Tag Archives: ropes

Darren Barker beats Simone Rotolo to win IBF Inter-Continental middleweight title

Barker makes light work of Rotolo to take middleweight title at Wembley Arena

By
Declan Warrington

PUBLISHED:

23:10 GMT, 9 March 2013

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UPDATED:

00:15 GMT, 10 March 2013

Darren Barker secured a routine victory over Simone Rotolo and the vacant IBF Intercontinental title after the Italian was forced to withdraw before the start of the fifth round.

The middleweight, fighting for the second time in a matter of months after a cruel run of injuries, needed to make a statement with his domestic rivals also progressing and would have been underwhelmed that the opportunity to do so was taken away.

Barker is one third of a rivalry with world-title contender Matthew Macklin and next month’s WBC challenger Martin Murray and impressed with a relaxed approach at the start but soon after fought more raggedly.

Strong showing: Darren Barker knocks down Simone Rotolo during their IBF Inter-Continental Middleweight bout

Strong showing: Darren Barker knocks down Simone Rotolo during their IBF Inter-Continental Middleweight bout

Fine fettle: Barker took Rotolo to task with a flurry of punches in the first round

Fine fettle: Barker took Rotolo to task with a flurry of punches in the first round

Rotolo was knocked down after a flurry
of punches towards the end of the first round when caught against the
ropes but instead of stopping his opponent there and then, Barker lost
any real polish and instead messily pursued the knockout which
ultimately never came.

Edging each round if not dominating
them as a more polished Barker perhaps would have done, the middleweight
tested his opponent occasionally if not convincingly and was in the
midst of another flurry of punches when Rotolo significantly backed off,
avoiding the fight and shaking his hand in obvious pain until the end
of the round came and the Italian’s corner announced his withdrawal
almost instantly after.

'Macklin and Murray [who fights WBC
champion Sergio Martinez on 27 April]' are looking busy now, so I’d like
a fight with Andy Lee,' he said afterwards.

He told Sky Sports 2: 'I'm ready to push on now. There's the obvious domestic fights
and world title fights – I'm game, I'll fight any of them. It just takes
two of us to get the ball rolling and it could be rematches, trilogies,
whatever.'

Pushing on: Barker is looking ahead to his future which could involve 'rematches' and 'trilogies'

Pushing on: Barker is looking ahead to his future which could involve 'rematches' and 'trilogies'

George Groves stops Dario Balmaceda in third round

Three and easy! Groves packs far too much power for Balmaceda on Matchroom debut

By
Declan Warrington

PUBLISHED:

22:34 GMT, 9 March 2013

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UPDATED:

00:12 GMT, 10 March 2013

George Groves needed only three rounds to continue his ascent in the super middleweight division ahead of a potential future fight with domestic rival Carl Froch.

He had originally been scheduled to meet Mohamed Ali Ndiaye next Saturday for the European title and in reality against Balmaceda was in with an underwhelming opponent but if there were any concerns about how seriously he was treating the fight then it instantly became apparent they could be dismissed.

Groves, competing for the first time under the Matchroom banner after this week signing a three-fight deal to be Eddie Hearn’s latest recruit, maintained a high workrate throughout and threatened an early finish from the start.

Easy: George Groves stopped Dario Balmaceda during their International Super Middleweight bout

Easy: George Groves stopped Dario Balmaceda during their International Super Middleweight bout

Debut: Groves was making his Matchroom bow after splitting from Frank Warren

Debut: Groves was making his Matchroom bow after splitting from Frank Warren

Weighing in three pounds over the
super middleweight limit and looking significantly big at the weight,
Groves bullied Balmaceda throughout, hurting the Argentinian with a
right hook as the opening round progressed and having regular success
with that same punch later.

It was a right hook to the body that
sent Balmaceda to the canvas after Groves followed his early success by
dominating through to the end of the second round, yet with the stoppage
appearing imminent the bell was to follow even if serving only to delay
the inevitable.

The finish came 58 seconds into the
third with Balmaceda again backed up onto the ropes, Groves throwing a
right hook to the head from which his opponent, having taken a knee and
clearly out of his depth, would not rise.

