Tag Archives: river

A 17-year-old Argentine recreates Trevor Sinclair magic with a stunning bicycle kick

17-year-old Argentine recreates Sinclair magic with stunning bicycle kick

By
Thom Drake

PUBLISHED:

00:07 GMT, 19 April 2013

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UPDATED:

00:51 GMT, 19 April 2013

As the most difficult art to master, and the most spectacular to witness, the overhead kick is a part of the game which can brings gasps of delight or sniggers of derision.

So when an Argentinian 17-year-old can pull this off in an international against bitter rivals Uruguay there must be something special about him.

Sebastian Driussi opened the scoring for Argentina under 17s in their 3-3 draw with a goal everyone present will remember.

Scroll down for video

Control: Driussi picks the ball up on his chest after a deep cross...

Control: Driussi picks the ball up on his chest after a deep cross…

Unbelievable: He then acrobatically connects with the ball as defenders stand off him

Unbelievable: He then acrobatically connects with the ball as defenders stand off him

Over the top: His shot then beats the keeper, who is left with absolutely no chance

Over the top: His shot then beats the keeper, who is left with absolutely no chance

The forward plays for River Plate, but brought back memories of Trevor Sinclair's wonder strike for QPR against Barnsley in the FA Cup.

Both goals were from outside the box, with Sinclair taking his first time from the cross, while Driussi controlled the ball and held off a defender before smashing it into the net over the keeper.

Could Lionel Messi, Sergio Aguero and Ezequiel Lavezzi be welcoming a new talent into their midst

What a strike! Trevor Sinclair's stunning overhead kick against Barnsley in the 1997 FA Cup

What a strike! Trevor Sinclair's stunning overhead kick against Barnsley in the 1997 FA Cup

VIDEO Sebastian Driussi recreates Trevor Sinclair's overhead kick

VIDEO And how about the original….

Atletico Madrid open door for Fernando Torres return from Chelsea

Atletico open door for Torres return while Chelsea given encouragement over Falcao

By
Rik Sharma

PUBLISHED:

12:45 GMT, 23 March 2013

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UPDATED:

13:00 GMT, 23 March 2013

Atletico Madrid manager Diego Simeone has opened the door for Fernando Torres to return to his former side.

The Chelsea striker made his name in Spain before moving to Liverpool in 2007.

Simeone says he knows how important Torres can be for his side and that because of his roots he knows about what it means to play for Los Rojiblancos.

Struggle: Fernando Torres has not been able to find his feet at Chelsea

Struggle: Fernando Torres has not been able to find his feet at Chelsea

He told Spanish radio station Onda
Cero: 'Fernando Torres is currently playing for another team. We have to
wait for the season to finish and decide which of the available players
could come here and do a good job.

'Fernando knows about the club's history, what it means to play here and I don't need to speak about his ability.

'We were teammates. I know how important he can be.'

Chelsea want Atletico's Colombian striker Radamel Falcao as a replacement. He has scored 25 goals in 28 games for his club this season, including a hat-trick against the Blues in the Super Cup final.

He can be procured for 48million but the Blues would be interested in a part-exchange deal involving Torres.

When asked about Falcao's future, Simeone did not insist the player would be staying at the club.
Instead he reasoned that everybody makes their own decisions and Falcao deserves respect.

Simeone said: 'I'm not Falcao and I'm not his agent. I'm the manager and have the utmost respect for him, because he gave me so much at River Plate and has done the same here.

'He always gives his all and I really respect players who do that. But everyone makes their own decisions in life.

'Every person is different, and we have to respect each other. Those who stay are always going to be the best.'

Can't stop: Radamel Falcao is in absolutely lethal form for club and country

Can't stop: Radamel Falcao is in absolutely lethal form for club and country

Frank: Diego Simeone said that Torres knows the club and he would be an important player

Frank: Diego Simeone said that Torres knows the club and he would be an important player

Nottingham Forest 1 Hull 2: Tigers stay on track with gritty win on the Trent

Nottingham Forest 1 Hull 2: Tigers stay on track with gritty win on the Trent

PUBLISHED:

17:19 GMT, 1 December 2012

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UPDATED:

17:40 GMT, 1 December 2012

Hull maintained their npower Championship promotion push with victory over Nottingham Forest.

It was a tale of two penalties in the first half of a drab encounter on the banks of the River Trent.

