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Sports pictures of the day: March 12

Sports images of the day: Our picture editor's selection

UPDATED:

13:24 GMT, 12 March 2012

Each day, MailOnline sports picture editor Dave Muir will choose his favourite photographs from around the world in the past 24 hours.

Enjoy today's selection right here…

Spaniard Edgar Torronteras at the FIM Indoor Trial World Motorcycling Championship in Palma de Mallorca

Spaniard Edgar Torronteras at the FIM Indoor Trial World Motorcycling Championship in Palma de Mallorca

Independiente keeper Diego Rodriguez appears to have a hold of Boca Juniors' Santiago Silva during a top-flight clash in Buenos Aires

Independiente keeper Diego Rodriguez appears to have a hold of Boca Juniors' Santiago Silva during a top-flight clash in Buenos Aires

Jeremy Clements goes off track and through the grass at the NASCAR Nationwide Series Sam's Town 300 in Las Vegas

Jeremy Clements goes off track and through the grass at the NASCAR Nationwide Series Sam's Town 300 in Las Vegas

An aerial view shows cross-country skiers during the Engadin Ski Marathon

An aerial view shows cross-country skiers during the Engadin Ski Marathon

Bails fly in as Pakistan's Saeed Ajmal dives to the crease against Bangladesh

Bails fly in as Pakistan's Saeed Ajmal dives to the crease against Bangladesh

England lose third Test with Pakistan and slump to 3-0 whitewash

England slump to humiliating 71-run defeat as Pakistan complete 3-0 series whitewash

England's miserable Test tour of the Middle East reached an appropriately sorry conclusion today with a 71-run defeat, and resulting 3-0 whitewash, against Pakistan.

England had to banish memories of their previous failings here to have any chance of pulling off the second-highest fourth-innings chase in their history.

In the end, despite Matt Prior's late defiance, they did not even come close on the way to a four-day beating at the Dubai International Cricket Stadium.

Game over: Pakistan broke England's resistance and sealed a comfortable win on day four

Game over: Pakistan broke England's resistance and sealed a comfortable win on day four

World's best England maintain their No 1 status, despite the crushing defeat

World's best England maintain their No 1 status, despite the crushing defeat

England v Pakistan: third Test

Click here for a full scorecard

For the record, they mustered 252 all
out in pursuit of 324 as Saeed Ajmal (four for 67) and Umar Gul (four
for 61) sentenced them to their first series whitewash since the Ashes
of 2006/07 which curtailed Andrew Flintoff's long-term captaincy
ambitions and hastened the end of Duncan Fletcher's coaching tenure.

No such watershed is in order this
time, after England's first series since completing their march to the
top of the International Cricket Council world rankings.

Their shortcomings, with bat but not
ball, have nonetheless been all too evident over the past three weeks –
and it is a measure of their fallibility that they should contrive to
lose this last Test after having Pakistan 44 for seven on the first
morning.

The hosts recovered to 99 all out,
yet this is the first example since 1907 of a team winning a Test match
after falling short of three figures at their first attempt.

Plenty to ponder: A number of England batsmen failed again - including Pietersen who was gated by Ajmal (below)

Plenty to ponder: A number of England batsmen failed again – including Pietersen who was gated by Ajmal (below)

Plenty to ponder: A number of England batsmen failed again - including Pietersen who was gated by Ajmal (below)

So often in this series, England's
out-of-form batsmen have simply been unable to establish themselves at
the crease in these alien climes against Pakistan spinners Ajmal and
Abdur Rehman.

The final act was merely a variation
on that theme, almost everyone coming through the 'danger period'
England identified at the start of each batsman's innings only to then
get out in pairs just when it seemed the habitual trend of failure might
conceivably be bucked.

Top Spin

The afternoon wickets of Kevin
Pietersen, Alastair Cook, Ian Bell and Eoin Morgan followed those of
Andrew Strauss and Jonathan Trott this morning.

Ajmal was the chief tormentor of
England's top order, bowling in tandem for much of the second session
with Rehman – who was unchanged for 30 overs.

Gul then accelerated England's
descent to defeat. But it was the slow left-armer who struck the first
blow when Strauss, who had already survived a straightforward
caught-behind chance off Gul, went without addition lbw on the back
foot.