Pummeled: Groves put his opponent down in the second and then finished him in the third

Pummeled: Groves put his opponent down in the second and then finished him in the third

For the promising super middleweight
it was a workout nonetheless, but one he would have learned little from
and that will need to be more difficult next time out on the undercard
of the unification fight between Mikkel Kessler and Froch.

Lee Purdy earlier enjoyed a ninth-round victory over Cosme River after the Mexican was stopped because of a cut.

Solid: Groves has a perfect record of 17 wins from 17 bouts

Solid: Groves has a perfect record of 17 wins from 17 bouts

Andrew Flintoff showed heart if not technique – Mike Dickson

Mike Dickson: What Flintoff lacked in elegance he made up for with sheer heart

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UPDATED:

01:48 GMT, 1 December 2012

Andrew Flintoff never took a step back on the cricket field and, when it came down to a huge test of nerve and courage last night, he remained resolutely on the front foot to record the first win of his reality boxing career.

We knew he could fearlessly smite short balls from Brett Lee off the tip of his nose, that he could bully the world’s finest batsmen with barrages of short-pitched bowling, and now we know he can hold his own inside the ropes before a baying, breathless crowd.

What he lacked in elegance he made up for with sheer heart to surge forward continually and defeat an opponent two stones heavier, albeit one who lived down to expectations, on a 39-38 points decision to the delirious acclaim of the MEN Arena in Manchester.

Pure heart: Andrew Flintoff was unrefined but brave and persistent

Pure heart: Andrew Flintoff was unrefined but brave and persistent

Caught off balance by the otherwise hapless Richard Dawson in the second round, Flintoff was floored by a clipped left hook in a rare show of aggression from the American, who had all the mobility of a giant water butt.

But recovering from that was a typical show of character from the former England all-rounder, who must now decide if he wants to go through all this again. ‘I don’t know, but the feeling of being back in front of a crowd and winning was incredible,’ he said. ‘It’s been amazing, humbling in fact.

‘It wasn’t one for the purist but it was everything I had hoped for and more. It was like an out-of-body experience. It was similar to how I played cricket: a bit ragged but I wanted to leave everything in the ring.’

His relieved and delighted mentor Barry McGuigan added: ‘He forgot everything I taught him in the excitement of it all but he got the job done.’

A few of the Celebocracy in which Flintoff moves these days were among the 6,000 crowd, including comedians John Bishop and Jack Whitehall and a smattering of former Test colleagues such as Matthew Hoggard and Steve Harmison.

Made it through: Flintoff survived his first foray into the ring to win on points

Made it through: Flintoff survived his first foray into the ring to win on points

When Ricky Hatton had fought a week earlier, the 19,000 tickets had gone within a week, the appetite for an authentic comeback from a credible star of the sport obviously greater than the desire to see a much-loved cricketing hero take this strange and rather brutal voyage of self-discovery.

You could not fault Flintoff’s courage but it was hard for any outcome to glorify the image of the noble art. A quick knockout or stoppage would have been the farce that many in the game had feared and predicted. Lasting the course as he did, even in this bare minimum format of eight minutes, did not suggest that the skill levels required to turn professional are stratospheric.

Something you could not criticise Flintoff for was his dedication to this cause, the loss of more than three stone sculpting his body into a sharper form than the one which, even at the height of his playing days, always had something of a built-for-comfort look about it.

He clearly answered the demands of McGuigan with four months of the kind of discipline that might have elongated the main part of his sporting career had he employed it then.

Get back up: Flintoff stumbled but recovered to emerge victorious

Get back up: Flintoff stumbled but recovered to emerge victorious

The last time he shared a sporting arena with a Richard Dawson it was the spindly Yorkshire off-spinner, not the former gang member from small town Oklahoma who had forged a more traditional, redemptive path into the sport.

Dawson, 23, has the sort of moobs that Simon Cowell might blush at, but unlike the Lancastrian he had the benefit of several amateur fights before two at professional level, albeit against equally unknown opponents.

Flintoff entered the ring wearing a Lancashire Twenty20 shirt, but he will never have heard a cacophony like this.

Compared to the earlier fighters on the bill Dawson was less nimble than a mobile home and after a cagey beginning Flintoff had him rocking back on the ropes.

