Tag Archives: revie

Ivor Powell dies aged 96

Welsh legend and former Blackpool, QPR and Villa midfielder Powell dies aged 96

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UPDATED:

18:20 GMT, 6 November 2012


Wales finest: Ivor Powell played for Blackpool, QPR and Aston Villa

Wales finest: Ivor Powell played for Blackpool, QPR and Aston Villa

Former Wales midfielder Ivor Powell, who won a place in the Guinness Book of Records as the world's oldest football coach, has died aged 96.

He was one of the finest players of his generation in a career that saw him play for Wales, Blackpool, Queens Park Rangers and Aston Villa.

Powell started his working life in the mines of South Wales before he made it as a top player.

A tough tackler, he set a record transfer fee for a half-back of 17,500 when he moved to Aston Villa in 1948.

At Blackpool he struck up his friendship with Sir Stanley Matthews, who went on to be best man at his wedding.

He was one of Bill Shankly's successors as manager at Carlisle and worked with the likes of Billy Bremner, Jackie Charlton and Norman Hunter who formed Don Revie's legendary Leeds side.

He had spells coaching at Bath City and also with PAOK in Greece, before joining the University of Bath as football coach in the early 1970s.

In 2004 he was inducted into the Welsh Sports Hall of Fame and in 2006 his role as the world's oldest working football coach was recognised as a Guinness World Record.

Powell was made an MBE in the 2008 New Year's Honours List and he finally hung up his boots in May 2010, aged 93.

The university has marked the end of his long service to the game with the Ivor Powell Sports Scholarship Fund.

Speaking in 2006 about his retirement, Powell said: 'I feel so proud of what I've done.

'I've been very, very happy at the University of Bath and I mean that.'

Explaining his coaching philosophy in 2007, Powell told the Independent newspaper: 'Aggression, determination, the will to win. These have always been my watchwords, and they still are.

'That's what I try to instil into these youngsters. And they listen, they really do.'

The University of Bath said Powell died last night after a short illness.

Deputy vice chancellor Professor Kevin Edge paid tribute.

'Ivor was an outstanding individual, a real character and a tremendous inspiration to countless generations of students and to his many colleagues at the university,' he said.

'He will be sadly missed. We would like to extend our sincere condolences to Ivor's family and friends.'

Jess Garland, head netball coach at the university, said: 'There are few people in life that have the ability to touch both the hearts and minds of so many but Ivor Powell had this capacity in abundance.

'People were drawn to his cheeky sense of humour, and the clear passion he had for the field of sport and coaching was infectious.

'It was 13 years ago that I first met Ivor, the morning of the passing of his dear friend Sir Stanley Matthews.

'Ivor's storytelling was second to none and he inspired so many of us to strive for the best.

'His coaching mantra of the key characteristics of sports people and teams needing passion, determination, aggression, the will to win and consistency of performance will transcend to many and will act as a legacy to such a true gentleman.

'It was a true privilege to have known and worked alongside Ivor.'

A spokesman for Queens Park Rangers said: 'The club is desperately saddened to learn of the passing of former half-back Ivor Powell.

'Powell passed away last night, aged 96. He made 159 appearances for Rangers in a 12-year spell that was interrupted by the War. He scored two goals.

'He was part of the R's team that clinched the Division Three South title in 1948 and was our first post-war player to be capped.

'Ivor was awarded an MBE for services to sport and collected his award from the Palace on June 25 2008.

'The club would like to extend its deepest condolences to Ivor's family and friends at this sad time.

'May he rest in peace.'

England v san Marino: A history of the Three Lions versus the world"s minnows

There are no easy games at international level… (unless you're playing this lot!)

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UPDATED:

21:58 GMT, 11 October 2012

It may look routine enough on paper, but it hasn’t always been plain sailing for England against some of the world’s lesser lights.

Two of their most emphatic scorelines were accompanied by controversy, with Malcolm Macdonald livid at the way Don Revie treated him against Cyprus and Luther Blissett suffering an unwarranted slur after his hat-trick against Luxembourg. Even opponents San Marino caused embarrassment before succumbing.

And who could forget the way David Healy fired in a dramatic late winner in Belfast seven years ago Here, Sportsmail talks to key figures from some of England’s past encounters with international minnows.

Mac the knife: Malcolm Macdonald thunders in one of his five

Mac the knife: Malcolm Macdonald thunders in one of his five

England 5 Cyprus 0

Wembley, April 16, 1975: Macdonald 5

Malcolm Macdonald: ‘Don Revie made it clear, in the previous game against West Germany, that I was in his squad under sufferance. It was down to pressure from the media, nothing to do with being the in-form finisher in the League and if I didn’t score against the newly-crowned world champions, I’d be out. I did manage a goal, but the message was the same against Cyprus — score, or you’ll never play for me again. The only reason I can think of is that I played for Newcastle and we used to batter his Leeds team and I’d often be on the scoresheet. That shouldn’t have mattered for England, but he was a complex character and it seemed to rankle. It was unprofessional on his part, but scoring five goals was the perfect answer. I was shaking hands with the Cypriots at the end when the scoreboard went blank. Then it lit up with ‘Supermac 5, Cyprus 0’. That was a special moment. I noticed Revie shuffling off down the touchline, shoulders hunched, hands in his sheepskin coat pocket, and I just bellowed: ‘Read that and weep, you b******.’ I knew he wouldn’t hear, but that was just how I felt. In the dressing room, he went round each player, from one to 11, shaking hands and saying thanks. After number eight, Mick Channon, he blanked me and went to 10 and 11, then walked out. Incredible, but what mattered was we’d been brutal with lesser opposition, which England must be tonight.’