Robert Koren put Hull in front after 34 minutes before Billy Sharp levelled things up with his spot-kick in the 43rd minute.

On the up: Paul McShane celebrates his goal for Hull City

On the up: Paul McShane celebrates his goal for Hull City

Match facts

Nottm Forest: Camp, Hutton, Ward, Collins, Harding, Coppinger, Guedioura, Gillett (McGugan 75), Cohen (Blackstock 75), Reid, Sharp. Subs Not Used: Darlow, Moussi, Findley, Moloney, Lansbury.

Scorer: Sharp 43 pen.

Hull: Stockdale, Bruce, Chester, McShane, Elmohamady, Meyler, Evans, Quinn, Brady (Faye 87), Koren (Rosenior 89), Mclean (Proschwitz 67). Subs Not Used: Jakupovic, McKenna, Simpson, Olofinjana.

Yellow cards: Brady, Stockdale, Meyler, Rosenior.

Scorers: Koren 34 pen,McShane 69.

Att: 19,472

Ref: Gavin Ward (Surrey).

The latest Championship table, results and fixtures

Paul McShane won it for the Tigers with a close-range header after 69 minutes.

Forest boss Sean O'Driscoll made two changes after seeing his side's four-game unbeaten league run come to an end with a 3-1 defeat at Ipswich on Tuesday night.

James Coppinger made only his second start since joining the Reds on loan from Doncaster at the end of August, while Andy Reid also returned in midfield.

Henri Lansbury and Dexter Blackstock dropped down to the bench as Forest played with Billy Sharp as a lone striker.

An injury to leading scorer Sone Aluko forced Hull boss Steve Bruce into his only change meaning a recall for Aaron Mclean.

A dull start to the game led to a first half littered with misplaced passes by both teams.

Forest had a lucky escape after 27 minutes when on-loan Aston Villa defender Alan Hutton conceded a corner when trying to head the ball back to goalkeeper Lee Camp.

Corry Evans' flag-kick was headed away from underneath his own crossbar by Elliott Ward before David Meyler shot into the side-netting. Meyler was involved in the penalty that gave Hull the lead.

He was brought down inside the box by Simon Gillett and Koren sent Camp the wrong way from the spot, stroking the ball into the bottom right-hand corner of the net.

Out of the blue, Forest were presented with the opportunity to equalise when they were awarded a penalty for Alex Bruce's foul on Sharp.

And the on-loan Southampton striker made no mistake from the spot, shooting powerfully into the top right-hand corner of the net.

Chris Cohen might have sent the hosts into half-time ahead but the midfielder lacked composure and blasted over from close range after his initial flick from Reid's cross was blocked.

The game improved slightly after the break with early chances at both ends.

Adlene Guedioura, who scored a superb long-range effort against his former club Wolves last weekend to give Forest a 2-1 win at Molineux, curled a shot just wide before Ahmed Elmohamady shot straight at Camp.

Guedioura then had a goalbound effort blocked and Cohen volleyed the rebound into the Trent End from the edge of the area.

Forest were dominating possession without making any telling inroads and they were made to pay midway through the second half.

It was dreadful defending from O'Driscoll's side.

Koren's corner was allowed all the way through a crowded penalty box and McShane had the simple task of heading in from two yards out.

Forest continued to enjoy much of the ball, with Hull seemingly content to play on the counter attack. O'Driscoll brought on Blackstock and Lewis McGugan, with Cohen and Gillett making way, but, with Forest continually frustrating with the final ball, it made no difference.

Centre-half Ward was pushed up front in the closing stages as an additional aerial threat and he almost rescued a point for Forest in injury time but his header was plucked from beneath the crossbar by Hull keeper David Stockdale.

Southwell flooded and closed until January

Water nightmare… Southwell closed for the year after being submerged by floods

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UPDATED:

09:38 GMT, 28 November 2012

Southwell racecourse will be closed until at least the New Year after severe flooding left the track under nine inches of water.

Wednesday's meet has been transferred to Wolverhampton after the Nottinghamshire track was submerged by extreme weather conditions for the second time in five years.

Submerged: Southwell meetings have been cancelled until the New Year

Submerged: Southwell meetings have been cancelled until the New Year

Eight all-weather flat meetings scheduled for next month have been switched to Lingfield and Wolverhampton while Tuesday's jumps meeting has been offered to other tracks.

