Tag Archives: ravichandran

India v England ODI series: Eoin Morgan praises preparations

Morgan praises England's preparations for India as one-day series looms large

. There are a lot of foundations already set so it's a matter of building on that,' he said.

'The majority of our preparation has already been done pre-Christmas. Many of us have been here (with the Test squad) since the 24th or 25th of October and some of the guys who weren't spent three weeks here before Christmas too.

'Over the next few days we'll just be doing top-ups in different areas of our games. We are prepared.'

'We've seen in past series how important that is – like the (2010/11) Ashes where we were there three or four weeks prior to the first game. It has done us good in the Test and Twenty20 matches and hopefully it will in the one-dayers too.'

While England are looking to get 2013 off to a winning start at the Palam Services Ground, all eyes in Delhi will instead be on the host nation's ODI match against Pakistan.

India have already lost that series after back to back defeats to their fierce rivals, but there is plenty still to play for in the final fixture.

Media pundits, former internationals and fans alike have called for a change when the squad for England is announced and established stars like Gautam Gambhir, Virender Sehwag, Virat Kohli and Yuvraj Singh are all in need of runs.

Run drought: Gautam Gambhir is in a rut

Run drought: Gautam Gambhir is in a rut

Spin bowler Ravichandran Ashwin has been another target for criticism, having performed also modestly against England in the Tests, but Morgan is not ready to take the reigning world champions lightly.

'I don't think it is a good time to play India. I don't think it is ever a good time to play India,' said the Dubliner.

'We know how successful they have been in the past and they are the World Cup champions at the moment.

'They might be going through a bad patch but they are very, very dangerous cricketers and they have guys who can turn the game on its head in a matter of minutes.'

Tomorrow's match is due to begin at 9am local time (3.30am GMT) in conditions likely to be colder than an April outing at Chester-le-Street.

England's new limited-overs coach Ashley Giles is in charge of his country for the first time and has a couple of selection issues to ponder.

Somerset's Jos Buttler and Yorkshire's Joe Root appear to be battling for one place in the top six, while the variations of Jade Dernbach and the pace of Stuart Meaker offer different options for the final pace bowling spot.

Giles must also decide whether to leave Ian Bell at opener or restore Kevin Pietersen, back in the 50-over set-up after reversing his retirement, alongside Alastair Cook at the head of the innings.

Jonathan Trott"s sportsmanship has been questioned by Indian spinner Ravichandran Ashwin

Ashwin's anger: Spinner questions Trott's sportsmanship

|

UPDATED:

03:42 GMT, 17 December 2012

Tempers spilled over in Nagpur yesterday when Indian spinner Ravichandran Ashwin questioned Jonathan Trott’s sportsmanship as England closed in on an historic series win.

Trott had taken advantage of a delivery from slow left-armer Ravindra Jadeja that slipped out of the bowler’s hand and bounced several times away on an adjacent strip.

Anger: Indian spinner Ravi Ashwin (pictured) was angered by Jonathan Trott hitting a ball that slipped out of Ravindra Jadeja's hand for four

Anger: Indian spinner Ravi Ashwin (pictured) was angered by Jonathan Trott hitting a ball that slipped out of Ravindra Jadeja's hand for four

The batsman took a few steps to his left and whacked the ball for four, as he was in his rights to do.

But after tea India were incensed when they thought they had Trott caught behind on 43 — although the Snickometer revealed no edge — and Ashwin later became involved in a heated exchange with the England No 3 after warning him for backing up too far.

‘It was just about the shot with the rolling ball he got away with,’ said Ashwin. ‘When you talk about gamesmanship, we think you should hold yourself to the standards you expect from the opposition.’

India have not forgotten an incident during the first Test at Ahmedabad, when Trott clearly grassed a slip catch which was then referred to the TV umpire — although he made it clear at the time he was unsure whether the ball had bounced.

And India were furious yesterday when Ishant Sharma went up for a caught behind as Trott played an uncharacteristically loose cut shot.

Umpire Kumar Dharmasena correctly ruled not out, which was the cue for uproar, as Sharma and Virat Kohli gave Trott — who appeared to blow them a kiss — the benefit of their advice, and India captain MS Dhoni had to be spoken to by the officials.

Then 10 overs later, Ashwin pulled up in his delivery stride to warn Trott he had strayed too far from his crease. ‘I said I could run him out if he could hit that ball,’ said Ashwin, a reference to the Jadeja incident.

Gamesmanship: Trott (pictured) is 66 not out as England head towards an historic series win

Gamesmanship: Trott (pictured) is 66 not out as England head towards an historic series win

‘He said you might as well run me out. But I said I wouldn’t. We’ve got him out enough times to get him out again.’

England fast bowler Jimmy Anderson last night defended his team-mate, saying: ‘I’d do the same if I was batting.

‘I think I saw Dhoni laughing about it at one stage, so I don’t think that was the catalyst for what happened later. But when you’re in the middle of a crucial Test, things are going to get heated from time to time.

‘There are two teams wanting to win a game of cricket, and the series is on the line. So things inevitably do boil over.’

We
are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a
dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and
international news organisations.

The
BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies
Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Jonathan Trott helps England build lead over India as they close in on series win

Determined Trott stays calm under pressure as England move closer to memorable series win

|

UPDATED:

14:03 GMT, 16 December 2012

Jonathan Trott stood defiantly up against the Indian attack, a pitch unfit for purpose and a barrage of verbal abuse to take England to within one good session of one of their best and most historic triumphs in modern memory.

What had been a cagey, turgid and mostly downright dull final Test burst into life with the series on a knife-edge in the final session of the fourth day when Trott put behind him a year full of frustrations to deliver just when it mattered most.

When Kevin Pietersen inexplicably shouldered arms to a straight ball from Ravindra Jadeja – just as Trott had done in the first innings – England, who had battled heroically for the best part of four days, looked to be letting their first series win in India for almost 28 years slip out of their grasp.

Building his runs: Jonathan Trott scored a half century as England look to build a lead

Building his runs: Jonathan Trott scored a half century as England look to build a lead

They were just 98 ahead with three wickets down and the man who could have attacked them to safety gone yet again to left-arm spin. But Ian Bell joined Trott and what followed was the most fluent, potentially decisive, batting of a Test England need only draw today to take the series.