Hat-trick: Luther Blissett celebrates his third

Hat-trick: Luther Blissett celebrates his third

England 9 Luxembourg 0

Wembley, December 15, 1982: Blissett 3, Coppell, Woodcock, Chamberlain, Hoddle, Neal, Jeanott Moes (og)

Luther Blissett: ‘I had a hand in the first goal and that was as important as my hat-trick. I drilled the ball across the six-yard box and it went in off a defender. The opening goal is crucial. A couple of headers from Steve Coppell and Tony Woodcock, then it was my turn. I did not get a clean contact on the first but there was nothing wrong with the headers that followed and it was great to have a hat-trick. There was never any chance of us letting up. I always remember my old Watford boss Graham Taylor saying: “If you get the chance to beat someone 10, then beat them 10”. The Sun carried a headline “Luther Missit” the next morning (the paper focused on his missed chances), but I’ve never been one for keeping negative thoughts. There was no chance of it spoiling a great memory.’

San Marino 1 England 7

Stadio Renato Dall’Ara, Bologna, November 17, 1993: Gualtieri; I Wright 4, Ince 2, Ferdinand

David Gualtieri: ‘I instinctively decided to chase Stuart Pearce’s backpass and when he mishit it, I was in on goal. There was no time to think. Just hit it hard and low and hope it goes in. It did and we were in front after eight seconds. It was the fastest goal in World Cup history and it changed my life. England got on top eventually, but while it was 1-0, the air turned blue with some of the language they were using. Fair play to Pearce, though. When I went up to him at the end, he swapped shirts and shook hands. I’ll get round to finding a frame for it one of these days. Eighteen months later, Scotland played us here and I remember seeing their fans wearing T-shirts that said “GUALTIERI EIGHT SECONDS”. It was really funny.’

Infamous: Davide Gualtieri pips Stuart Pearce to his under-hit backpass before firing past David Seaman

Infamous: Davide Gualtieri pips Stuart Pearce to his under-hit backpass before firing past David Seaman

On target: Martin Keown scores for England

On target: Martin Keown scores for England

Malta 1 England 2

Valletta, June 3, 2000: R Wright (og); Keown, Heskey

Martin Keown: ‘I should have had a hat-trick. It was a warm-up for Euro 2000 and we were all playing for places. I scored one, had another disallowed and should have had more. I was disappointed that the game was too easy. I didn’t have a chance to show what I could do and Sol Campbell and Tony Adams ended up starting at the Euros. When we played smaller teams, there was that uneasy feeling of having to get a good start, otherwise the match would become awkward.’

But beware, don't get too cocky!
Northern Ireland 1 England 0

Windsor Park, Belfast, September 7, 2005: Healy

David Healy: ‘I sensed something was going to happen before kick-off. The corridor from the changing rooms at Windsor Park is narrow and when the England boys emerged, there was barbed wire by the pitch, police everywhere. Our manager Lawrie Sanchez told us to make it like a Championship fixture. James Quinn smashed into Ashley Cole after six seconds and that set the tone. The England players became rattled, none more so than Wayne Rooney. He was only a young boy but he lost it. He was shouting at Sven Goran Eriksson and was lucky not to be sent off after elbowing Keith Gillespie. David Beckham did his best to calm him down but the body language among England’s lads was a giveaway. When I shot past Paul Robinson 15 minutes from time, it was a great feeling. There are murals of that goal on walls in Belfast and one has Lawrie’s words on it. “These boys have achieved immortality in Northern Ireland sport.” That’s what it meant.’

Flying start: David Healy fires in the winner as Ashley Cole looks aghast

Flying start: David Healy fires in the winner as Ashley Cole looks aghast

The no-hoper files: England’s record against the international whipping boys…

WHEN THEY’VE CRUISED

September 1, 1996: Moldova 0 England 3, World Cup qualifier

September 10, 1997: England 4 Moldova 0, World Cup qualifier

September 4, 1999: England 6 Luxembourg 0, Euro qualifier
Five goals in the first half.

June 6, 2009: Kazakhstan 0 England 4, World Cup qualifier
Took the lead after 20 minutes and eased to victory.

September 7, 2012: Moldova 0 England 5, World Cup qualifier

WHEN THEY’VE BEEN BRUISED

October 14, 1998: Luxembourg 0 England 3, Euros qualifier
Home side missed early penalty and late goals added gloss.

