Tag Archives: sachin

VIDEO: European Challenge Tour – cricket with golf clubs! Trick shot

VIDEO EXCLUSIVE: Cricket with golf clubs! European Challenge Tour trick shot…

PUBLISHED:

11:51 GMT, 4 March 2013

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UPDATED:

12:17 GMT, 4 March 2013

Inspired by Sachin Tendulkar's presence at the season-opening tournament in India, the stars of the Challenge Tour attempt to knock down the wicket from 22 yards away, with 6 attempts. And the results are quite spectacular…

Take a look at the latest 'Big Challenge' video below…

VIDEO Think you can hit a wicket from 22 yards using golf clubs

More Challenge Tour trick shots…

Click on the links below for more 'Big Challenge' videos.

Eight-iron… with a twist!'Olympic' obstacle course!Seve's backwards putt!

Stay tuned to MailOnline for Challenge Tour previews, results and more great videos.

Sachin Tendulkar retires from one-day international cricket

Legendary Tendulkar finally calls time on his one-day international career with India

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UPDATED:

08:53 GMT, 23 December 2012

India batsman Sachin Tendulkar has announced his retirement from one-day international cricket.

The Board of Control for Cricket confirmed the 39-year-old, regarded as the world's greatest living batsman, had decided to bring an end to his 50-over career after 463 one-day international caps.

Tendulkar spoke to BCCI president Narainswamy Srinivasan before announcing the decision.

History: Sachin Tendulkar reacts after scoring his hundredth century

History: Sachin Tendulkar reacts after scoring his hundredth century

The Little Master said on the governing body's official website: 'I have decided to retire from the one-day format of the game.'

Tendulkar added: 'I feel blessed to have fulfilled the dream of being part of a World Cup wining Indian team.

'The preparatory process to defend the World Cup in 2015 should begin early and in right earnest. I would like to wish the team all the very best for the future.

'I am eternally grateful to all my well wishers for their unconditional support and love over the years.'

The batsman, who made his ODI debut back in 1989, has made his decision before next month's five-match one-day series at home to England.

Grateful: Tendulkar thanked all his fans for their support over the years

Grateful: Tendulkar thanked all his fans for their support over the years

Tendulkar struggled during the recent Test series against England, passing 50 in only one innings and averaging just 18.66, and a decision over his future had been mooted.

He retires from ODIs having scored 18,426 runs at an average of 44.83, his highest score an unbeaten 200 against South Africa in 2010. He made 49 one-day centuries and 96 fifties.

His last one-day appearance came in March against Pakistan, the team against whom he made his debut almost exactly 23 years ago.

Tendulkar also took 154 one-day wickets, his best return five for 32 against Australia in 1998.

India spinner Harbhajan Singh was quick to pay tribute to the batting great.

He said on Twitter: 'Sachin tendulkar a great batsman.great human being.a great friend.great man to look up 2.proud indian.Real son of india.I salute u nd love u.

'Masters.423 matches, 23 yrs, 18426 runs !!!! These numbers no body else will be able to come close to.salute salute salute to sachin.'

Hero: Indian students hold a large poster of Tendulkar after he gained his 100th century

Hero: Indian students hold a large poster of Tendulkar after he gained his 100th century

SACHIN TENDULKAR FACTFILE

1973: Born April 24, Mumbai.

1988: Scores 100 not out in his first first-class match for Bombay against Gujarat in the Ranji Trophy becoming the youngest cricketer to score a century on his first-class debut, aged 15 years and 232 days.

1989: Makes Test debut for India against Pakistan in Karachi at the age of 16.
December: Makes ODI debut against Pakistan but is dismissed by Waqar Younis without scoring a run.

1990: Scores maiden Test century against England at Old Trafford.

1992: At the age of 19 he becomes the first overseas-born player to represent Yorkshire.

1994: September 9 – Claims his first ODI century against Sri Lanka in Colombo after 79 one-day matches.

1996: Leading run scorer at World Cup played in India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka with a total of 523 runs.
August: Takes on the India captaincy although suffers two relatively unsuccessful stints during a four-year period, winning only four Tests and 23 ODIs.

1997: Named Wisden Cricketer of the Year.

1998: Scores his first double century for Mumbai against Australia in the Brabourne Stadium.

1999: November – Involved in India's highest run-scoring ODI partnership with Rahul Dravid as the pair put on 339 against New Zealand. In the same match, he records the highest individual ODI score in Indian history with an unbeaten 186.

2000: Gives up the captaincy of India after the two-Test series with South Africa.

2001: Given a suspended ban of one game in light of alleged ball tampering during a match against South Africa at St George's Park, Port Elizabeth. The ban is later lifted by the International Cricket Council after an investigation.

2003: Named the Player of the Tournament at the 2003 Cricket World Cup and scores 673 runs, the highest by any player in the tournament.

2005: Overtakes Sunil Gavaskar's record of the highest number of Test centuries by claiming his 35th against Sri Lanka in Delhi.

2006: Overtakes Kapil Dev claiming the record for the highest amount of Test appearances for India with 135.

2007: January 3 – Edges past Brian Lara's world record of runs scored in Tests away from home with 5,751 runs.
June: Becomes the first player to score over 15,000 ODI runs during a match against South Africa in Belfast.

2008: March – Plays a record-breaking 417th ODI match against Australia.
August – Becomes just the third player in Test match history, and the first from India, to play 150 matches when he is selected in the third Test against Sri Lanka.
June: Nominated as the 'Icon Player' of IPL franchise Mumbai Indians, signing a deal worth US Dollars 1,121,250 per season.
October 17 – Becomes the highest run scorer in Test cricket, passing Lara's previous mark of 11,953, when he reaches 16 in the first innings of the second Test against Australia.

2010: February 24 – Scores the first double century in one-day international history, hitting an unbeaten 200 against South Africa.
April – Named player of IPL3 after finishing as the tournament's top run-scorer.
August 3 – Becomes most capped player in Test history, making his 169th Test appearance in the third Test against Sri Lanka in Colombo to overtake former Australia captain Steve Waugh.
December 19 – Becomes first batsman to hit 50 Test centuries, achieving the feat against South Africa in Centurion.

2011: March – Hits two tournament centuries as co-hosts India win the World Cup.
November: Becomes the first man to score 15,000 Test runs during Test series against West Indies.

2012: March – Scores his 100th international century in an Asia Cup match against Bangladesh, the first player ever to do so.
December 23 – Announces retirement from one-day international cricket.

England"s ruthless streak turned India series around – Nasser Hussain

Nasser Hussain: England's new ruthless streak turned series around

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UPDATED:

23:46 GMT, 17 December 2012

The first Test in Ahmedabad may have seen England beaten heavily but the second innings there proved a turning point both in this series and in the future of this team. Without it things could look very different now.

Just look at what had gone on before then. The high of going to No 1 in the Test world last year was followed by a 5-0 one-day thrashing in India, then a 3-0 Test hammering by Pakistan in the UAE followed by a convincing Test series defeat by South Africa last summer and then a very poor performance in spinning conditions in the World Twenty20 in Sri Lanka.

