Tag Archives: schleck

Bradley Wiggins given third place in 2009 Tour de France

Wiggins awarded third place in 2009 Tour de France after Armstrong's results struck off

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UPDATED:

18:50 GMT, 29 October 2012

Bradley Wiggins has been awarded third place in the 2009 Tour de France after Lance Armstrong's result was wiped from the record books.

Wiggins, who won the 2012 Tour, placed a then British record-equalling fourth three years' ago behind Alberto Contador, Andy Schleck and Armstrong.

After the International Cycling Union stripped Armstrong of all results from August 1, 1998, ratifying a ruling by the United States Anti-doping Agency, Wiggins is a two-time Tour podium rider.

Rewriting history: Bradley Wiggins (right) finished third in 2009's Tour de France now

Rewriting history: Bradley Wiggins (right) finished third in 2009's Tour de France now

The UCI ruled last week Armstrong's sequence of seven successive Tour wins would not be reallocated and results following any future disqualifications relating to 1998 to 2005 would not be reallocated, but those from his comeback years, in 2009 and 2010, will.

A UCI spokesperson said: 'In 2009 the placing of Mr Armstrong will be reallocated.

'Bradley Wiggins is the third-placed rider for the Tour de France, 2009.'

Stricken from the records: Lance Armstrong's result was erased

Stricken from the records: Lance Armstrong's result was erased

Less than a year after winning double
Olympic gold over four kilometres on the Beijing 2008 Games track, in
the individual and team pursuits, Wiggins produced a coming of age
performance on the road in the Tour.

For the first time, Wiggins focused on the fabled race, equalling Robert Millar's 1984 British best placing of fourth.

It was that performance and result which earned Wiggins a move to Team Sky and convinced him he could win the Tour, a dream realised in July, when he became the first British winner of the yellow jersey.

Coming of age: Wiggins' performance on the tour was excellent

Coming of age: Wiggins' performance on the tour was excellent

Chris Froome finished second, becoming the second Briton to claim a place on the Tour podium.

The Armstrong affair was the subject of much discussion last week in Paris at the launch of the route of the 2013 Tour, the 100th edition of the fabled race.

There Wiggins suggested he would target the Giro d'Italia next May and ride the Tour, which begins in Corsica on June 29 and finishes in Paris on July 21, in support of Froome as Team Sky seek to defend the title.

Bradley Wiggins turns back on second Tour de France title to support Chris Froome

Wiggins stuns fans by turning back on Tour de France defence to support Froome after nightmare route is unveiled

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UPDATED:

12:11 GMT, 24 October 2012

Reigning champion Bradley Wiggins has turned his back on a second Tour de France title after agreeing to support Chris Froome's bid for glory.

The move marks a role reversal for the Team Sky team-mates after Froome played a key part in Wiggins' historic victory in July.

Look says it all: Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome watch the 2013 route presentation

Look says it all: Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome watch the 2013 route presentation

Rivals: Andy Schleck, Alberto Contador and Bradley Wiggins

Rivals: Andy Schleck, Alberto Contador and Bradley Wiggins

Wiggins has set his sights on winning the Giro d’Italia next year as he attempts to secure all three Grand Tour titles.

Speaking at Wednesday's 2013 route announcement, Wiggins said: 'It's more than likely I'll be there in a helping capacity. For me it was about winning one Tour. I want to win the Giro.'

The 32-year-old became the first
Briton to win the Tour this summer when he beat Froome to the yellow jersey.

This year's race suited Wiggins'
time-trial prowess but next year's event, which starts for the first
time in Corsica, is apparently more mountainous which would not favour
the Briton but instead the likes of Alberto Contador.

Enlarge

The 2013 Tour de France route

The 2013 Tour de France route

the 2013 cycling classic Tour de France route

The Tour – the first since lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven titles – will end on the Champs-Elysees at night, organisers confirmed.

Tour director Christian Prudhomme revealed a 3,360-kilometre, 21-stage route, which takes place entirely in France, beginning on Corsica on June 21 and finishing under floodlights on the most famous boulevard in Paris on July 21.