October 13, 2004: Azerbaijan 0 England 1, World Cup qualifier

March 30, 2005: England 2 Azerbaijan 0, World Cup qualifier
Two tight, scrappy games.

October 11, 2008: England 5 Kazakhstan 1, World Cup qualifier
Made sure with three goals in the last 13 minutes.

WHEN THEY’VE BEEN BOOED

March 28, 2007: Andorra 0 England 3, Euros qualifier
Awful first 45 minutes.

September 6, 2008: Andorra 0 England 2, World Cup qualifier
A dreadful, goalless first half.

June 18, 2010: England 0 Algeria 0, World Cup group stage
Wayne Rooney ranted at England fans who booed the team.

London 2012 Olympics: Water polo girls to renew old rivalry in… the Bashes!

GB and Australia's water polo girls to renew old rivalry in… the Bashes!

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UPDATED:

18:21 GMT, 31 July 2012

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MEDALS TABLE

‘We get loads of scratches, bruising, marks from grabbing. It is very physical,’ says British Olympian Fran Leighton. ‘It’s bad when you go on a night out and you’ve got a low top on and everybody looks at you like, “Beaten wife”.’

‘I’ve broken somebody’s nose. I was young,’ confesses Frankie Snell, while Ciara Gibson-/07/31/article-2181692-13E4B190000005DC-802_634x433.jpg” width=”634″ height=”433″ alt=”The wrestler: British water polo player Frankie Snell (bottom) in training for the Olympics” class=”blkBorder” />

The wrestler: British water polo player Frankie Snell (bottom) in training for the Olympics

Not only are players required to tread water for more or less 60 minutes, swim up and down the pool at sprint speed, and find the athleticism to push out of the water to shoot, but they also have to be mentally and physically prepared for rough-house tactics you would associate more with, say, rugby, martial arts, or Leeds United under Don Revie.

‘In the rule book it’s down as non-contact, which is the biggest joke I’ve heard,’ team captain Leighton laughs.

There are seven players on each team, including a goalkeeper, and the aim is simply to score more goals than the opposition. Referees patrol the side of the pool looking for infringements, but the action under water is difficult to police, meaning players use every advantage possible no matter how violent. What lies beneath, indeed.

No holds barred: The British women's water polo team build their strength up by grappling

No holds barred: The British women's water polo team build their strength up by grappling

That is why, as these exclusive pictures show, land training is equally important as pool work. Every week the GB squad, centralised in Manchester, practice grappling and wrestling moves at the city’s Aquatics Centre.

Centre-back Snell explains: ‘We look like ninjas as we wear these skin-tight black leotards to reduce the risk of bruising. The moves are called things like mount and thrust. The mount is someone lying on the ground and you’re literally straddling them, and the person underneath has to try to flip them over and get on top. So you’re really going for it, no boundaries.

‘We do it for about 30 seconds then after you’re exhausted because your whole body’s tense. We have managed to transfer it into the pool a little bit. Sometimes you have to when you’re playing someone twice the size. The knee in the back is a little trick I do if someone’s holding me and I can’t get away.’

Meet the team: The British water polo team face old rivals Australia on Wednesday night

Meet the team: The British water polo team face old rivals Australia on Wednesday night

Leighton, the team’s captain since 2004, adds: ‘The wrestling is more to work all the muscles in our arms and get strength in our shoulders, but some of the grabs we now use in the water.’

The 30-year-old says they have even had lessons from an ultimate fighter. ‘He’s come and shown us how to defend ourselves.’

Leighton’s boyfriend is former swimmer Alex Scotcher, who won Commonwealth gold in Melbourne, and she concedes her idea of aquatic sport was initially a shock to him. But she has won him over and he now plays too, for London Penguins.

She says: ‘If we go out as a group of girls we must look like a women’s refuge or something. There’s all these scratches, a black eye, a few bandages. The worst I’ve had is an elbow to the face which split my eye. The blood just went everywhere. I looked like that guy in Batman, Two-Face!’

What lies beneath: Water polo is a brutal sport under the water as players bend the rules

What lies beneath: Water polo is a brutal sport under the water as players bend the rules

Snell, 25, adds: ‘Usually you do shake hands afterwards, but if someone’s given me a deliberate punch or something like that it’s hard to be friendly.’

Winger Gibson-/07/31/article-2181692-144FD0C4000005DC-948_634x463.jpg” width=”634″ height=”463″ alt=”Hot ticket: The Water Polo Arena on the Olympic Park will be packed to the rafters on Wednesday” class=”blkBorder” />

Hot ticket: The Water Polo Arena on the Olympic Park will be packed to the rafters on Wednesday

The Olympic tournament structure encourages the women to dream. There are two groups of four and all progress to the quarter-finals, with finishing positions deciding the draw. Win the fourth match and they are into the semi-finals. In Beijing, Holland finished third in their group with two losses, but narrowly won their next three to take gold. They have not qualified this time.

The British squad are aware just how important that fourth game is. ‘It’s all or nothing,’ Leighton says. Indeed, ask Fekete what the aim is and he will reply: ‘To win.’