Course clerk Roderick Duncan told the Daily Star: 'We had just short of 50 millimetres of rain on Saturday and going into Sunday and we’ve had a further 10 or more since.

Water shame: Meetings have been moved to Wolverhampton and Lingfield

Water shame: Meetings have been moved to Wolverhampton and Lingfield

Water shame: Meetings have been moved to Wolverhampton and Lingfield

'This added to the high water levels alongside the River Trent which was almost at the top of its banks has caused widespread flooding in the area.

'Unfortunately we had to abandon Monday and Tuesday’s fixtures but transferred today’s card to Wolverhampton.

Water shame: Meetings have been moved to Wolverhampton and Lingfield

Water shame: Meetings have been moved to Wolverhampton and Lingfield

'We have on-going talks with the Environment Agency and Trent Valley Drainage Board to improve this situation in the future.'

Officials also revealed that the drying out and repair process has already begun and it is hoped racing can resume in January.

Jimmy Bullard messing about – image of the week by Andy Hooper

Andy Hooper: My image of the week – Jimmy Bullard messing about on the river

PUBLISHED:

08:20 GMT, 23 October 2012

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UPDATED:

08:20 GMT, 23 October 2012

Jimmy Bullard was always going to be up for a bit of larking around.

The interview was to take place in Cobham and as Jimmy is a keen fisherman we decided to look for a picturesque shot down by the river.

He spent his time looking for places to fish while I set my gear up. When the lights were turned on Jimmy jumped for the camera, kicking an imaginary ball.

It’s the expression on his face which makes this a good picture, as he appears to float above the river.

Nikon D4
Lens 24-70mm
Exposure 1/250th of a second at F4.5, ISO 50

Water performance: Jimmy Bullard in a shoot with Sportsmail snapper Andy Hooper

Water performance: Jimmy Bullard in a shoot with Sportsmail snapper Andy Hooper

England fans show Bulldog spirit in Poland

Fans show Bulldog spirit but feel the pain after Poland clash is rescheduled

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UPDATED:

21:44 GMT, 17 October 2012

Plac Zamkowy, Warsaw’s historic hub, was bathed in watery autumn sunlight and busy with tourists as midday chimed.

A group of schoolchildren gathered around Sigismund’s Column to pose for a photograph before visiting the Royal Castle.

Others burrowed down the cobbled streets towards the old-town Market Square, past the mime artists, human statues and those hawking business for restaurants and bars.

All smiles: England fans take in the sights in Warsaw ahead of the match

All smiles: England fans take in the sights in Warsaw ahead of the match

Weather beaten: An England fan with his ticket which was destroyed in the rain

Weather beaten: An England fan with his ticket which was destroyed in the rain

Across the River Vistula, the National Stadium glistened, blissfully unaware it had become the focus of what Polish papers called a ‘National Scandal’.
Inside, the grass was being mown and the tarpaulin roof had been re-opened to help the pitch air. Later it was closed, as if the roof controller was making up for lost time.

In the city centre, with five hours to kick-off, there was little evidence that this was a big match day. England flags hung outside the Bulldog pub but the anticipation was not building.

Some England supporters were trying to work out if it was better to watch the first half and miss the second as they travelled to the airport, or go early to the airport and see the whole game on TV. Others were long gone.

Many were seeking help to re-arrange flights or trying to claim back their 40 ticket, as the FA had promised they could do.

In fact, England’s players have joined with the FA to part-fund the fans’ money-back scheme as a sign of their appreciation for their away support.

Heading home: Some England fans left Warsaw after the rain on Tuesday

Heading home: Some England fans left Warsaw after the rain on Tuesday

Scott Thompson was one of a group of Stockport County fans who had always planned to stay until Thursday but still something rankled about the fact a World Cup tie in a new 400million stadium with a retractable roof had been postponed for rain.

‘We went to watch Stockport at Southport and it was raining but they borrowed a blotter from Lancashire cricket club and got the game on,’ said Thompson. ‘We were in Belarus when it was -14C on a rubbish pitch and they played.

‘The English are used to things going wrong with the weather. We were at Bristol Rovers one night when a game was called off at 7.40pm, five minutes before kick-off.

‘The worst thing with this was the lack of information. They had a state-of-the-art screen, so why not use it to get information across I found out on Twitter. They got it all so wrong.’