Crowd favourite: 'Freddie' connects with Dawson's head

Crowd favourite: 'Freddie' connects with Dawson's head

That was until the left hook that had the home favourite sprawling across the canvas, forced to take a count of eight. Our hero survived through to the end of it and into a third round which saw much grappling, pushing and shoving, and the odd jab from both men.

With chants of ‘Freddie! Freddie!’ ringing around the arena and Dawson being reminded about his copious flab, Flintoff surged forward in the fourth round and landed his best combinations of the bout.

The late flurries, while somewhat ungainly, were enough to guarantee him the points decision after eight minutes of a different sort of fame.

Wladimir Klitschko beats Mariusz Wach

Klitschko shows Wach no mercy as he hammers Pole to retain heavyweight titles

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

23:18 GMT, 10 November 2012

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UPDATED:

23:47 GMT, 10 November 2012

Wladimir Klitschko retained his IBF, IBO, WBO and WBA super world heavyweight titles, although he survived a scare before recording a unanimous points decision over the durable Mariusz Wach in Hamburg.

Klitschko, fighting for the first time without the late revered trainer Manny Steward in his corner, landed at will for nearly five rounds but a huge right hand at the end of the fifth sent the champion reeling into the ropes.

The Ukrainian managed to survive and showed no lasting effects in the sixth before brutally stepping up his punishment of the previously unbeaten Wach.

No sweat: Wladimir Klitschko kept all of his belts in Hamburg

No sweat: Wladimir Klitschko kept all of his belts in Hamburg

Target practice: Wladimir Klitschko outclassed Mariusz Wach in Hamburg

Target practice: Wladimir Klitschko outclassed Mariusz Wach in Hamburg

The scores of 120-107, 120-107 and
119-109 reflected the near-complete domination Klitschko enjoyed in his
13th world title defence.

Tonight marked the first time Klitschko was fighting someone taller than him in the city where he made his professional debut.

However, the real talking point was
how he would fare in his first outing since the passing of Steward, who
died last month aged 68, with aspiring heavyweight contender Johnathon
Banks being appointed as Klitschko's new trainer – for the time being.

Klitschko showed his determination to
honour Steward tonight by landing several one-two combinations in the
first, with the pattern continuing in the second.

Easy: Klitschko (left) barely broke sweat as he dismantled the Pole round after round

Easy: Klitschko (left) barely broke sweat as he dismantled the Pole round after round

Easy: Klitschko (left) barely broke sweat as he dismantled the Pole round after round

Easy: Klitschko (left) barely broke sweat as he dismantled the Pole round after round

However, Wach attempted to spoil his opponent's work by tying Klitschko up.

The 36-year-old seemed to be in his comfort zone and continued to land the right hand at will in the fourth.

But in the fifth, the challenger
brought the crowd to its feet with an overhand right that sent Klitschko
into the ropes, although the Ukrainian showed his superior experience
by covering up and avoiding any further damage as Wach sloppily went in
for the kill.

But Klitschko, who has not been beaten
in eight years since being stopped by Lamon Brewster in 2004, did not
seem to be affected at the start of the sixth and landed a straight
right that temporarily stunned Wach.

Scare: Klitschko survived a huge right hand in the fifth round

Scare: Klitschko survived a huge right hand in the fifth round

Rocky Actor Sylvester Stallone was in Hamburg to watch the bout

Rocky Actor Sylvester Stallone was in Hamburg to watch the bout

The punishment continued in the
seventh and Klitschko looked to stop the fight with perhaps only the
bell preventing the champion from doing so, with Wach sent into the
ropes after yet another right hand.

Wach's lack of defence seemed to prove
his undoing and he came in for severe punishment in the eighth before
Klitschko settled into a rhythm in the ninth.

By the 10th Wach had marks over his
eyes and nose and his lack of head movement was giving Klitschko all the
encouragement he needed.

Wach did land another rare right in the 11th that opened up a cut on Klitschko's left eye but the champion closed strongly.