Britain narrowly lost their opener to Russia 7-6 on Monday and next up is Australia, on Wednesday at 7.40pm. The rivalry between these nations will be even fiercer because of a nasty incident Down Under at the start of the year. Alex Rutlidge had her ribs broken when an Australian player kicked her hard in the midriff.

‘That was deliberate,’ Snell says, mood darkened. ‘We’ve got the video. She grabbed hold of Alex and booted off her. Then we see Alex going under water. That was the first time I’d ever seen broken ribs.’

Rutlidge does not know the name of the player, but remembers her face. ‘It was quite vicious and she meant to hurt me but not to break anything. It put me out of action for a while. If I saw her again I wouldn’t say anything to her. What happens in the pool stays in the pool.’

Wednesday’s match promises to be hard-hitting. The Bashes, you might call it.

Charles Sale: Euro swansong for England"s Umbro deal

Euro swansong for England's Umbro deal

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UPDATED:

23:26 GMT, 7 June 2012

Euro 2012 looks almost certain to be the last tournament at which Umbro have their logo on the England shirts, despite their 20million-a-year contract running until 2018.

FA insiders believe it is only a matter of time before Nike, who are selling off Umbro, start talks to switch the logo to their ‘Swoosh’.

All change: Umbro set to lose their long-standing England agreement

All change: Umbro set to lose their long-standing England agreement

Nike have the choice of offering Umbro for sale with or without the marquee England property but the second option is regarded as far more likely — with the change happening around the launch of the next England shirt next spring.

Euro 2012 email button

The FA, who had no warning of their long-term kit suppliers being ditched, will not be complaining if Nike extend the deal and offer more money — as was the case with Manchester City, who will be making the Umbro-Nike transition for the 2013-14 season.

Rival bid

There is plenty of acrimony between football conference rivals Leaders in Football and Soccerex. So it will cause concern at Leaders, run by James Worrell, that the 65 per cent shareholding of collapsed Russian-owned Convers Sports that is being sold off by the administrators is interesting the Duncan Revie-run Soccerex. Worrell left them to set up the opposition.

Picture this

Despite all of the FA’s admirable on-message branding of the England media centre in a Krakow hotel, the first picture in a montage of entries in Vauxhall’s photographer-of-the-year competition is of Rio Ferdinand, whose non-selection has overshadowed the start of the tournament. A laughing Ferdinand is snapped stage centre of a goal celebration in training.

Jordan Henderson

On the ball

Jordan Henderson (pictured right) still has to win over plenty of sceptics who don’t think he deserves his England place.

So it was a canny PR move for inside-the-camp rolling FATV footage to be shown at the England media centre of the Liverpool midfielder (148 touches) winning a tennis ball keepy-uppy contest against Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain (136).

Flower power

The Gary Neville influence has already pervaded the England team room at the Hotel Stary, with the Stone Roses being played on the jukebox installed there with snooker and pool tables. Neville is a big enough fan of the Manchester group for frontman Ian Brown to have sung at his testimonial.

Face fits

The love-in between Roy Hodgson and FA chairman David Bernstein included the England manager inviting his boss, plus Club England management and other FA officials, to join him for dinner at the team hotel on their first night in Krakow. This follows Hodgson sitting next to Bernstein on the flight from Luton, as he had on the way back from Oslo after the Norway friendly, as well as being partners on the FA golf day. It adds up to more face time in less than a fortnight than Bernstein would have had with Hodgson’s insular predecessor, Fabio Capello, over 14 months.

What goes around…

The Foreign Office-led decision to boycott the group stages of Euro 2012 in protest over human rights in Ukraine avoids what would have been a spiky encounter with some of the FA party.

Minister for Sport Hugh Robertson, who met FA members in Rustenburg, South Africa, before England’s opening World Cup match against the USA, has been a vociferous critic of the FA, famously calling football the worst governed sport in the country.

Those same FA blazers were looking forward to challenging Robertson over his department being ‘fit for purpose’ after the travails of beleaguered Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport Jeremy Hunt, who hopes to travel over if England progress.

Kids stuff

One wonders about the FA’s priorities when the main subjects of discussion at the last meeting of the absurd Protocol Committee were a Chelsea request for their FA Cup final seats to be nearer the front of the Royal Box and whether York chairman Jason McGill’s children, who are under the minimum age of 16, should be allowed into Wembley’s VIP suite at the FA Trophy final. They weren’t.

EURO 2012: Sportsmail looks back at England managers" first games ahead of Roy Hodgson"s opener against Norway

Will Roy repeat history We look back at the successes (and failures) of England managers in their opening games

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UPDATED:

14:43 GMT, 25 May 2012

As Roy Hodgson prepares to take charge of an England team for the first time against Norway on Saturday, Sportsmail looks back over the starts made by his predecessors in the role.

With Euro 2012 just around the corner, Hodgson needs to get off to a winning start. But not everyone who has come before him has been so lucky, and the former West Brom and Liverpool coach will be praying not to be the first manager to lose his opening game as manager since Alf Ramsey in 1963.