Resolute: Around 800 fans stayed in Warsaw to watch England play Poland

Resolute: Around 800 fans stayed in Warsaw to watch England play Poland

Inside the stadium, as the game kicked off under a big top, keeping the sunshine at bay, there were more than 50 St George flags on display and 800 people rattling around inside the section for visiting supporters.

There were many empty seats in the Polish end, too, left by those fans who had travelled from different parts of the country or could not get time off work at short notice.

Kevin Miles of the Football Supporters’ Federation, called for a FIFA inquiry to make sure it does not happen again.

‘We want the process to be examined and questioned,’ said Miles. ‘Never again should we have hundreds and thousands sent home from an expensive trip without seeing a ball kicked.’

England fans were praised by Polish police.

There were eight arrests after the game, for bottle-throwing and damaging police vehicles, but the night seemed to pass without major incident.

Clint Dempsey goes fishing

Addicted to Bass! Spurs star Dempsey hooked on fishing as perfect way to relax

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UPDATED:

12:37 GMT, 9 October 2012

For the modern day footballer, favourite activities outside of playing in the Premier League can involve a round of golf, video games or stumbling out of night clubs.

But for Clint Dempsey, few things are more enjoyable than going out to the middle of a lake to do a spot of fishing!

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The Tottenham forward, signed from Fulham in the summer, scored the winner against Manchester United at Old Trafford last month, but one of his favourite past-times could not be any different to the atmosphere he experienced in the 3-2 win for Spurs.

The American international wouldn’t have it any other way either, explaining he loves nothing better than going back to his childhood roots.

Dempsey said: ‘Fishing is important to me because it reminds me of growing up. My family used to go on camping trips and always be together doing that kind of stuff. The game, it can consume you and it's a lot of pressure.

‘For me it's being able to shut that off for a little bit and relax and get back to what I used to do as a kid.’

So for the locals around White Hart Lane, next time you get up at the crack of dawn to go for a spot of fishing on the banks of the River Lea, you may just find a Tottenham forward in close proximity.

River Plate fans unveil 8km long banner in world record bid

River Plate fans unveil huge 8km banner (but good luck getting it in to the ground!)

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UPDATED:

23:57 GMT, 8 October 2012

Show of support: Fans with their banner

Show of support: Fans with their banner

River Plate fans have unveiled
a 7.8 kilometre banner they claim is the longest in the world and fit
for the Guinness Book of Records.

The
red and white banner measuring 7,829.74 metres was paraded by thousands
of fans from the site of River's former ground in the Palermo district
of the capital to the Monumental, their giant World Cup stadium in Nunez
opened in 1938.

The fans' timing coincides with the team's improved form in their last two matches in which they have scored nine goals and conceded none, including Sunday's 5-0 rout of Godoy Cruz at the Monumental.

Organisers said more than 50,000 people took part in the procession along Alcorta Avenue that lasted nearly three hours.

Fans then watched a match at the Monumental between the River reserves and their Under 20 team, who are South American champions.

Sunday's victory was River's first at home this season after two draws and two defeats following their promotion back to the first division. They are in mid-table with 15 points from 10 matches.

The immensely popular River were relegated for the first time in June 2011 after a decade of poor management.

They renew their league rivalry with the equally well-supported Boca Juniors in the 'Superclasico', the biggest club match on the Argentine calendar, in their next home match in three weeks time.

Flying the flag: River Plate fans march with the huge banner in Buenos Aires on Monday

Flying the flag: River Plate fans march with the huge banner in Buenos Aires on Monday

Back on form: River Plate have scored nine goals and conceded none in their last two matches

Back on form: River Plate have scored nine goals and conceded none in their last two matches

London 2012 Olympics: Women"s place is on the podium – Martin Samuel

Martin Samuel: Indeed, women do know their place… on the podium

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UPDATED:

22:22 GMT, 10 August 2012

A boy growing up in Flint, North Wales, on the banks of the River Dee, would have had no shortage of sporting role models. Ian Rush, one of the greatest footballers his country ever produced, came from Flint.

He went to St Richard Gwyn Catholic High School. He played for Hawarden Rangers in the local junior leagues. Their pitch was in the shadow of Shotton Steelworks, where his father worked.

Jade Jones was not a football-mad boy, though. She was an eight-year-old girl. She had tried football and didn’t like it. She didn’t much care for athletics, either. It was her grandfather who spotted the poster at Flint Pavilion Leisure Centre, promoting the emerging sport of taekwondo. He took her. She loved it.

