Tag Archives: rowsell

Olympic medallist Joanna Rowsell is knocked off her bike

Olympic cycling curse strikes again, as golden girl Rowsell is knocked off her bike

By
Peter Scott

PUBLISHED:

22:53 GMT, 6 April 2013

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UPDATED:

22:53 GMT, 6 April 2013

Sportsmail's
Joanna Rowsell, who won a gold medal for Britain at the London
Olympics, has been knocked off her bike by a car, the latest of several
British Olympians to have accidents on the road.

Rowsell told her 25,000 Twitter
followers that she been knocked off her bike on Saturday morning, the
first time it had happened to her in 9 years of cycling.

She told said: 'I am OK. No serious injuries, just cuts and bruises. Bike came off worst.'

Golden girl: Joanna Rowsell poses with Olympic gold

Golden girl: Joanna Rowsell poses with Olympic gold

She also thanked her followers for their messages of support.

Rowsell, was part of the team that won pursuit gold at the London Olympics, alongside Laura Trott and Dani King.

Other Olympians have also been knocked off their bikes since the Games.

Sir Bradley Wiggins was hit while training last year, and then coach Shane Sutton was involved in a crash the following day.

The best moustaches in sport

The Saturday debate: Which sportsman has sported the best moustache

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UPDATED:

23:51 GMT, 2 November 2012

To celebrate Movember, the moustache-growing charity event, Sportsmail asked: who has the best tache in sport

Mike Dickson: Tennis Correspondent

Rollie Fingers was the baseball relief pitcher with a great name and a moustache to match. While playing for the Oakland Athletics in the 70s, the future Hall of Famer cultivated a classic handlebar number in order to win a $300 bonus offered by owner Charles O. Finley to whichever player could grow the best. So many players tried that they became known as the Moustache Gang. Fingers kept it his whole career.

A head-turner: Rollie Fingers

A head-turner: Rollie Fingers

Dominic King

Graeme Souness. Not only was Souness a formidable midfielder, he was once the owner of the best moustache in Liverpool’s history. While a mere puff of wind would blow the bum fluff off Gary Neville’s chin, a hurricane wouldn’t have budged the undergrowth above Souness’s lip. Provided the perfect partner for his curly perm. Unbeatable.

Model moustache: Graeme Souness in his pomp

Model moustache: Graeme Souness in his pomp

John Edwards

This is a tough one between Australia’s cricketing legends Merv Hughes and David Boon. Both fearsome sights, but, applying Aussie rules, necking 52 tinnies (cans of lager, to the uninitiated) on a flight from Sydney to London in 1989 just tilts this battle Boon’s way. Good call.

I am the walrus: David Boon

I am the walrus: David Boon

Joanna Rowsell: Olympic gold medal-winning cyclist and Sportsmail columnist

In cycling, there is only one answer — America’s David Zabriskie. It’s not only a fantastically big moustache, he has a goatee beard underneath to match. Not good for aerodynamics but he certainly pulls it off in the style stakes!

Aerodynamic asset David Zabriskie

Aerodynamic asset David Zabriskie

Chris Foy: Rugby Correspondent

Merv Hughes. It has to be Big Merv, by a landslide. As a fixture of an Australian team with an abundance of facial hair, he was head, shoulders and top lip above the rest. Captain Allan Border couldn’t compete, while David Boon was good, but not good enough for me. Do an internet image search for Hughes and the first predicted phrase is ‘Merv Hughes moustache’. Case closed.

Costly: Merv Hughes insured his moustache during his playing days

Costly: Merv Hughes insured his moustache during his playing days

Andrew Magee

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then Mark Spitz has this in the bag. When he turned up to the Olympic pool sporting his fine facial hair, every other swimmer was shaving theirs to save precious milliseconds. The American told a Russian coach it helped deflect water from his face and made him swim faster. The following year, every Russian male swimmer had a moustache.

Iconic: Mark Spitz poses with the seven gold medals he won at Munich

Iconic: Mark Spitz poses with the seven gold medals he won at Munich

Ian Ladyman: Northern Football correspondent

Johnson Wagner. It’s one thing trying to look like a porn star and another modelling yourself on Tom Selleck. But a combination of both That’s the look that the US golfer has been rocking this year on tour. And, frankly, he looks absurd.

