Tag Archives: rages

Roberto Mancini blasts officials for Samir Nasri red card

Furious Mancini rages against officials again after 'incredible' decision to send off Nasri

|

UPDATED:

19:02 GMT, 29 December 2012


Head-to-head: Samir Nasri and Sebastian Bassong (left) clashed

Head-to-head: Samir Nasri and Sebastian Bassong (left) clashed

Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini hit out at the 'incredible' decision to send off midfielder Samir Nasri in this afternoon's thrilling 4-3 Barclays Premier League win at Norwich.

The champions, beaten at Sunderland on Boxing Day, were off to a flying start when they went 2-0 up inside four minutes after Edin Dzeko's quick brace.

Norwich reduced the deficit through Anthony Pilkington's deflected free-kick, before Nasri was shown a red card by referee Mike Jones on 44 minutes for putting his head into the face of Sebastien Bassong.

Although the decision did not
eventually cost City as Sergio Aguero and an own-goal from Norwich
keeper Mark Bunn eventually saw off the spirited Canaries, the Italian
was left less than impressed by the whole incident.

Mancini
– who is already facing a Football Association probe for comments after
the Sunderland game that referee Kevin Friend had 'ate too much for
Christmas' – felt City were hard done by and will appeal against what is
set to be a three-match ban.

Things got ugly again just before the break when Bassong upended Nasri on the far touchline.

'Incredible': Roberto Mancini raged at the decision to send off Nasri but not Bassong

'Incredible': Roberto Mancini raged at the decision to send off Nasri but not Bassong

The
duo squared up face-to-face, with Nasri pushing his head into the
Norwich defender – which on consultation with the assistant referee
resulted in a red card for the France midfielder, and a caution for
Bassong.

Mancini lamented: 'Both players came forward with their heads, so if you are going to send off one, then you have to send off both, not only Samir.

'Samir said he touched his head, okay, but the other player has done the same.

'The linesman has a big responsibility also, because it was not a good decision, it is incredible.

'You want to send off both players Then, okay, the referee was there, he saw everything. The linesman was behind [the players], he could not see. We will appeal, sure.'

Mancini continued: 'I am disappointed with Samir, and he will pay his fine, but the decision was not correct.

'Samir did a mistake, okay, but after why when the other player did the same thing, does he send off only one

'There are two rules for different teams, and I hate this in football and cannot accept this.

'In life, there is only one rule for everyone. This season, I have seen things which are not good.

'For the referees, this is the most easiest thing to do, but I do not want to talk about the referees too much, because I said last time that they had a big lunch for Christmas, and I don't know what [will happen].'

Lunge: Bassong was booked for this lunge on Nasri which sparked the incident

Lunge: Bassong was booked for this lunge on Nasri which sparked the incident

City have now won three out of their last four Premier League games, but still trail leaders Manchester United by seven points.

Mancini was just happy to get a victory, which was made harder by some poor defending as all of Norwich's goals came from set-plays.

'I am delighted with the result and the performance,' the City boss said.

'In the first few minutes, we played some fantastic football and scored two goals, but after the sending off it was difficult, however, we fought well.'

Norwich, meanwhile, have now lost three Premier League games in a row, having been on an unbeaten 10-match run before Christmas.

Unimpressed: Mancini was upset at what he percieives to be another unfair decision

Unimpressed: Mancini was upset at what he percieives to be another unfair decision

Canaries boss Chris Hughton, though, remained positive despite a second home loss in a week, after Chelsea ran out 1-0 winners in Norfolk on Boxing Day.

'Manchester City showed why they spend the amount of money they do for the offensive players they have, but you cant be 2-0 down so early on and expect to have a good day,' Hughton said.

'However, we displayed great character and certainly at 4-3 it seemed it might be going our way, but again they showed real good quality.

'I cannot fault the endeavour of the players we have got, so now we will look to go again.'

Hughton could empathise with Mancini's complaints on the refereeing.

He said: 'In the build-up to their second goal, there was a foul by Vincent Kompany in midfield, which was disappointing.

'On the sending off, there was certainly a coming together of heads and some movement, now whether that was enough for a sending off… if the referee has given it for that reason, was it a bit harsh Probably yes.'

Demba Ba, Papiss Cisse, Kolo and Yaya Toure caught up in Senegal riot

Cisse, Ba and Toure brothers escape from danger as Senegal fans riot in stands

|

UPDATED:

09:39 GMT, 14 October 2012

The African Cup of Nations qualifier between Senegal and Ivory Coast in Dakar was abandoned following crowd trouble.