All the good vibes about the England cricket team were starting to be questioned.

Ruthless: Stuart Broad was gone from the side after two poor tests

Ruthless: Stuart Broad was gone from the side after two poor tests

More from Nasser Hussain…

Nasser Hussain: We have to bring in DRS for all Test matches
16/12/12

Nasser Hussain: Little Master has no answer to the immaculate Anderson
14/12/12

Nasser Hussain: Careless England fail to punish defensive Dhoni and leave the door ajar
13/12/12

Nasser Hussain: Don't let India off the hook now – win and leave them in turmoil
11/12/12

Nasser Hussain: Do Dhoni, Gambhir, Sachin and India legends still have Test hunger
09/12/12

Nasser Hussain: Captain fantastic is allowed to make one slip-up
07/12/12

Nasser Hussain: Fletch told me 'This lad will be a great…' I just couldn't see it!
06/12/12

Nasser Hussain: Sachin just cannot work paceman out as Anderson gets the better of him again
05/12/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

But when Alastair Cook scored a big hundred in a losing cause in Ahmedabad in that second innings things changed. It was the moment the captain said to his team: ‘Hang on, there are no demons here. The ball is not spinning both ways. If we show some character, application and belief we can do this.’ And since then the transformation has been astonishing.

Everything England have done since then has been right. And their business has been conducted in a quite ruthless manner. There has been no dilly-dallying, no worrying about reputations. This has been anything but a closed shop.

Tim Bresnan has been a very good cricketer for England but as soon as Cook and Andy Flower realised they had made a mistake in not picking Monty Panesar for the first Test the Yorkshireman was gone.

Stuart Broad was England’s vice-captain and one of the leading wicket-takers in world cricket in 2012 but when he had two poor Tests and England knew they had to get a fit-again Steven Finn in the side, Broad was also gone.

Samit Patel had not done too much wrong but once it became clear that his bowling was not going to be required with Panesar in the team England took one look at him and said: ‘He’s not one of our best six batsmen.’

And then they overlooked Jonny Bairstow and Eoin Morgan to make another ruthless, and what turned out to be a thoroughly astute, call in picking Joe Root.

England basically had to nail everything to win this series after going one down and they did it. Look at Kevin Pietersen. He was a frenetic wreck in the first Test and only had a couple of days to come up with a defensive technique against his old nemesis, left-arm spin. What happened He went out and smashed 186 in Mumbai.

Good call: Joe Root was brought in for business and it proved a wise decision

Good call: Joe Root was brought in for business and it proved a wise decision

Consider also that this effectively became a three-match series when you look at how poor the wicket in Nagpur was.

Nobody
was going to get a result on that so England had to win in both Mumbai
and Kolkata, which they did in spectacular fashion. Two players stand
out — Cook and Jimmy Anderson. The way the new captain went about his
work was hugely impressive. He is a run machine. Cook would always start
again after a big innings as if he still had everything to prove.

Tour by numbers

Tour by numbers

He was never out straight after an interval or after drinks, as many were in this series, and he always made sure he kicked on after reaching a hundred.

And Anderson was world-class. The deliveries and spells he produced. The hold he had over Sachin Tendulkar. He led the attack with great energy and gusto, and he was not even as grumpy as he can be. Jimmy set the tone and he enjoyed what he did.

India are not the side they were. If I was putting together a composite side from the two teams I would start by picking the whole England attack. England, for once, had better spinners than India in Indian conditions. The tourists were fitter, both physically and mentally, and hungrier for Test cricket. India would not have been able to take four wickets late in a day, after two sessions without a wicket, as England did on Saturday.

India went one up and just thought they could prepare a turning pitch and England would crumble. They showed too much bravado.

And England made them pay very heavily indeed for that.

Picture dispute: We are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

James Anderson – records are nice but winning is more important

James Anderson: Records are nice but winning is all that matters

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UPDATED:

22:25 GMT, 15 December 2012

I was genuinely surprised to be told that Saturday was 10 years to the day since I made my England debut, in a one-day international against Australia at Melbourne. Then, the idea of me celebrating that anniversary by drawing level with Ian Botham as the leading England wicket-taker in all cricket would have been nuts.

Everyone who knows me knows I do not play the game for records. But if those things do happen, it is satisfying because it means I am making a proper contribution to the team’s effort.

This has been a tough match for the bowlers on a pitch that has just got deader and it could have been a very difficult day for us, even at one stage looking as though we might not take a wicket at all.

Priorities: James Anderson says he does not play the game for records

Priorities: James Anderson says he does not play the game for records

More from James Anderson…

James Anderson: Winning here will be as good as winning the Ashes
08/12/12

James Anderson: Swanny has the skill and control to surpass Sir Ian
24/11/12

James Anderson: India open with spin and we could do the same with Swanny
17/11/12

James Anderson: We all admire Sachin, but I just want him out!
10/11/12

James Anderson: Pietersen's back No problem for this England dressing room
03/11/12

James Anderson: Vaughan wasn't as good an England captain as others made out and I never felt at ease playing under him
08/09/12

James Anderson: We will miss Straussy dancing like your uncle at a wedding, but new captain Cook has respect of the whole team
01/09/12

James Anderson: This can't be the end for captain Strauss
25/08/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

It can be soul-destroying when you are bending your back and you see our wicketkeeper, Matt Prior, taking the ball on the second bounce.

That is what we expected when we came and why, when the ball is moving as it did the day before, you have to make it count and you have to hope the luck is with you.

To be honest, while I was planning to attack the stumps with inswing, when I bowled Virender Sehwag it looked to me like he just missed a straight ball, though it might have held up on the pitch.

Later I also got Gautam Gambhir with one that seemed to nip off a crack. The fact is, on a pitch like this all you can do is put as many balls in the right place as possible and hope that something happens.

I'll have to get Monty to ask Tendulkar for his autograph

I cannot deny that taking the wicket of Sachin Tendulkar for the ninth time in Test cricket is a feather in my cap, but for a moment it was touch and go whether I’d get the chance.

I was feeling pretty sick for most of the second day and I had been off the field for about 20 minutes when Sachin came in to bat.

Cooky was keen to get me back on the field because he knew I would have to wait a while before being allowed to bowl at him.

Then I got a break. I had bowled a couple of outswingers at him, one of which he’d edged to third man, so I tried to chuck one up at him outside off stump to swing in, it seemed to nip back off the pitch as well and might have kept low.

Mission: Monty Panesar might have to get Sachin Tendulkar's autograph

Mission: Monty Panesar might have to get Sachin Tendulkar's autograph

It was the kind of ball that is devilish hard for a new batsman to face and, lucky for me, it did what it did.

People have asked me if I intend to ask Sachin to sign something for me as a memento of the record. Frankly, I don’t think I have the audacity to go up to him and say: ‘Can you sign a ball for me please’

I have two days to pluck up the courage or, knowing Sachin signed a ball for Monty Panesar when he got him out on his Test debut, I might get Monty to do it for me.