Not to mention the most controversial. For when Trott walked a few paces outside his crease and smacked a ball that had dribbled out of Jadeja’s hand and bounced several times before trickling to a halt on the leg-side of the pitch for four he ignited another argument between these teams over the spirit of cricket.

Trott was perfectly within his rights to do what he did but, even though both Jadeja and MS Dhoni reacted with wry smiles, Ravichandran Ashwin later said that this was the spark for the tense and unpleasant scenes that were to follow.

Remember, it was Dhoni who called Bell back at Trent Bridge last year when he had been run out walking out of his crease at tea. And remember it was Trott who, in Ahmedabad, pleaded ignorance when he had clearly grassed a catch. India feel that their gesture in Trent Bridge has hardly been reciprocated since.

Trott will not care. His totally legal shot – which went down as four off a no-ball – showed the competitive desire of the man and he carried on displaying it when India were convinced, wrongly, they had him caught behind on 43.

This has again been a chastening match for the umpires and those of us who against all hope tried to cling on to a game not dominated by technology. Sorry, this series has proved the Decision Review System doubters like myself totally wrong. It has been punctuated by one awful umpiring error after another.

The latest howlers came from the man this year voted the best official on the ICC elite panel, Kumar Dharmasena. Firstly he gave out Alastair Cook, wrongly, for the second time in the Test and then said no when Trott should have been given lbw on just seven to Jadeja. How important that reprieve now looks.

Frustration: Ishant Sharma thought he had taken Jonathan Trott's wicket

Frustration: Ishant Sharma thought he had taken Jonathan Trott's wicket

Add Sunday’s other wrong decision of Rod Tucker who gave Nick Compton lbw to one he inside edged onto pad – the ball then ballooned to gully so Compton should have been given out anyway, only in a different way – and this series has seen a catalogue of errors from these umpires and the ones who officiated in the first two Tests, Aleem Dar and Tony Hill.

But Dharmasena’s decision to reprieve Trott when he attempted to cut Ishant Sharma was not among them. This was the right call but that did not stop the Indian players losing their cool completely, with their agitator in chief Virat Kohli involving himself in an incident that had nothing to do with him.

There at the end: Ian Bell supported Trott at the end

There at the end: Ian Bell supported Trott at the end

They were picking on the wrong man in Trott. He is one who thrives on such things rather than being cowed by them. He appeared to blow a little kiss at Sharma – that didn’t exactly calm India down – and went on his merry way to an unbeaten 66 by the close with England on 161 for three, a priceless lead of 165.

There was one other flashpoint when Ashwin threatened to run Trott out backing up – he later said in essence that he would not have stooped to Trott’s level – but the combative Trott and his team lived to fight one last day in this absorbing and unpredictable series.

As long as England do not blow it with a cluster of quick wickets today they will surely achieve the draw they need. It would be a series triumph richly deserved. Even yesterday India, until they were stirred into a late reaction, were strangely passive, poor in the field and lacking any sort of dynamism.

Their fortunes were summed up by a quite bizarre first hour yesterday when they batted on but showed no ambition to try to win the match, scoring just 29 runs in 13 soporific overs before declaring with one wicket left four runs behind England’s 330. All they achieved was take time out of the match and made Cook’s task a little easier. It was not very Duncan Fletcher-like cricket at all.

A Test that has never progressed beyond first gear, at least until Trott and Bell took the run-rate up close to a giddy three an over, has done little to further the cause of the ultimate game in its most passionate country. Shame on the groundsman who produced this lifeless excuse of a pitch, whether by accident or design.

But the sheer importance of this Test and what is at stake has made it compelling viewing for the purists. And England just need one last, final push now for the most extraordinary of series wins.

We are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

LIVE: India v England – day one, fourth Test, Nagpur

LIVE: India v England – the action on day one of the fourth Test in Nagpur as it happens

|

UPDATED:

09:56 GMT, 13 December 2012

Stay up to date with all the action on day one of the fourth Test between England and India with Sportsmail's
unrivalled team. We'll deliver over-by-over coverage as the action
unfolds in Nagpur while our brilliant team of writers update with their
insights from the ground. Tweet your thoughts to: @James Andrew_ or email your thoughts to [email protected]

India v England – essentials

India: Gautam Gambhir, Virender Sehwag, Cheteshwar Pujara, Sachin Tendulkar, Virat Kohli, Ravindra Jadeja, Mahendra Dhoni (capt & wk), Ravichandran Ashwin, Piyush Chawla, Ishant Sharma, Pragyan Ojha.

England: Alastair Cook (capt), Nick Compton, Jonathan Trott, Kevin Pietersen, Ian Bell, Joe Root, Matt Prior (wk), Tim Bresnan, Graeme Swann, James Anderson, Monty Panesar.

Umpires: R Tucker (Aus) and K Dharmasena (SL)

Match referee: J Crowe (NZ)

ENGLAND WON THE TOSS AND BAT

DM.has('rcp',”twitterCombined”,
feeds : 'newman_cricket, the_topspin',
tweetCount : 4
);

Cricket writers on Twitter

Twitter Avatar

Loading tweets…

Feeds provided by Twitter

80th over: England 164-5 (Root 21, Prior 14)

79th over: England 164-5 (Root 21, Prior 14)

Ashwin comes back into the attack.

Prior plays one down to deep point for a single and Root then flicks one wide of mid-on for another single.

78th over: England 162-5 (Root 20, Prior 13)

Ojha comes back to bowl.

Root adds two more with a nice drive through the covers.

77th over: England 160-5 (Root 18, Prior 13)

Prior takes a single off the first ball with a shot to deep backward square. Root then adds two with a nice shot guided to point.

76th over: England 156-5 (Root 15, Prior 12)

Jadeja to Root and it is yet another maiden. I wish I hadn't said anything a few overs a go.

75th over: England 156-5 (Root 15, Prior 12)

Sharma comes back into the attack after his spell on the side lines and he starts off this spell with a maiden.

74th over: England 156-5 (Root 15, Prior 12)

Just as I mention the lack of maidens, what happens next A maiden from Jadeja.

73rd over: England 152-5 (Root 15, Prior 8)

A lovely shot by Prior from the final ball of the over with a nice shot through the covers.