Ivory Coast were leading 2-0 on the night and 6-2 on aggregate – a result which seems likely to stand, sending Senegal out – when the match was stopped in the 72nd minute at the Stade Leopold Senghor.

The incident was confirmed on the official website of the Senegalese Football Federation, www.senegalfoot.sn: 'Unfortunately the match ended in very sombre circumstances.

Unrest: Didier Drogba is shielded by a policeman as trouble rages in the stands

Unrest: Didier Drogba is shielded by a policeman as trouble rages in the stands

Heading for shelter: Manchester City star Yaya Toure is guided off the pitch in Dakar

Heading for shelter: Manchester City star Yaya Toure is guided off the pitch in Dakar

'The referee was forced to stop in the
match in the 72nd minute with the score at 2-0 because of serious
outbreaks in the stands by very unhappy Senegalese supporters.

'The police took the public out after many confrontations.'

Play had been temporarily halted in
the 65th minute when a person ran on to the pitch and almost reached
Ivory Coast striker Didier Drogba before being wrestled to the ground
and escorted off the field.

Drogba had given his side the lead in
the 51st minute with a free-kick and the former Chelsea man then made it
2-0 from the penalty spot in the 70th minute.

Take cover: Kolo Toure is covered by riot policemen's shields

Take cover: Kolo Toure is covered by riot policemen's shields

Take cover: Kolo Toure is covered by riot policemen's shields

Following that second goal there were
disturbances in the stands, with small fires being set alight and
objects thrown as players and staff from both teams grouped together in
the centre circle.

A host of Barclays Premier
League-based players were involved in the match, including Newcastle
pair Demba Ba and Papiss Cisse lining up for Senegal, along with West
Ham's Mohamed Diame.

In Ivory Coast's starting line-up were
Arsenal striker Gervinho, Manchester City brothers Yaya and Kolo Toure,
and Newcastle midfielder Cheick Tiote.

City said on their official website:
'City's Yaya and Kolo Toure are both safe after crowd trouble halted
play as Senegal hosted the Ivory Coast in Dakar.

Stick and stones: Fans threw anything they could lay their hands on onto the pitch

Stick and stones: Fans threw anything they could lay their hands on onto the pitch

Stick and stones: Fans threw anything they could lay their hands on onto the pitch

'Disturbances broke out as Didier
Drogba put the Elephants 2-0 up, after what was deemed a controversial
penalty decision in the Africa Cup of Nations qualifier.

'Fires were started in the stands at
Stade Leopold Senghor and missiles were launched on to the pitch before
the players were escorted to safety.

'Yaya and Kolo were both involved in the second leg clash and early reports suggest the brothers are unharmed.'

Turning nasty: Senegal fans throw rocks and set fires in the stands at Leopold Sedar Senghor Stadium

Turning nasty: Senegal fans throw rocks and set fires in the stands at Leopold Sedar Senghor Stadium

Watching on: Riot police watch from the field as Senegal fans throw rocks and set fires in the stands

Watching on: Riot police watch from the field as Senegal fans throw rocks and set fires in the stands

Luis Suarez was "victim"… so stop vilifying him for diving – Brendan Rodgers

Suarez was 'victim' of a stamp… so stop vilifying him for diving, rages Rodgers

|

UPDATED:

18:34 GMT, 8 October 2012

Liverpool manager Brendan Rodgers has hit out at the unjust 'vilification' of striker Luis Suarez after more diving allegations were levelled at him.

Only a couple of weeks ago the Northern Irishman felt the need to not only to speak out publicly about the treatment the Uruguay international was receiving on the pitch but also raise the subject with referees' chief Mike Riley.

In Sunday's goalless draw at home to Stoke, Suarez went down theatrically in the penalty area which led to Potters manager Pulis called for three-match bans for players who dive.

Taken a tumble: Luis Suarez went down in the box against Stoke

Taken a tumble: Luis Suarez went down in the box against Stoke

Defender Robert Huth has, however, escaped punishment despite appearing to stamp on Suarez after the Football Association confirmed the incident was seen by officials at the time and therefore no further action can be taken.

That has left Rodgers outraged.

'As manager of this football club I find it incredible that in nearly all the coverage about Luis Suarez this weekend, very little focus has been placed on the fact that he was actually the victim of a stamping incident within the first five minutes of the game,' he told liverpoolfc.com.

'At this moment there seems to be one set of rules for Luis and another set for everyone else.

'Diving and simulation is obviously a
wider issue in football and one that we all agree has to be eradicated
from our game but there were other incidents this weekend that didn't
seem to generate the same coverage.