Why I went over the top with KP

When
I ran to celebrate Sehwag’s wicket with Kevin Pietersen, people
speculated that it might have been the result of a plan based on the
inside knowledge Kev gained from playing with him in the IPL.

Nice
thought. But the truth is far simpler. Knowing how hard it was going to
be to get wickets on that track, I was so excited to take one third
ball that I went a bit over the top and Kev just happened to be in the
way!

Not inside knowledge: Anderson says he celebrated with Kevin Pietersen because he was in the way!

Not inside knowledge: Anderson says he celebrated with Kevin Pietersen because he was in the way!

It's not rock 'n' roll

Monty Panesar has been tweeting that the fast bowlers have been trying to get him into rock ’n’ roll. I think his take on the genre might be a bit different to ours, though.

True, we had a big session the night before last, but it was all old-school power ballads like Foreigner, Roxette and Bonnie Tyler.

A change from rap and Bollywood, yes, but rock ’n’ roll No, Monty, just no!

We are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Nasser Hussain: Little Master has no answer to the immaculate Anderson

Little Master has no answer to the immaculate Anderson

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UPDATED:

02:18 GMT, 15 December 2012

Just look at the names of the three
players Jimmy Anderson dismissed yesterday: Sehwag, Tendulkar and
Gambhir. That is the sort of treble that Alastair Cook could only dream
about when he threw him the ball.

Anderson was outstanding again. His
control of length and line was immaculate from beginning to end. Piyush
Chawla may have ended up with four wickets for India but Anderson was
unquestionably the bowler of the day.

Out again: Tendulkar has fallen to Anderson nine times in Tests

Out again: Tendulkar has fallen to Anderson nine times in Tests

On an up-and-down pitch like that a captain will tell his seamers to bowl straight with a split field but the danger, as Ishant Sharma discovered when he was clipped to the leg side by Kevin Pietersen, is that they will stray to a line around middle and leg. Where Anderson was different is that he never strayed from around off and middle.

It was said that the ball which did for Tendulkar kept low but it was no lower than the bulk of the others in the context of this game. It was late movement that did for Sachin, as it did for Sehwag.

That is the ninth time Anderson has dismissed Tendulkar and I think it is getting a bit psychological with the Little Master now. Monty Panesar is all over him at one end and Anderson at the other. If one of them doesn't get him, the other will. We had no-one who could master him in my day!

Anderson just works Tendulkar over now. No-one has been better at working bowlers out than Sachin over the years but he just cannot work Jimmy out. He doesn't know which way the ball will swing.

Tendulkar now has one innings left in this series to get it right, but one thing I will say is that it is not for me to say when he should retire.

He has been the greatest player I played against and have seen and he has earned the right to decide when the best time is to go. I just hope he is able to go out on a high.

James Anderson vs Sachin Tendulkar: The full lowdown of the England seamers nine dismissals of the Little Master

How Jimmy has got the better of the Little Master: Anderson's nine career dismissals of Tendulkar

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UPDATED:

12:35 GMT, 14 December 2012

James Anderson today dismissed India great Sachin Tendulkar for the ninth time in Tests, breaking Muttiah Muralitharan's record total. Here, Sportsmail looks back over Anderson's successes against the 'Little Master'.

March 19, 2006, Mumbai
A rare false shot from Tendulkar gifted Anderson his wicket for the first time. Having made only one, the batsman drove loosely outside off stump and the ball took the toe of his bat and went through to wicketkeeper Geraint Jones.

The first time: James Anderson dismissed Sachin Tendulkar for the first time in Mumbai in 2006

The first time: James Anderson dismissed Sachin Tendulkar for the first time in Mumbai in 2006

July 20, 2007, Lord's
Umpire Steve Bucknor adjudged Anderson's full inswinger, which hit Tendulkar on the pad as he looked to drive through the leg side, would have clipped leg stump and sent him on his way lbw for 37.

On his knees: James Anderson celebrates with captain Michael Vaughan and Alastair Cook after dismissing Sachin Tendulkar at Lord's

On his knees: James Anderson celebrates with captain Michael Vaughan and Alastair Cook after dismissing Sachin Tendulkar at Lord's

August 10 & 12, 2007, The Oval
Anderson established his dominance over Tendulkar by taking his wicket in each innings, first via a regulation edge to Andrew Strauss at slip when on 82 and then bowled off the inside edge for one second time around.

Double joy: Anderson celebrates taking the wicket of Tendulkar twice at the Oval in 2007 and (below)

Double joy: Anderson celebrates taking the wicket of Tendulkar twice at the Oval in 2007 and (below)

James Anderson

James Anderson

December 22, 2008, Mohali
Another loose edge saw Tendulkar depart for five, with Graeme Swann at gully the catcher on this occasion.

Getting the better of him again: Anderson takes Tendulkar in Mohali in 2008

Getting the better of him again: Anderson takes Tendulkar in Mohali in 2008

July 25, 2011, Lord's
Tendulkar's likely last innings at Lord's brought him just 12 runs before Anderson nipped one past his inside edge to dismiss him lbw.

That is out: Anderson takes Tendulkar at Lord's yet again

That is out: Anderson takes Tendulkar at Lord's yet again

July 29, 2011, Trent Bridge
In the second Test of the same series, Tendulkar managed 56 in a forlorn fourth-innings chase before shouldering arms to a big inswinger which trapped him leg before once again.

And again: Anderson has more joy against Tendulkar at Trent Bridge

And again: Anderson has more joy against Tendulkar at Trent Bridge

December 5, 2012, Kolkata
Tendulkar made 76 before an excellent outswinger from Anderson caught his outside edge and was held by a tumbling Matt Prior behind the stumps.

On his way: Sachin Tendulkar's miserable series continued

On his way: Sachin Tendulkar's miserable series continued

December 14, 2012 Nagpur
Tendulkar made just two before Anderson got one to nip back off the seam, deflect off a thin inside edge and on to middle stump.

LIVE: India v England – day one, fourth Test, Nagpur

LIVE: India v England – the action on day one of the fourth Test in Nagpur as it happens

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UPDATED:

09:56 GMT, 13 December 2012

Stay up to date with all the action on day one of the fourth Test between England and India with Sportsmail's
unrivalled team. We'll deliver over-by-over coverage as the action
unfolds in Nagpur while our brilliant team of writers update with their
insights from the ground. Tweet your thoughts to: @James Andrew_ or email your thoughts to [email protected]

India v England – essentials

India: Gautam Gambhir, Virender Sehwag, Cheteshwar Pujara, Sachin Tendulkar, Virat Kohli, Ravindra Jadeja, Mahendra Dhoni (capt & wk), Ravichandran Ashwin, Piyush Chawla, Ishant Sharma, Pragyan Ojha.

England: Alastair Cook (capt), Nick Compton, Jonathan Trott, Kevin Pietersen, Ian Bell, Joe Root, Matt Prior (wk), Tim Bresnan, Graeme Swann, James Anderson, Monty Panesar.

Umpires: R Tucker (Aus) and K Dharmasena (SL)

Match referee: J Crowe (NZ)

ENGLAND WON THE TOSS AND BAT

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80th over: England 164-5 (Root 21, Prior 14)

79th over: England 164-5 (Root 21, Prior 14)

Ashwin comes back into the attack.