Trott then fell shortly before lunch,
sweeping Ajmal straight to deep backward-square. Cook's luck was in
during an ultra-patient 187-ball 49 which took more than four hours.

Nemesis: England were undone by Ajmal (above) and Gul (below) once again

Nemesis: England were undone by Ajmal (above) and Gul (below) once again

Nemesis: England were undone by Ajmal (above) and Gul (below) once again

But England needed much more than a
touch of good fortune if their out-of-form batsmen were to achieve even
qualified redemption on this fair pitch.

Cook passed a notable personal
milestone when, with his 22nd run, he became the second-youngest batsman
in cricket history to reach 6,000 in Tests.

He ought to have gone last night,
dropped at third slip off Gul on just four, and this morning was put
down on 31 by Gul himself after mis-sweeping Rehman into the leg-side
deep.

He was also the batsman on strike
when Pakistan squandered their final DRS option, Ajmal reviewing an lbw
for an off-break that pitched outside leg-stump.

England had one precious review still
available, after Strauss used up the first one to no avail. But it was
to be no use to any of their frontline batsmen.

Pietersen hinted at much better when
he went up the wicket to Rehman and hit him for a straight four and then
six in the same over – shots that raised stoic England's scoring rate
to almost two runs an over.

Same old story: Cook managed a respectable 49 (above) but Bell's most recent failure (below) means he has averaged 8.5 in this series

Same old story: Cook managed a respectable 49 (above) but Bell's most recent failure (below) means he has averaged 8.5 in this series

Same old story: Cook managed a respectable 49 (above) but Bell's most recent failure (below) means he has averaged 8.5 in this series

But Ajmal, scourge of the tourists
with his doosras in the first Test here, out-thought both Pietersen and
Cook with conventional off-breaks this time.

He bowled Pietersen between bat and
pad, on the front-foot defence, from round the wicket – and then had
Cook, trying to push his 50th run to leg, very well-caught at slip by a
diving Younus Khan.

Bell and Morgan appeared to tame the
spinners with the old ball, only to fall in quick succession when
Misbah-ul-Haq turned back to Gul's pace.

It was a lack of that which did for
Bell, embarrassingly mistiming a cut for a simple catch at cover – and
then Gul produced a fine delivery to find Morgan's edge for a
caught-behind on the back foot.

England had lost two big wickets for
just three runs for the second time in the innings, a statistic they
could ill afford if they were to get anywhere near such a tough target.

All but the most fanciful hopes of
that were gone by tea – and although Prior and the tail tried to salvage
some pride with a counter-attack, it was little more than a token
effort from a team who may not now still be top of that Test table when
the annual awards are handed out at the start of April.

Party time! Pakistan celebrate completing the 3-0 series whitewash

Party time! Pakistan celebrate completing the 3-0 series whitewash

England need to sweep away the scrambled batting brains – Nasser Hussain

England need to sweep away the scrambled batting brains

That was painful, there’s no other way of putting it. It was a horror show.

Anything that could have gone wrong for England during that run chase did so. That was as bad as it gets.

The opening batsmen set the tone. Andrew Strauss and Alastair Cook scored 21 off the first 15 overs and that just played into Pakistan’s hands.

Out: Andrew Strauss' performance helped set the tone

Out: Andrew Strauss' performance helped set the tone

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Tricky: Abdur Rehman caused trouble for England

It was as if England had cut the sweep shot out entirely because it had got them into trouble in Dubai, but they got it completely the wrong way round.

They played the sweep when it wasn’t turning in Dubai but when it was here they did not use it at all.

It wasn’t Saeed Ajmal who destroyed England, it was Rehman. And he was the bowler who had to be targeted because there is no mystery about him.

I know Jimmy Anderson was out trying to sweep and by then the match was over but in a way that was Jimmy showing England’s batsmen what they should have done.

Let’s not pretend this was a bad pitch. It wasn’t. This was no minefield. Instead it was the mindset of the England batsmen that was wrong.

I’m not saying it was easy — there are so many lbws now with the decision review system — but it is not supposed to be easy.

England are not bad players of spin. They are bad players of good spin in sub-continental conditions.

