Tag Archives: scouser

Tony Bellew draws with Isaac Chilemba, putting Chad Dawson title fight in jeopardy

Bellew left frustrated in bid to line up Dawson title fight after draw with Chilemba

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

01:10 GMT, 31 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

01:12 GMT, 31 March 2013

Tony Bellew was left frustrated in Liverpool after a lackadaisical performance saw him draw with fellow world title contender Isaac Chilemba in Liverpool.

The 30-year-old Scouser knew victory in this WBC light-heavyweight title final eliminator would put him in position to take on American champion Chad Dawson, who first defends his title against Adonis Stevenson in June.

Bellew was unable to force that title challenge, though, with a laboured night's work in front of 7,000 partisan fans at the Echo Arena in his home city.

Bellew – with a record of 19-1 with 12 early wins heading in – is ranked at number one with the WBC having steadily rebuilt since his only career defeat, which came against British rival Nathan Cleverly for the Welshman's WBO title in 2011.

Head-to-head: Tony Bellew (right) drew with Isaac Chilemba

Head-to-head: Tony Bellew (right) drew with Isaac Chilemba

Malawi native Chilemba, with a record of 20-1-1 (9KO wins) heading into the encounter, represented another step up for the Englishman and boasted a number three ranking with the WBC.

Everton fanatic Bellew, watched by Toffees manager David Moyes in the crowd and entering the ring the club's Z Cars theme tune, started positively in an untidy first round, landing a solid early right hand to mark Chilemba's card before the two had to be pulled apart after the bell.

Bellew employed the jab in the second with some success but Chilemba was ready to counter when the chance arose.

Both men landed stiff right hands in an otherwise-tepid third round with Bellew struggling to pin down the visitor. Both men traded close-in in the fourth with Bellew just about coming off better thanks to a stern body shot and right hand.

Another burst of action saw the Scouser repeat the attack with a left hook to the stomach and glancing right but Chilemba was certainly making a fight of it.

Chilemba bullied the home favourite across the ring with one attack without doing any real damage but looked to have done enough to win the round.

Bellew was labouring but did land a long right hand in the sixth, though the African was landing more prolifically. Chilemba was progressing from prey to predator, taking ring centre in the middle rounds. A Bellew right made him think twice for a moment.

Chilemba was more accurate and, as his confidence grew, more aggressive. The consensus at ringside was that the fight was level after eight rounds but Chilemba had the momentum heading into the ninth. Chilemba landed two body shots before Bellew responded with a booming right and following it up with two more decent shots.

The Englishman had sparked into life at last, doubling up the jab before a left to the body and short right gave him a strong finish before the bell.

Chilemba began the 10th well, landing hard shots from range and edging the round. The underdog's combination punching was superior too as he arguably did enough to take the 11th, picking his punches and landing eye-catching shots with the right.

It was all to play for heading into the final round and Chilemba landed a right followed by a counter left hook to Bellew's temple.

Bellew still seemed flat, only sporadically forcing the action as he urged the crowd to gee him up. A right to the body did land for the Briton but he faced an anxious wait before scores were read out.
One judge scored it 116-112 for Chilemba, another 116-115 for Bellew and the third had it level at 114-114 to leave both men disappointed.

Bellew said afterwards: 'I thought I won nine out of the 12 rounds and even Chilemba's trainer Buddy McGirt, one of the most respected men in boxing, told me he thought I won. I've got a lot of time for Chilemba he's a good fighter and a tough man but I won the fight.'

United striker Javier Hernandez still can"t understand Scouser Wayne Rooney

I haven't got a clue, Roo! United striker Hernandez still can't understand Scouser Wayne

By
Graeme Yorke

PUBLISHED:

10:47 GMT, 15 January 2013

|

UPDATED:

11:01 GMT, 15 January 2013

Wayne Rooney's foreign team-mates at Manchester United are struggling to understand him because of his strong Scouse accent.

Striker Javier Hernandez admits
he still has problems understanding Roo's lilt – despite playing
alongside him for three years at Old Trafford.