Prior plays one down to deep point for a single and Root then flicks one wide of mid-on for another single.

78th over: England 162-5 (Root 20, Prior 13)

Ojha comes back to bowl.

Root adds two more with a nice drive through the covers.

77th over: England 160-5 (Root 18, Prior 13)

Prior takes a single off the first ball with a shot to deep backward square. Root then adds two with a nice shot guided to point.

76th over: England 156-5 (Root 15, Prior 12)

Jadeja to Root and it is yet another maiden. I wish I hadn't said anything a few overs a go.

75th over: England 156-5 (Root 15, Prior 12)

Sharma comes back into the attack after his spell on the side lines and he starts off this spell with a maiden.

74th over: England 156-5 (Root 15, Prior 12)

Just as I mention the lack of maidens, what happens next A maiden from Jadeja.

73rd over: England 152-5 (Root 15, Prior 8)

A lovely shot by Prior from the final ball of the over with a nice shot through the covers.

72nd over: England 148-5 (Root 15, Prior 8)

A run each for Root and Prior, the runs are not flowing freely, but at least the maidens have stopped – for now.

71st over: England 146-5 (Root 14, Prior 7)

Sharma is back on the field.

Prior takes one and then Root plays a nice flick past square leg for three.

70th over: England 146-5 (Root 11, Prior 5)

Prior gets one off the over from the bowling of Jadeja.

69th over: England 145-5 (Root 11, Prior 5)

Prior plays a cut shot towards cover point for two.

68th over: England 142-5 (Root 11, Prior 3)

WICKET: Pietersen c Ojha b Jadeja 73

Big wicket for India, they have got England's main man, it was a loose shot against the spin (what little spin there is) and Ojha takes the catch low at midwicket. England are wobbling.

Matt Prior is the new man in the middle.

Prior gets two off his first ball with an edge and then adds a single to keep the strike.

Coming in for his debut: Joe Root came in for England at No 6

Coming in for his debut: Joe Root came in for England at No 6

67th over: England 139-4 (Pietersen 73, Root 11)

Some news emerging from the England camp, Stuart Broad has been ruled out of the two-match Twenty20 series against India due to a heel injury and will be replaced as captain by Eoin Morgan. James Harris has been called into the Twenty20 squad as a result.

Root gets a single with a shot into the covers and Pietersen then adds another one.

66th over: England 137-4 (Pietersen 72, Root 10)

Excellent shot from Pietersen from the first ball after tea, a flashing drive that goes past cover point for FOUR.

TEA ON DAY ONE: ENGLAND 133-4

View from Sportsmail's cricket writer and editor of Wisden, Lawrence Booth in Nagpur:

'The trouble with attritional cricket is that it places an onus on the batsmen not to give it away. While England were advancing at two an over to 101 for 2, this was not an issue. But Jonathan Trott gift-wrapped a first Test wicket to Ravindra Jadeja, and Ian Bell presented Piyush Chawla with his first since April 2008. If England are to close out this series, they can’t afford many more shows of generosity.

A lot now depends on Kevin Pietersen, who has reined himself in with impressive discipline on a pitch apparently designed to scare away the people of Nagpur for a generation.

Occasionally Pietersen has opened up, using his class to pierce the few gaps presented by MS Dhoni’s ultra-defensive field. But this was cricket for a very particular type of connoisseur – one who goes through life wondering who is going to blink first.

Dhoni was damned if he was going to be that man, setting 6-3 leg-side fields for Ishant Sharma and generally placing his men as if in a one-day international.

Trott was in his element for a while, and looked set for a repeat of his Kolkata vigil before he misjudged a delivery from the left-arm spin of Jadeja that went on with the arm. Bell got bogged down, but didn’t have the nous to ride it out, driving elegantly to extra-cover to make it 119 for 4.

Joe Root has made a positive start to his Test career, and Pietersen is still there on 68. But, after finally winning a toss, England will be disappointed with anything less than 300.'

65th over: England 133-4 (Pietersen 68, Root 10)

Pietersen sweeps one into the deep, they run one and come back for the second, for a second it looks as though Root may struggle to make his ground, but he does

Run off the final ball of the over meaning Pietersen will keep the strike after tea.

64th over: England 130-4 (Pietersen 65, Root 10)

Nice shot by Root to square leg for two.

He then finds a boundary with a well timed drive for FOUR.

63rd over: England 124-4 (Pietersen 65, Root 4)

First runs in Test match cricket for Root. He will be relieved to be off the mark. He takes a big stride forward and plays a neat drive through the covers for three.

Pietersen adds one more and then Root retains the strike with a single from the final ball of the over.

62nd over: England 119-4 (Pietersen 64, Root 0)

Ojha comes back on and it is another maiden.

61st over: England 119-4 (Pietersen 64, Root 0)

Now this is interesting, Ishant Sharma has gone off the field just one over into his latest spell. Rules state that players can only go off if injured (it does not always work like that in practice) but if he is injured then that is a problem for Dhoni, as he is his only seamer.

Piyush Chawla comes into the attack.

Pietersen takes two thanks to a miss field, gets home safely despite the appeal. And then another single.

WICKET: Bell c Kohli b Chawla 1

Bell chips one to short extra-cover and he is caught, 28 balls, one run and out.

Debutant Joe Root is the new man in the middle. A big moment for the young batsman.

60th over: England 116-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

And another maiden, this time it is Jadeja to Bell.

59th over: England 116-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

Sharma to Pietersen and another maiden.

58th over: England 116-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

Just one slip in for Bell. Four leg-byes come off the final ball.

57th over: England 112-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

India's only seamer Ishant Sharma is back into the attack.

Chance for India, or was it Pietersen flicked one away towards midwicket and Cheteshwar Pujara could not hold it, but unclear if it actually carried.

Maiden over.

56th over: England 112-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

Another maiden from Jadeja, bowling to Bell.

55th over: England 112-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

Another good shot from Pietersen which is dispatched to the boundary, it was in the air, but safely over extra cover for FOUR.

Looking to build: England batsman Ian Bell make a telling contribution with the bat

Looking to build: England batsman Ian Bell make a telling contribution with the bat

54th over: England 108-3 (Pietersen 57, Bell 1)

The dot balls continue to mount, another maiden for India, this time it is Jadeja.

53rd over: England 108-3 (Pietersen 57, Bell 1)

Ojha to Pietersen, and not for the first time today it is a maiden.

52nd over: England 108-3 (Pietersen 57, Bell 1)

Bell gets off the mark as he plays the ball to mid-on and scampers home for a single. KP then adds one more from the final ball to keep the strike.

51st over: England 106-3 (Pietersen 56, Bell 0)

Another perfectly timed shot from Pietersen for FOUR, this time he plays it through midwicket.

50th over: England 102-3 (Pietersen 52, Bell 0)

WICKET: Trott b Jadeja 44

The debutant gets his first Test wicket. Trott left it along and it came in to take the bails. What was he thinking

Ian Bell comes to the middle.