Enzo Maccarinelli beaten by Ovil McKenzie in controversial fashion

Devastated Maccarinelli controversially stopped in second round as McKenzie retains Commonwealth title

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UPDATED:

23:03 GMT, 9 November 2012

Enzo Maccarinelli was robbed of the chance to win the only belt missing from his collection when his light-heavyweight Commonwealth title clash with Ovil McKenzie was stopped prematurely in the second round.

The Welshman, 32, came under pressure from the champion but appeared in no distress, only for referee Ian John-Lewis to end the fight, much to the bewilderment of the former cruiserweight world champion, and the crowd.

'I am absolutely devastated,' Maccarinelli said. 'The referee apologised to me afterwards.

Taking the blows: Enzo Maccarinelli gets caught with a left hook from Ovill McKenzie

Taking the blows: Enzo Maccarinelli gets caught with a left hook from Ovill McKenzie

'We knew he [McKenzie] was strong but it was my plan to take the shots on the ropes. My hands were up and I blocked his shots until the referee stepped in.'

McKenzie meanwhile admitted the fight could have continued.

'It's not my fault, there's nothing I can do,' he said. 'I will give this guy a rematch anytime. The fight could have carried on, I can't lie about that.'

Maccarinelli was involved in a controversial bout for the second time this year following his British title victory over Shane McPhilbin in March.

Stoppage time: Refree Ian John Lewis explains to Maccarinelli why he stopped the fight against McKenzie. The referee later apologised

Stoppage time: Refree Ian John Lewis explains to Maccarinelli why he stopped the fight against McKenzie. The referee later apologised

That fight was marred by the bizarre decision to end the first round 47 seconds early after Maccarinelli had been knocked down. He was floored again in the third before winning on all three judges' scorecards.

Having endured a torrid four years since losing a cruiserweight unification bout with David Haye at the O2 Arena in London, Maccarinelli had hoped to get back on track against McKenzie after serving a six-month ban for failing a drugs test.

Game over: Maccarinelli looks stunned as McKenzie celebrates his win

Game over: Maccarinelli looks stunned as McKenzie celebrates his win

He looked comfortable in the opening stages, although the man from Derby was the busier man which was also the case in the second session before the controversial stoppage.

The final fight of the evening saw Paul Butler maintain his unbeaten record and claim the vacant British super flyweight title with a stunning first-round stoppage of John Donnelly.

The home favourite delivered a sickening body shot after just 69 seconds to send the Liverpool crowd into delirium.

Kevin Pietersen scores 23 on England return as old foe Yuvraj Singh takes his wicket

KP's humble pie: Old foe Yuvraj ruins Pietersen's return to England side

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UPDATED:

22:37 GMT, 31 October 2012

Kevin Pietersen has been warned he will face more of his old nemesis Yuvraj Singh in the Test series against India after the part-time left-arm spinner he once called a pie-chucker spoiled his comeback.

On the day Alastair Cook marked his first game as England’s new captain with a typically careful century against India A, Pietersen was caught and bowled by Yuvraj for 23 in his first knock for England since August 6 and the infamous Headingley Test against South Africa.

Cook’s men closed the second day on 286 for four, with Samit Patel crafting an attractive unbeaten 82 to lay claim to the No 6 spot following a third-ball duck for opener Nick Compton in his first senior game for England.
Return: Pietersen produced a swashbuckling 23 before being caught and bowled by Yuvraj Singh

Return: Pietersen produced a swashbuckling 23 before being caught and bowled by Yuvraj Singh

Return: Pietersen produced a swashbuckling 23 before being caught and bowled by Yuvraj Singh

Return: Pietersen produced a swashbuckling 23 before being caught and bowled by Yuvraj Singh

PIETERSEN vs THE PIE-CHUCKER

March 28, 2006, 1st ODI — Yuvraj dismisses Pietersen for the first time as the England batsman is caught by Gautam Gambhir for 46.

March 31, 2006, 2nd ODI — Pietersen is caught for 71 off Yuvraj.

April 15, 2006, 7th ODI — He is caught again, this time for 64.

November 17, 2008, 2nd ODI — Yuvraj takes out his off stump, sending the England man packing for 33.

December 13, 2008, 1st Test, Day 3 — Pietersen is trapped lbw for one.

Wednesday, tour game — On his England return, KP drives a ball straight back at the bowler to go for 23.