Get them on a tired pitch with a bit of mystery in the attack and they look clueless. Four out of the top six are badly out of nick and if that doesn’t change quickly then England are always going to be under pressure here.

Kevin Pietersen can deny it as much as he likes but he has got a problem against good left-arm spin in these conditions.

Disappointment: Kevin Pietersen saw Rehman take his wicket

Disappointment: Kevin Pietersen saw Rehman take his wicket

When the ball comes on to the bat he can get into position but when he has to feel for the ball his bat is coming across at an angle.

This is the man who was able to master Shane Warne and Muttiah Muralitharan and Rehman is not in their calibre by a long way.

The fact is Pietersen has gone backwards and has to sort it out. Four of our top six — the exceptions are Cook and Jonathan Trott — have such scrambled brains now we will have to cross our fingers and hope for the best in the third Test.

I would bring in Ravi Bopara for Eoin Morgan in Dubai on Friday but only because his brain is not scrambled and he would have no baggage. But if he plays, do not expect him to be England’s saviour.

He hasn’t played since the India one-day tour so it’s asking a lot of him to come in and rescue England.

But if Morgan plays then I would tell him to treat it like a one-day match and play in exactly the same way as he would over 50 overs. And if he got stumped early on I would tell him I couldn’t give a monkey’s.

England have only won one Test out of the last 19 in sub-continental conditions, if you do not count Bangladesh, and it’s about time we put that right.

India get a lot of flak for not being able to play in English conditions but we are just as bad in theirs.

We need to say it out loud. The England batsmen are not very good here. Then we have to face up to it and sort it out.

Cricket: less of this

Saeed Ajmal second Test bowler rankings

Ajmal leaps up bowler rankings after double England demolition jobs

Pakistan off-spinner Saeed Ajmal has moved up to second in the International Cricket Council Test bowler rankings after his match-winning performances against England in Abu Dhabi.

Saeed followed up his 10 for 97 in Dubai with seven for 130 in Abu Dhabi as Pakistan took a winning 2-0 lead in the series.

Saeed knocked England's James Anderson down to third but South Africa's Dale Steyn still heads the rankings.

Jumping for joy: Ajmal has leapt up the Test rankings

Jumping for joy: Ajmal has leapt up the Test rankings

Fellow Pakistan player Abdur Rehman, whose figures of two for 67 and six for 25 in Abu Dhabi won him the man-of-the-match award, rose five places to ninth, having claimed four for 89 in Dubai.

The latest rankings also see England spinner Monty Panesar make a return in 34th position.

England can retain the number one team spot with a win in the final Test against Pakistan which begins in Dubai on Friday.

Nemesis: Ajmal has had a stranglehold over England in the first two Tests

Nemesis: Ajmal has had a stranglehold over England in the first two Tests

Nemesis: Ajmal has had a stranglehold over England in the first two Tests

Defeat or a draw against Pakistan would leave the way open for South Africa to return to the number one spot if they win all three home Tests against New Zealand in March.

If England retain the number one ranking for the April 1 cut-off date they will receive the 111,000 prize awarded to the side who top the Reliance ICC Test Championship table.

Game over: England have lost the three-match Test series

Game over: England have lost the three-match Test series

David Lloyd: Broad"s scrambled legs worth shelling out for

Broad's scrambled legs worth shelling out for

That scrambled single during Stuart Broad's excellent counter-attack was a coach's dream.

When Duncan Fletcher was coach he would pull to one side any player run out and ask them: 'Where was your dive'

Broad used every inch of his 6ft 7in
frame to make his ground by millimetres and had the awareness to jump up
and scamper another single. Excellent cricket.

Scroll down for more

Scramble: Broad dives to avoid being run out

Scramble: Broad dives to avoid being run out

POWER TO HIS ELBOW

There was much debate during the first Test and before the second about the legitimacy of Saeed Ajmal's bowling action.

Well, I have made a few enquiries and I understand that the umpires in this series have no problems with it at all.

And that means that nothing will be done by the International Cricket Council either.

JIMMY'S DESERT SPAT

Looked like divorce was on the cards
for England couple Jimmy Anderson and Graeme Swann when they had a
marital skirmish in the afternoon.