Not a winning look: Johnson Wagner

Not a winning look: Johnson Wagner

Wendy Houvenaghel restored to British cycling team for Road World Championships

Houvenaghel returns to British team just a month after 'vindictive' Olympics snub

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UPDATED:

16:27 GMT, 17 September 2012


Snubbed: Wendy Houvenaghel was left out of Team GB for the Olympics

Snubbed: Wendy Houvenaghel was left out of Team GB for the Olympics

Wendy Houvenaghel will represent Great Britain at the UCI Road World Championships in Holland on Tuesday, little more than a month after leaving the Olympics distraught.

The 37-year-old from Northern Ireland was not selected for any of the three rides in the women's team pursuit competition, won by Joanna Rowsell, Laura Trott and Dani King, therefore missing out on a gold medal, and labelled the decision 'vindictive'.

Houvenaghel refocused and won the British Championships road time-trial earlier this month before a win in the prestigious Chrono Champenois event in Betheny, France last week confirmed her selection alongside Emma Pooley in Tuesday's 24.3-kilometre time-trial in Limburg.

She was reluctant to discuss the Olympic fall-out and thanked British Cycling's women's road coach Chris Newton for supporting her selection.

'I was pleasantly surprised to get the call to represent Great Britain in the time-trial at these World Championships,' Houvenaghel said.

'I've spent most of the year training for a three-minute team pursuit effort and over the last four weeks I've just applied myself to time-trialling. I'm keen to get racing tomorrow.

'I've just thrown myself into my training the last few weeks and here I am in Valkenburg.

'The time has passed quite quickly since the Games and I've been busy focusing on various races. I haven't been in touch with any of the members of staff.

'I'm just focusing on my own race and that's my priority while I'm out here.'

Comeback: Houvenaghel returns to represent Britain at the UCI Road World Championships this week

Comeback: Houvenaghel returns to represent Britain at the UCI Road World Championships this week

Despite her whole focus being on 12 laps of a 250m Siberian pine track, Houvenaghel is confident of springing a surprise in Tuesday's race, which takes place near Maastricht.

'I am optimistic, otherwise I wouldn't be here,' she added.

'I will give it everything I've got and I'll just do my best and see where my performance takes me.

'The course is very rolling and there are a couple of quite steep climbs.

'I am good at climbing; in any of the time-trials where there have been hills I've done very well. That shouldn't pose too much of a problem for me.

'I've done my homework and I'm happy that I can do reasonably well.

'The course suits my strengths as a rider and I'll give it everything I've got.'

Back on the podium: Pooley (right) and Sharon Laws took bronze in the Elite Women's Team Time Trial on Sunday

Back on the podium: Pooley (right) and Sharon Laws took bronze in the Elite Women's Team Time Trial on Sunday

Pooley won the world title in 2010 and is also aiming to bounce back from Olympic disappointment.

The 29-year-old was in tears after missing out on a podium place in the Hampton Court time-trial on August 1, but the terrain in Holland is more suited to her climbing ability.

'Emma will be really excited about the nature of this course,' Houvenaghel added.

'She's a well-known good climber and I think she is looking forward to the challenge tomorrow as well.'

Pooley has spoken of possibly taking a break from cycling to complete her PhD, while the future for Houvenaghel also remains uncertain.

She plans to spend some time with her family after the World Championships and will assess whether the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro in 2016 are an option. It is understood the women's team pursuit may be increased to become an event over 4km with four riders.

'I'm keeping my options open at the moment,' Houvenaghel said.

FROOME GIVEN TIME TO RECOVER

Chris Froome has withdrawn from Wednesday's time-trial at the UCI Road World Championships to focus on Sunday's road race, British Cycling have confirmed.

The World Championships come at the end of a gruelling season for Froome.

The Team Sky rider was Tour de France runner-up behind Bradley Wiggins in July, won Olympic time-trial bronze behind his compatriot and was fourth in the Vuelta a Espana, which finished on September 9.