72nd over: England 148-5 (Root 15, Prior 8)

A run each for Root and Prior, the runs are not flowing freely, but at least the maidens have stopped – for now.

71st over: England 146-5 (Root 14, Prior 7)

Sharma is back on the field.

Prior takes one and then Root plays a nice flick past square leg for three.

70th over: England 146-5 (Root 11, Prior 5)

Prior gets one off the over from the bowling of Jadeja.

69th over: England 145-5 (Root 11, Prior 5)

Prior plays a cut shot towards cover point for two.

68th over: England 142-5 (Root 11, Prior 3)

WICKET: Pietersen c Ojha b Jadeja 73

Big wicket for India, they have got England's main man, it was a loose shot against the spin (what little spin there is) and Ojha takes the catch low at midwicket. England are wobbling.

Matt Prior is the new man in the middle.

Prior gets two off his first ball with an edge and then adds a single to keep the strike.

Coming in for his debut: Joe Root came in for England at No 6

Coming in for his debut: Joe Root came in for England at No 6

67th over: England 139-4 (Pietersen 73, Root 11)

Some news emerging from the England camp, Stuart Broad has been ruled out of the two-match Twenty20 series against India due to a heel injury and will be replaced as captain by Eoin Morgan. James Harris has been called into the Twenty20 squad as a result.

Root gets a single with a shot into the covers and Pietersen then adds another one.

66th over: England 137-4 (Pietersen 72, Root 10)

Excellent shot from Pietersen from the first ball after tea, a flashing drive that goes past cover point for FOUR.

TEA ON DAY ONE: ENGLAND 133-4

View from Sportsmail's cricket writer and editor of Wisden, Lawrence Booth in Nagpur:

'The trouble with attritional cricket is that it places an onus on the batsmen not to give it away. While England were advancing at two an over to 101 for 2, this was not an issue. But Jonathan Trott gift-wrapped a first Test wicket to Ravindra Jadeja, and Ian Bell presented Piyush Chawla with his first since April 2008. If England are to close out this series, they can’t afford many more shows of generosity.

A lot now depends on Kevin Pietersen, who has reined himself in with impressive discipline on a pitch apparently designed to scare away the people of Nagpur for a generation.

Occasionally Pietersen has opened up, using his class to pierce the few gaps presented by MS Dhoni’s ultra-defensive field. But this was cricket for a very particular type of connoisseur – one who goes through life wondering who is going to blink first.

Dhoni was damned if he was going to be that man, setting 6-3 leg-side fields for Ishant Sharma and generally placing his men as if in a one-day international.

Trott was in his element for a while, and looked set for a repeat of his Kolkata vigil before he misjudged a delivery from the left-arm spin of Jadeja that went on with the arm. Bell got bogged down, but didn’t have the nous to ride it out, driving elegantly to extra-cover to make it 119 for 4.

Joe Root has made a positive start to his Test career, and Pietersen is still there on 68. But, after finally winning a toss, England will be disappointed with anything less than 300.'

65th over: England 133-4 (Pietersen 68, Root 10)

Pietersen sweeps one into the deep, they run one and come back for the second, for a second it looks as though Root may struggle to make his ground, but he does

Run off the final ball of the over meaning Pietersen will keep the strike after tea.

64th over: England 130-4 (Pietersen 65, Root 10)

Nice shot by Root to square leg for two.

He then finds a boundary with a well timed drive for FOUR.

63rd over: England 124-4 (Pietersen 65, Root 4)

First runs in Test match cricket for Root. He will be relieved to be off the mark. He takes a big stride forward and plays a neat drive through the covers for three.

Pietersen adds one more and then Root retains the strike with a single from the final ball of the over.

62nd over: England 119-4 (Pietersen 64, Root 0)

Ojha comes back on and it is another maiden.

61st over: England 119-4 (Pietersen 64, Root 0)

Now this is interesting, Ishant Sharma has gone off the field just one over into his latest spell. Rules state that players can only go off if injured (it does not always work like that in practice) but if he is injured then that is a problem for Dhoni, as he is his only seamer.

Piyush Chawla comes into the attack.

Pietersen takes two thanks to a miss field, gets home safely despite the appeal. And then another single.

WICKET: Bell c Kohli b Chawla 1

Bell chips one to short extra-cover and he is caught, 28 balls, one run and out.

Debutant Joe Root is the new man in the middle. A big moment for the young batsman.

60th over: England 116-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

And another maiden, this time it is Jadeja to Bell.

59th over: England 116-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

Sharma to Pietersen and another maiden.

58th over: England 116-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

Just one slip in for Bell. Four leg-byes come off the final ball.

57th over: England 112-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

India's only seamer Ishant Sharma is back into the attack.

Chance for India, or was it Pietersen flicked one away towards midwicket and Cheteshwar Pujara could not hold it, but unclear if it actually carried.

Maiden over.

56th over: England 112-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

Another maiden from Jadeja, bowling to Bell.

55th over: England 112-3 (Pietersen 61, Bell 1)

Another good shot from Pietersen which is dispatched to the boundary, it was in the air, but safely over extra cover for FOUR.

Looking to build: England batsman Ian Bell make a telling contribution with the bat

Looking to build: England batsman Ian Bell make a telling contribution with the bat

54th over: England 108-3 (Pietersen 57, Bell 1)

The dot balls continue to mount, another maiden for India, this time it is Jadeja.

53rd over: England 108-3 (Pietersen 57, Bell 1)

Ojha to Pietersen, and not for the first time today it is a maiden.

52nd over: England 108-3 (Pietersen 57, Bell 1)

Bell gets off the mark as he plays the ball to mid-on and scampers home for a single. KP then adds one more from the final ball to keep the strike.

51st over: England 106-3 (Pietersen 56, Bell 0)

Another perfectly timed shot from Pietersen for FOUR, this time he plays it through midwicket.

50th over: England 102-3 (Pietersen 52, Bell 0)

WICKET: Trott b Jadeja 44

The debutant gets his first Test wicket. Trott left it along and it came in to take the bails. What was he thinking

Ian Bell comes to the middle.

49th over: England 101-2 (Trott 44, Pietersen 51)

Another nice sweep shot from Trott to the backward square boundary for FOUR.

That brings up the hundred for England.

Time for drinks.

48th over: England 97-2 (Trott 40, Pietersen 51)

KP breaks to eat a banana.