Grumpy old Jimmy told his mate in no
uncertain terms that he wanted him closer at second slip, reminding me
of the forthright exchanges they have in Dickie Pinks, a salubrious
hostelry in Jimmy's home town of Burnley.

Spat: James Anderson in a marital dispute

Spat: James Anderson in a marital dispute

STUART'S BROADSIDE

England had to battle to gain a good
first-innings lead – with perfect, positive batting from the lower
order, which took the attack to Pakistan.

Broad used his height to get a big stride in and dispersed the field with a couple of big shots.

He forced the fielders to where he wanted them – not where Misbahul-Haq wanted them.

More from David Lloyd…

Bumble in the desert: Trott not a gallop but no matter in these conditions
26/01/12

Bumble in the desert: No public transport, but at least we have a crowd
25/01/12

Bumble in the desert: There's been plenty of time for tee out in the UAE
23/01/12

Bumble in the desert: Saved by a snick as Strauss and Co mull over technology doubts
19/01/12

Bumble in the desert: Bit of a relief that it's a snog-free zone
18/01/12

Bumble at the Test: Ajmal's new delivery It's just like watching Gilo!
17/01/12

Cowpats, concrete and the M62: Bumble's guide to weird and wonderful cricket grounds
16/01/12

Bumble at the Test: The beer's not cheap out here but the DJ put me in a spin
16/01/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

MOVE IT FOR MONTY

Wonderful to see Monty Panesar, the housewives' favourite, back in business and the question now is, how does he get in the England team regularly

The answer comes when Tim Bresnan is fit again.

Move Matt Prior to six, bring in Bresnan at seven and leave out Eoin Morgan to make room for Monty in a five-man attack. Simples…

SHE'S NO OIL PAINTING

A surreal Test series, this. Not only are we playing in the middle of the desert but we also have two female German press officers looking after us.

One of them bears a striking resemblance to Helga from TV's 'Allo 'Allo and seems more interested in finding the Fallen Madonna with the Big Boobies.

No sign of Herr Flick yet, mind.

AUF WIEDERSEHEN BET

Talking of Germans, Martin Kaymer has let me down over the road at the golf club. He's missed the cut!

Still, my dirhams are riding on a Spaniard, an Irishman and a Scotsman now – so come on Sergio Garcia, Rory McIlroy and Paul Lawrie.

Might even be able to pop over and cheer them on this Sunday if England do the business on Saturday.

Stuart Broad: England will fight back against Pakistan

We've had a punch in the face… but we're ready to fight back

Cycle clip: Broad exercises in the Dubai sun as England look to battle back after losing the first Test to Pakistan

Cycle clip: Broad exercises in the Dubai sun as England look to battle back after losing the first Test to Pakistan

England's all-rounder gives his exclusive insight into the aftermath of his side’s abject first Test defeat against Pakistan, and reveals how the world’s No 1 team plan to hit back in the second Test in Abu Dhabi on Wednesday.

The aftermath

We were very, very disappointed with ourselves after the first Test.
The thing was, our bowling and fielding was as good as it has been at any time in the last few years, but you are not going to win many Tests if you lose five wickets in the first session of the match.

I still felt we were back in it after
Pakistan’s first innings because our batsmen have shown that they can
go very big in the second innings, especially as the wicket was pretty
flat, but we made far too many mistakes. It wasn’t like it was seaming
around.

Having two players caught down the leg side, for instance, is not down to the wicket or the quality of the bowling.

What went wrong

We didn’t adapt to the conditions as well as we have done in the past. Saeed Ajmal didn’t bowl any ‘jaffas’ but he ended up with seven wickets in the first innings.

There’s been a lot of chat about him, his action and how we played him. And the bottom line is that we played him very poorly.

He certainly didn’t get into our heads with all this talk about a new delivery. That just reminded us of Shane Warne and all the zooters and other new tricks he apparently had up his sleeve.

There was no mystery or magic from Ajmal. And there didn’t seem to be a ‘teesra’ either. We just have to play him a lot straighter, like Matt Prior did.

Umar Gul took wickets in the second innings, but again I think it was more down to us than him.

Fortunate: Umar Gul profited from England's poor batting

Fortunate: Umar Gul profited from England's poor batting

As a bowler you don’t walk off thinking you’re a hero if you have two caught down the leg side and a couple of other soft dismissals.