The 27-year-old wants more time to recover ahead of Sunday's 261-kilometre road race in Limburg, Holland, when Mark Cavendish will ride in defence of his title.

Froome's non-participation means Alex Dowsett is Britain's sole entrant in the 45.7km elite men's time-trial on Wednesday.

London 2012 Paralympics: Sarah Storey wins gold in individual pursuit cycling

Storey storms to GB's first Paralympic gold of the London Games in the Velodrome

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UPDATED:

16:16 GMT, 30 August 2012

Sarah Storey won Great Britain's first gold medal of the XIV Paralympics with a supreme victory in the women's C5 three-kilometres individual pursuit at the London 2012 velodrome.

After Mark Colbourne won silver in the men's C1-2-3 one-kilometre time-trial, fastest qualifier Storey caught final opponent Anna Harkowska of Poland after six and a half of the 12 laps to triumph to rapturous applause from the 6,000-capacity partisan crowd.

The 34-year-old from Manchester won her eighth Paralympic title and third as a cyclist in a career which began as a 14-year-old swimmer in Barcelona in 1992.

Let the gold rush begin! Sarah Storey on her way to winning the women's individual C5 pursuit

Let the gold rush begin! Sarah Storey on her way to winning the women's individual C5 pursuit

Storey was in contention for the Olympic team pursuit squad until last December and her heat time of three minutes 32.170 seconds was quicker than Joanna Rowsell's time in winning Track World Cup on the same track in February as she confirmed her status as favourite.

Crystal Lane qualified fourth and had to settle for a place outside the medals, finishing in 4mins 02.773secs as New Zealand's Fiona Southorn claimed bronze in 3:55.867.

Glory Storey: The British cyclist celebrates her triumph in front of the patriotic crowd in the Velodrome

Glory Storey: The British cyclist celebrates her triumph in front of the patriotic crowd in the Velodrome

Champion: Storey celebrates in the Velodrome

Storey said the victory was not as easy as it looked.

'Mentally you've got to prepare, anything can happen,' she told Channel 4. 'I have to respect all my competitors.

'I didn't expect to be able to catch her as quick as I did, I stepped my game up as well.

'So much goes into it emotionally that nothing's ever easy at this level.'

Record breaker: Sarah Storey celebrates after qualifying for the women's C5 individual pursuit

Record breaker: Sarah Storey celebrates after qualifying for the women's C5 individual pursuit

Asked what she was thinking as she chased down her opponent, she said: 'Just, “gotta get there quick, quick, quick!”

'I was like, “It's not gonna be this lap, maybe the next lap…”

'You're just willing the rider to come to you as quick as possible so you can just finish.'

Flying start: Storey in action at the Velodrome on the opening day of the London 2012 Paralympic Games

Flying start: Storey in action at the Velodrome on the opening day of the London 2012 Paralympic Games

Storey now has another three events to prepare for.

'I always said if I could get off to a
really great start that would set me up for the rest of the week and
hopefully that's the case,' she said. 'The first one's always the
hardest to get out of the way and to come away with a gold medal is a
dream come true.'

Support: Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge at the Veldrome on Thursday

Support: Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge at the Veldrome on Thursday

Good sports: William and Kate took part in a Mexican wave during the Paralympic cycling races

Good sports: William and Kate took part in a Mexican wave during the Paralympic cycling races

London 2012 Olympics: Cycling – Wendy Houvenaghel lashes out

Shabby and vindictive! Bitter Houvenaghel lashes out at British cycling

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UPDATED:

22:25 GMT, 6 August 2012

Olympics 2012

British cyclist Wendy Houvenaghel has hit out at the snub by team management which denied her an Olympic gold medal.

The 37-year-old has been an integral member of a four-woman squad over the past 18 months with Joanna Rowsell, Dani King and Laura Trott and she was expected to have at least one ride in the team pursuit.

Golden girls: (left to right) Dani King, Laura Trott and Joanna Rowsell

Golden girls: (left to right) Dani King, Laura Trott and Joanna Rowsell

Golden girls: (left to right) Dani King, Laura Trott and Joanna Rowsell

But despite Rowsell struggling with
illness hours before Saturday’s two rides, which yielded gold and a
world record, Houvenaghel was left out and will not qualify for a medal.