'No-one
should be distracted by the real issue here, both at Anfield and at
another game played on Sunday, when Luis and another player were hurt in
off-the-ball incidents that went unpunished but were caught on TV
cameras.

Dive: No Stoke defenders appeared to be near Suarez as he went down

Dive: No Stoke defenders appeared to be near Suarez as he went down

'I believe some people need to develop a sense of perspective and I also believe in this moment the vilification of Luis is both wrong and unfair.

'I will continue to protect the values, spirit and people of this great club and game while searching for a consistent level of results in order to make progress on the field.'

Suarez has earned a reputation, during his relatively short time in English football, for going down too easily but Rodgers has always insisted that was not the case.

Less than a fortnight ago the Reds boss raised his concerns about how referees were not giving decisions in Suarez's favour, having been frustrated by what he felt were clear penalties against Sunderland and Manchester United being overlooked.

Floored: Brendan Rodgers is furious about this 'stamp' by Robert Huth

Floored: Brendan Rodgers is furious about this 'stamp' by Robert Huth

'He hasn't dived – they have been legitimate,' he said at the time.

'He went down at Sunderland and it looked a clear penalty and he ended up getting booked for it.

'I'm not sure (whether Suarez's reputation is influencing officials). You'd need to ask the referees but he is a wonderful talent and, irrespective of whether he goes down, if it's a penalty, it's a penalty.

'What I have seen he certainly doesn't ever look like he is going to get a decision and that is something which would bother me going forward.'

David Moyes fumes at Everton disallowed goals

We were robbed! Moyes rages at disallowed goals as Everton are held by Newcastle

|

UPDATED:

22:22 GMT, 17 September 2012

Everton manager David Moyes was left to bemoan two disputed decisions by officials which cost his side the chance of victory at home to Newcastle.

Having seen Leighton Baines' opener cancelled out by Demba Ba just after half-time Moyes was aggrieved Marouane Fellaini had one effort ruled out for offside and Victor Anichebe's header was not spotted by linesman Ceri Richards despite appearing to cross the line.

Anichebe almost spared the officials with a goal with two minutes remaining only for Ba's second of the night to snatch a point for the Magpies.

Hold up: Everton's Victor Anichebe puts the ball into the net, but his 'goal' was disallowed

Hold up: Everton's Victor Anichebe puts the ball into the net, but his 'goal' was disallowed

Robbed: Anichebe's header is clearly over the line but the goal was not given by the officials

Robbed: Anichebe's header is clearly over the line but the goal was not given by the officials

'There are two goals missed so I can't get them back but you hope that the linesman has a look and sees how he missed them,' said Moyes, who spoke to the officials after the game.

'I had a word and said 'You've missed two goals' and it does affect the outcome of the game but what can I do about it

'I am sure the referee will have a look at them himself and see if he got it right or wrong – which we all know because we have seen it.

Robbed again: Everton's Marouane Fellaini scores but the Belgian was wrongly flagged offside

Robbed again: Everton's Marouane Fellaini scores but the Belgian was wrongly flagged offside

'Fellaini's goal was onside and if your job is to look along the line you hope the linesman sees if the ball crosses the line but we've seen many occasions where they don't get it right.

'I thought the offside goal was a goal from the touchline so I was surprised when it was ruled out.

'The other one you can't really tell but the reaction of the players was that they felt it was over and they are not usually far off the mark.'

Come on ref! Fellaini protests after his goal was ruled out for offside

Come on ref! Fellaini protests after his goal was ruled out for offside

Newcastle manager Alan Pardew, who had to watch from the stands as he served the first game of a two-match touchline ban, admitted Everton had been hard done to.

'The one over the line was definitely in,' he said.

'I have been saying all along that technology must come in and it has cost Everton a crucial goal tonight.'

Bad call: Play was called up for Steven Pienaar's foul on Hatem Ben Arfa but should have continued

Bad call: Play was called up for Steven Pienaar's foul on Hatem Ben Arfa but should have continued

Wayne Rooney sheds light on Sir Alex Ferguson"s "hairdryer"

There's nothing worse! Rooney sheds light on Ferguson's 'hairdryer' treatment as he recalls fiery tirades

|

UPDATED:

09:02 GMT, 14 September 2012

Fantasy football 2012

Wayne Rooney has shed some light on Sir Alex Ferguson’s notorious dressing-room ‘hairdryer’ treatment – and has revealed the United manager’s most fiery tirade.

Ferguson’s ferocious temper is infamous, and former United striker Mark Hughes coined the ‘hairdryer’ phrase to describe the locker-room rages.

But despite claims the 70-year-old boss has mellowed with age, Rooney says the Scot can still lose it when absolutely necessary – striking fear into his playing staff.

