and Greg Abbott are worlds apart… but dream is the same

Pardew and Abbott are worlds apart… but dream is the same

PUBLISHED:

11:30 GMT, 2 October 2012

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UPDATED:

11:33 GMT, 2 October 2012

A lot can happen in eight seconds in football. So what can you achieve in eight years

Managers dream of the contract Alan
Pardew has just signed. It is Pardew's task to make the dreams of
Newcastle United fans come true.

And he has eight years. Eight years.

Big deal: Newcastle have handed eight-year contract to Alan Pardew

Big deal: Newcastle have handed eight-year contract to Alan Pardew

All managers like to claim some sort of autonomy when they take charge of a football club, but in reality those days are gone.

I had the privilege of visiting Carlisle United last week, spent a day with laughaholic Greg Abbott, as we did back in the days when he was Hull captain and part-time boss of Hunsworth Under 10s.

But there is a deadly serious side to his work too, and the daily financial difficulties he battles with Carlisle wouldn't function without his prudence. But his orders come from above.

It's the same for Pardew at Newcastle, as it was at Reading, West Ham, Charlton and Southampton. Now he has longer to deal and play with it.

Chief scout and fellow eight-yearer Graham Carr's astonishing record in the European transfer market means that when he recommends a player, the entire game listens, never mind his manager and the board. The scouting network could not be more boxed off.

Training day: Carlisle manager Greg Abbott

Training day: Carlisle manager Greg Abbott

Slowly but decisively, Pardew eked out Chris Hughton's warriors, and quickly built his own team spirit, assuring through the immense leadership of Fabricio Coloccini, that his new players bought into it. Getting the ball to Papiss Cisse and Demba Ba helped, but Newcastle cruised to fifth last season and finished above Chelsea.

So hopes are high on Tyneside, although it is a difficult task replicating that success, never mind emulating it.

There weren't too many new signings in the summer, when fans were looking for splashing of cash from Mike Ashley, but Pardew and his bosses have emphasised the importance, and cost, of keeping their squad together.

The new campaign, with the additional European sideshow, has been dogged but far from dazzling. But by grinding out results now, they are building the foundations of more to come. Ba's goals have helped. This season is boxed off and being dealt with.

Now he can look elsewhere in the club, pinpointing youth development last week.

Carlisle training session on a pitch at the back of Brunton Parkin

Carlisle made about 50,000 from the 13,000 who turned up to watch Spurs last week. A full house at White Hart Lane would have earned them about five times that amount, maybe more. That was how much their peers at Stevenage, Crawley and Leyton Orient made from their away cup exploits last season.

No surprise that those three clubs have circulated that money in their wages department to make them serious contenders this season. Abbott meanwhile has to rely on freebies and recommendations from his contacts.

He said: 'I used to argue and haggle with agents but now if they start messing about with figures, I just say “that's what we can afford, so forget it' and we move on to the next target on the list.”

Carlisle have three or four good young players – and look out for keeper Mark Gillespie and lanky striker Mark Beck – and I asked Greg, if he had the money, would he invest in an academy first

He pointed over to the Brunton Park ground and said 'No. I'd love to but it has to be out there first. That's what matters.'

It's what matters at every club.

But with eight years at your disposal, a decent budget and owners looking to invest in the cream of North East talent, Pardew has at his disposal the opportunity to help build a club from the base, take a real hands-on approach to the youth system and really build his football club.

Cattermole must tackle reckless streak
Lee Cattermole of Sunderland

I sat down with Lee Cattermole (right) two weeks ago. And I believed him.

He said he wanted to cut out the daft lunging tackle which had cost him so many yellow cards, and reds. He knows the one, I didn't even have to mention it, and he had his own target. And I believed him. But when the red mist descends on poor old Lee in the heat of battle, he tends to forget the other 70-odd yellow cards which have been thrust in his direction in Sunderland colours.

He is an honest lad, a bullish, old-school, annoying-to-the-opposition, like Marmite, love him or hate him, pushy, demanding, infuriating, likeable, hard-working, daft, intelligent, English, kind of footballer, we don't see enough of them in the Premier League nowadays. We won't be see much of them. Sorry but it is a shame.

But he is Sunderland captain and while he is definitely maturing and growing into the role, his lack of discipline means he is out of the Wear-Tyne derby, following his red card at the end of the last one in which he'd earlier made an ugly mark.