Houvenaghel said: ‘I feel
particularly aggrieved that the head coach (Shane Sutton) made the
decision to put in a rider who wasn’t 100 per cent well on the start
line twice.

‘Thankfully the girls did go on to
win but perhaps had I been allowed to do my job that world record could
have been faster. We had done faster times in training in Newport the
week before with me in the line-up.

Missing out: Houvenaghel (left) thought she was set to race in the final

Missing out: Houvenaghel (left) thought she was set to race in the final

‘I do feel I have been deliberately
omitted from that opportunity that was mine and the opportunity to bring
home a gold medal. It’s a very shocking and upsetting decision.

‘I’ve been treated really shabbily by
an organisation which I have been dedicated to for six years. To not
allow me to ride in a three-minute race, which I can do with my eyes
closed practically, and let me pick up my Olympic gold medal, was just
vindictive.’

Experienced: Houvenaghel won silver in the women's individual pursuit in Beijing

Experienced: Houvenaghel won silver in the women's individual pursuit in Beijing

London 2012 Olympics: Joanna Rowsell on her women"s team pursuit gold

Wow! How on earth will I ever top this

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UPDATED:

23:56 GMT, 5 August 2012

Joanna Rowsell was part of the women's pursuit team who won gold in the Velodrome on Saturday.

Here, the Sportsmail columnist describes her experience.

GOLDEN FEELING

I was woken up on Sunday by a 6.45am alarm to do BBC Breakfast — but it was OK because the first thing I saw was a gold medal on the bedside table. It’s bigger and heavier than I thought. It weighs you down a bit. It has been crazy since we won the team pursuit. For starters, we’ve had police with us wherever we have been.

We went to do some shopping and they made us put our medals, which we had been wearing round our necks all morning, in a safe at Team GB House even though we were happy to put them in our pockets. I didn’t like it but it was the right call as we could barely walk two metres without everyone saying ‘Hi’ and asking for pictures.

Golden girls: Dani King, Laura Trott, and Joanna Rowsell celebrate their victory in the women's team pursuit

Golden girls: Dani King, Laura Trott, and Joanna Rowsell celebrate their victory in the women's team pursuit

PERFECT PREPARATION

We had such a big gap over the others in qualifying it was hard to not be complacent. On Saturday, because we only had an hour between races — normally it’s around five — we had to devise a recovery plan before the final. We called it the Golden Hour and it involved a 10-minute warm-down, then a chill-out period with a cool towel around our necks and the special hot pants on our legs to keep our muscles warm. Then, just before the race, a warm-up.

WHAT A RACE!

The crowd were so loud I had to block them out at the start as I didn’t want to go out too fast. Our coach stands up from the finish line if we’re riding better times than we are supposed to and down from the line if we’re off schedule. He was standing well up from the line in the first few laps so we knew we were doing well.

Fast as lightening: The pursuit team broke the world record as they stormed to glory in the Velodrome

Fast as lightening: The pursuit team broke the world record as they stormed to glory in the Velodrome

DESPERATE FOR DAN

After the victory laps, I was trying to find my boyfriend, Dan, in the crowd. All these people were cheering so I figured I could just pretend I’d gone to wave at them if I couldn’t find him. Luckily I did.

SOAKING IT UP

We only had about five minutes to get ready for the podium and were in a tiny room trying to make ourselves look nice. Thankfully one of the American girls had a make-up bag and was letting us use it. The organisers were reading us instructions for the ceremony but we weren’t paying attention. So when we got off the podium, we stepped the wrong way. It was great up there — it’s the only point you really get to take it all in.

Proud as punch: Sportsmail's Rowsell poses with her gold medal at what is her first Olympic Games

Proud as punch: Sportsmail's Rowsell poses with her gold medal at what is her first Olympic Games

HAIR HOPES

I knew before the race it was International Alopecia Day. It was a bit of a spooky coincidence. I didn’t have time to think about putting a wig on for the podium and I don’t mind not having one on in the Velodrome. I feel comfortable there and never think about all the people watching on TV. I’ve had the condition since I was 10 so I’m used to it. You will have seen I have hair on some parts of my head and they are just the bits that still grow. I know it looks a bit silly at the moment but I don’t want to cut them off as I’m hoping the rest of it will grow.