But, for sheer drama, nothing matched
the moment Pietersen shimmied down the track and chipped a return catch
to Yuvraj to end an eventful 24-ball stay.

After getting off the mark with a
quick single to mid-on off his first ball, Pietersen lofted his sixth —
from Suresh Raina’s off-spin — over the ropes down the ground. He carted
the next delivery through the covers, was dropped at short leg on 16
off Raina, then pulled seamer Vinay Kumar for four.

But Yuvraj was lying in wait. With
his third ball of a new spell — his second to Pietersen — he struck. It
was the sixth time he had embarrassed England’s alpha male following
four dismissals in one-day internationals and one in a Test at Chennai
four years ago.

India A captain Raina promised it
would not be the last time Yuvraj would be given the chance to add to
Pietersen’s litany of woes against slow left-armers.

‘Last time England came here, he
bowled really well to KP and the plan worked again,’ said Raina with a
smile. ‘I was always going to try him. I know he’s had success against
him early on.’

Asked whether India’s Test captain MS
Dhoni would repeat the ploy in the four-match series, starting in
Ahmedabad on November 15, Raina said: ‘Definitely. He was so happy to
get him out but KP came after the game to the dressing room and they
both had a laugh.

Slow start: Compton went for a third-ball duck

Slow start: Compton went for a third-ball duck

SCORECARD

Click here for the full scorecard from Mumbai

‘He needs to score runs against
India. He did well against South Africa but this is going to be
different. We have a good spin attack, plus Zaheer Khan and Umesh
Yadav.’

Pietersen’s cameo overshadowed an
otherwise good day for England, including Cook’s six-hour unbeaten 112 —
a monument to self-denial that bodes well for the rest of the tour.

Top knock: Cook

Top knock: Cook

Top knock: Cook celebrates reaching his ton

Just as reassuring for England was
the batting of Patel, who must now be favourite to bat at No 6 in
Ahmedabad. Dropped on 29, he added an unbroken 153 with Cook after
England were wobbling at 133 for four.

Patel said: ‘One of the things we
work hard on is to grind down the bowling, and we wanted to keep India
in the dirt. It was fantastic to have Kevin back. He gave us a bit of
oomph to get us going.’

Ton-derful: Cook was in fine form with the bat as he passed 100

Ton-derful: Cook was in fine form with the bat as he passed 100

Ton-derful: Cook was in fine form with the bat as he passed 100

Top knock: Cook

Compton’s first-over duck at the
ground where his grand-father Denis made 249 not out for Holkar in the
Ranji Trophy final in 1945 was something of a disappointment, but
Jonathan Trott helped Cook steady things with 56.

Steven Finn faces a race against time to prove his fitness for the first Test after straining his right thigh on Tuesday.

singly, it came only three balls after India A captain Raina had brought Yuvraj on to bowl.

Rebuilding: Cook and Patel put on a fine fifth-wicket partnership to dig England out of a hole

Rebuilding: Cook and Patel put on a fine fifth-wicket partnership to dig England out of a hole

Rebuilding: Cook and Patel put on a fine fifth-wicket partnership to dig England out of a hole

Rebuilding: Cook and Patel put on a fine fifth-wicket partnership to dig England out of a hole

Ricky Burns beats Kevin Mitchell in Glasgow

Feel the Burns: Rampant Ricky blasts through Mitchell to win 'Battle of Britain' and retain world belt

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UPDATED:

23:23 GMT, 22 September 2012

Burns stunned Kevin Mitchell in front
of a raucous crowd in Glasgow to retain his world lightweight title in
breathtaking fashion.

The Scot, defending his WBO belt for
the second time, took the fight to his opponent from the first bell and
never relented in a staggering display.

Mitchell was floored twice in the
fourth round before yet another unanswered flurry of punches forced the
referee to call a halt to the bout.

Impressive: Ricky Burns aims a punch at Kevin Mitchell during his convincing victory

Impressive: Ricky Burns aims a punch at Kevin Mitchell during his convincing victory

Billed as a 'Battle of Britain', Burns turned the fight into a procession, beating the Englishman to the punch time and time again before pinning him to the ropes and unloading.