Organisers made a decision to shorten
the combined length of the race's two individual time trials in part as
a response to the domination in this year's tour by champion Wiggins.

The 65 kilometers (40 miles) of time
trials split evenly between the 11th and 17th stages is almost 40
kilometers (25 miles) less than in the 2012 Tour, which could play into
Olympic time trial champion Wiggins' decision to focus instead on the
Giro d'Italia.

The first individual time trail on July 10 finishes against the backdrop of the Mont Saint-Michel monestary.

Line up: (l to r) Bradley Wiggins, Cadel Evans, Mark Cavendish, Philippe Gilbert, Tejay van Garderen, Chris Froome and Alberto Contador

The contenders: (l to r) Bradley Wiggins, Cadel Evans, Mark Cavendish, Philippe Gilbert, Tejay van Garderen, Chris Froome and Alberto Contador

Main man: Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme

Main man: Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme

Organisers have given sprinters like Mark Cavendish a gift – the June 29 stage finish in Bastia is the first time since 1966 that a sprinter can hope to wear the yellow jersey after the first stage, Prudhomme said.

The traditional Bastille Day stage on July 14 is the race's longest at 242 kilometers (150 miles), ending with the 20.8-kilometer (13-mile) ascent of Mont Ventoux, one of cycling's most mythical climbs.

In another first for the race, which has only stopped for the two world wars since the first Tour in 1903, riders will begin the final stage on July 21 inside the grounds of the Versailles Palace. With the sprawling 17th-century chateau as a backdrop to the race start, 'It's going to be a knockout,' Prudhomme said.

The last stage will start later in the day than traditionally and timed for a finish at about 9 p.m., while there is still enough light to ensure riders' safety, Prudhomme said.

'We wanted the finish of the 100th Tour winner to be unique,' Prudhomme said.

In another change to tradition, the eight laps of the Champs Elysees will send riders all the way around the giant Arc de Triomphe arch at the top of the grand avenue, rather than just passing in front of it as in past years.

Armstrong finished on the top of the podium in a record seven Tours from 1999 to 2005 but was subject to a United States Anti-Doping Agency investigation and stripped of his titles and banned for life.

The UCI, cycling's world governing body, ratified the sanctions on Monday.

Tour de France 2013: Bradley Wiggins left with a mountain to climb

Wiggins left with a mountain to climb with Tour to unveil high-altitude route for centenary

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UPDATED:

22:30 GMT, 23 October 2012

With the credibility of cycling now in tatters, this year’s Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins could be forgiven if he decides not to defend the yellow jersey.

And when the mountainous route of next year’s race is unveiled in Paris, he may not want to anyway.

Wiggins won the 2012 race over a terrain that suited his time-trialling pre-eminence and limited his exposure to the high-altitude finishes that trouble him.

For next year’s 100th Tour, the organisers have devised a course which offers little respite from mountains.

Tall order: The 2013 Tour does not suit Bradley Wiggins

Tall order: The 2013 Tour does not suit Bradley Wiggins

The legendary peaks of Mont Ventoux and Alpe d’Huez will feature in a handful of summit finishes which mark the 2013 Tour as a race for climbers like Alberto Contador, Andy Schleck and Wiggins’s Sky team-mate Chris Froome.

Alpe d’Huez will be climbed twice on the same stage while the final stage on the Champs-Elysees in Paris will be held at night under floodlights.

While two individual time trials will entice Wiggins to compete, one of them will be over the hilly terrain of the Alpes-Maritimes, meaning that he may give serious thought to the advice of Shane Sutton, his mentor at Team Sky, to skip the Tour next year and concentrate instead on the Giro d’Italia in May and the Vuelta a Espana in September.

The unveiling of the route is supposed to be a celebration of the centenary Tour. Instead, Wiggins and race director Christian Prudhomme will be besieged by questions about Lance Armstrong, doping, cheating and cycling’s credibility.

Unwanted attention: Lance Armstrong's shadow looms large over the Tour

Unwanted attention: Lance Armstrong's shadow looms large over the Tour

The Tour is now a race without a recent past after Armstrong was stripped on Monday of his seven Tour triumphs beginning in 1999.