HAPPY FAMILIES

After all the interviews, Laura (Trott) went back to rest as she has the omnium to compete in. Dani and I came back to Team GB House. As we came out of the lift there were big cheers and our families were lined up to welcome us. Then it was more media till 11.45pm, back to the village and McDonald’s at 1.30am. Then Dani and I watched the race back on the internet as it’s tough to remember what you were doing.

Happy families: The three women celebrate their stunning win at the Velodrome

Happy families: The three women celebrate their stunning win at the Velodrome

THANKS, GUYS

I couldn’t have done any of this without my team-mates. Laura is the youngest at 20. She’s tiny so she gets lots of protection when she’s behind, which is great because she can save lots of energy for a big burst. She’s really loud and bubbly and not afraid to say what she thinks. Dani is 21 and the best of us at pace control, which is so important. She’s great at keeping things light-hearted if it gets a bit tense or tough. Wendy (Houvenaghel) didn’t get to ride but was so important to our success. We couldn’t have done it without her advice and support.

THE FUTURE

I’m going to stick around to watch Laura, go to the closing ceremony and then it will be off to anywhere with a beach. After that, I want to carry on but I don’t know how I will ever top this: first Olympics, gold medal, world record. And who knows if the team pursuit will still be in the Olympics in Rio. They might include the individual pursuit too and I won that at the Test event, so that would be a new challenge.

London 2012 Olympics: Great Britain team pursuit close in on gold

British women smash world record again to close in on team pursuit gold

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UPDATED:

15:56 GMT, 4 August 2012

Great Britain's women set a fifth consecutive team pursuit world record to advance to the Olympic final on day three of competition at the London 2012 velodrome.

Britain stuck with the line-up of Joanna Rowsell, Dani King and Laura Trott, who had broken the world record in their last four rides – at February's Track World Cup in London, twice at April's Track Cycling World Championships in Melbourne and in qualifying on Friday.

Britain required only victory in the
first round of the three-woman, three-kilometre event, to advance to the
gold medal ride-off, but stated their intent with a new world best of
three minutes 14.682 seconds.

Dream team: Dani King, Laura Trott and Joanna Rowsell stormed through to the gold medal race

Dream team: Dani King, Laura Trott and Joanna Rowsell stormed through to the gold medal race

The
trio were set to meet Sarah Hammer, Dotsie Bausch and Jennie Reed of
the United States in the final, having finished more than two seconds
clear of the field.

A
phenomenal turn of pace in the closing kilometre saw the USA finish in
3mins 16.853secs, overcoming a large deficit to Australia (3:16.935) in
the process.

The bronze medal ride-off was set to be between Australia and Canada (3:17.454).

Britain's
Wendy Houvenaghel, silver medallist in the individual pursuit in
Beijing behind team-mate Rebecca Romero, had to wait in reserve and,
unless she is drafted in for the final, will return home without a
medal.

I want Great Britain to rule the cycling world: Joanna Rowsell

It's fantastic to win… now to be invincible

By
Joanna Rowsell

PUBLISHED:

21:52 GMT, 5 April 2012

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UPDATED:

21:52 GMT, 5 April 2012

I am so thrilled to have pulled on the rainbow jersey and to wear that gold medal around my neck. That is the moment when our win really sank in.

It feels like a long time since I was last a world champion, back in 2009.

We missed out in 2010 to Australia, the worst feeling of my career. Then I was injured and ill last year — breaking my elbow in a freak training accident and contracting glandular fever.

It meant I had to watch the girls reclaim the title, but really I wanted to be back in there myself. That is one reason why this win means so much to me.

Pride: Joanna Rowsell and the other members of the Women's Pursuit team celebrate their gold medals

Pride: Joanna Rowsell and the other members of the Women's Pursuit team celebrate their gold medals

Everyone will see our victory in the context of the London Olympics and, yes, it has certainly given us a boost. But we are aware that the rest of the world is catching us up. They are doing really, really fast times.