Stong accent: Scouser Wayne Rooney

Stong accent: Scouser Wayne Rooney

The Mexican, aged 24, says he can differentiate between forward Danny Welbeck's Mancunian accent and Rooney's Liverpool twang – but sometimes struggles to make out what the Scouser is saying.

He said: 'When I first came here, everyone that spoke English sounded exactly the same.

'But now I know the accents. Mind you, it's still difficult to understand Wazza sometimes, though!'

Team talk: United's Javier Hernandez (left)

Team talk: United's Javier Hernandez (left)

Recalling when he joined United in 2006, Serbian defender Nemanja Vidic, 31, said of Rooney: 'I thought he spoke German because his accent is different.'

Ex-England boss Fabio Capello once even suggested Rooney struggles to speak English. Wayne himself has admitted he can only just about understand Liverpool star Jamie Carragher's Scouse accent.

David Price beats Audley Harrison in first-round knockout

Audley pays the Price: Harrison suffers first round KO at hands of heavyweight hope

By
Ian Ridley

PUBLISHED:

21:41 GMT, 13 October 2012

|

UPDATED:

23:30 GMT, 13 October 2012

The man who talks such a good fight thought he had one last special one in him. He was spectacularly wrong.

Audley Harrison lasted just 82 brutal seconds against the new big hope of British heavyweight boxing, David Price, at the Liverpool Echo Arena. At 40, it must surely be the end of the Londoner’s controversial and ultimately unfulfilled career.

Brutal: David Price celebrates after knocking out Audley Harrison in the first round

Brutal: David Price celebrates after knocking out Audley Harrison in the first round

Price had respect neither for age nor
the reputation of Harrison, an Olympic gold medal winner 12 years ago,
and gave 8,000 raucous Merseyside fans a satisfying, if curtailed,
performance.

The 29-year-old Beijing bronze
medallist did exactly what he needed to do to retain his British and
Commonwealth heavyweight titles and enhance his reputation with the 12th
knock-out in his 14 winning fights since turning professional three
years ago.

On the front foot: Price takes the fight to Harrison

On the front foot: Price takes the fight to Harrison

On his way: Price goes in to finish off Harrison

On his way: Price goes in to finish off Harrison

Harrison was left with a broken nose and concussion and ended the night in hospital.

Price said: ‘I would have liked more rounds but I have done a number on him and surprised myself.’
Harrison entered the ring to the theme from Rocky and many gave him
about as much chance as the cinematic underdog in Price’s backyard.To
rub it in, the Scouser made his entry to a rousing rendition of You’ll
Never Walk Alone.

Going down: Price sends Harrison crashing to the canvas

Going down: Price sends Harrison crashing to the canvas

Out for the count: Harrison lies on the floor after being knocked down

Out for the count: Harrison lies on the floor after being knocked down

The look of apprehension that beset
Harrison in his non-event of a fight against David Haye two years ago,
when he barely landed a punch, was evident again.

Within a minute, he was reeling from a
fierce Price right hand. Scenting blood, Price unleased a flurry of
punches and soon Harrison was on the canvas, clinging to the ropes to
avoid falling from the ring. Blood spurted from his nose. Referee Howard
Foster’s count was irrelevant.

Harrison’s corner rushed to his aid
and a doctor was soon administering oxygen. After five minutes he rose
to his feet and groggily departed the arena, leaving Price to bask in
the adulation of his home city. Departing boxing too

Game over: Price celebrates his victory

Game over: Price celebrates his victory

Mixed emotions: Harrison looks dejected after his defeat to Price who celebrates in the background

Mixed emotions: Harrison looks dejected after his defeat to Price who celebrates in the background

Before the fight, Harrison acknowledged he was in the last-chance saloon. Surely the sport will no longer serve him.

By contrast, Price dealt with the
first real challenge of his career impressively. Soon a big box office
fight against his friend Haye may beckon.

With the Klitschko brothers coming to
the end of their careers, he looks to be in the right place at the right
time. Unlike Audley Harrison.