Add in the retrospective expunging of the names of Floyd Landis in 2006 and Contador in 2010 and the inevitable tarnishing of Contador’s wins in 2007 and 2009, and only Wiggins, Carlos Sastre in 2008 and Cadel Evans in 2011 can be considered clean winners in the past 14 Tours.

Even Armstrong is no longer publicly declaring himself a seven-time Tour champion after changing his Twitter profile to reflect being stripped of his Tour success by the International Cycling Union (UCI).

On Monday, Armstrong’s profile read: ‘Father of 5 amazing kids, 7-time Tour de France winner, full time cancer fighter, part time triathlete.’

/10/23/article-0-15A12BF0000005DC-272_468x312.jpg” width=”468″ height=”312″ alt=”Calls to resign: Pat McQuaid is under pressure” class=”blkBorder” />

Calls to resign: Pat McQuaid is under pressure

‘UCI clearly have to take the blinkers off, look at the past, examine people who are there, ask themselves the questions, “Are those same people still in the sport and can they proceed forward with those people remaining”’

Tyler Hamilton, a former US Postal team-mate of Armstrong retrospectively stripped of his 2004 Olympic time trial gold medal for doping, said: ‘Pat McQuaid’s comments expose the hypocrisy of his leadership. He has no place in cycling.’

Tour de France 2012: Frank Schleck claims poison

I'm positive it's poison! Schleck defends himself in face of drug claim

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UPDATED:

22:48 GMT, 18 July 2012

As protestations of innocence go, Frank Schleck chose the abrupt approach in the face of Tuesday’s positive drug test.

‘I categorically deny taking any banned substance — I insist that the B sample be tested. If this analysis confirms the initial result, I will argue that I have been the victim of poisoning,’ he said in a statement.

There were plenty around the Tour who wanted to believe the Luxembourg rider yesterday but cycling’s problem is that virtually every rider protests his innocence after a positive test. So, innocent or not, Schleck will be presumed guilty by those outside the sport.

Trouble: Radioshack's Frank Schleck has failed a doping test on the Tour

Trouble: Radioshack's Frank Schleck has failed a doping test on the Tour

In the hunt: Schleck is one of the elite group of riders, currently 12th

In the hunt: Schleck is one of the elite group of riders, currently 12th

There were gestures of support for
the older brother of Andy Schleck, the sporting heroes of their tiny
principality, from Luxembourg fans on the road.

Schleck tested positive for the
banned diuretic xipamide but received unequivocal support from
RadioShack team-mate Jens Voigt, 40, who said: ‘I just hope this gets
cleared up.

'I can’t believe that Frank would do
something so stupid. I honestly don’t doubt him for a second, one
because he’s my friend and two because it would make no sense to take
anything to defend 12th place on a flat day.’

Tour de France 2012: Frank Schleck fails drug test

Tour de France rocked after high-flying Schleck fails drugs test

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UPDATED:

19:03 GMT, 17 July 2012

Luxembourg rider Frank Schleck has failed a doping test, taken on July 14, for the diuretic Xipamide, cycling's governing body the UCI have said.

More to follow…

Failed: Radioshack rider Frank Schleck has failed a doping test on the Tour de France

Failed: Radioshack rider Frank Schleck has failed a doping test on the Tour de France

In the hunt: Schleck is one of the elite group of riders, finishing third in 2011

In the hunt: Schleck is one of the elite group of riders, finishing third in 2011

Tour de France 2012: Bradley Wiggins confident

Favourite Wiggins confident and ready to put last year's Tour agony behind him

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UPDATED:

08:43 GMT, 29 June 2012

Bradley Wiggins is full of confidence ahead of his challenge to become the first British winner of the Tour de France.

Wiggins crashed out of last year's race with a broken collarbone but starts in Liege on Saturday highly-fancied following victories in the Paris-Nice, Tour de Romandie and Criterium du Dauphine this season.

The three-time Olympic champion won two gold medals in Beijing four years ago and admits he has the same mindset as he had back then.