Another maiden for Jadeja.

47th over: England 97-2 (Trott 40, Pietersen 51)

Ojha bowls another maiden to Trott. India have done well to keep the runs down.

46th over: England 97-2 (Trott 40, Pietersen 51)

Jadeja comes back into the attack.

KP sees a good shot well blocked. Maiden.

45th over: England 97-2 (Trott 40, Pietersen 51)

Trott survives a very optimistic shout for LBW after missing a sweep. It was sliding down the leg side. Maiden for Ojha

44th over: England 97-2 (Trott 40, Pietersen 51)

Pietersen works one away fine to the boundary for for FOUR.

FIFTY FOR KEVIN PIETERSEN

KP then nudges one away to square leg for one and then Trott gets a single off the last ball.

43rd over: England 91-2 (Trott 39, Pietersen 46)

Ojha comes back for the first time in this session.

Pietersen drives one down to third man and they run three.

42nd over: England 88-2 (Trott 39, Pietersen 43)

Ashwin bowls five dot balls to Trott, but the sixth is unleashed past point for FOUR.

41st over: England 84-2 (Trott 35, Pietersen 43)

Sharma continues, this policy of using just one seamer could come back to hurt India.

Pietersen drives one through the off-side for FOUR, brilliantly timed shot.

40th over: England 80-2 (Trott 35, Pietersen 39)

Pietersen whips one away down to deep square for one.

39th over: England 79-2 (Trott 35, Pietersen 38)

Pietersen works one away for one and Trott flicks one away for a single and KP ends the over with one more towards square.

38th over: England 76-2 (Trott 34, Pietersen 36)

FOUR for Trott, a nicely timed half volley through cover point.

37th over: England 72-2 (Trott 30, Pietersen 36)

Sharma looks to bang one down to Trott but it gets no height, Trott looks to sway out of the way to avoid being hit and it hits the gloves and goes away towards third man for one.

36th over: England 70-2 (Trott 29, Pietersen 36)

Ashwin to Trott and it is another maiden.

35th over: England 70-2 (Trott 29, Pietersen 36)

Sharma stays on at the other end.

Pietersen gets two from a ball he works away towards long-leg.

Sharma then bowls too straight and KP has no problem in flicking it away past midwicket.

Pietersen adds a single and Trott does the same, eight runs from the over.

34th over: England 62-2 (Trott 28, Pietersen 29)

Ashwin takes the ball after lunch.

Big session for both sides, England and Pietersen in particular will look to kick on, while India will no doubt feel that a couple of wickets and they are in with a good chance of winning this Test and leveling the series.

Pietersen flicks one away to deep backward square for a single.

LUNCH ON DAY ONE: ENGLAND 61-2

View from Sportsmail's cricket writer and editor of Wisden, Lawrence Booth in Nagpur:

'That was a bizarre session, in which England’s early nerves were assisted by India’s eggs-in-one-basket selection. If Ishant Sharma had been granted a fellow seamer to help him exploit a pitch of variable bounce (most of it low), England might have been in deeper trouble than 61 for 2 after both openers had fallen with 16 on the board.

At lunch, they were grateful to have faced as many as 25 overs of spin, many of them met with a dead bat as England focussed on not making a mess of winning their first toss of the series.

It really was slow going. Nick Compton nibbled at one he ought to have left, even if he might have been unfortunate to get one of the few deliveries which didn’t die a sorry death on the way through to MS Dhoni.

And Alastair Cook, tied down by Pragyan Ojha’s left-arm spin and a 7-2 leg-side field, was definitely unlucky to be given out leg-before by umpire Dharmasena to a ball that was clearly missing off stump.

If Cook’s 1 off 28 balls – following 548 runs in the first three Tests – said something about the mood of the morning and the state of the pitch, then Jonathan Trott and Kevin Pietersen were generally content to bide their time. It may be the only match-winning template available as England go in search of their first series win in India for nearly 28 years.'

Looking to make his mark: Kevin Pietersen will look to build after lunch

Looking to make his mark: Kevin Pietersen will look to build after lunch

33rd over: England 61-2 (Trott 28, Pietersen 28)

This should be the last over before lunch.

Pietersen gets a single. Trott then ducks to avoid a bouncer, but again it does not bounce particularly high.

One from the over, and that is lunch.

32nd over: England 60-2 (Trott 28, Pietersen 27)

Trott sees off a maiden from Ashwin.

31st over: England 60-2 (Trott 28, Pietersen 27)

Sharma comes back into the attack before lunch.

No slips in play. No real surprise given the lack of bounce in the pitch.

He bowls a maiden with his first over back.

30th over: England 60-2 (Trott 28, Pietersen 27)

Change of bowling for India, and it is their best player from the last test, Ravichandran Ashwin, to take over with the ball.

Trott paddles one away for a single. Pietersen drives one to long-on for a single.

Trott then hits a couple off the final ball of the over.

29th over: England 56-2 (Trott 25, Pietersen 26)

Trott works one away on the half-volley wide past Ashwin for three.

28th over: England 53-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 26)

Jadeja stays on and bowls another maiden, this time to Pietersen.

27th over: England 53-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 26)

Chawla to Trott and it is another maiden.

26th over: England 53-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 26)

Pietersen looks in the mood now, he punches the ball through cover-point for another FOUR.

25th over: England 49-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 22)

Pietersen starting to show his power, brilliant shot for FOUR over mid-on, really nice shot from the England batsman.

He's done it again, another boundary, as Pietersen once again clears mid-on for FOUR, no fuss from KP.

Single off the final ball and Pietersen keeps the strike. Nine from the over.

24th over: England 40-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 13)

Pietersen finally finds the gap from the final ball, off the front foot and through cover point for three.

23rd over: England 37-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 10)

Pietersen walks down the wicket and works one away to long-off for a single. One from the over.

22nd over: England 36-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 9)

Trott facing Jadeja, and it is yet another maiden. Trott won't mind this, but you get the feeling that Pietersen at the other end could get frustrated, that is no doubt India's plan.

21st over: England 36-2 (Trott 22, Pietersen 9)

Bowling change for India, Piyush Chawla comes into the attack.

First run for a while. Trott pushes one away for a single.

20th over: England 35-2 (Trott 21, Pietersen 9)

This time it is the turn of Pietersen and Ojha, but the result is the same, another maiden.