Controlling the fight with his jab and always looking to land the right to head and body, Burns edged the opening exchanges of the first round.

Mitchell looked to respond where he could but the bout burst into life when the pair went toe-to-toe with neither giving an inch.

Down and out: Ricky Burns knocks Kevin Mitchell down

Down and out: Ricky Burns knocks Kevin Mitchell down

The home favourite continued to dominate in the second stanza as the pace of the bout refused to relent.

Mitchell served the champion with some timely reminders of his punching power but it was he who was taking some hefty punishment.

Mitchell showed he was not fazed by the Scot's flying start in the third round when, pinned to the ropes, he beat his own chest in a mocking show of defiance.

Punishing: Ricky Burns goes on the attack

Punishing: Ricky Burns goes on the attack

But if that was an indication that he was forcing his way into the contest, the sizeable English contingent in the crowd were silenced minutes later.

Burns' pressure fighting paid off as he floored Mitchell twice in quick succession and although he rose on both occassions, Burns' victory was inevitable and 10,000 fans rose as one to salute their hero.

Burns is set to defend his title again in December with countryman Scott Harrison a possible opponent.

World Twenty20 2012: AB de Villiers steers South Africa to victory over Sri Lanka in seven-over encounter

De Villiers steers South Africa to victory over Sri Lanka in seven-over encounter

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UPDATED:

14:55 GMT, 22 September 2012

South Africa thrashed World Twenty20 hosts Sri Lanka in Hambantota after a rain delay reduced their Group C showdown to a seven-overs-a-side match.

Captain AB de Villiers crunched 30 from 13 balls in South Africa's 78 for four and Sri Lanka never threatened to go close to that imposing total, limping instead to 46 for five.

Fortunately, given it would have been a cruel way to go out, today's match only determined which of the two teams would finish top of the group, not which would go through to the Super Eight stage. Both were already assured of advancing, after wins over Zimbabwe.

On the front foot: AB de Villiers lashes out in Hambantota

On the front foot: AB de Villiers lashes out in Hambantota

South Africa v Sri Lanka

Click here for a full scorecard

South Africa lost Richard Levi to the
fourth ball of the innings, to a brilliant diving catch by Dilshan
Munaweera off the bowling of Nuwan Kulasekara, before Hashim Amla
clubbed three boundaries over the infield to make a swift 16.

Amla was stumped by Kumar Sangakkara off Rangana Herath, and that brought De Villiers to the batting strip.

Angelo Matthews briefly clamped the
brakes on with a tidy fourth over, but Herath then began to take
punishment as De Villiers seized the initiative.

Stumped: Hashim Amla is dismissed by Kumar Sangakkara

Stumped: Hashim Amla is dismissed by Kumar Sangakkara

A swept four from the first ball of the fifth over by the skipper was followed by a vicious punch over the ropes for six.

De Villiers fell when Jeevas Mendis
showed safe hands at mid-off to give Lasith Malinga a wicket, having
been taken for 14 runs in the preceding five deliveries by the same
batsman.

On 65 for three going into the final
over, South Africa lost Faf du Plessis but JP Duminy played a clever
scoop shot to the boundary from the fifth ball before drilling a
straight six to end the innings.

Tillakaratne Dilshan fell in the first over of Sri Lanka's reply, brilliantly run out by wicketkeeper De Villiers.

Falling down: Tillakaratne Dilshan is run out by De Villiers

Collision course: Tillakaratne Dilshan is run out by De Villiers

Collision course: Tillakaratne Dilshan is run out by De Villiers

Mahela Jayawardene had struggled to
get the ball away so it was perhaps to Sri Lanka's advantage that he was
dismissed for four at the end of the second over.

Yet at eight for two, the home side already looked to be batting in a lost cause.

They rode their luck when Albie Morkel dropped a steepler to hand Sangakkara a life.

The same batsman was soon on his way though, top-edging an attempted pull shot to De Villiers.
Perera and Dilshan Munaweera perished when hitting out in the closing two overs, Sri Lanka's hopes long over.