London 2012 Olympics: Beth Tweddle: After Beijing, I hated myself and I hated the Olympics

Beth Tweddle: After Beijing, I hated myself and I hated the Olympics

Beth Tweddle recalls all too vividly
the moment her crushing disappointment at missing out on an Olympic
medal in Beijing hit her hardest.

As the members of the British team
boarded their flight home, the medal winners turned left to enjoy the
privileges of business class.But Tweddle, the standard bearer of British
gymnastics, had to turn right.

'I was stuck at the rear of the plane
near the toilets,' she recalls. 'I took a step back on my dismount from
the parallel bars in the Olympic final and that one, small error turned
a bronze medal into fourth place.'

Honorary scouser: Beth Tweddle is targeting gold in London

Honorary scouser: Beth Tweddle is targeting gold in London

At Heathrow, the distinction between success and failure was rubbed in again.

The medallists had pink name tags for their baggage to speed up the recovery process at the carousel.

Tweddle remembers standing forlornly waiting for her bags to appear, the medallists long gone.

'A huge crowd of well-wishers greeted the team at Heathrow and again at Manchester but all I wanted to do was disappear back to my flat in Liverpool,' she says. 'The next day I went with my flatmate to the travel agents and asked what was the first flight out of the country. It turned out to be Kavos. But even on a Greek island people kept asking me about the Games.

'It was all a horrible experience. I hated myself, I hated the Olympics and I hated gymnastics. There was no way I was going to carry on in the sport. But the day I returned home I texted my coach and asked when did she want me in for training. It had taken that week for me to realise I couldn't walk away.'

It proved to be a wise decision.

Up for it: Beth Tweddle in action at the World Championships in Tokyo

Up for it: Beth Tweddle in action at the World Championships in Tokyo

Tweddle, now 26, went on to add world titles in 2009 and 2010 to the first world crown she claimed in 2006, as well as a host of European golds.

And she can now expect to compete in the bars and the floor exercise at London's O2 Arena as a serious Olympic medal contender in both disciplines this summer.

Adversity is something the 'honorary scouser', as she calls herself, has come to deal with over the years, especially early on when British gymnastics was considered not much more than a joke by the Eastern Europeans.

'Back then, when I first started competing in international events as a teenager, you'd have to fight to get a chance to practise on the bars,' she recalls.

'You'd get a Russian girl swinging away and then announcing to a team-mate that she was about to dismount, which was the cue for the next Russian to jump on. I'd be standing there not getting a look-in.

'Even when I did get on someone, normally from Eastern Europe, would leap on to the lower bar and start swinging round and round. Someone would have to give way or there would have been a nasty accident. It would always be me.

Disappointment: Beth Tweddle in action during the Beijing Olympics

Disappointment: Beth Tweddle in action during the Beijing Olympics

'On the beam I'd begin a routine on one end only to see a Russian jump on the other end, start her routine and edge closer and closer towards me. Again, I would jump off without completing my routine. One day my long-time coach, Amanda Reddin, told me never to give way again. The next time it happened, the Russian had to dismount.'

Tweddle stumbled into the sport because her parents found her 'too energetic'.

She was born in South Africa but the family moved to England when she was just one.

In gymnastics she discovered a pastime she adored but she had no role models to inspire her to make it a full-time sport.

Double gold: Beth Tweddle poses with her European Championship medals

Double gold: Beth Tweddle poses with her European Championship medals

'Olga Korbut, Nadia Comaneci and the others were way before my time,' she says. 'The transition from enjoyable past-time to competitive sport just kind of happened. There were no successful British gymnasts to emulate.' It is little wonder that the small girl felt out of her depth when she began to feature in events in Germany, France and other European venues.

'I was overawed. I kept saying to my coach: “I don't deserve to be here”.'

Her low self-esteem would continue for a number of years.But in 2002 she clinched a European bronze, the first medal ever won by a British gymnast at the European Championships.