19th over: England 35-2 (Trott 21, Pietersen 9)

Jadeja to Trott and it is another maiden. India keeping the runs down well.

18th over: England 35-2 (Trott 21, Pietersen 9)

Pietersen is having no real problem with this left arm spin so far, just struggling to beat the field at the moment. Another maiden.

17th over: England 35-2 (Trott 21, Pietersen 9)

Really nice shot from Trott, down the wicket, takes it on the half-volley and drives it between the stumps and mid-on for FOUR.

16th over: England 31-2 (Trott 17, Pietersen 9)

Ojha makes a big appeal against Pietersen, but there was a big inside edge. And then just a few balls later he goes up for another appeal, but Pietersen is so far down the wicket again there is no way it could be given out. Maiden.

15th over: England 31-2 (Trott 17, Pietersen 9)

Trott sees off Jadeja's first over after drinks. Maiden.

14th over: England 31-2 (Trott 17, Pietersen 9)

Trott sweeps one away over square leg for FOUR. Single off the final ball of the over as India look for a run-out, but Pietersen is home comfortably.

End of the first hour, so time for drinks.

13th over: England 26-2 (Trott 12, Pietersen 9)

Bowling change for India, and MS Dhoni is going for two left arm spinners as Ravindra Jadeja replaces Sharma.

Pietersen looks in the mood as he comes down the wicket again and plays one off the pads to midwicket and England run three.

Trott then pushes one to short leg for a single and then KP gets his first boundary of the morning. Pietersen comes down the wicket and lofts the ball back over the bowlers head for FOUR.

12th over: England 18-2 (Trott 11, Pietersen 2)

Ojha to Pietersen and there is another big appeal from the fourth ball as the ball hits the pads. But the England batsman is half way down the wicket when he lets the ball hit his pads. No way he could be given out coming that far down. Pietersen then takes a single.

Out in the middle: Jonathan Trott came in at No 3 earlier than he would have hoped after Nick Compton's dismissal

Out in the middle: Jonathan Trott came in at No 3 earlier than he would have hoped after Nick Compton's dismissal

11th over: England 17-2 (Trott 11, Pietersen 1)

WICKET: Cook LBW Sharma 1

Another big appeal from Sharma and this time umpire Kumar Dharmasena raises his finger. But it looked to be a poor decision. It was hitting him outside the line and did not look like it was going to hit the stumps. Very poor call from Dharmasena, not that you will hear too many Indians complain, they have dismissed England's talisman cheaply.

Kevin Pietersen is the new man for England and he will have to adjust to this pitch which seems to be dying a death out there.

He pulls one away from the final ball to keep the strike.

10th over: England 16-1 (Cook 1, Trott 11)

Trott sweeps Ojha away past short fine leg for FOUR. He is playing well, despite that scare in the last over.

9th over: England 12-1 (Cook 1, Trott 7)

Trott plays one fine down towards fine leg, good stop by Ojha on the boundary.

Trott then ducks to avoid a Sharma bouncer, with the pitch and its uneven bounce that one went through at about waist height.

Big, big appeal from Sharma. It was a length ball that was nipping in and it beat the inside edge, and hits Trott in front or just outside off as the umpire shakes his head. Probably just the correct decision, but it was very close.

8th over: England 9-1 (Cook 1, Trott 5)

India bring a leg slip in for Cook, the England skipper defends the over away.

Maiden over from Ojha.

7th over: England 9-1 (Cook 1, Trott 5)

First boundary of the day to Trott and it is a beautifully timed shot back down the ground past the stumps on the half volley for FOUR. It has been a careful start from England so far.

6th over: England 5-1 (Cook 1, Trott 1)

Cook gets off the mark with a shot to deep midwicket. Trott then gets off the mark with a single to mid-on.

5th over: England 3-1 (Cook 0, Trott 0)

WICKET: Compton c Dhoni b Sharma 3

Breakthrough for India early on. Sharma gets Compton to play at one and nicks off the edge and it is a straight forward catch for Dhoni behind the stumps, replays showed Sharma was very close to bowling a no ball, but it was ok – just. England are one down.

Jonathan Trott is the new man in the middle.

Wicket maiden for Sharma.

4th over: England 3-0 (Cook 0, Compton 3)

Compton defends the first five ball of the over. He then hits the final ball towards mid-on and takes a single to keep the strike.

3rd over: England 2-0 (Cook 0, Compton 2)

Compton works one away off the pads for a single down the leg side. Cook sees off the the remaining five balls of the over, and is still to get off the mark.

2nd over: England 1-0 (Cook 0, Compton 1)

Left arm spinner Pragyan Ojha takes the new ball at the other end.

First run of the morning as Compton pushes the ball to mid-on.

Cook then fends the remaining balls away. Just the one run from the over.

1st over: England 0-0 (Cook 0, Compton 0)

Only one seam bowler in the starting XI, and he, Ishant Sharma, opens up for India.

Low bounce from this first over, and it is a maiden first up.

Captain marvel: Alastair Cook has guided England to a 2-1 lead

Captain marvel: Alastair Cook has guided England to a 2-1 lead

3.57am: Earlier, Joe Root was handed his first Test cap by former batsman Paul Collingwood, big five days for the 21-year-old at No 6 for England.

3.55am: View from Sportsmail's Lawrence Booth in Nagpur via Twitter:

'England will miss Finn, but with Bresnan they have a shorter tail. In Mumbai, last four fell for seven, in Kolkata for 13…'

3.50am: We are just ten minutes away from the start of play and Alastair Cook and Nick Compton opening up for England. Hopefully from the England point of view they will start better than the second innings in the last Test where they found themselves 8 for 3.

3.45am: If England manage a draw then they will win the series 2-1 for the first time since 1984/85, if they win the game then they will win 3-1 for the first time ever.

3.35am: Couple of changes for England. Steven Finn misses out due to a bad back and Tim Bresnan returns. And as Sportsmail's Paul Newman revealed here, Joe Root comes in for his debut in place of Samit Patel.

3.30am: England have one the toss and will bat.

3.25am: The one thing England have not managed to do so far is win the toss, that is coming up. Can Cook win his first toss as England captain

3.15am: Good morning and welcome to the first days play of the fourth and final Test between India and England.