49th over: England 101-2 (Trott 44, Pietersen 51)

Another nice sweep shot from Trott to the backward square boundary for FOUR.

That brings up the hundred for England.

Time for drinks.

48th over: England 97-2 (Trott 40, Pietersen 51)

KP breaks to eat a banana.

Another maiden for Jadeja.

47th over: England 97-2 (Trott 40, Pietersen 51)

Ojha bowls another maiden to Trott. India have done well to keep the runs down.

46th over: England 97-2 (Trott 40, Pietersen 51)

Jadeja comes back into the attack.

KP sees a good shot well blocked. Maiden.

45th over: England 97-2 (Trott 40, Pietersen 51)

Trott survives a very optimistic shout for LBW after missing a sweep. It was sliding down the leg side. Maiden for Ojha

44th over: England 97-2 (Trott 40, Pietersen 51)

Pietersen works one away fine to the boundary for for FOUR.

FIFTY FOR KEVIN PIETERSEN

KP then nudges one away to square leg for one and then Trott gets a single off the last ball.

43rd over: England 91-2 (Trott 39, Pietersen 46)

Ojha comes back for the first time in this session.

Pietersen drives one down to third man and they run three.

42nd over: England 88-2 (Trott 39, Pietersen 43)

Ashwin bowls five dot balls to Trott, but the sixth is unleashed past point for FOUR.

41st over: England 84-2 (Trott 35, Pietersen 43)

Sharma continues, this policy of using just one seamer could come back to hurt India.

Pietersen drives one through the off-side for FOUR, brilliantly timed shot.

40th over: England 80-2 (Trott 35, Pietersen 39)

Pietersen whips one away down to deep square for one.

39th over: England 79-2 (Trott 35, Pietersen 38)

Pietersen works one away for one and Trott flicks one away for a single and KP ends the over with one more towards square.

38th over: England 76-2 (Trott 34, Pietersen 36)

FOUR for Trott, a nicely timed half volley through cover point.

37th over: England 72-2 (Trott 30, Pietersen 36)

Sharma looks to bang one down to Trott but it gets no height, Trott looks to sway out of the way to avoid being hit and it hits the gloves and goes away towards third man for one.

36th over: England 70-2 (Trott 29, Pietersen 36)

Ashwin to Trott and it is another maiden.

35th over: England 70-2 (Trott 29, Pietersen 36)

Sharma stays on at the other end.

Pietersen gets two from a ball he works away towards long-leg.

Sharma then bowls too straight and KP has no problem in flicking it away past midwicket.

Pietersen adds a single and Trott does the same, eight runs from the over.

34th over: England 62-2 (Trott 28, Pietersen 29)

Ashwin takes the ball after lunch.

Big session for both sides, England and Pietersen in particular will look to kick on, while India will no doubt feel that a couple of wickets and they are in with a good chance of winning this Test and leveling the series.

Pietersen flicks one away to deep backward square for a single.

LUNCH ON DAY ONE: ENGLAND 61-2

View from Sportsmail's cricket writer and editor of Wisden, Lawrence Booth in Nagpur:

'That was a bizarre session, in which England’s early nerves were assisted by India’s eggs-in-one-basket selection. If Ishant Sharma had been granted a fellow seamer to help him exploit a pitch of variable bounce (most of it low), England might have been in deeper trouble than 61 for 2 after both openers had fallen with 16 on the board.

At lunch, they were grateful to have faced as many as 25 overs of spin, many of them met with a dead bat as England focussed on not making a mess of winning their first toss of the series.

It really was slow going. Nick Compton nibbled at one he ought to have left, even if he might have been unfortunate to get one of the few deliveries which didn’t die a sorry death on the way through to MS Dhoni.

And Alastair Cook, tied down by Pragyan Ojha’s left-arm spin and a 7-2 leg-side field, was definitely unlucky to be given out leg-before by umpire Dharmasena to a ball that was clearly missing off stump.

If Cook’s 1 off 28 balls – following 548 runs in the first three Tests – said something about the mood of the morning and the state of the pitch, then Jonathan Trott and Kevin Pietersen were generally content to bide their time. It may be the only match-winning template available as England go in search of their first series win in India for nearly 28 years.'

Looking to make his mark: Kevin Pietersen will look to build after lunch

Looking to make his mark: Kevin Pietersen will look to build after lunch

33rd over: England 61-2 (Trott 28, Pietersen 28)

This should be the last over before lunch.

Pietersen gets a single. Trott then ducks to avoid a bouncer, but again it does not bounce particularly high.

One from the over, and that is lunch.

32nd over: England 60-2 (Trott 28, Pietersen 27)

Trott sees off a maiden from Ashwin.

31st over: England 60-2 (Trott 28, Pietersen 27)

Sharma comes back into the attack before lunch.

No slips in play. No real surprise given the lack of bounce in the pitch.

He bowls a maiden with his first over back.

30th over: England 60-2 (Trott 28, Pietersen 27)

Change of bowling for India, and it is their best player from the last test, Ravichandran Ashwin, to take over with the ball.

Trott paddles one away for a single. Pietersen drives one to long-on for a single.

Trott then hits a couple off the final ball of the over.

29th over: England 56-2 (Trott 25, Pietersen 26)

Trott works one away on the half-volley wide past Ashwin for three.

28th over: England 53-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 26)

Jadeja stays on and bowls another maiden, this time to Pietersen.

27th over: England 53-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 26)

Chawla to Trott and it is another maiden.

26th over: England 53-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 26)

Pietersen looks in the mood now, he punches the ball through cover-point for another FOUR.

25th over: England 49-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 22)

Pietersen starting to show his power, brilliant shot for FOUR over mid-on, really nice shot from the England batsman.

He's done it again, another boundary, as Pietersen once again clears mid-on for FOUR, no fuss from KP.

Single off the final ball and Pietersen keeps the strike. Nine from the over.

24th over: England 40-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 13)

Pietersen finally finds the gap from the final ball, off the front foot and through cover point for three.

23rd over: England 37-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 10)

Pietersen walks down the wicket and works one away to long-off for a single. One from the over.

22nd over: England 36-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 9)

Trott facing Jadeja, and it is yet another maiden. Trott won't mind this, but you get the feeling that Pietersen at the other end could get frustrated, that is no doubt India's plan.

21st over: England 36-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 9)

Bowling change for India, Piyush Chawla comes into the attack.

First run for a while. Trott pushes one away for a single.

20th over: England 35-2 (Trott 21, Pietersen 9)

This time it is the turn of Pietersen and Ojha, but the result is the same, another maiden.

19th over: England 35-2 (Trott 21, Pietersen 9)

Jadeja to Trott and it is another maiden. India keeping the runs down well.

18th over: England 35-2 (Trott 21, Pietersen 9)

Pietersen is having no real problem with this left arm spin so far, just struggling to beat the field at the moment. Another maiden.

17th over: England 35-2 (Trott 21, Pietersen 9)

Really nice shot from Trott, down the wicket, takes it on the half-volley and drives it between the stumps and mid-on for FOUR.