Sky is the limit: Bradley Wiggins is raring to go in this year's Tour de France

Sky is the limit: Bradley Wiggins is raring to go in this year's Tour de France

'I really feel this could be my year. It's simply the way I've felt all season, and that's how it was in 2008,' Wiggins said. 'There have been no upsets, no setbacks, just one phase after another. Now we are finally there.

'Before Beijing in the Great Britain team we were aware of the expectation, knew we were the favourites, but also knew that we had to concentrate on what we had to do. I feel poised, hopefully to make history.

Give me a break: Wiggins broke a collarbone during the seventh stage of last year's Tour

Give me a break: Wiggins broke a collarbone during the seventh stage of last year's Tour

'That doesn't mean I'm dreaming of what might be: I've got my businesslike head on. I feel relaxed and businesslike.'

The 32-year-old Team Sky rider believes there are a number of factors in his favour – most notably the absence of Andy Schleck, who misses out due to a broken pelvis.

'There are good reasons to be confident: the team I've got, the way the guys in the team have been riding, the fact that Andy Schleck won't be at the Tour. All those factors add up and give you greater confidence and belief,' added Wiggins in the Guardian.

'That feeling of confidence is a hard thing to explain. It's not confidence that you are unbeatable but confidence that you have done the work to the maximum of your ability, and all you have to do now is empty it, be the best athlete you can be and take what you get from it at the end.

'It's not going to be pleasant, but it's what needs to be done. It's not going to be nice. In fact, it's going to be horrible.'

Tour de France 2012 guide

Tour de France 2012: You ultimate guide to this year's race

PUBLISHED:

14:37 GMT, 22 June 2012

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UPDATED:

14:40 GMT, 22 June 2012

The Tour de France starts at the end of this month – and here is your complete lowdown on the big race across the Channel…

tour de france

Tour de France
Contenders for the yellow jersey

CADEL EVANS
Age: 35
Team: BMC Racing
Previous appearances (finishes): 2005 (8), 2006 (4), 2007 (2), 2008 (2), 2009 (30), 2010 (26), 2011 (1)
Stage wins: One (2011: stage four)
After twice finishing runner-up, Evans became the first Australian winner of cycling's most prestigious race in 2011 with a supreme display. Will be highly fancied to succeed once again.

BRADLEY WIGGINS
Age: 32
Team: Team Sky
Previous appearances (finishes): 2006 (124), 2007 (withdrawn after stage 16), 2009 (fourth), 2010 (24), 2011 (abandoned during stage seven)
Stage wins: None
The three-time Olympic champion turned himself from track thoroughbred to mountain goat to equal the best finish by a Briton in 2009 with fourth place. After winning Paris-Nice, the Tour de Romandie and Criterium du Dauphine in 2012, he is in the form of his life.

FRANK SCHLECK
Age: 32
Team: RadioShack-Nissan Trek
Previous appearances (finishes): 2006 (10), 2007 (17), 2008 (6), 2009 (5), 2010 (abandoned during stage three), 2011 (3)
Stage wins: Two (2006: stage 15; 2009: stage 17)
With brother Andy, the 2010 champion, absent through injury, Frank Schleck is poised to assume leadership of the RadioShack-Nissan Trek team. Will have to make his gains in the mountains due to inferior time-trialling ability.

VINCENZO NIBALI
Age: 27
Team: Liquigas-Cannondale
Previous appearances (finishes): 2008 (20), 2009 (7)
Stage wins: None
An outside bet, but proficient in the mountains and against the clock, the Italian has won the Vuelta and twice placed third in the Giro d'Italia.

Prologue: Saturday, June 30 – Liege to Liege (6.4-kilometres)
Do not bet against Spartacus. Fabian Cancellara will fancy the yellow jersey on a route which favours power and includes plenty of straight sections, plus some tricky turns.

Stage one: Sunday, July 1 – Liege to Seraing (198km)
The first road stage finishes at the top of the day's fifth fourth category climb, a 2.5km rise to the finish which will favour explosive riders such as Philippe Gilbert of Belgium, rather than the likes of sprinter Mark Cavendish.