Kick start: Jade Jones was led to taekwondo by her granddad

Kick start: Jade Jones was led to taekwondo by her granddad

Now she has a gold medal, a stamp and
gaily painted postbox in her honour. And little girls in Flint no
longer have to imagine growing up to be Ian Rush. They can pop their
membership applications to the sports club of their choosing into the
receptacle redecorated in honour of Jade Jones.

Between the 1968 Olympics in Mexico
City and the 2004 Olympics in Athens, women contributed nine gold medals
to the British cause. So far, in London, women alone have won 10. There
are golden postboxes from Penzance (sculls rower Helen Glover) to
Lossiemouth (partner Heather Stanning), from Hamble in Hampshire (team
pursuit cyclist Dani King) to the Teesside parish of Ingleby Barwick
(lightweight double sculls rower Kat Copeland).

All Olympics strive for legacy and so
few achieve much that is meaningful, but London 2012 might be
different. If one lasting positive comes from the last two weeks, it is
that no young female should have far to look again for sporting
inspiration.

How they match up: GB men and women

Towns are fighting for the right to
lay claim to Laura Trott — born in Harlow, Essex, but brought up in in
Cheshunt, Hertfordshire — while the Royal Mail’s attempt to commemorate
Copeland required a second coat of paint as so much gold was picked off
by souvenir-hunting admirers.

What sets this revolution apart is
not just its geographical breadth, but its sporting reach. Boxing to
equestrianism. If the London 2012 Games have proved anything it is that
there are no taboos for women any more. Jones was nicknamed The
Headhunter at her Manchester academy, so aggressive is her kicking
style.

And nobody who saw Nicola Adams win
the first gold medal awarded to a female boxer is in any doubt about the
authenticity of her technique.

Too often women are forced to compete
with a male powerhouse sport for attention. Football, cricket, rugby
union, golf, tennis — all have established male fortresses that command
the bulk of the exposure and therefore the sponsorship dollars. It is at
an Olympics that female athletes come into their own.

Take Jones’s sport, taekwondo. It is
played by men and women, but, in this country at least, does not have
such a strong following that the two are compared. Nobody looks at
Jones, or Sarah Stevenson, the most high-profile taekwondo competitor in
this country until the Aaron Cook controversy, as offering a gentler,
or inferior, version of a man’s game.

And when female rowers or cyclists do
not clock the same times as their male counterparts, their efforts are
not viewed with disdain. As there is no male stranglehold, quite the
opposite. The lack of familiarity with many Olympic sports means men’s
and women’s events have room to breathe.

Gold standard: Helen Glover and Heather Stanning with their medals and Katherine Copeland and Sophie Hoskins (below)Helen Glover an

Gold standard: Helen Glover and Heather Stanning with their medals and Katherine Copeland and Sophie Hoskins (below)

Gold standard: Helen Glover and Heather Stanning with their medals

It would be considered idiotic, for
instance, to compare Victoria Pendleton’s keirin to that of Sir Chris
Hoy, yet how often is the performance of a female goalkeeper in football
set up against that of a professional male equivalent, up to six inches
taller and training every day for 20 years

At the Team GB headquarters —
Westfield shopping centre, next door to Marks and Spencer — yesterday a
steady stream of gold medallists offered their thoughts on this
revolution. And it was there that its necessity became most apparent.

Jones and queen of dressage Charlotte
Dujardin are from a section of society where a woman’s views on sport
are so rarely considered. Considering that equestrianism is the one
Olympic discipline that treats men and women as entirely equal,
Dujardin, in particular, seemed very uncomfortable contemplating it as a
political issue.

How they match up: GB men and women

The years on the margins have taken
their toll. It took her team-mate Laura Bechtolsheimer, a former
politics student at Bristol University, to put this watershed moment
into context.

‘I grew up with three older brothers
so I’ve always had a bit of a bee in my bonnet about being able to do
anything a guy could do,’ she said. ‘For me, it’s apt to compete in a
sport like equestrianism in which men and women are equal.

‘Gender issues don’t have any
relevance in our sport. It is about the way you train your horse, your
relationship with your horse.

‘Our world is great in that we can
compete with the boys and in our sport at least there were three girls
on the podium, so it was quite nice that, beating the boys.