It has been some series so far, with India winning the first Test with ease and looking like they would stroll to a comfortable series win. But Alastair Cook and England had different ideas and fought back brilliantly to win the next two tests to take a 2-1 lead.

They now stand on the brink of a the first series win in India for 28 years.

Field of dreams: England have the chance to secure a famous series win in Nagpur

Field of dreams: England have the chance to secure a famous series win in Nagpur

Picture Dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from the fourth Test in Nagpur due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.

MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

England beat India by seven wickets in third Test

England survive late wobble to secure famous win by seven wickets

|

UPDATED:

09:08 GMT, 9 December 2012

England overcame a last-minute wobble to complete a seven-wicket win over India at Eden Gardens this morning and take a 2-1 lead with one Test to play.

Ravichandran Ashwin (91no) remained undefeated after his valiant resistance last night, but on the final day it took James Anderson (three for 38) only four balls to see off number 11 Pragyan Ojha as India were bowled out for 247 in their second innings.

England were left needing only 41 for a thoroughly-deserved victory, yet then stumbled to eight for three against the spin of Ashwin and Ojha before they got over the line.

Relaxing after the win: Jimmy Anderson raises a glass after the win

Important runs: Ian Bell scored 28 runs as England won by seven wickets

Getting the job done: Jimmy Anderson puts his feat up after the win as Ian Bell sees England home with an unbeaten 28

Ian Bell and Nick Compton settled the nerves and the issue, and England can therefore no longer lose this series.

For India, it was a first defeat since the last millennium at this famous venue, and England will become the first tourists since 2004 to win a Test series here if they can at least draw the last match in Nagpur.

After dominating the first three days thanks to captain Alastair Cook's batting and Anderson and Monty Panesar's bowling, they endured a chastening first session yesterday but then took six wickets for only 36 runs in the afternoon.

Seeing England home: Nick Compton kept his calm as England got over the line

Seeing England home: Nick Compton kept his calm as England got over the line

Only Ashwin delayed them, as 88 runs were added for the last two wickets and prevented England finishing the game inside four days.

The number eight immediately counted two more boundaries this morning too, a high-class back-foot force past cover and a vicious pull past midwicket off Steven Finn.

But in the second over, Anderson snaked one into left-hander Ojha from round the wicket and – even while he was appealing for caught-behind – belatedly noticed he had in fact dislodged the off-bail to at last end a last-wicket stand of exactly 50.

Missing out: Kevin Pietersen was out for a duck

Missing out: Kevin Pietersen was out for a duck

Ashwin had been denied a second Test century, but got his own back when Cook came down the wicket to him in the first over of England's mini-chase and was stumped for only the second time in his first-class career.

When Jonathan Trott was then lbw pushing forward to Ojha, and Kevin Pietersen edged Ashwin behind in defence for a five-ball duck, the unthinkable seemed briefly and horribly possible.

But the previously out-of-form Bell, in particular, had other ideas.

Picture dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.
The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.
MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Ravichandran Ashwin frustrates England as they close in on victory

Day four analysis: Ashwin makes England wait as Cook and co close on emphatic win

|

UPDATED:

12:23 GMT, 8 December 2012

Ravichandran Ashwin's one-man show of defiance with the bat may have frustratingly held up England's victory charge but sometime tomorrow morning Alastair Cook's side will establish a 2-1 lead in this series.

That prospect would have appeared beyond the realms of fantasy when Andrew Strauss sat in a stark back room at Galle in late March following England's fourth consecutive Test defeat.

The press conference in question was the first time Strauss' position as England captain had been publicly questioned. It came after yet another loss in Asian conditions following the 3-0 whitewash against Pakistan in the UAE and it was a spinner, Sri Lanka's Rangana Herath, who again had been England's chief tormentor.

Dominate display: Ravichandran Ashwin was a key man with the bat for India

Dominate display: Ravichandran Ashwin was a key man with the bat for India

The team's ability to play spin, or lack of it, has been the theme of the year away from home. Although the subsequent victory in Colombo saw England draw that series in Sri Lanka 1-1, their demons against spin bowling reappeared with a vengeance when they lost the first Test of this series by nine wickets in Ahmedabad.

/12/08/article-2244987-15EEBEB5000005DC-218_306x423.jpg” width=”306″ height=”423″ alt=”In control: Alastair Cook's team look set to take a 2-1 lead” class=”blkBorder” />

In control: Alastair Cook's team look set to take a 2-1 lead

If the questions about spin had been like a broken record to all connected with English cricket then what has occurred in these last two, glorious Tests must be akin to discovering a lost orchestral masterpiece.

The victory in Mumbai, only England's second in India in 27 years, was good. This, though, at Eden Gardens promises to be even better.

At lunch yesterday, with Virender Sehwag poised on 49 and India just 121 runs behind with ten second-innings wickets in hand, the momentum of a match which England had dominated for three days was threatening to swing back in the home side's favour.

Just 79 devastating minutes after the interval and the door which England had allowed India to push ajar had been ruthlessly slam shut.

Six wickets fell in that period, kickstarted by Graeme Swann bowling Sehwag with the first ball after lunch. They looked like completing the job after tea, knocking over Virat Kohli, Zaheer Khan and Ishant Sharma, before an inspired Ashwin took matters into his own hands.

Spin king: Graeme Swann had a good session after lunch

Spin king: Graeme Swann had a good session after lunch

No wonder the spinner is fighting hard. India have not lost at this ground since 1999 but his defiance will surely be in vain as England look to move ever closer to their first series victory in India since 1984/85.

Hopefully by lunch tomorrow, all that stands between's Cook's men and a place in history will be avoiding defeat in the final Test in Nagpur. They have proved they are undoubtedly the better side over these last two Tests.

Now they have to finish the job in the morning.

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.
The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies.
MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Top Spin at the Test: Compton is all out of glove as Tucker puts premature end to partnership

Top Spin at the Test: Tucker's luck for Nick as Compton is all out of glove

|

UPDATED:

21:08 GMT, 6 December 2012

Nick Compton had already reached the non-striker’s end by the time umpire Rod Tucker — after a bizarre shake of the head — gave him out lbw on the sweep to Pragyan Ojha. But replays suggested Compton had gloved the ball and the batsman himself said later: ‘It hit my glove. It’s one of those things. I’m a bit disappointed, but from his position it was a very difficult decision, so that’s the way it goes.’