16th over: England 31-2 (Trott 17, Pietersen 9)

Ojha makes a big appeal against Pietersen, but there was a big inside edge. And then just a few balls later he goes up for another appeal, but Pietersen is so far down the wicket again there is no way it could be given out. Maiden.

15th over: England 31-2 (Trott 17, Pietersen 9)

Trott sees off Jadeja's first over after drinks. Maiden.

14th over: England 31-2 (Trott 17, Pietersen 9)

Trott sweeps one away over square leg for FOUR. Single off the final ball of the over as India look for a run-out, but Pietersen is home comfortably.

End of the first hour, so time for drinks.

13th over: England 26-2 (Trott 12, Pietersen 9)

Bowling change for India, and MS Dhoni is going for two left arm spinners as Ravindra Jadeja replaces Sharma.

Pietersen looks in the mood as he comes down the wicket again and plays one off the pads to midwicket and England run three.

Trott then pushes one to short leg for a single and then KP gets his first boundary of the morning. Pietersen comes down the wicket and lofts the ball back over the bowlers head for FOUR.

12th over: England 18-2 (Trott 11, Pietersen 2)

Ojha to Pietersen and there is another big appeal from the fourth ball as the ball hits the pads. But the England batsman is half way down the wicket when he lets the ball hit his pads. No way he could be given out coming that far down. Pietersen then takes a single.

Out in the middle: Jonathan Trott came in at No 3 earlier than he would have hoped after Nick Compton's dismissal

Out in the middle: Jonathan Trott came in at No 3 earlier than he would have hoped after Nick Compton's dismissal

11th over: England 17-2 (Trott 11, Pietersen 1)

WICKET: Cook LBW Sharma 1

Another big appeal from Sharma and this time umpire Kumar Dharmasena raises his finger. But it looked to be a poor decision. It was hitting him outside the line and did not look like it was going to hit the stumps. Very poor call from Dharmasena, not that you will hear too many Indians complain, they have dismissed England's talisman cheaply.

Kevin Pietersen is the new man for England and he will have to adjust to this pitch which seems to be dying a death out there.

He pulls one away from the final ball to keep the strike.

10th over: England 16-1 (Cook 1, Trott 11)

Trott sweeps Ojha away past short fine leg for FOUR. He is playing well, despite that scare in the last over.

9th over: England 12-1 (Cook 1, Trott 7)

Trott plays one fine down towards fine leg, good stop by Ojha on the boundary.

Trott then ducks to avoid a Sharma bouncer, with the pitch and its uneven bounce that one went through at about waist height.

Big, big appeal from Sharma. It was a length ball that was nipping in and it beat the inside edge, and hits Trott in front or just outside off as the umpire shakes his head. Probably just the correct decision, but it was very close.

8th over: England 9-1 (Cook 1, Trott 5)

India bring a leg slip in for Cook, the England skipper defends the over away.

Maiden over from Ojha.

7th over: England 9-1 (Cook 1, Trott 5)

First boundary of the day to Trott and it is a beautifully timed shot back down the ground past the stumps on the half volley for FOUR. It has been a careful start from England so far.

6th over: England 5-1 (Cook 1, Trott 1)

Cook gets off the mark with a shot to deep midwicket. Trott then gets off the mark with a single to mid-on.

5th over: England 3-1 (Cook 0, Trott 0)

WICKET: Compton c Dhoni b Sharma 3

Breakthrough for India early on. Sharma gets Compton to play at one and nicks off the edge and it is a straight forward catch for Dhoni behind the stumps, replays showed Sharma was very close to bowling a no ball, but it was ok – just. England are one down.

Jonathan Trott is the new man in the middle.

Wicket maiden for Sharma.

4th over: England 3-0 (Cook 0, Compton 3)

Compton defends the first five ball of the over. He then hits the final ball towards mid-on and takes a single to keep the strike.

3rd over: England 2-0 (Cook 0, Compton 2)

Compton works one away off the pads for a single down the leg side. Cook sees off the the remaining five balls of the over, and is still to get off the mark.

2nd over: England 1-0 (Cook 0, Compton 1)

Left arm spinner Pragyan Ojha takes the new ball at the other end.

First run of the morning as Compton pushes the ball to mid-on.

Cook then fends the remaining balls away. Just the one run from the over.

1st over: England 0-0 (Cook 0, Compton 0)

Only one seam bowler in the starting XI, and he, Ishant Sharma, opens up for India.

Low bounce from this first over, and it is a maiden first up.

Captain marvel: Alastair Cook has guided England to a 2-1 lead

Captain marvel: Alastair Cook has guided England to a 2-1 lead

3.57am: Earlier, Joe Root was handed his first Test cap by former batsman Paul Collingwood, big five days for the 21-year-old at No 6 for England.

3.55am: View from Sportsmail's Lawrence Booth in Nagpur via Twitter:

'England will miss Finn, but with Bresnan they have a shorter tail. In Mumbai, last four fell for seven, in Kolkata for 13…'

3.50am: We are just ten minutes away from the start of play and Alastair Cook and Nick Compton opening up for England. Hopefully from the England point of view they will start better than the second innings in the last Test where they found themselves 8 for 3.

3.45am: If England manage a draw then they will win the series 2-1 for the first time since 1984/85, if they win the game then they will win 3-1 for the first time ever.

3.35am: Couple of changes for England. Steven Finn misses out due to a bad back and Tim Bresnan returns. And as Sportsmail's Paul Newman revealed here, Joe Root comes in for his debut in place of Samit Patel.

3.30am: England have one the toss and will bat.

3.25am: The one thing England have not managed to do so far is win the toss, that is coming up. Can Cook win his first toss as England captain

3.15am: Good morning and welcome to the first days play of the fourth and final Test between India and England.

It has been some series so far, with India winning the first Test with ease and looking like they would stroll to a comfortable series win. But Alastair Cook and England had different ideas and fought back brilliantly to win the next two tests to take a 2-1 lead.

They now stand on the brink of a the first series win in India for 28 years.

Field of dreams: England have the chance to secure a famous series win in Nagpur

Field of dreams: England have the chance to secure a famous series win in Nagpur

Picture Dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Nasser Hussain: Alastair Cook did not impress me when I first saw him

Fletch told me 'This lad will be a great…' I just couldn't see it!

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UPDATED:

05:50 GMT, 7 December 2012

The first time I saw Alastair Cook was
during one of my many spells when I was struggling to score runs as
England captain. I wanted to clear my head, get back to basics, so I
asked my former coach Keith Fletcher if I could play for Essex seconds.

I turned up at Colchester and was
quickly dismissed so I went for a walk round the boundary edge with
Fletch, the wise old ‘Gnome’, to ask him what I could do to get my game
right. Suddenly Keith stopped, pointed to the middle and said: ‘That lad
is going to be one of the greats.’

I couldn’t see it to be honest. All I
saw was a left-hander whose head fell over when he played his shots and
was full of nudges and nurdles. His name was Alastair Cook and
he scored his 23rd Test hundred, more than any other Englishman. At the
time I just said to Keith: ‘That’s all very well, Fletch, but I’m
worried about my game here, not him!’