Ready Roy Hodgson (right) is gearing up for his first game in charge of England against Norway on Saturday

Ready Roy Hodgson (right) is gearing up for his first game in charge of England against Norway on Saturday

Walter Winterbottom

Beat Ireland 7-2, Windsor Park, September 28, 1946

Wilf Mannion's hat-trick helped England's first full-time manager launch his reign with a thumping win over a united Ireland team in the British Home Championship.

Tom Finney, Tommy Lawton, Raich Carter and Bobby Langton were also on the scoresheet as Norman Lockhart scored the home team's two goals.

Alf Ramsey

Lost to France 5-2, Parc des Princes, February 27, 1963

Not the best of omen for Hodgson, as England are to face France in the groups stages next month.

England's future World Cup-winning coach took over after a 1-1 draw in the home leg of the European Nations Cup first qualifying round, but could not inspire second-leg success and, indeed, remains the only permanent England manager to lose his first game in charge.

Maryan Wisniewski and Lucien Cossou scored twice apiece and Yvon Douis also found the net, Bobby Tambling and Robert Smith replying for England.

Legend: Sir Bobby Robson has a successful tenure as England manager but only drew his first game

Legend: Sir Bobby Robson has a successful tenure as England manager but only drew his first game

Don Revie

Beat Czechoslovakia 3-0, Wembley, October 30, 1974

In contrast to Ramsey, an ultimately unsuccessful reign was given a false dawn as three goals in the final 17 minutes sank a physical Czechoslovakia side in the opening game of the European Championship qualifying campaign.

Mick Channon's header set England on their way before Colin Bell struck twice.

Ron Greenwood

Drew with Switzerland 0-0, September 7, 1977

Greenwood, hired as a steady hand to manage the fall-out of Revie's regime, opted to build his side around European champions Liverpool and selected six of their players for his first game at the helm – but they could not break down Switzerland in a lacklustre friendly stalemate.

Bobby Robson

Drew with Denmark 2-2, Copenhagen, September 22, 1982

Trevor Francis' double gave England an undeserved 2-1 lead with 10 minutes remaining in their European Championship qualifier, but a solo goal from Jesper Olsen earned the hosts a point. Robson himself labelled his side's share of the spoils a “travesty”.

Graham Taylor

Beat Hungary 1-0, Wembley, September 12, 1990

Gary Lineker began Taylor's reign in rather happier fashion than he ended it, his winner in a low-key friendly win standing in stark contrast to his substitution in favour of Alan Smith in Taylor's last game in charge against Sweden at Euro 92 while one short of Bobby Charlton's record goal tally for the national team.

Terry Venables

Beat Denmark 1-0, Wembley, March 9 1994

Beaming: Terry Venables managed to scrape a victory in his first game in charge

Beaming: Terry Venables managed to scrape a victory in his first game in charge

With no competitive fixtures for two years as England prepared to host Euro 96, Venables was granted license to experiment and took on the Danes with his unconventional “Christmas tree” formation. David Platt scored the only goal as another manager began his reign with victory.

Glenn Hoddle

Beat Moldova 3-0, Chisinau, September 1, 1996

Hoddle's first game in charge was notable chiefly for the debut of future captain and 100-cap stalwart David Beckham as England made a winning start to qualification for the 1998 World Cup.

Nick Barmby and Paul Gascoigne put England in control by half-time and Alan Shearer made the game safe on the hour mark.

Kevin Keegan

Beat Poland 3-1, Wembley, March 27, 1999

Listen up: Kevin Keegan also made a solid start to his time as England manager

Listen up: Kevin Keegan also made a solid start to his time as England manager

A Paul Scholes hat-trick got Keegan off to a winning start, following Howard Wilkinson's one-match spell as caretaker.

The Manchester United star converted Shearer's knock-down and then Beckham's cross to put the hosts 2-0 up and, although Poland skipper Jerzy Brzeczek pulled a goal back, a second headed goal from the midfielder secured victory.

Sven-Goran Eriksson

Beat Spain 3-0, Wembley, February 28, 2001

Repeat Hodgson will be hoping he can emulate Sven Goran Eriksson (left) by winning his first match

Repeat Hodgson will be hoping he can emulate Sven Goran Eriksson (left) by winning his first match

For the second time, Barmby popped up to score the first goal of an England manager's reign.

If that statistic seems incongruous, England's other scorers in a comfortable friendly win are perhaps more improbable still – Emile Heskey netting one of his seven goals in 62 caps before defender Ugo Ehiogu rounded off the scoring as England's first foreign manager made a winning start.

Steve McClaren

Beat Greece 4-0, Old Trafford, August 16, 2006

Off the mark: Steve McLaren managed to get a win in his first game in charge

Off the mark: Steve McLaren managed to get a win in his first game in charge

McClaren made the bold call to axe former captain Beckham from his first squad and began his tenure with a comfortable 4-0 win over a team failing to live up to their status as reigning European champions.

New skipper John Terry, Frank Lampard and Peter Crouch (two) scored the goals but it soon turned sour for McClaren and Beckham had to be recalled before the end of a dismal failed qualifying campaign for Euro 2008.