It wasn’t all bad

I was chuffed with the way I bowled, actually. I’ve been out for a little while with injury and it was nice to hit my straps.

The ball with which I got left-hander Taufeeq Umar particularly pleased me.

You are unlikely to take five for 40 in these conditions so you have to sit in, create chances and aim to end up with three or four for 60.

What pleased us is that we got wickets with good balls. There were no ‘gimmes’. Yes, the wicket was pretty flat but there was actually a little bit more in it than we expected, a bit of seam and swing.

It’s so important that you use the new ball well here, and that may be even more pertinent in Abu Dhabi where the wicket is said to be very flat.

Gone: Broad bowled Taufeeq Umar

Gone: Broad bowled Taufeeq Umar

Remaining united

Perhaps in some sides the bowlers would have been grumpy at the batsmen after a match like that, but we are all in this together.

There have been plenty of times over the last couple of years when the bowlers have been in the dressing room watching for three days while the batsmen bat on.

We’ve talked about what happened here and we are all disappointed for each other. You hurt one member of this England team and we are all hurt. And believe me, we have been hurting.

It’s how we hit back now. You can make mistakes once, and learn from them, but if you make the same ones again then you have a problem. After each of the heavy defeats we have always hit back strongly. We have to do it again.

It Wasn’t all down to us

Pakistan looked a very professional unit. They were very chirpy in the field, and to be fair we gave them plenty to be chirpy about.

They impressed us with the way they went about their business.

Professional unit: Broad was impressed with Pakistan

Professional unit: Broad was impressed with Pakistan

More from Stuart Broad…

Stuart Broad: Last time our hard work was tainted but we won't let that distract us
15/01/12

Stuart Broad: I've gone on a diet and endured the toughest pre-season… I'm bang up to speed
03/01/12

Stuart Broad: Now we aim to dominate just like Manchester United
23/08/11

Stuart Broad: The pep talk that turned England into world No1 team
14/08/11

Stuart Broad: What a homecoming! My family was there for dream game at ground I played on as a kid
02/08/11

Stuart Broad: Just let me at them! I'm bang in form and I can't wait to get going…
19/07/11

Stuart Broad: Outplayed by experts – but let's not panic
26/06/11

Stuart Broad: The fans went bonkers… all 50 of them
31/05/11

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

We did not under-estimate them, believe me, and anyone who knows their cricket would realise how tough this series was going to be. What we have to do is focus on what has made us a good team.

It’s only the second defeat in a Test I’ve been involved in since Headingley 2009 and it’s a feeling I don’t want to experience too often. Adversity can give you a hunger to put it right.

True supporters

There’s one thing I really want to say in this column – the England fans were absolutely magnificent.

There are not too many Barmy Army or other supporters out here – I think most are saving their money for Sri Lanka – but the ones who made the journey were amazing.

To hear them singing ‘we’re going to win 2-1’ immediately after the defeat gave us quite a lift at a time when we were feeling heartbroken.

Anyone can jump on a bandwagon when you’re winning, but the real dedication and support comes when you have a setback.

No boos, just encouragement, and I want them to know how much we appreciated that. I think they know that we’re a good team with the character to bounce back. We have to prove that they are right.

New territory

The only time I have played at the Abu Dhabi ground was in a Twenty20 warm-up game against the England Lions when I handed Craig Kieswetter his international career by dropping a dolly off him!

He went on to a big score and was then picked for the World Twenty20 team. What I remember from that was that the sky was so incredibly blue it was hard to pick the ball up at times.

We’ve had a setback but there’s still everything to play for, starting with the second Test. We have had a punch in the face and it is up to us to come back with a counter-punch. We need to be emotional and passionate but we have to mix that with logic and clarity against their bowlers. We will come out fighting on Wednesday.

Sorry England admit Ajmal mind games affected performance

Sorry England admit Ajmal mind games affected performance

The days of naughty-boy nets may be over, but England were put through a series of rigorous training drills that left them doubled over and panting for breath as they returned to work following their humiliating drubbing by Pakistan in the first Test in Dubai.

There was no sense that this was a ‘punishment’ session, but the step-up in intensity was deliberate as England sought to regain their focus before heading to Abu Dhabi and a Test they must not lose to stay in the three-match series.