Still got it: Wayne Rooney says that there is nothing worse than receiving the 'hairdryer' from Sir Alex Ferguson

Still got it: Wayne Rooney says that there is nothing worse than receiving the 'hairdryer' from Sir Alex Ferguson

Rooney said in his book My Decade, serialised in the Daily Mirror: ‘There’s nothing worse than getting the “hairdryer” from Sir Alex.’

‘When it happens, the manager stands in the middle of the room and loses it at me. He gets right up in my face and shouts.

‘It feels like I’ve put my head in front of a Ba/09/14/article-0-0BC507CD00000578-875_468x356.jpg” width=”468″ height=”356″ alt=”He's not all bad! Rooney (right) says that he does not like to be shouted at by anyone, including Ferguson (left)” class=”blkBorder” />

He's not all bad! Rooney (right) says that he does not like to be shouted at by anyone, including Ferguson (left)

‘I’ve seen the manager shout and scream at people and when they’ve gone back on the pitch their heads have dropped. They’ve lost it.’

In his biography, Rooney recounts a particularly heated dressing-room telling off when United were beaten 1-0 at Celtic in a Champions League group game in 2006.

The now Sunderland striker, Louis Saha, missed a last-gasp penalty and failed to level the match.

Saha got the full treatment as Ferguson was livid to have lost to Gordon Strachan’s side.

‘It’s the worst “hairdryer” I’ve seen,’ said Rooney. ‘He’s in Louis’ face, shouting and screaming.

‘But Louis isn’t the only one getting an earful.

‘The manager knows I’ve been negotiating a new deal with the club and he saves some for me, “Players wanting more money from the club and new deals – you don’t deserve anything after that performance!”’

The worst he's seen: Louis Saha took a tirade after missing a penalty against Celtic in 2006

The worst he's seen: Louis Saha took a tirade after missing a penalty against Celtic in 2006

Control: Rooney believes Ferguson sometimes yells at his players to maintain his authority over his squad

Control: Rooney believes Ferguson sometimes yells at his players to maintain his authority over his squad

Reflecting on the blast, Rooney said his performance hardly warranted the new and improved contract he eventually received from the club.

Later in the same season, Rooney also revealed that Ferguson ripped into the team just before United lifted the trophy at Old Trafford.

Ferguson’s side ended Chelsea’s two year reign at the top, but the Scot was furious that his side went down 1-0 to West Ham on the final day of the season.

‘Most sides would be celebrating in the dressing-room, getting ready for the champagne and the photos,’ recalled Rooney.

‘Not us. We’re staring at the floor like school kids, the manager giving us the “hairdryer”.

‘After the rollicking it takes a while before everyone cheers up enough to put their Premier League-winning smiles back on.’

Sidelined: Rooney is out after gashing his leg against Fulham

Sidelined: Rooney is out after gashing his leg against Fulham

Wimbledon 2012: Francesca Schiavone rages at rules

Schiavone rages at rules after rain interruption during loss to Kvitova

|

UPDATED:

21:53 GMT, 2 July 2012

Rage: Schiavone felt the conditions were treacherous

Rage: Schiavone felt the conditions were treacherous

Francesca Schiavone wants an explanation from Wimbledon over the tournament’s rain rules after a bizarre on-court stand-off helped to hand Petra Kvitova a quarter-final spot.

The former French Open winner was incensed by the umpire’s handling of her match on Court No 3 and said that it should have been stopped.

Schiavone had taken advantage of wayward shot-making from the defending champion to claim the first set.

However, with the next set delicately poised at deuce with Schiavone 6-5 down on her serve, she made representation to umpire Fiona Edwards to halt the match.

Light rain was falling at the time and, rather than instruct the groundstaff to pull the covers over the court, the official asked the players to wait on their chairs, which they did for eight minutes.

There was then another delay of five minutes in the third set.

The disruption clearly helped Kvitova, who broke and then secured the third set easily to win the match 4-6, 7-5, 6-1.

On a roll: Kvitova is one step closer to retaining her crown

On a roll: Kvitova is one step closer to retaining her crown

‘I didn’t think we should play,’ said Schiavone. ‘I was surprised that the umpire didn’t stop it. It was dangerous. I am going to ask how it works when the weather is like this.’ Kvitova said: ‘I was ready to play. Far better to stay there than go to the locker room and come back.’

Andre Ward warns Carl Froch he will beat him again – Jeff Powell boxing column

EXCLUSIVE: Credit to Froch but I WILL beat him again, warns unbeaten rival Ward

|

UPDATED:

23:01 GMT, 11 June 2012

Andre Ward believes Carl Froch has re-established himself as the second best super-middleweight in the world with his stunning destruction of Lucian Bute.