Openers look a dynamic duo

Alastair Cook and Andrew Strauss are comfortably England’s most prolific opening pairing, adding 5,253 Test runs together in 132 innings at an average of 40, with 14 century stands. Cook and Compton have already put on 438 runs together at an average of nearly 110 in only three Tests. On only four occasions did Cook and Strauss put on more than the 165 managed yesterday between the new England captain and his equally new opening partner.

In the runs: Alastair Cook and Andrew Strauss are England's most prolific openers

In the runs: Alastair Cook and Andrew Strauss are England's most prolific openers

Finn delivers on demand

A glimpse of why England were so keen for Steven Finn to play from the start of the series. With MS Dhoni threatening to extend India’s first innings, Cook turned to Finn, who responded by removing him in his first over. The nature of the ball — dug in short of a length, before climbing to take the shoulder of the bat — was just how England imagined it before Finn picked up the thigh injury that ruled him out of the first two Tests.

Ashwin’s turn to look average

India may be wondering what has happened to Ravichandran Ashwin. Feted as a mystery spinner before the start of the series, he briefly appeared to fit the bill with two early wickets on the second evening at Ahmedabad. But since England’s first innings there, he has looked ordinary, taking only three more wickets by stumps on the second day at an average of 115. His line to the right-handers has been especially poor.

Panesar excels on the subcontinent

England would dearly love to pick Monty Panesar in every Test they play, home and away, but continue to regard him as an Asian specialist because of his non-existent batting and fallible fielding. But the two wickets he took on the second morning lifted his tally for the series to 15 at 20 apiece. Graeme Swann has managed 15 at 23 — but in one more Test. The other England bowlers combined, meanwhile, have picked up eight wickets between them, five going to Jimmy Anderson.

Spearheading the attack: Monty Panesar

Spearheading the attack: Monty Panesar (FILE PHOTO)

India v England: Alastair Cook takes command of third Test with record 23rd century

Cook breaks records and Indian hearts as England take command of the third Test thanks to skipper's 23rd Test century

|

UPDATED:

11:13 GMT, 6 December 2012

Alastair Cook became England's most prolific Test centurion when he completed his 23rd – and third in successive matches – at Eden Gardens today.

Cook (136 not out) is also the youngest batsman in history to 7,000 runs, a milestone he passed with his 88th this afternoon as he and Nick Compton took control in an opening stand of 165 on day two of the third Test against India.

/12/06/article-2243830-02374BA100000514-789_468x324.jpg” width=”468″ height=”324″ alt=”In command: Record-breaker Alastair Cook (right) and Nick Compton (left)” class=”blkBorder” />

In command: Record-breaker Alastair Cook (right) and Nick Compton (left)

Cook was dropped on 17 when he edged Zaheer Khan low to slip, where Cheteshwar Pujara could not hold the catch.

Otherwise, though, the most likely mode of dismissal appeared to be a run-out as Cook and his apprentice partner took chances with scampered singles and more than once were in danger of mid-wicket collisions as they kept holding the same line.

Cook is the greatest!

Captain Marvel breaks record for most Test tons aged just 27 – Read more…

Lawrence Booth: Pujara left to ponder drop on just 17 – Read more…

There were to be no such mishaps, though, and Cook duly reached his 179-ball century with a leg-glance off Ravichandran Ashwin – having previously also hit the off-spinner for one memorable straight six to go with his 14 fours.

Compton (57) had fewer obvious scoring options but also profited from using his feet, hitting Pragyan Ojha for a six of his own over long-on, on his way to a maiden Test half-century in 123 balls.

Grandson of Denis, and two years Cook's senior, Compton therefore claimed a notable milestone of his own – albeit on a reduced scale to his captain's – before Ojha got his revenge.

Awesome foursome: Monty Panesar (left) took another two wickets on day two

Awesome foursome: Monty Panesar (left) took another two wickets on day two

Cook was safely past his hundred when Compton missed an attempted sweep at the slow left-armer and was, eventually, given out lbw by umpire Rod Tucker just as the batsmen completed what they thought by then was a leg-bye.

Jonathan Trott had made two ducks in his last three Test innings, but did enough here to help Cook consolidate an advantage which gives England clear prospects of pushing for a second successive win over their hosts.

Monty Panesar had earlier finished with four for 90, to add to his 11 wickets in the series-levelling victory in Mumbai, as England picked up the last three Indian wickets for 43 runs this morning – despite some late belligerence from Mahendra Singh Dhoni (52).

The home captain made his intent clear immediately, up the wicket to the second ball of the day to crunch James Anderson past mid-off.

His overnight partner Zaheer was dropped by Graeme Swann off Anderson, but was soon gone anyway – lbw to a Panesar arm ball.

Thinking to do: India captain MS Dhoni hit a half-century but is now under the cosh

Thinking to do: India captain MS Dhoni hit a half-century but is now under the cosh

Panesar also made short work of Ishant Sharma, but the last-wicket pair frustrated England for more than half an hour.

Ojha made no runs but kept out 19 balls, allowing Dhoni to club Panesar for successive sixes over long-off and long-on as England brought the field up for the final two deliveries of one over.

The cat-and-mouse continued, with four consecutive maidens at one point, until Cook had to rest Anderson for Steven Finn.

It was a change which brought Dhoni's 50, with his fifth four from 113 balls crashed past cover, but then the end too when he gloved the next ball and Swann did well to make ground from slip to complete a diving catch.

England had done well to restrict Dhoni's attempt to alter the momentum of a match which was to swing still further the tourists' way thanks to the next historic tour de force from Cook's remorseless repertoire.

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann outspin India in their backyard – Lawrence Booth

Panesar and Swann outspin India in their own backyard

|

UPDATED:

05:45 GMT, 26 November 2012

This is an England win to rank with any. Derided after Ahmedabad, they appeared ripe for more humiliation here, with MS Dhoni demanding a track tailor made for his spinners. And if the result was largely the work of four players, England were not in the mood to be picky.

They have thrashed India inside 10 sessions in their own lair. Apparently heading for a rout, this series, gloriously, is now back in the balance.

For Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann there will be memories to last a career. Jimmy Anderson may have struck with the second ball of the match when he swung one into Gautam Gambhir’s pads, but England’s spinners hit back with 19 wickets. More than that, they outbowled the Indian spin trio.