And if Martin O'Neill is losing patience with him, which he undoubtedly and very publically is, then he is on the very precipice of a pretty long plank.

When we met, he had this observation on the captaincy. 'Listen I have never, ever worried about that,' he said. 'It is something you press guys have said since I was made captain and with everything I have ever done wrong.

'I don't want to name names but a lot of other lads get booked or sent off and no one says anything. But if it is Lee Cattermole it is a big issue and they say “he is losing the captaincy”.

'When I was made captain I thought I didn't need to change because I was captain for what I am but it is a bigger role than I thought at the time. There is so much more to it goes on behind the scenes . . . I am still learning but I do think I'm getting better.'

He's right on all those fronts. But unless he can learn to deliver his own promise to cut out the daft challenges and cards, he'll be handing it over to John O'Shea permanently.

And that would be a real shame for Cattermole, and Sunderland.

He might miss the Tyne version of the derby but Cattermole should be back for the game against his former club Middlesbrough in the Capital One Cup later the same week.

You wait for one derby…

It's a shame Boro didn't get a completely level playing field with a home tie, but they have nothing to fear after their heroics in the FA Cup draw last season. O'Neill knows Tony Mowbray's side deserved to win that day.

And even more so than that side, this is a team closer to Mowbray's vision now, and moulded by him from the mess left by Gordon Strachan. They are in the Championship shake-up early on, but have yet to shake off the inconsistency which hindered them last season.

The one advantage of travelling to Sunderland is they can do so without a care in the world. They are not expected to win, Mowbray can name his strongest side, but also use it as a motivation for the rest of his squad. It was that freedom that gave them the edge last season and O'Neill knows that too.

The Sunderland manager barely tinkered with his team against Morecambe and MK Dons, demonstrating his serious intent in a competition he has enjoyed success, so Boro can expect the full force of his squad, and an eager full house at the Stadium of Light.

And whatever the outcome of the game against Newcastle, that will add extra spice.

A great week to look forward to up here, with the added bonus that the North East definitely has a representative in the quarter-finals.

Just don't ask me who it will be.

Adam Bowden wins Virgin Active London Triathlon

Bowden wins London Triathlon ahead of fellow Brits Bishop and Harris

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UPDATED:

21:44 GMT, 23 September 2012

Britain's Adam Bowden claimed victory in the elite men's category at Sunday's Virgin Active London Triathlon.

The 30-year-old from Hertfordshire conquered testing weather conditions to complete the 1500metre swim, 40kilometre bike ride and 10km run in a time of one hour 48 minutes and eight seconds.

Terrible weather: Bowden and Co had to fight against the conditions

Terrible weather: Bowden and Co had to fight against the conditions

Bowden came home four seconds ahead of Thomas Bishop, with Aaron Harris (1hr 48mins 52secs) completing an all-British top three.

The elite women's was won by Daniela Ryf in a time of 2:01.05. The 25-year-old from Switzerland led home from South Africa's Gillian Sanders (2:02.07) with Britain's Lucy Hall third in 2:02.24.

LONDON 2012 PARALYMPICS: David Stone wins road race gold

Stone retains Paralympic title by winning gold in road race at Brands Hatch

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UPDATED:

11:59 GMT, 8 September 2012

David Stone successfully defended his Paralympic Games title with victory in the mixed T1-2 road race at Brands Hatch on Saturday.

The 31-year-old relinquished his time-trial title on Wednesday and was disappointed with bronze.

Gold: Stone celebrates retaining his Paralympic title

Gold: Stone celebrates retaining his Paralympic title

Gold: Stone celebrates retaining his Paralympic title

Gold: Stone celebrates retaining his Paralympic title

Stone, who has cerebral palsy and rides a tricycle, bounced back in the 24-kilometre road race to win his third Paralympic gold medal, seven seconds ahead of Italy's Giorgio Farroni.

David Vondracek of the Czech Republic was three minutes 17 seconds behind in third.

Briton Stone said: 'I made my move, but the Italian (Farroni) stayed with me. It was so hard.

Closing in: Stone hunts down Giorgio Farroni of Italy

Closing in: Stone hunts down Giorgio Farroni of Italy

Closing in: Stone hunts down Giorgio Farroni of Italy

'It makes it better to win today because it was so disappointing not winning in the time-trial.