Fabio Capello

Beat Switzerland 2-1, Wembley, February 6, 2008

Roy's predecessor: Fabio Capello left England in February after falling out with the FA

Roy's predecessor: Fabio Capello left England in February after falling out with the FA

The FA once again looked overseas after axing McClaren, and Capello saw Jermaine Jenas and Shaun Wright-Phillips earn his new employers victory over the Swiss, for whom Eren Derdiyok was on target.

Capello led England to the 2010 World Cup and this summer's European Championship but a second-round exit to Germany crowned a miserable campaign in South Africa and he resigned before the journey to Poland and Ukraine.

Don Revie statue unveiled at Leeds

Leeds' legendary manager Revie honoured with bronze statue at Elland Road

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UPDATED:

14:17 GMT, 5 May 2012

A bronze statue of former Leeds manager Don Revie has been unveiled at Elland Road.

The 8ft statue by Barnsley sculptor Graham Ibbeson was revealed by players from the 1972 cup-winning team.

The statue was paid for by funds raised by thousands of Leeds fans up and down the country.

Remembering a legend: Members of Leeds triumphant team under Don Revie unveiled a statue to the manager

Remembering a legend: Members of Leeds triumphant team under Don Revie unveiled a statue to the manager

Sunday marks the 40th anniversary of the club's centenary FA Cup final success in which Leeds beat Arsenal 1-0.

The statue is sited on Lowfields Road, opposite the East Stand entrance.

Revie played for several clubs including Manchester City and Leeds and he won six England caps.

He signed as a player for Leeds United in the late 1950s and was then appointed manager in 1961.

In 1977 Revie controversially resigned from the England manager's job to take over the United Arab Emirates team.

He died of motor neurone disease in 1989 aged 61.

Tribute: revie's children Duncan and Kim were also present

Tribute: revie's children Duncan and Kim were also present

Peter Shilton urges Ben Foster to reconsider decision to quit England

Shilton urges West Brom keeper Foster to reconsider decision to quit England

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UPDATED:

13:06 GMT, 26 April 2012

West Bromwich goalkeeper Ben Foster believes he is playing the best football of his career – and has been urged by England legend Peter Shilton to reconsider his decision to quit international football.

Foster, on loan from Birmingham this season, has played a key role in the Baggies guaranteeing Barclays Premier League football for a third successive season.

But the 29-year-old has opted not to play for his country for the past 12 months – a move Shilton has urged him to contemplate changing.

Top form: Foster believes he is putting in some of the best performances of his career to date

Top form: Foster believes he is putting in some of the best performances of his career to date

Foster said: 'I think it is my best football. At Birmingham last year I felt pretty sharp and on top of my game, and I think I have pretty much carried that on.

'They say goalkeepers get better with age and I feel I am now playing at probably the best level I have played throughout my career so far.'

Foster's stance on not playing for England since the tail-end of last season has not altered.

But Shilton said: 'It would be good if Ben reconsidered his decision.

'Ben, when he has played for England, has looked okay and it would be nice if he came and was available again.

'It would create a nice trio of keepers in Joe Hart, Robert Green and Ben, who would pressurise each other.

England legend: Shilton remains the most-capped England player

England legend: Shilton remains the most-capped England player

'It surprises me when someone does not want to play for England, although I've got to say I did it once when Don Revie was manager and I felt he wasn't being honest with me.

'Ben is 29. I don't know is there is something deeper. He probably feels 'do I need to be travelling around at the end of the season being number two'.

'But anything can happen, an injury or loss of form, and suddenly you are England's keeper, win a medal and be a hero and win the first trophy since 1966. To me it's a case of “hang on in there”.'

Sir Trevor Brooking says The FA could stick with Stuart Pearce for Euros

Brooking hints FA could stick with Pearce for Euros and says players would have no problem adapting

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UPDATED:

08:26 GMT, 16 March 2012

The FA have given their strongest hint yet that they are ready to stick with caretaker manager Stuart Pearce for Euro 2012.

Pearce took charge of the friendly with Holland last month and could remain in temporary control if the FA are unable to get their man in time for the tournament in June.

Tottenham manager Harry Redknapp remains the overwhelming favourite to lead the country on a full-time basis, but there is a chance the appointment might not be made until after the Euros.

Ready to take the call: England could ask Stuart Pearce to take charge of the Euros

Ready to take the call: England could ask Stuart Pearce to take charge of the Euros

Trevor Brooking, one of the men on the FA’s panel who will decide on who to appoint as Fabio Capello’s successor, says the players would have no problems adapting to life under a caretaker coach.

Brooking, the FA director of football development, has first-hand knowledge from dealing with such an experience in his early days as an England player.

He made his debut in the last match of Sir Alf Ramsey's reign but then played under stand-in boss Joe Mercer who enjoyed a seven-game run before making way for Don Revie.