England captain Andrew Strauss, front center, leads his players away after shaking hands with the Pakistan players

Downbeat: England captain Andrew Strauss leads his players away after their thrashing at the hands of Pakistan in Dubai

It was, of course, an unscheduled session, as England were supposed to be busy with day five of a game they lost inside three days. It meant sharing the ICC Academy facilities with club cricketers who were using the main dressing rooms and playing on both of the Ovals.

The spin-bowling machine, Merlyn, was given almost as hefty a work-out as the players, as England have just three more days to work on how to deal with Pakistan bowler Saeed Ajmal — both technically and mentally.

Coach Andy Flower came the closest so far to admitting that Ajmal had got inside his players’ heads.

When asked whether the batsmen had been worried about not being able to pick the off-spinner, he conceded: ‘Yes, that plays on people’s minds, no doubt.’

Pakistan's Saeed Ajmal, third left, celebrates taking the wicket of England's Ian Bell

Another one bites the dust: Pakistan's Saeed Ajmal celebrates taking the wicket of Ian Bell

Jonathan Trott was the only batsman to avoid being dismissed by spin in either innings. He was less willing to admit that Ajmal might have a psychological edge.

‘I hope not, I don’t think so,’ he said. ‘I think what you have to do is like with any quick bowler or spin bowler — you can’t go in with any preconceived ideas or try to prejudge what the bowler is going to do. You focus on yourself.’

Rather more distracting for England — if they let it — are the question marks over Ajmal’s action.

Flower has said a lot by saying very little, preferring to keep what he calls his ‘private views’ to himself, yet declining to take the opportunity to say he has no problem with the spinner’s action.

Regardless of any private discontent, England know it will do them no good to let it niggle away at them. Until and unless Ajmal is reported, like he was in April 2009, he is able to play, and England need to learn to play him better.

‘Obviously there’s going to be a bit of speculation and stuff around his action,’ said Trott.

Pakistan's Saeed Ajmal

Pakistan's Saeed Ajmal

Unconventional: Flower says Saeed Ajmal's controversial bowling action may have distracted his players

‘Whenever you’re successful there will be. As a team the guys aren’t really too fussed. It would be foolish for us every time we face him to think it’s a bit suspect, but the fact of the matter is we are 1-0 down and have got to win Test matches.

'We can’t make any sort of accusations before the guy has been tested or whatever. The ICC have got their job to do and we fully trust they’ll be able to do it.’

England head to Abu Dhabi today having asked for a full report on the ground from their statistician, Nathan Leamon.

Depending on the conditions they find upon arrival, The Mail on Sunday understands that England will look seriously at the idea of playing two spinners and leaving out Chris Tremlett, who otherwise remains preferred to Steven Finn for his reliability.

Monty Panesar has been impressing in the nets, but is only likely to feature if the pitch looks like it will offer significant turn after the first two days.

 Jonathan Trott

Odd one out: Jonathan Trott was the only English batsman not to succumb to spin in the first test against Pakistan

Trott’s efforts with the ball in the first Test might also offer England encouragement if they go with two seamers. Ever since Paul Collingwood’s retirement, they have lacked a batsman who can be a reliable change bowler.

In Dubai, the Warwickshire man dismissed Younis Khan and got the ball to wobble either way with a medium pace that seemed to suit the nature of the pitch.

‘I thought I was quite quick, to be honest!’ he said with a laugh. ‘What can I say It’s just my job to go for as little runs as possible and keep the score down, build pressure and then when the new ball comes, hopefully it will get a few wickets.’

Trott also revealed that he shook hands with Wahab Riaz at the end of the first Test, the Pakistan bowler with whom he had an altercation in the nets at Lord’s not long after the spot-fixing scandal first hit the papers in 2010.

‘I don’t have any sort of hold up or hang ups from what happened,’ he said. ‘I’ve moved on.

‘Whichever XI you come up against, its important not to carry any sort of past experiences or anything with you. The game was played in a good spirit and hopefully it can continue.’

David Lloyd on England"s Test defeat to Pakistan

Bumble in the desert: Saved by a snick as Strauss and Co mull over technology doubts

Everybody got hot under the collar about the DRS and you have to accept that the technology is not 100 per cent. Andrew Strauss took 10 seconds to decide to review his, so he wasn't sure. HotSpot was inconclusive but there was a big noise. That's what TV umpire Steve Davis went on.