'It was a massive moment for me and for British gymnastics, a real breakthrough,' she admits. 'But I still didn't think I deserved to be there. And I certainly didn't believe that I could kick on and achieve better results.'

Even though she claimed two silvers in the 2004 Europeans and a bronze at the 2005 worlds, Tweddle had decided, at the ripe old age of 20, that the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne would be her swansong.

'It would be another two years to the Olympics, my body hurt and even at 20 I was on the old side to be a top level gymnast,' she explains.

'I just didn't think I could become a world, let alone a European champion. I thought I was as good as I could get.'

She laughs at herself and shakes her head. 'I guess I was wrong.'

An ankle sprained the day before Commonwealth competition ruled her out of the Games, but there was a 'silver lining', as she puts it.

'There was no way I was going to bow out on that note so I then resolved to have a go at the Beijing Olympics and the 2009 world championships, partly because they would be staged in London, and then stop. This time I was adamant.'

The fourth place in Beijing made Tweddle re-evaluate again. 'I told the BBC that I wouldn't be around in 2012 but the day after returning from Kavos I was back in the gym. A package had arrived in the post in my absence. Inside I found a pink Olympic baggage tag and a message from Tim Brabants, the gold medal canoeist, who told me I deserved a medal, or at least this tag.It was a lovely touch and I knew I couldn't walk away.'

She laughs again and shrugs her shoulders by way of explanation.

Team-mates: The Great Britain team at the European Championships, including Beth Tweddle (second left)

Team-mates: The Great Britain team at the European Championships, including Beth Tweddle (second left)

'I guess I'm just stubborn. I hate giving up.'

The 2009 world championships proved to be a massive fillip for her. In front of a partisan home crowd inside the O2 she won gold in the floor exercise.

'It was the most amazing experience of my life to have such a huge and wonderful support base behind me,' she recalls. 'It's what has kept me going over the past two years, knowing that it will be bigger and better at the Olympics.'

During the past four years British gymnastics has been transformed, with the likes of Louis Smith winning an Olympic bronze in 2008 on the pommel horse, and Dan Keatings an all-round world silver.

At the 2010 Commonwealths the second rung of English gymnasts swept the board.

At last there is more to British gymnastics that just Beth Tweddle.

'That really helps me,' she admits. 'Before, when the management announced the team's aim was one medal I knew that, in reality, it was Beth's aim. Now I know it's spread around the team. They've seen what I've done and come to realise that if I can do it, so can they. We now have serious medal contenders in a number of events.'

Taking the weight: Louis Smith is an Olympic medallist

Taking the weight: Louis Smith is an Olympic medallist

This is quite a transformation for a sport whose British participation was almost ridiculed a decade ago.

'Back then nobody took any notice of the Brits when they trained. Now it's a case of “The Brits are here. We'd better watch what they do.” It's very satisfying to see.'

So what of this summer Tweddle remains understandably cautious, pointing out that she is yet to qualify.

'We have the European championships in Brussels in May, then a couple of trial competitions and finally the British championships in Liverpool in June. After all that we receive letters telling us if we've been selected for the Olympics.

'I've got friends wanting to buy me 2012 badges and gear but I don't want to know until I have that letter.'

The thought of Tweddle not being selected for London is like Ben Ainslie failing to make the sailing team, but too much has happened in the past and too much could still happen.

'Listen, I've fallen flat on my face from the bars hundreds of times,' says Tweddle. 'I've fractured my cheekbones and both feet, I've torn biceps tendons, I've suffered from a huge list of injuries. I'll start thinking about the Games when that letter's in my hand.'

Yet still she cannot resist one piece of Olympic information. 'I have a good bars routine I know so well that you could wake me up at three in the morning and I'd do it without a flaw.

'But it won't win me an Olympic medal and I'd regret trying it for the rest of my life. To win a medal means an element of risk. It could boil down to a fraction of a second, but that's what I'll have to do. It could end with the one thing missing in my competitive life – an Olympic medal. Or it could all go wrong. But I'm not going to die wondering.'