Four wise men: Trevor Brooking, Adrien Bevington, David Bernstein and Alex Horne will decide who will be the next England manager

Four wise men: Trevor Brooking, Adrien Bevington, David Bernstein and Alex Horne will decide who will be the next England manager

Brooking said: 'When I started with England, Joe Mercer came in for a few games after Sir Alf left. But, when you play at international level you can cope with something like that.

'You are in a group of players you know well, you want to play well. Part of that under Joe was an end of season tour, a difference perhaps to a tournament like Euro 2012.

'But I've always felt you can have someone come in, if everything is in place, and take up the role pretty quickly because the quality of player you are working with can easily adapt.'

Brooking is part of the four-man FA board who will decide Capello's replacement but he is reluctant to comment on how that search is developing.

Favourite: Harry Redknapp is the front runner to be named England manager

Favourite: Harry Redknapp is the front runner to be named England manager

He said: 'We've always said we will wait until the latter part of the season and nothing has changed.

'It will be the back end of the season before something happens.
But Brooking does insist England need to increase the amount of home-grown talent playing Premier League football for the new national manager – whoever it is – to have a greater chance of success.

He admits the bright talent at Under-16 to Under-19 level needs more top-flight football if it is to flourish on the international stage.

Successor: Fabio Capello quit as England manager at the beginning of February

Successor: Fabio Capello quit as England manager at the beginning of February

Lion heart: Pearce has said in the past he'd be ready to lead England at the Euros

Lion heart: Pearce has said in the past he'd be ready to lead England at the Euros

Brooking said: ‘People say more young home-grown players are now making their mark in the Premier League but unfortunately it is a bit misleading because it is still the 35 per cent figure for starting elevens.

'In the Under-16 to Under-19 bracket, we have got a good group of youngsters coming through with potential, a bit more imagination and creativity, showing a bit more in the attacking third.

'But there is still that frustration that the Under-18 and Under-19s are not playing as much first-team football as we would like.

'There are a few on loan to Football League clubs but you would want them playing in the top flight.'

Brooking added: 'If you compare us with Spain, where nearly 80% of the starting elevens in La Liga are Spanish players, you can see the Spanish national coach has twice as many players to choose from.

'We need to get that 35 per cent figure up to 45 per cent, 55 per cent, and over 60 per cent to give us more of a competitive chance in terms of the depth of choice.'

Brooking was speaking at the launch of the Grass Roots Football Show which will take place in 2012 at the NEC in Birmingham from the May 25-27.

England v Holland: Remember 1977, when Total Football conquered Wembley

The night Total Football conquered Wembley thanks to Cruyff and his Orange masters

This was the night Holland came to town and painted it orange with the supreme craft of Johan Cruyff, the flair of Johan Neeskens and the swagger of Johnny Rep.

Wembley stood to applaud the Dutch players from the pitch at half-time as they handed Don Revie’s side a lesson in the power of Total Football.

Cruyff was the inevitable star of a slick exhibition rated by some as the most emphatic display by an away team against England since the Hungarians of 1953.

But, as MATT BARLOW and NEIL MOXLEY describe, it was NEC Nijmegen winger Jan Peters who stole the headlines with both goals in a 2-0 triumph…

Pure genius: The brilliant Johan Cruyff led Holland in their 2-0 win over England at Wembley

Pure genius: The brilliant Johan Cruyff led Holland in their 2-0 win over England at Wembley

MATCH FACTS

ENGLAND (4-4-2): Clemence; Clement, Doyle, Watson, Beattie; Greenhoff (Todd 40min), Madeley (Pearson 74), Brooking, Bowles; Keegan (capt), Francis. Manager: Don Revie.

HOLLAND (4-3-3): Schrijvers; Suurbier, Krol, Hovenkamp, Rijsbergen; Van der Kerkhof, Peters, Neeskens; Rep (Kist 75), Cruyff (capt), Rensenbrink. Manager: Jan Zwartkruis.

Scorer: Peters 28, 36.

Booked: Rijsbergen.

Referee: Walter Eschweiler (West Germany).

Attendance: 90,260.

JAN PETERS: ‘That was a very important game. Around that time, we hadn’t had very good results, but we won 2-0, I scored both goals, and it was the first and only time I played in the national team with Johan Cruyff, so for me personally it was extra special.

‘I was only playing for a small team, so to then play at Wembley – a place that every player thinks is the most beautiful stadium in the world – and to score two goals, was wonderful. It was a highlight for me as a player.

‘After the game at Wembley I moved to AZ in Alkmaar. They were one of the best teams in the Netherlands. We won the cup three times, won the championship once and also reached the UEFA Cup final, where we lost to Ipswich Town. It was a very good time for me.’

It would be the only time this wonderful Dutch team of the Seventies would play in England. To many, they were the best international side never to win a major trophy, losing in the World Cup finals of 1974 and 1978 and finishing third in the 1976 European Championship.

England were down in the dumps. They had failed to qualify for the Germany ’74 World Cup and a 2-0 defeat to Italy in Rome, in a World Cup qualifier on their previous outing in November 1976, would ultimately deny them a place at Argentina ’78.