Gone: Strauss was controversially dismissed in England's second innings

Gone: Strauss was controversially dismissed in England's second innings

A Saeed of doubt

The Saeed Ajmal dismissal was different. That was nothing to do with DRS, simply an error by the umpire for me. He was given caught but it seemed to come off his pad. Ajmal reviewed it immediately but HotSpot was a frame out. The TV umpire couldn't be sure so it stays with the on-field call.

Man of the moment: Ajmal caused England all sorts of problems during the first Test

Man of the moment: Ajmal caused England all sorts of problems during the first Test

And no, I was never out

Let's be fair, batsmen are never out! I was never out in 20 years! Even if you knock all three poles out the batsman says it was a no ball. David Steele was once bowled and said it was the wind. Bill Alley told him to be careful it didn't blow his cap off as he walked back to the pavilion

Day Lamb got the chop

Get on with the game: Umpires will make mistakes

Get on with the game: Umpires will make mistakes

When I was an umpire the incomparable Ray Julian, who was standing with me in a game, said: 'Mr Lloyd, look who's coming in to bat now, it's Mr Allan Lamb. I bet I get him before you do.' Sure enough he gave him lbw and shouted: 'I told you Mr Lloyd.'

Umps love reviews…

I should declare an interest. I am one of the selectors of the ICC's panel of elite umpires along with Venkat, David Richardson and Ranjan Madugalle. I can tell you the umpires are very comfortable with the DRS and it means more decisions are correct. Mistakes still get made. In true Lloyd style – get on with the game!

But just have the one

A potential solution to the confusion currently being debated is that there should be only one review per team, so the players would have to think really carefully before using it. That would take tactical use out and would return the DRS to its original aim – that it should cut out the howlers…

Hail Captain Calm

Drubbed. Taken to the cleaners and hung out to dry. Thoroughly outplayed by a very methodical Pakistan. Captain Misbah ul-Haq has a calmness which belies this volatile nation. As the forthright Michael Henderson once said: 'Pull your socks up England. This simply will not do.'

Virender Sehwag smashes his way to one-day world record with stunning 219

Sehwag smashes his way to one-day world record with stunning 219

Virender Sehwag hit a record-breaking 219 to make the highest individual score in one-day internationals in India”s match against West Indies in Indore.

The opener passed team-mate Sachin Tendulkar”s 200 not out against South Africa in February last year as he put the Windies bowling to the sword.

Balls eye: India

Balls eye: India”s captain Virender Sehwag smashed his way to a world record 219

TOP TEN ONE-DAY INNINGS

V Sehwag 219 India v West Indies December 8, 2011
SR Tendulkar 200* India v South Africa (Gwalior) February 24, 2010
CK Coventry 194* Zimbabwe v Bangladesh August 16, 2009
Saeed Anwar 194 Pakistan v India May 21,1997
VA Richards 189* West Indies v England May 31,1984
ST Jayasuriya 189 Sri Lanka v India October 29, 2000
G Kirsten 188* South Africa v UAE February 16, 1996
SR Tendulkar 186* India v New Zealand November 8, 1999
SR Watson 185* Australia v Bangladesh April 11, 2011
MS Dhoni 183* India v Sri Lanka Oct 31, 2005

The 33-year-old, who was dropped on 170, hammered seven sixes and 25 boundaries in his magnificent 148-ball knock as India posted 418 for five in the fourth ODI.

Sehwag, whose previous ODI best was 175 against Bangladesh in Dhaka in February, brought up the record in style with his 23rd four of the match.

He was finally dismissed in the 47th over off the bowling of Kieron Pollard.

The double century also took him past the 8,000-run mark in ODIs.

The Windies used seven bowlers in a bid to find a way to stop the Sehwagonslaught, but none will be keen to remember their figures.

Sehwag and Gautam Gambhir put on 176 for the first wicket before the latter was run out by Marlon Samuels for 67.