And if she does claim a medal, even a bronze one, it will be some achievement for the girl who was bullied by the Eastern Europeans – but came back to beat them all.

Behind the scenes at Soccer Saturday

Jeff, Robbie, Merse, Thommo and Charlie are game for a laugh

It's the football show with no football, the weekly six-hour comedy sitcom with no script.

Four former footballers sitting in a studio wearing headphones watching matches we can't see, with a Hartlepool United fan giving us the latest scores from around the country (with the help of more ex-players watching matches we can't see).

Does it sound bonkers Oh yes. But that's just why Sky's Soccer Saturday works so well….

Must-see TV: Jeff Stelling, Robbie Fowler, Paul Merson, Phil Thompson and Charlie Nicholas

Must-see TV: Jeff Stelling, Robbie Fowler, Paul Merson, Phil Thompson and Charlie Nicholas

It is 10.30am on Saturday at Sky's
studios in Brentford, west London. There are just 90 minutes to go
before the show goes live on air – not that you would know it, as
everyone is so relaxed.

Presenter Jeff Stelling is browsing the day's newspapers before he goes and retrieves his James Brown doll from his locker.

The singing puppet makes an appearance whenever its Hartlepool namesake gets on the score sheet.

Former Liverpool striker Robbie Fowler looks a little nervous and another Scouser, Phil Thompson, is doing his best to put him at ease.

Ex-Arsenal midfielder Paul Merson is deep in a copy of the Racing Post, busy predicting the day's football results.

Each pundit picks a winner each week and the five 20 bets go into an accumulator.

They haven't won for 'about two years' but they keep an eye on their teams throughout the show.

'People don't realise, but we're ribbing each other if one's letting us down,' explains Thompson.

'If Jeff's is down we'll all be staring at him and then rip him apart during the ad breaks.'

Telly buddies: Jeff lets Laura into Soccer Saturday secrets

Telly buddies: Jeff lets Laura into Soccer Saturday secrets

Former Arsenal and Celtic striker Charlie Nicholas is the last to arrive, breezing in with a diamond stud in his left ear and wearing dark glasses.

It is non-stop from the moment they are together.

So who takes the longest in make up, then

'Thommo – powdering that hooter!' says Merson, whose unique take on the English language comes in for the most stick.

Norwich City suddenly had a player called 'Cinnamon Jackson'.

'Rangel Angel' has also been known to play for Swansea.

'The worst thing is we know what he means,' notes Nicholas.

He's not the only one, mind you. Fowler manages to label Per Mertesacker 'Metzelder' and describes 'Terry Henry' scoring Arsenal's winner agains t Sunderland.

'It's like football dressing-room banter,' explains Nicholas, 'and Jeff chairs it well and winds us all up.'

Thompson adds: 'People look at us and it's just like a bunch of guys sitting in the pub having a laugh and taking the mickey out of each other.

'I'm the big-nosed biased Scouser, Charlie's the Scotsman with an earring in who still thinks he's 25, Merse just can't get a name right and Jeff is the biased Hartlepool Monkey Hanger.

'But we do have our own opinions about things. We've maybe bridged that gap, between a sports show and an entertainment show.

'Certain people in the game said, “Oh, it's the comedy show” but isn't that what sport's about: fun and enjoyment It was a back-handed compliment.'

Merson spends the first 55 minutes drawing a picture of a house while the panel give their opinions on a tumultuous week in football.

Steering the ship: Stelling keeps the panel under control (usually)

Steering the ship: Stelling keeps the panel under control (usually)

The commercial breaks are spent ordering food from the studio runner (or, in the case of Fowler and Merson, trying to catch Maltesers in their mouths).

But there's a serious side, too.

This is a results service, after all, and there are frequent updates from the day's early kick-offs, before Stelling really gets into his stride at 3pm.

He starts preparing the Tuesday before each show, devouring the bundle of statistics provided by Trevor Simmons, who feeds extra titbits of information throughout the show, which Stelling weaves in almost effortlessly.

Making it up: Merson gets a makeover

Making it up: Merson gets a makeover

It really is a military operation.