'Compared to Beijing, the competition was so much better, it's good. It pushes me. It makes it a much better sport.'

More to follow…

Making amends: Stone was disappointed not to win the time-trail on Wednesday

Making amends: Stone was disappointed not to win the time-trail on Wednesday

Making amends: Stone was disappointed not to win the time-trial on Wednesday

Making amends: Stone was disappointed not to win the time-trail on Wednesday

Joaquim Rodriguez leads Vuelta a Espana after Stage 16

Rodriguez edges closer to Vuelta title as Froome slips further back

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UPDATED:

18:32 GMT, 3 September 2012

Joaquim Rodriguez took an important step towards his first Vuelta a Espana title after claiming more ground over closest challenger Alberto Contador's in Monday's demanding 16th stage.

Contador attempted a number of breakaways over the arduous 20-kilometre final climb but it was his fellow Spaniard who snuck away at the end to extend his overall lead by six seconds.

Rodriguez now lead by 28secs from Contador with five stages remaining before next Sunday's finish into Madrid.

Leading the way: Rodriguez held off the challenge of Contador

Leading the way: Rodriguez held off the challenge of Contador

Leading the way: Rodriguez held off the challenge of Contador

Dario Cataldo won Monday's 185km stage from Gijon to Cuitu Negro, which contained four special category climbs, after he and Thomas de Gendt embarked on an early successful breakaway.

The pair opened up a 15-minute gap with 88km left and were allowed to battle it out as the race for the red jersey went on behind them.

Cataldo, 27, proved too strong for De Gendt, holding off a late charge over the sapping final climb to claim the most memorable success of his career.

Rodriguez was two mins 39 secs further back, while Team Sky's Chris Froome lost further ground to be fourth overall and almost five minutes off the pace.

Chris Froome maintains fourth at Spanish Vuelta

Froome fourth at Spanish Vuelta as Olympic bronze medallist bids for Team Sky glory

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UPDATED:

10:43 GMT, 21 August 2012

Team Sky rider Chris Froome came home third to maintain a strong position at the Spanish Vuelta after the 96-mile mountain stage from Faustino V to a summit finish in the Basque town of Eibar.

Alejandro Valverde of Movistar took the overall lead after winning the third stage in a photo finish ahead of fellow Spaniard Joaquim Rodriguez.

'Both of us deserved to win,' Valverde said of Rodriguez, who looked like he was headed for victory when Valverde made his last push. 'At the end I was able to come back and win,' he said. 'He let up a little at the end and I managed to stick my wheel out in front.'

Close call: Alejandro Valverde (left) just edged out Joaquin Rodriguez, with Chris Froome in the background at the end of third stage of the Spanish Vuelta

Close call: Alejandro Valverde (left) just edged out Joaquin Rodriguez, with Chris Froome in the background at the end of third stage of the Spanish Vuelta

Froome and Alberto Contador of SaxoBank were next, followed by a group of riders six seconds behind the four front runners who clocked a time of three hours, 49 minutes and 37 seconds.

Valverde, who won the 2009 Vuelta before serving a two-year doping ban, took the red leader's jersey with an 18-second lead over Movistar teammate Benat Intxausti. Rodriguez, Froome and Contador are all within six seconds of Intxausti.

Contador, who returned from a doping ban earlier this month, tried to break free several times on the final climb, only to be followed by the other contenders.

Poised: Froome is fourth overall

Poised: Froome is fourth overall

'It was a pity not to win, but my goal is Madrid,' said the two-time Tour de France winner.

Tuesday's fourth stage is a 99-mile ride from Barakaldo to Estacion de Valdezcaray.

The 21-stage race finishes on September 9 in Madrid.

London 2012 Olympics marathon: Stephen Kiprotich wins

Ugandan Kiprotich beats Kenyan duo Kirui and Kipsang to spring marathon surprise

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UPDATED:

13:01 GMT, 12 August 2012

Uganda's Stephen Kiprotich stunned the Kenyan challenge to clinch a surprise Olympic gold medal in the marathon on The Mall.

The 23-year-old burst past Abel Kirui and Wilson Kipsang around the 38-kilometre mark to leave his two rivals trailing and claim only Uganda's second ever Olympic gold in athletics.

Kiprotich followed in the footsteps of his compatriot John Akii-Bua, who was 400 metres hurdles champion 40 years ago, and crossed the line in two hours, eight minutes and one second.