Salute: Sehwag also passed the 8,000-run mark during his special innings

Salute: Sehwag also passed the 8,000-run mark during his special innings

Suresh Raina was run out by Andre Russell for 55 to leave India 316 for two in the 41st over, while Sehwaggot a reprieve on 170 when he was dropped by Darren Sammy off Ravi Rampaul.

Russel removed Ravindra Jadeja for 10 before Sehwag surpassed Tendulkar”s record to move on to 201.

He added 18 more runs before his glorious innings came to an end, Pollard finally getting some joy for the beleaguered Windies attack.

Dismantled: The India captain took the West Indies bowling attack apart

Dismantled: The India captain took the West Indies bowling attack apart

Afterwards Sehwag admitted he never expected to break the record.

Sehwag said: “I never dreamt of it. I told Gauti (Gautam Gambhir) if we showed a little patience we could get a big one. But I was never expecting a double century. When I decided I wanted to hit a six, I went and did it with a straight bat.

“I know people expected me to score a double-century, so thanks to them. And thanks to my family. I had said earlier that the top order was not contributing, and it was my job. When (Darren) Sammy dropped my chance, I knew God was with me.”

Pure delight: Sehwag 219 beat compatriot Sachin Tendulkar

Pure delight: Sehwag 219 beat compatriot Sachin Tendulkar”s previous best of 200

But Rohit Sharma hit 27 off 16 and Virat Kohli an unbeaten 23 off 11 as India continued to pile on the runs. India lead the five-match series 2-1.

Virender Sehwag breaks one-day world record

Sehwag smashes his way to one-day world record with stunning 219 against Windies

Virender Sehwag hit a record-breaking 219 to make the highest individual score in one-day internationals in India”s match against West Indies in Indore.

The opener passed team-mate Sachin Tendulkar”s 200 not out against South Africa in February last year as he put the Windies bowling to the sword.

Balls eye: India

Balls eye: India”s captain Virender Sehwag smashed his way to a world record 219

TOP TEN ONE-DAY INNINGS

V Sehwag 219 India v West Indies December 8, 2011
SR Tendulkar 200* India v South Africa (Gwalior) February 24, 2010
CK Coventry 194* Zimbabwe v Bangladesh August 16, 2009
Saeed Anwar 194 Pakistan v India May 21,1997
VA Richards 189* West Indies v England May 31,1984
ST Jayasuriya 189 Sri Lanka v India October 29, 2000
G Kirsten 188* South Africa v UAE February 16, 1996
SR Tendulkar 186* India v New Zealand November 8, 1999
SR Watson 185* Australia v Bangladesh April 11, 2011
MS Dhoni 183* India v Sri Lanka Oct 31, 2005

The 33-year-old, who was dropped on 170, hammered seven sixes and 25 boundaries in his magnificent 148-ball knock as India posted 418 for five in the fourth ODI.

Sehwag, whose previous ODI best was 175 against Bangladesh in Dhaka in February, brought up the record in style with his 23rd four of the match.

He was finally dismissed in the 47th over off the bowling of Kieron Pollard.

The double century also took him past the 8,000-run mark in ODIs.

The Windies used seven bowlers in a bid to find a way to stop the Sehwagonslaught, but none will be keen to remember their figures.

Sehwag and Gautam Gambhir put on 176 for the first wicket before the latter was run out by Marlon Samuels for 67.

Salute: Sehwag also passed the 8,000-run mark during his special innings

Salute: Sehwag also passed the 8,000-run mark during his special innings

Dismantled: The India captain took the West Indies bowling attack apart

Dismantled: The India captain took the West Indies bowling attack apart

Suresh Raina was run out by Andre Russell for 55 to leave India 316 for two in the 41st over, while Sehwaggot a reprieve on 170 when he was dropped by Darren Sammy off Ravi Rampaul.

Russel removed Ravindra Jadeja for 10 before Sehwag surpassed Tendulkar”s record to move on to 201.

Pure delight: Sehwag 219 beat compatriot Sachin Tendulkar

Pure delight: Sehwag 219 beat compatriot Sachin Tendulkar”s previous best of 200

He added 18 more runs before his glorious innings came to an end, Pollard finally getting some joy for the beleaguered Windies attack.

But Rohit Sharma hit 27 off 16 and Virat Kohli an unbeaten 23 off 11 as India continued to pile on the runs. India lead the five-match series 2-1.