SIR TREVOR BROOKING: ‘The teams Holland produced in ’74 and ’78 showed the quality of that generation, and the outstanding talents were Cruyff and Neeskens.

‘We all knew Cruyff’s strengths but we couldn’t stop him. He was the ultimate two-footed player with devastating acceleration and the ability to go past anyone. Neeskens was the attacking midfielder with the skills to open up defences. I can remember long spells when we couldn’t get the ball.

‘They were the equivalent of the modern Spain team and everyone was trying to understand the Dutch philosophy of possession and rotating positions. They were ahead of their time.

Dutch courage: Rudi Krol gets away from Trevor Brooking on the hallowed Wembley turf

Dutch courage: Rudi Krol gets away from Trevor Brooking on the hallowed Wembley turf

Johan Cryuff dominated last night’s match as no great player has ever dominated Wembley before. He had 61 touches of the ball and of his 50 passes, 30 were positively forward balls. He switched play with some stunning 40-yard passes which left the crowd and England’s defenders gasping. Unlike some stars, Cruyff also worked hard, often appearing in his own penalty area. /02/28/article-2107856-11F56D3C000005DC-365_306x490.jpg” width=”306″ height=”490″ alt=”Key man: Holland's Jan Peters” class=”blkBorder” />

Key man: Holland's Jan Peters

KEVIN BEATTIE: ‘They ripped us to pieces that night. I only played nine times for England but that was easily the worst game. Cruyff was unbelievable. They just passed the ball so quickly, all the way through the team from back to front.

‘We couldn’t get near them and even Don Revie afterwards admitted they had played some smashing stuff. It was Total Football and, although on one hand it was just awful, you really had to admire it. I’ve no idea why I’m flat out for the goal. I must have been having a lie-down. I’d been marking Robbie Rensenbrink and he’d tired me out.’

Revie handed a debut to Trevor Francis. Talk about a baptism of fire for the 22-year-old!

TREVOR FRANCIS: ‘I had waited a long time to make my international debut and was thrilled when Don Revie chose me to play. It wasn’t the greatest of starts for me, but I know I won’t be alone when I say it was no disgrace on this particular occasion because that Dutch team contained some very special players.

‘People ask about Total Football, and what it was like to play against, in practice.

THE STATS FROM THE NIGHT

0 times Holland had beaten England before their 2-0 win (lost three and drawn two)

400 lucky Dutch fans were allowed in, though their tickets were stuck in the hold of a plane

61 touches by Johan Cruyff – 40 more than debutant Trevor Francis

260 thousand pounds taken in gate receipts, from 90,260 fans

100 thousand pounds of the gate the Dutch took home, having won

‘The fact was that this was the first time that players were expected to be comfortable in possession, regardless of where they stood on the pitch. That was a novelty. It hadn’t been seen before. They were also supposed to interchange their position and be intelligent enough to realise what was going on around them.

‘I would go so far as to say there were three who you could term as world-class. Even now, when you are talking about the greats of the game, they would have to be discussed. Certainly, that went for Cruyff. He was the best player in Europe at that time. He was the one player I tried to model parts of my own game upon.

‘His speed with the ball that night was terrific. And he had this knack of almost stopping to a standstill. It would lull the defender into a false sense of security. Almost like that nothing was happening, that he was stuck for an idea. Then he would explode into action. He had great pace from a standing start.

‘I also tried to copy the move that became known as the “Cruyff turn”. I practised it relentlessly.

Game over: Jan peters fired home the decisive goal as Robby Rensenbrink (centre), England's Micky Doyle (right) and Kevin Beattie (on ground extremme right) watch on

Game over: Jan peters fired home the decisive goal as Robby Rensenbrink (centre), England's Micky Doyle (right) and Kevin Beattie (on ground extremme right) watch on

England joined the rest of the secondraters in the gutter of world football last night. The last dregs of self-respect drained away to the accompaniment of Wembley’s new theme tune, ‘What a load of rubbish’. To be one of 90,000 Englishmen in this once impregnable stadium was a demoralising experience, as even manager Don Revie bore unhappy witness. For England were not merely beaten for the first time by Holland.. . they were torn apart.

JEFF POWELL in Sportsmail the next day

‘The fulcrum of the team was Johan Neeskens. He was the Dutch version of Bryan Robson who, if he hadn’t been standing in Cruyff’s shadow, would have received far more recognition than he did. Lastly, there was Rudi Krol, who wasn’t part of the great Ajax side of the early 1970s, but was nevertheless, in my eyes, the equal of Franz Beckenbauer.’

Peters is now on the coaching staff at amateur club De Treffers in the third tier of Dutch football but is not enamoured with Bert van Marwijk’s Holland team, despite their progress, because they do not uphold the legacy of Total Football.

JAN PETERS: ‘They had good results but the football was not what we like in Holland. When all of the best players are in good form then I think we can win the Euros – but every team will be at a high level.

‘Robin van Persie is one of the most important players. Robin plays in England very well, but in the national team he hasn’t had a big impact. I hope he can reach the same level that he plays for Arsenal.’

A full interview with Jan Peters will appear in the official matchday programme