Before the World Cup in London in February people were around the 3min 20sec mark, but not now. So we have to maintain our focus — nothing has changed in that regard.

We’ve always said that we were looking at the 3min 15sec mark — our winning time yesterday — to win gold at the Olympics but we now need to set our target a bit higher. It may take as much as two or three seconds’ improvement but we won’t know until we get there and everybody is fully tapered.

Another pleasing aspect of our win was that we were controlled — the opposite of the way we raced at the London World Cup.

On track for success: Great Britain's trio race to a world record

On track for success: Great Britain's trio race to a world record

I went out super-fast then because of the inspiration I drew from the crowd. We died in the last few laps. We knew we could do far better than that.

In training we’ve done far more disciplined rides.

Last week we did world record pace but that was only over 2k — rather than the full 3k — so we didn’t know whether we could carry it on.

Paul Manning, our coach, is very strict. He keeps us on precisely the right pace. To begin with, it’s weird holding yourself back in training but obviously it pays off at the end of the race. That’s where it is won, as we showed.

Different style: Rowsell, who suffers from alopecia, has previously worn a wig to collect her medals

Different style: Rowsell, who suffers from alopecia, has previously worn a wig to collect her medals

I have suffered from alopecia, or hair loss, since I was 10. I had auburn hair until then.

I have twice worn a wig to collect medals, but I didn’t yesterday.

When I first bought wigs I thought I’d give it a go on the podium. I do enjoy wearing them and the way they make me feel. But it wasn’t really me. Without a wig represents me on a bike. It is me as an athlete.

I am going home to my parents in Surrey at the end of the championships and then the training starts again in earnest.

By the time the Olympics come around the aim is to be invincible.

British women"s team pursuit win gold at Track Cycling World Championship

They've done it again! British trio set new world record en route to glory over Australia

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UPDATED:

10:30 GMT, 5 April 2012

Great Britain's Joanna Rowsell, Dani King and Laura Trott set a sensational second world record of the day to win three-kilometre team pursuit gold on day two of the Track Cycling World Championships at the Hisense Arena in Melbourne.

The trio clocked three minutes 15.720 seconds to ensure Britain have now won four of the five team pursuit titles since the event was incorporated into the World Championships programme.

Golden girls: The British trio of Danielle King (left), Laura Trott (centre) and Joanna Rowsell celebrate after beating Australia

Golden girls: The British trio of Danielle King (left), Laura Trott (centre) and Joanna Rowsell celebrate after beating Australia

Australia's Annette Edmondson,
Melissa Hoskins and Josephine Tomic were second in 3mins 16.943secs –
also under the previous world record set this afternoon – as the battle
for Olympic glory in London in August intensified.

Australia clocked 3:17.053 in
qualifying – beating Britain's mark from February – before Rowsell, King
and Trott went faster still in 3:16.850.

Hat-trick: The British trio smashed the world record in Melbourne

Hat-trick: The British trio broke the world record twice on Thursday

The unchanged British trio – with
2008, 2009 and 2011 world champion Wendy Houvenaghel a mere spectator –
wound up after a start which saw them trail by almost 1.5 seconds with a
phenomenal final kilometre to win by 1.233secs.

It meant King and Trott retained the
title won in Apeldoorn in March 2011 and Rowsell claimed a first world
champion's rainbow jersey since Pruszkow in 2009.

On song: Pendleton advanced to the semi-finals of the women's sprint

On song: Pendleton advanced to the semi-finals of the women's sprint

Canada's Tara Whitten, Jasmin
Glaesser and Gillian Carleton won the race for bronze in 3:19.529, with
New Zealand's Lauren Ellis, Jaime Nielson and Alison Shanks fourth in
3:19.847.

Olympic champion Victoria Pendleton advanced to the semi-finals of the women's sprint.

After successfully negotiating the early rounds, Pendleton met Virginie Cueff of France in the best-of-three quarter-final.