‘I hope we’ll inspire success and
more girls will get involved in sport because of us. Growing up it is
great to have a goal, and something to work for.

‘If you’ve got a talent it gives people confidence who might otherwise be quite shy.’

Bechtolsheimer went to Stonar, a
boarding school that promises an equestrian education beside the
academic. The main building is Grade II listed and set in 80 acres of
parkland. It has stabling for 65 horses and a fully qualified British
eventing coach on site. Mary King pops by to do the occasional extra
lesson.

We know the advantages of attending a
school like Stonar, so it is no surprise that Bechtolsheimer can speak
for herself and is independent of thought, but it contrasted greatly
with tongue-tied Dujardin, whose family were not wealthy and who left
school at 16, having bunked off a lot of it. Asked about her education,
she had to check the name of her school with her mum.

Sport only reflects society, it does
not mould it. Women are marginalised in sport, because that is the way
in life. As we discovered last season, football, understandably, has a
whole list of taboos around race, religion and homophobia, but wives,
mothers and sisters are still fair game. It is the inclusivity of this
Olympics that has resonated.

Podium not pedestal: team GB women have won events right across the board

Podium not pedestal: team GB women have won events right across the board

Podium not pedestal: team GB women have won events right across the board

The ascent of women

British women have won 10 gold medals so far at this Games – that is more than the total won by British women between the 1968 Games in Mexico City and the 2004 Games in Athens.

The 268 female competitors at these Games make up the biggest women’s team by a margin of 126 participants. On Friday morning, British women were effectively seventh in the medal table.

The ratio of 52 to 48 per cent in favour of the men is the closest at these Games to an equal squad. Women made up 46 per cent of Team GB in Beijing.

At the London Games in 1948 not a single GB woman won gold. In the 1908 London Games the gold medal gender split on the British team was an astonishing 52 to four in favour of the men.

The 1960 Olympics in Rome is the only Games in history where GB’s men and women won an equal number of golds – and that was only one each. Don Thompson (men’s 50km walk) and Anita Lonsbrough – above – (women’s 200m breaststroke).

Only four times have British men won as many as 10 golds – 2008 (12 golds), 1920 (14 golds), 1908 (52 golds) and 1900 (13 golds).

Statistics can be misleading, and, in
comparison to previous Games, the spread of medals is roughly the same.
Women will end up contributing around 40 per cent of British success,
which will be up on Beijing, but not wildly. What has changed is the
move from specialist areas such as swimming or athletics to success
across the programme.

There had never been a British female
gold medallist in rowing until Glover and Stanning. Boxing was a first,
so too taekwondo and dressage. Rower Katherine Grainger highlighted the
worth of female competition by saying that it was training against the
other gold medal-winning female crews each day that raised the
collective standard. Britain had three gold medallist pairs at these
Games and Grainger insists that was no coincidence.

‘If you came first in training, you
knew you had done well,’ she said. ‘It wasn’t as if one pair won it
every day.’ Only four women have collected double gold at a single
Olympic Games, and two of those — Trott and Dujardin — were in London.
So if your daughter still comes home from school believing her sporting
horizon begins and ends on the rounders square, feel free to approach
the head of PE.

‘Running the equestrian programme,
you never think how many women we have got, or how many men,’ said Will
Connell. ‘The only time it comes up is when we are allocating rooms. We
have men and women as equals, and our athletes cross more than 30 years;
we have people in their mid-50s talking of going on to Rio de Janeiro
in 2016.

‘I tell people equestrianism is the
only sport that you can get into at the age of six and still be
competing at the highest level 50 years later, man or woman. In the end,
all sports at this level are not so different: this is about producing
an elite performance on a given day in history. It does not matter who
you are, or where you are from, what you need are talent and drive.’

And a few shiny gold postboxes dotted
around the lanes. Just to remind us that the days of women knowing
their place are gone. From 2012, it’s on a podium, not a pedestal.

Travelers Championship: Live leaderboard

Travelers Championship leaderboard: Keep up to date with the latest scores

The PGA Tour is at TPC River Highlands this week for the Travelers Championship.

Swede Freddie Jacobson took the title last year and you can keep track of all the latest scores right here.

CLICK HERE FOR THE LIVE LEADERBOARD

Freddie Jacobson posted 20 under par to win the Travelers Championship in 2011

Freddie Jacobson posted 20 under par to win the Travelers Championship in 2011