Director Karen Willmington, producer Ian Condron and their crew members keep tabs on myriad screens showing games throughout the country, plus the information on the vidiprinter, while the studio pundits and roving reporters shout and scream about goals or incidents in their particular games.

'We all enjoy our football and I think that's what makes it so exciting,' said Thompson.

'When the three o'clocks kick off and it's all flashing round, it shows proper passion for the game.'

The constant drip-feed of controversy, upsets, goals and red cards provides an enthralling storyline to which Stelling must react.

Stelling is Soccer Saturday, the unflustered front man who keeps it all together without the help of an autocue, and you wonder if there is life after Jeff for the programme.

The fact he supports a League One side has helped to mould the show's success: it doesn't just focus on the Premier League with a few token lower-division results thrown in. It encompasses English and Scottish football, plus some non-League football, too.

Stelling said: 'I used to sit and watch Ceefax, the pages clicked over and you waited for your team's score to come through. Being a Hartlepool fan, you weren't going to hear your team's score on national radio or anything like that and it was the same for most football fans.

'We don't give equal treatment to lower league sides but we give them as much as we can. I love it, because some of the best stories out there are from the lower leagues, or from Scotland.'

Even Stelling admits he is still surprised by the success of a programme he has presented since 1998.

He knows: Thommo gives his opinion about Jeffs make-up (right)

He knows: Thommo gives his opinion
about Jeffs make-up (right)

'If somebody had said to me that we would still be going strong, I'd have thought they were crackers,' he said.

It really should not work, yet it does.

The blokey humour, opinion and insight is both entertaining and informative. It's a cosy little club, but that's part of its charm.

Stelling laughs when it is suggested Soccer Saturday has become as much a part of the weekend football routine for some people as a pie and a Bovril.

'They should really go to a game, shouldn't they' he says.

Top sport stories of 2011

Simoncelli and Speed dominate our coverage: MailOnline”s top sport stories of 2011

It has been yet another incredible 12 months in the world of sport and to mark the end of 2011, we have compiled a list of our top 10 most popular stories of the year according to the number of hits they received…

Marco Simoncelli, Sergio Aguero and Gary Speed for 2011 review
MailOnline”s top 10 UK sport stories of 2010

1) Marco Simoncelli”s death in Malaysia

October was a dark month for motorsport. Fans across the globe were still reeling from the death of British driver Dan Wheldon in Las Vegas when Marco Simoncelli lost his life just a week later. The 24-year-old Italian MotoGP star died from injuries sustained in a crash at Sepang in Malaysia.

Click here to read the full article

Tragedy: Italian MotoGP rider Marco Simoncelli lost his life after a crash in Malaysia

Tragedy: Italian MotoGP rider Marco Simoncelli lost his life after a crash in Malaysia

2) A first look at the strips your team will wear in the Premier League in 2011-12

Football meets fashion on this website every summer as fans cannot wait to get a glimpse of the gear their heroes will be wearing over the coming season. Kids want kitted out in socks, shorts and tops while the more mature supporter is just in it for the jersey. We cover all 20 top-flight teams AND give a Sportsmail verdict out of 10.

Click here to read the full article

3) Steven Gerrard taunts Man United fans after Champions League woe at Wembley

Loads of Liverpudlians loved it when Manchester United were outclassed by the brilliant Barcelona in May”s Champions League final. This was no surprise – their rivalry is fierce – but what did make us take a step back was a picture of high-profile Scouser and Reds captain Steven Gerrard joining in. United”s Wembley woe was on the same weekend Gerrard turned 31 and, judging by the snaps, the midfielder had a very happy birthday.

Click here to read the full article

4) Club-by-club guide to every Premier League transfer during the summer window

Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish splashed the cash, Andre Villas-Boas was busy, Sergio Aguero joined Manchester City and Sir Alex Ferguson took David De Gea, Phil Jones and Ashley Young to Old Trafford. But there were plenty more big market movers during the summer transfer window and we kept you up to date with every single one in the Premier League.