Over the line: The trio celebrate after beating Australia on their own turf

Over the line: The trio celebrate after beating Australia on their own turf

The first bout saw Pendleton come round Cueff on the final bend and win by a bike length. The Briton led from the front in the second to win by a convincing margin once more and go through to the last four tomorrow evening.

Rowsell won her first team pursuit world title in Manchester in 2008 when the event was not on the Olympic programme, triumphing alongside Houvenaghel and Rebecca Romero.

All smiles: The Team GB riders are gold-medal hopes

All smiles: The Team GB riders are gold-medal hopes for this summer's Games

The 23-year-old won again in Poland 12 months later, with Houvenaghel and Lizzie Armitstead, before her latest victory.

Rowsell said: 'I can't believe I'm world champion again – it's been three years.

'I so badly wanted that rainbow jersey back. I'm absolutely over the moon.

'I was so pleased with our qualifying ride. To see the world record broken before our ride is always quite tough. We saw that happen to the team sprint girls yesterday.

'We had to keep our heads, do our own ride. We went out rode to a schedule and actually beat it.

'It was great to go into the final fastest qualifiers and we knew we had more in the tank.

'I felt good in the final, Laura was awesome, Dani was absolutely awesome as well.

'The Australians went out fast, but we stuck to our plan to go out steady and hold pace.

'We knew we could go fast – in the qualifier we beat them in the last couple of laps.'

The partisan spectators were in raptures early on, but soon silenced as Britain clawed back the deficit before overhauling their hosts in emphatic fashion.

King said: 'At the London World Cup the Australians were saying they had a disadvantage with our amazing home crowd.

'I think we proved that even without a home crowd we can still do it. It was really good.

'They did a fast ride in the qualifier and we just came out to do a better ride, which we did.'

Joanna Rowsell, Dani King and Laura Trott seal world record

British trio set up duel with Australia after smashing world record

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UPDATED:

06:56 GMT, 5 April 2012

Great Britain's Joanna Rowsell, Dani King and Laura Trott set a world record in the three kilometre team pursuit to advance as fastest qualifiers on day two of the Track Cycling World Championships at the Hisense Arena in Melbourne.

Britain watched on as Australia's Annette Edmondson, Melissa Hoskins and Josephine Tomic, the 10th of 14 teams to ride, lowered the world record to three minutes 17.053 seconds.

It was more than a second quicker than the time Britain set in February. But Rowsell, King and Trott went faster still to finish in 3mins 16.850secs and set up another team pursuit duel between the World Championship hosts and the London Olympics hosts.

At the double: Pendleton (left) and Varnish have progressed to the first knockout round

At the double: Pendleton (left) and Varnish have progressed to the first knockout round

Britain's men won the 4km bout in a
world record on the opening day. The race for bronze will take place
between Canada, whose trio of Tara Whitten, Jasmin Glaesser and Gillian
Carleton clocked 3:19.494, and New Zealand's Lauren Ellis, Jaime Nielson
and Alison Shanks (3:20.598).

Meanwhile, Great Britain's Victoria
Pendleton and Jess Varnish have safely advanced to the first knockout
round of the women's sprint on day two of the Track Cycling World
Championships – as Australia's Anna Meares broke the world record at the
Hisense Arena in Melbourne.

Olympic champion Pendleton clocked
11.076 seconds to place fifth as defending champion Meares finished in
10.782secs, surpassing the previous world record by 0.011secs.

Centre of attention: Home favourite Meares delighted the Melbourne crowd

Centre of attention: Home favourite Meares delighted the Melbourne crowd

Varnish was eighth quickest in 11.090 in the flying lap, which seeds the 24 riders who qualify for the first knockout round.

Meares beat Colombia's Juliana
Gaviria comfortably in her head-to-head bout to progress to the third
round. Pendleton met Yvonne Hijgenaar of Holland and edged through by a
wheel length.

Varnish was up against Junhong Lin of China. The race was restarted after a Junhong track stand – where riders hold a stationary position – unsettled Varnish, who grabbed onto the rail running around the periphery of the track.

At the second attempt, Varnish led out but was overhauled by her rival in the finishing straight and eliminated from the competition.