Stage two: Monday, July 2 – Vise to Tournai (207.5km)
A flat stage which is likely to favour the mass sprint finish in which Cavendish thrives. The likes of Andre Griepel, Tyler Farrar and Peter Sagan will also seek success.

Stage three: Tuesday, July 3 – Orchies to Boulogne-sur-Mer (197km)
Another day for Gilbert and his ilk, with six short, sharp climbs in the final 60km, including a 700m ascent to the finish line.

Stage four: Wednesday, July 4 – Abbeville to Rouen (214.5km)
The route follows the coast, where the winds could cause disruption for the peloton. The overall contenders will need to be aware of the potential for time losses.

Stage five: Thursday, July 5 – Rouen to Saint-Quentin (196.5km)
A day which the sprinters will relish after a challenging first week for the fast men of the peloton.

Stage six: Friday, July 6 – Epernay to Metz (207.5km)
Cavendish and co will seek further success in Metz on another day across the flat.

Stage seven: Saturday, July 7 – Tomblaine to La Planche des Belles Filles (199km)
The overall contenders will be whittled down as the first major changes in the general classification standings occur on the 6km long finishing ascent at an average gradient of 8.5%.

Stage eight: Sunday, July 8 – Belfort to Porrentruy (157.5km)
A medium mountain stage features the Cote du Passage de la Douleur and the Col de La Croix, with the final climb, coming around 20km from the line, set to be decisive.

Stage nine: Monday, July 9 – Arc-et-Senans to Besancon (41.5km individual time-trial)
'The City of time' will host the Tour's first time-trial where Bradley Wiggins will seek to enhance his prospects of becoming the first Briton on the Paris podium.

Rest day: Tuesday, July 10

Stage 10: Wednesday, July 11 – Macon to Bellegarde-sur-Valserine (194.5km)
Following a day's rest, the Tour climbs again, with the first hors categorie (beyond category) ascent of the 2012 race, the Col du Grand Colombier.

Stage 11: Thursday, July 12 – Albertville to La Toussuire-Les Sybelles (148km)
The host city of the 1992 Winter Olympic Games is the starting point for a potentially momentous day in the Alps, featuring the Col de la Madeleine, the Col de la Croix de Fer and the Col du Mollard before the first summit finish of the Tour.

Stage 12: Friday, July 13 – Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne to Annonay Davezieux (226km)
A day which begins with two category one climbs could end in a sprint unless an early breakaway opens up a commanding lead.

Stage 13: Saturday, July 14 – Saint-Paul-Trois-Chateaux to Le Cap d'Agde (217km)
The peloton must again be wary of the wind as the race heads towards the Mediterranean, with the sprinters again expected to be active.

Stage 14: Sunday, July 15 – Limoux to Foix (191km)
The first Pyrenean day takes place with some challenging climbs, including the Mur de Peguere, where riders face gradients nearing 14%.

Stage 15: Monday, July 16 – Samatan to Pau (158.5km)
Two category four and a category three climb towards the end of the day's racing should not present too many difficulties for the sprinters.

Rest day: Tuesday, July 17

Stage 16: Wednesday, July 18- Pau to Bagneres-de-Luchon (197km)
The race for the maillot jaune is sure to accelerate with the fabled climbs of the Tourmalet, the Aubisque, the Aspin and the Peyresourde.

Stage 17: Thursday, July 19 – Bagneres-de-Luchon to Peyragudes (143.5km)
Another challenging day in the mountains could shake up the overall rankings further with climbs of the Col de Mente, Col des Ares and the Port de Bales, as well as a bumpy finish.

Stage 18: Friday, July 20 -Blagnac to Brive-la-Gaillarde (222.5km)
If they have survived the Pyrenees, the sprinters will seek success in Brive as the yellow jersey hopefuls get their breath back.

Stage 19: Saturday, July 21 – Bonneval to Chartres (53.5km, individual time-trial)
The Tour will be decided in the final time-trial and if the climbers will be hoping they have made enough gains to hold on to their positions.

Stage 20: Sunday, July 22 – Rambouillet to Paris Champs-Elysees (120km)
The traditional finale favouring the sprinters and a celebration for the maillot jaune. Will it be Wiggins