Eye on the ball: Alastair Cook takes a catch at the launch of the Under 15 World Cup at Lord's in 2000

Eye on the ball: Alastair Cook takes a catch at the launch of the Under 15 World Cup at Lord's in 2000

That reminded me of the time a
young off-spinning opponent of ours walked into the England dressing
room after taking a few wickets for KwaZulu Natal in a tour match in
Durban and plonked himself down next to me, asking if I knew of any
English teams he could play for.

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Nasser Hussain: Ricky Ponting was a streetfighter, a panto villain… and a true great
29/11/12

Nasser Hussain: Triumph is thanks to fantastic four… but it's time to have a word with out-of-sorts Broad
26/11/12

Nasser Hussain: 'Public enemy No 1' Pietersen is a genius and he is worth a bit of hassle
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Nasser Hussain: England captain Cook comes nicely to the boil in Mumbai
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Nasser Hussain: Captain Cook must think on his feet now that the pressure is on
21/11/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

I
thought he meant club cricket and almost gave him my brother’s number
and told him to try Fives and Heronians but it turned out he had bigger
ambitions than that. His name was Kevin Pietersen and in the second Test
he scored his 22nd Test hundred for England. All of which goes to show
how much I know about spotting a good young player.

Fast
forward a few months after my first meeting with Cook and I bumped into
him again when I went to the indoor school in Chelmsford for a bit of
practice —yes, you’ve guessed it, I was searching for form as England
captain.

When I got there, Cook, who had just
been named England Under 19 skipper, was with a local TV crew, I think
they might have been from Look East.

The
interviewer saw me and asked if the England captain might like to say a
few words about this young star from my county. I looked at Cook, back
at the interviewer and said, ‘Not now, son’, before going off to the
bowling machine.

Cook still
reminds me of that one every time I speak to him. There are plenty of
words to say about him now. He was brilliant here, brilliant in
scoring his record hundred, brilliant in reaching 7,000 Test runs
younger than anyone in history and brilliant in scoring his fifth
century in five Tests as captain.

Truly, this innings has to be right up there with his best. It is as good if not better than all those hundreds he made in Australia and the 294 he scored against India at Edgbaston. It was special because Cook was so fluent.

Ever since Cook scored that potentially career-saving hundred against Pakistan at The Oval in 2010, he has been an absolute run machine. And what really impresses me is that he has worked so hard on improving the areas of his game that, a couple of years ago, weren’t his best. He has never said: ‘This is how I play, it works for me.’ He has kept his strengths and improved his weaknesses.

Special innings: Cook answered his critics at The Oval with a gutsy 110

Special innings: Cook answered his critics at The Oval with a gutsy 110

Not too long ago Cook relied heavily on his cut, pull and nudge off his hips. But now he is playing far more shots down the ground and is sweeping much more effectively. He may not have the flair of Pietersen or the shot selection of Graham Gooch, but he is becoming almost a complete batsman.

Cook keeps himself so well grounded. A lot of players might have been tempted to be a bit flashy after scoring hundreds in the last two Tests but he plays every innings with the same application as the last and at the same tempo. And how mentally strong must he be to score each of those hundreds after he has lost the toss and spent all that time in the field as a young and inexperienced captain

It’s good, too, that he has interests outside the game, in particular the family farm. /12/06/article-0-14214923000005DC-331_634x414.jpg” width=”634″ height=”414″ alt=”Hot on his heels: Kevin Pietersen (right) will be keen to match Cook's milestone” class=”blkBorder” />

Hot on his heels: Kevin Pietersen (right) will be keen to match Cook's milestone

I’m sure Cook’s team-mates will be inspired by him. Pietersen will want to quickly catch him up after falling one Test century behind him and Jonathan Trott will have been prodded after a relatively lean spell of his own. What will please Cook most of all is that his hundred has put his team in a potentially decisive position in this third Test and the series.

India were not very good on the second day, even though I cannot fault the effort of their four bowlers. They were flat and looked an old side in the field. If England can run them ragged they really will be on the verge of something special.

Alastair Cook breaks record for most England Test hundreds against India in third Test in Kolkata

Cook is the GREATEST! Captain marvel breaks record for most England Test tons aged just 27 (…and the bad news for India is he's not done yet!)

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UPDATED:

12:00 GMT, 6 December 2012

Alastair Cook has become England's all-time leading Test century maker at the age of just 27 after reaching his 23rd hundred on the second day of the third Test against India in Kolkata today.

Cook overtook the previous record, jointly held alongside Wally Hammond, Geoff Boycott, Colin Cowdrey and current team-mate Kevin Pietersen, in his 86th match for his country.

England's captain notched his third ton in as many Tests on the tour – and he is also the first batsman to score five centuries in his first five Tests as captain in Test cricket.

Leading from the front: Alastair Cook hit his 23rd Test century on Thursday

Leading from the front: Alastair Cook hit his 23rd Test century on Thursday

Lawrence Booth: Wisden editor on why Captain Cook's remarkable runscoring will go on and on…

Statistics can mislead, but in Alastair Cook’s case they tell a story that brooks no argument.

When he drove Ishant Sharma through the covers for three in third over after tea, he became the youngest player to score 7,000 Test runs – younger even than Sachin Tendulkar, the man most usually associated with these dizzyling landmarks.

Tendulkar was 28 years and 193 days to Cook’s 27 years and 347 days, although he needed only 136 innings to Cook’s 151. But we’re splitting hairs.

The point is this: by the time Cook retires, we’ll look back at the 7,000-runs business and wonder what all the fuss was about.

We’ll also shrug at the fact that this was the day he went past Wally Hammond, Colin Cowdrey, Geoff Boycott and Kevin Pietersen to register his 23rd Test hundred.

And, by the time the series has run its course at Nagpur, we may feel underwhelmed by his fifth century in his first five Tests as captain – a unique achievement.

His innings today summed up his career: rock-solid concentration, but with the capacity to learn. He may not have played a more unexpected shot in his life than the shimmy towards Ravi Ashwin which resulted in the straightest of sixes, right elbow high as if in defiance of his penchant for the leg side.

Since the only quiet year of his career in 2008, when he averaged 36 and failed to score a Test hundred, Cook has adapted his game bit by bit while only occasionally forgetting that his first task was to score runs.

He learned, in 2010, that too much technical tinkering wasn’t good for the soul, saving his Test career with a century at The Oval against Pakistan, then applying the lesson during a relentless Ashes.

He learned, in 2011, that he could play one-day cricket, striking at 90 when many thought him one-dimensional.

And he has relearned, in 2012, that he can bat in Asia – a truism that was evident on his debut at Nagpur more than six years ago, but was in danger of being forgotten during the traumas of the UAE and Galle.

Cook turns 28 on Christmas Day. The worry for bowlers everywhere is that there are more lessons to come.

Cook is also the youngest batsman in history to 7,000 runs, beating even the great Sachin Tendulkar, a milestone he passed with his 88th on the second afternoon of the third Test as he and Nick Compton consolidated England's advantage over India.