Vitali Klitschko beats Manuel Charr

Time to make Haye Klitschko dominates Charr but could yet retire from boxing

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UPDATED:

10:18 GMT, 9 September 2012

Vitali Klitschko ended Manuel Charr's perfect record with a clinical defence of his WBC heavyweight title in Moscow.

In what could prove to be the Ukrainian's last-ever bout before embarking on a career in politics, a cut over Charr's right eye brought proceedings to an end with 56 seconds remaining in the fourth round.

It was a one-sided contest from the off, with Klitschko stalking the ring behind his jab and landing a couple of early shorts.

Furious: Manuel Charr was disgusted that the fight was ended early

Furious: Manuel Charr was disgusted that the fight was ended early

He put the former kickboxer down in the second round, landing a left hook which saw Charr counted to eight. And, when a similar shot wounded Charr in the fourth, the referee stepped in.

Charr was disgruntled with the call, kicking the ropes, but the amount of blood he was losing meant it was impossible for him to carry on.

Dominant: Vitali Klitschko (right) made light work of his unbeaten opponent

Dominant: Vitali Klitschko (right) made light work of his unbeaten opponent

Klitschko will now turn his attention the Ukrainian parliamentary elections on October 28 and refused to be comment on a future fight with David Haye.

The British heavyweight was recently welcomed back into the WBC, seemingly paving way fro a 10million superfight with Vitali.

Still champion: Klitschko defended his WBC heavyweight title

Still champion: Klitschko defended his WBC heavyweight title

'I'm facing major tasks and not only in sports,' Klitschko said. 'I'll
fly to Kiev in the morning and will be fully occupied with preparations
for the parliamentary elections [in October] as the leader of the party.

'I'm 41 and I'm still boxing, but one cannot trick nature – I will have to hang my gloves on a nail soon.'

London 2012 Olympics: Natasha Jonas focused on winning gold

History maker Jonas marks British women's boxing bow with victory

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UPDATED:

16:04 GMT, 5 August 2012

Natasha Jonas shrugged off her history-making moment in the London 2012 boxing ring at ExCeL and insisted she is fully focused on winning the fight of her life on Monday to secure an Olympic medal.

Jonas became the first female boxing Olympian from Great Britain when she stepped through the ropes to beat American Queen Underwood 21-13 on the first day of the inaugural women's boxing competition.

But the 28-year-old Liverpudlian is more focused on the task ahead of her tomorrow, when she must fight and beat Ireland's four-time world champion Katie Taylor – widely regarded as the best female boxer in the world – to secure a medal.

Let's hear it for the girl;! Jonas is confirmed as the winner of her bout

Let's hear it for the girl;! Jonas is confirmed as the winner of her bout

Jonas said: 'History and records are great but I'm here at the Olympics and I don't want to just make up the numbers.

'I believe Katie and I are two of the
best boxers in the world at our weight and it's unfortunate that we have
fight so early. She's the world champion but with a crowd like that I
think I have every chance.'

Jonas believes she is a much better
fighter than for the pair's last meeting at the Strandja Cup in Bulgaria
in February 2011, when Jonas, having only recently joined the full-time
programme, was beaten 6-3.

Jonas added: 'When I fought her I was
still in awe of her reputation, which no-one can dispute. She's a
world-class boxer and a great ambassador for the sport.

History maker: Jonas became the first female British boxer at the ExCel

History maker: Jonas became the first female British boxer at the ExCel

History maker: Jonas became the first female British boxer at the ExCel

'But I'm a different boxer to who I
was two years ago. I did what I had to do to qualify and now I've got
started at the Olympics in front of an unbelievable crowd.'

Jonas boxed cleverly against her
experienced American opponent, a former world silver medallist, who
hurled big right hands but frequently failed to penetrate the
Liverpudlian's tight guard.

Flicking scoring jabs in response,
Jonas allowed Underwood to dictate the early pace and shade the first
round 4-3, but stormed back in the second to move ahead, and enjoyed a
spectacular third in which she increased her lead to five points.

Jonas had her best round in the last,
landing a right hand which forced Underwood to take a standing count,
before leaping for joy when the verdict was announced to move her one
big win from a guaranteed medal.

Gold standard: Jonas hopes to land a medal in the coming days

Gold standard: Jonas hopes to land a medal in the coming days