Glory: Stephen Kiprotich reaches the finish line

Glory: Stephen Kiprotich reaches the finish line

Kiprotich on the way towards the finish

Kiprotich on the way towards the finish

Kirui took the silver, 26 seconds adrift, and long-time leader Kipsang finished with the bronze.

Kipsang, the London Marathon winner, made an early move to try to break up the lead group, building a 21-second lead at one point.

It was a high-risk strategy in such warm conditions, though, and he paid for it as the race went on as he started to look less and less comfortable.

Front runners: Kiprotich and Kenya's Wilson Kipsang Kiprotich and Abel Kirui (left-right)

Front runners: Kiprotich and Kenya's Wilson Kipsang Kiprotich and Abel Kirui (left-right)

He missed a drinks stop and by the 25km mark his advantage was down to seven seconds.

Kenyan world champion Kirui and Kiprotich soon joined the leader to make it a three-way battle for the gold medal.

Kiprotich looked to be starting to struggle, holding the back of his leg, but he suddenly produced a big surge, leapt to the front and pulled away.

Silver service: Kenya's Kirui prays after coming second place

Silver service: Kenya's Kirui prays after coming second place

And in front of packed crowds rows deep all along the looped central London course, the Ugandan, who moved to Kenya as a teenager to train, started smiling and pointing his finger into the air as he closed in on victory before draping himself in the Ugandan flag as he crossed the line.

Lee Merrien was the first Briton home in 30th place in 2hrs 17.00mins as team-mate Scott Overall struggled late in the race.

Medal men: Kenya's Abel Kirui (right) is congratulated by gold medalist Kiprotich

Medal men: Kenya's Abel Kirui (right) is congratulated by gold medalist Kiprotich

More to follow.

London 2012 Olympics: Ashton Easton wins decathlon, Christian Taylor wins triple jump

New American star Eaton crowned best all-round athlete after taking decathlon gold

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UPDATED:

21:20 GMT, 9 August 2012

Ashton Eaton won the Olympic decathlon gold medal by 198 points on Thursday night.

Eaton set the decathlon world record at the U.S. trials in June and backed it up with an Olympic victory with 8,869 points.

Two-time world champion Trey Hardee settled for silver with 8,671 points and Leonel Suarez of Cuba took the bronze, 346 points behind Eaton, at 8,523.

Glory: Ashton Eaton (left) and Trey Hardee (right) celebrate an American one-two in the decathlon

Glory: Ashton Eaton (left) and Trey Hardee (right) celebrate an American one-two in the decathlon

No catching him: Eaton competes in the 1500m, the final event of the decathlon

No catching him: Eaton competes in the 1500m, the final event of the decathlon

Jolly good throw: World record holder Eaton hurls the discus in the Olympic Stadium

Jolly good throw: World record holder Eaton hurls the discus in the Olympic Stadium

Eaton had a 151-point lead going into the final event, the 1,500 meters, and is a better middle-distance runner than Hardee.

But there were still some nerves in the field, with a rare false start in the 1,500.

Eaton needed to slash six seconds off his fastest ever time in the 1,500 to break his world record, but ran a cautious race and finished well outside his personal best in 4 minutes, 33.59 seconds.

Centre of attention: Eaton lines up before the start of the 110m hurdles on Thursday

Centre of attention: Eaton lines up before the start of the 110m hurdles on Thursday

Golden boy: Easton lines up a throw in the decathlon javelin event

Golden boy: Easton lines up a throw in the decathlon javelin event

Meanwhile, world champion Christian Taylor produced this year's biggest jump to take gold in the men's triple jump in an American one-two at the London Olympic Games on Thursday.

Taylor produced a season's best mark of 17.81 metres to finish ahead of U.S. compatriot Will Claye, who took silver with a jump of 17.62 metres. Fabrizio Donato of Italy finished in bronze with a jump of 17.48 metres.

American dream: Christian Taylor celebrates after winning the men's triple jump final

American dream: Christian Taylor celebrates after winning the men's triple jump final

American dream: Christian Taylor celebrates after winning the men's triple jump final

Leevan Sands of the Bahamas, bronze medallist four years ago in Beijing, was forced to retire after injuring his knee on his fourth attempt.

Taylor was already the leading jumper in the world this year with a mark of 17.63 set in June.