Click here to read the full article

Tribute: Everton fans remembered Gary Speed with a minute

Tribute: Everton fans remembered Gary Speed with a minute”s applause before they played Stoke

5) Gary Speed dies aged 42

News of Gary Speed”s death broke on the last Sunday morning in November. The Wales boss had been on television the day before and the sudden loss of one of football”s true gentlemen, apparently after taking his own life, sent shockwaves throughout the world of football and beyond.

Click here to read the full article

6) Valentino Rossi”s tribute to tragic Marco Simoncelli

“So strong and so sweet. I will miss him,” said Valentino Rossi as he came to terms with the death of his close friend Marco Simoncelli. Rossi was involved in the crash which claimed Simoncelli”s life and the seven-time world champion led the tributes to his fellow Italian.

Click here to read the full article

7) Eva Carneiro joins Chelsea bench

Chelsea signed the likes of Fernando Torres, Juan Mata, Raul Meireles and David Luiz in 2011 but it was an unknown new arrival who caught the eye more than any of the big names. You all wanted to know the identity of the woman on the Chelsea bench and we were more than happy to provide the answer.

Click here to read the full article

Who

Who”s that girl Team doctor Eva Carnneiro on the end of the Chelsea bench at Stoke

8) Sir Alex Ferguson snaps at Kenny Dalglish”s daughter

Sir Alex Ferguson reacting angrily to questions is nothing new. But this story of Fergie”s fury had added spice as the interviewer was Kelly Cates – daughter of Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish. She wanted to know why Anders Lindegaard and not David De Gea was in between the sticks against Benfica in the Champions League.

Click here to read the full article

9) Manchester United pull plug on Wesley Sneijder deal

For months it seemed like Wesley Sneijder would fill the hole Paul Scholes left when he called time on his career at Manchester United. But, as Ian Ladyman reported, Sir Alex Ferguson grew tired of the long-running transfer saga and pulled the plug on plans to take the Holland and Inter Milan midfielder to the Premier League.

Click here to read the full article

Saga: Wesley Sneijder appeared to be heading to Manchester United until Sir Alex Ferguson pulled the plug

Saga: Wesley Sneijder appeared to be heading to Manchester United until Sir Alex Ferguson pulled the plug

10) Club-by-club guide to every Premier League transfer during the January window

Readers were more interested in the summer transfers than the goings on in January but the winter window still made our top 10. Fernando Torres to Chelsea and and Andy Carroll to Liverpool were the big ones but they weren”t all bad and we had every last one in our easy-to-follow guide.

Click here to read the full article

MailOnline”s top 10 global sport stories of 2010

1) Marco Simoncelli”s death in Malaysia

See No 1 above

Click here to read the full article

2) A first look at the strips your team will wear in the Premier League in 2011-12

See No 2 above

Click here to read the full article

3) Club-by-club guide to every Premier League transfer during the summer window

See No 4 above

Click here to read the full article

4) Valentino Rossi”s tribute to tragic Simoncelli

See No 6 above

Click here to read the full article

Looks sore: Liverpool and Denmark defender Daniel Agger has a tattoo of a Viking graveyard on his back

Looks sore: Liverpool and Denmark defender Daniel Agger has a tattoo of a Viking graveyard on his back

5) Steven Gerrard taunts Man United fans after Champions League woe at Wembley

See No 3 above

Click here to read the full article

6) Gary Speed dies aged 42

See No 5 above

Click here to read the full article

7) Eva Carneiro joins Chelsea bench

See No 7 above

Click here to read the full article

8) Manchester United pull plug on Wesley Sneijder deal

See No 9 above

Click here to read the full article

9) Daniel Agger shows off his tattoos

WhichPremier League footballer has a Viking graveyard on his back Okay, so the question is unlikely to come up in any pub quiz but the thousands and of you who read our article about Liverpool”s Daniel Agger early this year would have been awarded full marks.

Click here to read the full article

10) Club-by-club guide to every Premier League transfer during the January window

See No 10 above

Click here to read the full article