/12/06/article-2243859-0C7438CD00000578-50_306x499.jpg” width=”306″ height=”499″ alt=”Cook notched a ton at Lord's last June” class=”blkBorder” />

Cook's ton at Lord's last June

104 v India, Nagpur, 2006

105 v Pakistan, Lord's, 2006

127 v Pakistan, Old Trafford, 2006

116 v Australia, WACA, 2006

105 v West Indies, Lord's, 2007

106 v West Indies, Old Trafford, 2007

118 v Sri Lanka, Galle, 2007

139* v West Indies, Bridgetown, 2009

160 v West Indies, Chester-le-Street, 2009

118 v South Africa, Durban, 2009

173 v Bangladesh, Chittagong, 2010

109* v Bangladesh, Dhaka, 2010

110 v Pakistan, The Oval, 2010

235* v Australia, The Gabba, 2010

148 v Australia, Adelaide, 2010

189 v Australia SCG, 2011

133 v Sri Lanka, Cardiff, 2011

106 v Sri Lanka, Lord's, 2011

294 v India, Edgbaston, 2011

115 v South Africa, The Oval, 2012

176 v India, Ahmedabad, 2012

122 v India, Mumbai, 2012

136* v India, Kolkata, 2012

Cook is congratulated by Paul Collingwood during the fifth Ashes Test at the SCG last January

Cook is congratulated by Paul Collingwood during the fifth Ashes Test at the SCG last January

Cook's ton against Pakistan at the Oval in August 2010 saved his career

Cook hit a century against South Africa in December 2009 in Durban

Cook's ton against Pakistan at the Oval in August 2010 possibly saved his England career (left) and it's all smiles after hitting a century at Durban in December 2009 in the drawn series against South Africa (right)

Cook was first made captain during the tour to Bangladesh, where he hit two hundreds

Cook was first made captain during the tour to Bangladesh in 2010, where he hit two hundreds

Cook scored his maiden century on his Test match debut in Nagpur in March 2006

Cook celebrates his century against Pakistan at Lords in July 2006

It all began when Cook scored his maiden century on his Test match debut in Nagpur in March 2006 (left)
and the young opening batsman celebrates another early ton against Pakistan at Lords in July 2006 (right)

England's top 10 centurions

Alastair Cook
23 centuries in 86 matches

Wally Hammond
22 in 85

Kevin Pietersen
22 in 90*

Geoffrey Boycott
22 in 108

Colin Cowdrey
22 in 114

Andrew Strauss
21 in 100

Ken Barrington
20 in 82

Graham Gooch
20 in 118

Len Hutton
19 in 79

Michael Vaughan
18 in 82

*yet to bat in 91st Test

All-time top 10 centurions

Sachin Tendulkar (India)
51 tons in 192* matches

Jacques Kallis (South Africa)
44 in 158*

Ricky Ponting (Australia)
41 in 168

Rahul Dravid (India)
36 in 164

Sunil Gavaskar (India)
34 in 125

Brian Lara (West Indies)
34 in 131

Steve Waugh (Australia)
32 in 168

Mahela Jayawardene (Sri Lanka)
31 in 135*

Matthew Hayden (Australia)
30 in 103

Kumar Sangakkara (Sri Lanka)
30 in 113*

*denotes still active

7,000 not out! Cook's record-breaking career by numbers

60 & 104 not out – Cook's scores on his Test debut, against India in March 2006.

294 – His highest Test score, against India in August 2011.

23 – Cook became the first England batsman to make 23 Test centuries when he reached three figures against India in Kolkata on Thursday.

27 years, 347 days – His age as he became the youngest batsman to reach 7,000 Test runs.

86 – The number of Tests Cook took to reach those two landmarks.

50.34 – Cook's Test average at the end of today's play.

Five – Cook has now made centuries in his first five Tests as England captain, including two Tests against Bangladesh as a stand-in in 2010.

29 – The number of Test half-centuries he has made, giving him a superb conversion rate of 44 per cent from fifties to hundreds.

26 – However, he went 26 innings without reaching three figures between March 2008 and February 2009.

766 – His cumulative runs in the 2010-11 Ashes series.

3,536 and nine – his tally of runs and centuries before his 25th birthday, both comfortable England records.

214 – his score for Essex against the touring Australians in 2005 which helped bring him to England's attention.

Sachin Tendulkar"s wait for his next Test hundred goes on: Top Spin at the Test

Top Spin at the Test: The wait goes on as Tendulkar's ton proves elusive

PUBLISHED:

22:56 GMT, 5 December 2012

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UPDATED:

22:56 GMT, 5 December 2012

Sachin Tendulkar’s highest Test innings since he made 80 at Sydney in January could not disguise the fact that his last 29 visits to the crease have failed to produce a Test hundred. That is comfortably the longest century-less drought of his career, stretching all the way back to his 146 in Cape Town in January 2011. The sense of disappointment yesterday at Eden Gardens when he edged Jimmy Anderson to Matt Prior was almost tangible.

Disappointment: Sachin Tendulkar missed out on a century

Disappointment: Sachin Tendulkar missed out on a century

Sachin eclipses sunny record
For all his frustration, Tendulkar did tick off yet another milestone. When he clipped Monty Panesar for a single shortly after lunch, he completed 34,000 runs in all international cricket. He won’t be caught any time soon: next in the list is former Australia captain Ricky Ponting, who retired on Monday with 27,483 runs to his name. Tendulkar also became India’s leading Test run-scorer against England, passing Sunil Gavaskar, who hit 2,483.

Bogie man: Hansie Cronje took Tendulkar's wicket five times in his career

Bogie man: Hansie Cronje took Tendulkar's wicket five times in his career

Cronje chips in on Tendulkar's list
The eight bowlers to have dismissed Tendulkar five times or more in Tests include some of the modern fast-bowling greats: Anderson (eight times), Glenn McGrath (six), Jason Gillespie, Brett Lee and Allan Donald (all five). But one name stands out on the list: the late South Africa captain Hansie Cronje also took Tendulkar’s wicket in Tests on five occasions with his gentle medium-pace — a stat made all the more remarkable by the fact that Cronje managed only 43 wickets in his 68 Tests.

Sharp Samit proves his point
Samit Patel has often incurred the wrath of team director Andy Flower for his lack of sharpness in the field, but his hard work on the boundary led to the run-out that changed England’s day. Virender Sehwag had his eye on a third after working Anderson through midwicket, but Patel chased down the stroke and then flicked the ball up to Steven Finn, who hurled it to Matt Prior at the striker’s end with Sehwag stranded mid-pitch.

On his toes: Samit Patel's alert fielding led to a run-out

On his toes: Samit Patel's alert fielding led to a run-out

Gambhir changes his tune
When Gautam Gambhir was asked how disappointed Tendulkar would be to miss out on a hundred, he replied: ‘It’s not about hundreds or individuals. It’s about what the team does together.’ This hymn to team spirit raised eyebrows among those who recall him exposing the India tail on the fourth morning in Mumbai, where cynics wondered whether he was more concerned with carrying his bat than actually saving a game India went on to lose by 10 wickets.