Spin twins: Swann (right) and Panesar (left) mopped up the final few wickets for England

Spin twins: Swann (right) and Panesar (left) mopped up the final few wickets for England

The general wisdom, most authoritatively expressed on Sunday evening by Kevin Pietersen, was that Panesar in particular bowled a couple of mph quicker than the Indians.

But it has also been the case that Ravichandran Ashwin and Harbhajan Singh offered almost no support at all to the steady Pragyan Ojha. Ashwin’s line was wrong for most of the match, while the selection of the ageing Harbhajan looked like what it was in advance: pure hubris.

Sure, Panesar’s pace suited a pitch that, crucially for England, had more bounce in it than the surface at the Sardar Patel Stadium in Ahmedabad. But he and Swann were also more accurate, conceding 2.66 an over to the 3.61 leaked by India’s spinners.

Dhoni, watching it all impassively from behind the stumps, never had any control. A rupee for his thoughts.

Much of this, of course, was down to the differing qualities of Alastair Cook and Kevin Pietersen. Perhaps the most definitive statement of the match came not when Pietersen eased his first ball through extra cover on Saturday afternoon, but before that, when Cook decided to attack Ojha.

The six he hit over long-on struck all kinds of psychological blows, not least because it told India that their banker could no longer be guaranteed to cash in his chips.

Chipping in: Swann was able to support Panesar with his wickets

Chipping in: Swann was able to support Panesar with his wickets

Main man: Panesar bowled very well in both innings

Main man: Panesar bowled very well in both innings

After that, Cook and Pietersen put together a partnership of 206 that was all the more watchable for its contrasts. Pietersen’s genius is of a bums-on-seats style: to be at the Wankhede on Sunday morning was a genuine privilege. But Cook’s talent is no less remarkable. It’s just different.

As if to prove the point, both men completed their 22nd Test hundreds – a seminal statistic in the annals of English batsmanship – within a couple of overs of each other.

There is a long way to go. You sense that all India need to do to recreate English doubt is to produce a slow turner – not a bouncy one, as here in Mumbai – and things could change. Equally, England could do with runs from a few of the unusual suspects.

But it doesn’t do to carp in these circumstances. Four days ago, England were down and out. Suddenly, they’re dreaming of the impossible.

LIVE: India v England, day five, first Test, Ahmedabad

LIVE: India v England – the action on day five of the first Test in Ahmedabad

|

UPDATED:

04:15 GMT, 19 November 2012

Stay up to date with all the action on day five of the first Test between England and India with Sportsmail's
unrivalled team. We'll deliver over-by-over coverage as the action
unfolds in Ahmedabad while our brilliant team of writers update
with their insights from the ground. Contact me on Twitter via: @Chris_Cutmore or e-mail your thoughts to [email protected]

India v England: Essentials

India: Virender Sehwag, Gautam Gambhir, Cheteshwar Pujara, Sachin Tendulkar, Virat Kohli, Yuvraj Singh, Mahendra Dhoni (capt & wk), Ravichandran Ashwin, Zaheer Khan, Umesh Yadav, Pragyan Ojha.

England: Alastair Cook (capt), Nick Compton, Jonathan Trott, Kevin Pietersen, Ian Bell, Samit Patel, Matt Prior (wk), Tim Bresnan, Stuart Broad, Graeme Swann, James Anderson.

Umpires: Aleem Dar (Pakistan) and Tony Hill (New Zealand).

Referee: Roshan Mahanama (Sri Lanka).

India first innings: 521-8 dec

England first innings: 191

Click here for a full scorecard

DM.has('rcp',”twitterCombined”,
feeds : 'newman_cricket, the_topspin',
tweetCount : 4
);

Cricket writers on Twitter

Twitter Avatar

Loading tweets…

Feeds provided by Twitter

PICTURE DISPUTE:

We are unable to carry live pictures from the First Test in Ahmedabad due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations. The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

LUNCH ON DAY ONE: INDIA 120-0 (Sehwag 79 Gambhir 37)

View from Sportsmail's cricket writer and editor of Wisden, Lawrence Booth in Ahmedabad

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/cricket/article-2232857/LIVE-India-v-England-day-Test-Ahmedabad.html#ixzz2CSP9h3DH

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

LUNCH ON DAY ONE: INDIA 120-0 (Sehwag 79 Gambhir 37)

View from Sportsmail's cricket writer and editor of Wisden, Lawrence Booth in Ahmedabad

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/cricket/article-2232857/LIVE-India-v-England-day-Test-Ahmedabad.html#ixzz2CSP9h3DH

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

131sth over: England 346-5 (Cook 168 Prior 90)

Shot! That's a statement of intent from Prior, who creams a length ball from Zaheer to the cover fence for the first FOUR of the day. And Prior follows up with another sweet drive into the covers, just one this time as the sweeper cuts it off. Into the 90s goes England's wicketkeeper. Will they be nervous If he carries on like that he won't be in them for long…

130th over: England 341-5 (Cook 168 Prior 85)

The highly-impressive Pragyan Ojha resumes the attack from the opposite end with his left-arm spin. India on the attack: slip, gully, silly point – they won't move for most of the day, you'd think. Prior notches the first run of the day with a trademark punch through the covers.

129th over: England 340-5 (Cook 168 Prior 84)

Zaheer Khan, wily old left-armer, gets us underway… and it's a beauty! From over the wicket to the left-handed Cook the ball holds its line and zips past the outside edge. Nervy start for England's captain. Maiden.

3.55am: Players are out, Indians in a huddle and getting a real talking to by captain MS Dhoni… we're ready to go.

3.50am: Brisbane 2010, remember that England 221 runs behind after first innings 501 for one Alastair Cook 235 not out

Well, that's the spirit that Cook invoked yesterday during his incredible innings of 168 not out, but the job's not done yet.

England lead by just 10 runs and with only five second-innings wickets in hand. But if the Gabba taught us anything it's that this side knows how to seriously scrap.

Rounds one, two and three went to India, but round four was claimed by Cook and Matt Prior.

Ding ding… round five.

Hopes fading: Can Matt Prior rescue England in the first Test

Glimmer of hope: Can Matt Prior help rescue England in the first Test