However, the American prodigy insists that if and when they meet in a re-match the fight will go the same way as his December victory over the Nottingham Cobra.

Ward is full of praise for the way Froch came back from that defeat to KO Bute, who was highly rated as the holder of the IBF version of the world title in the 12-stone division.

Ready to rumble: Carl Froch, fresh from his victory over Lucian Bute, wants to avenge his defeat to Andre Ward

Ready to rumble: Carl Froch, fresh from his victory over Lucian Bute, wants to avenge his defeat to Andre Ward

More from Jeff Powell…

Jeff Powell: Jailed Mayweather will miss opportunity to scout arch-rival Pacquiao
05/06/12

Jeff Powell: Khan demands drugs cheat Peterson is banned for life
28/05/12

Jeff Powell: Price the best value to be our next heavyweight hero like Lewis
21/05/12

Jeff Powell: The Warren paradox: Supporting Haye v Chisora is ugly… but acceptable as a one-off
14/05/12

Jeff Powell: It's a dog's life! Ricky blasts Sky's reluctance to back Hatton Promotions
30/04/12

Jeff Powell: British boxing returns to its spiritual home… and about time too
23/04/12

Jeff Powell: Leonard v Hagler – 25 years later and the great debate rages on
09/04/12

Jeff Powell: Not bad at all – Tyson can be proud of how he's turning his life around
02/04/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

But he was not as surprised as many by the beating Froch inflicted on the Canada-based Romanian.

Ward says: ‘Bute’s reputation had been protected by taking carefully selected opponents instead of joining us in the big Super Six tournament in which I beat Carl in the final.

‘He has punching power but he is much more easily hit than I am. Carl has a great chin and big heart and I expected him to walk through Bute’s big left hand to land his own shots.

‘All credit to Froch. He fought a great fight. He is clearly back as No 2 to me, above Kessler and Bute and the rest of the 168lb pack.

‘But that performance would not change anything if we fight each other again.

‘When I beat him, Carl conceded he had lost to the better man. But since then he has been excusing the defeat by saying he was much more fully focused and on his game against Bute.

‘I don’t buy into that. What I do believe is what he said at the time, that he was in the best shape of his life for our fight.

Victorious: Ward claimed the Super Six and world titles after defeating Froch last December

Victorious: Ward claimed the Super Six and world titles after defeating Froch last December

‘Why wouldn’t he have been As the Super Six final and a title unifier it was the biggest fight of his life. The fact is that I had a lot to do with his problems that night. He couldn’t get to me and there will be nothing different if we meet again.’

Froch is lining up another re-match against the only other man to have beaten him, Mikkel Kessler, in Nottingham in September.

Ward beat Kessler, also, in the Super Six, and says: ‘We hear a lot from Mikkel and Carl about wanting to fight me again but to be honest I’m not sure that either of them really want the re-match. None of us are all-time greats yet. We still have work to do. But I think they know that I am improving all the time.

‘I get accused of not being exciting. That’s odd. Sometimes I seem to get more appreciation of my skills from genuine boxing fans in the United Kingdom than I do at home.

‘But I am beating everyone and now I am working on being a more ruthless finisher, going for the KOs.

Target man: Froch is also eager to meet Denmark's Mikkel Kessler

Target man: Froch is also eager to meet Denmark's Mikkel Kessler

‘I’m not the same type of character as Floyd Mayweather but inside the ring I see some parallels with my career. It took a long time for Floyd to get recognition for his boxing but it came in the end and I believe the same thing will happen for me.’

Ward makes a home-town defence of his WBC and WBA titles in Oakland, California on September 8 against Chad Dawson.

His fellow American beat legendary veteran Bernard Hopkins to become world light-heavyweight champion. He says he is happy to come down half a stone and surrender home advantage to Ward in a 19,000 seat arena.

In return, Ward anticipates moving up to light-heavy himself with a re-match with Dawson for that world title a possibility.

When that happens, assuming he gains revenge over Kessler, the way would be clear for Froch to reassert his dominance at super-middleweight.

Ward was talking in Las Vegas, where he joined in the world-wide condemnation of the decision which robbed Manny Pacquiao of his world welterweight title and probably his chance of a $200million mega-fight against Floyd Mayweather.

He said: ‘Ridiculous. I had Manny winning ten of the 12 rounds against Tim Bradley.

‘Judging like this is very bad for boxing.’

Quigg and Monroe: be careful what you wish for…

Two fine ambassadors for British boxing put their futures on the line this Saturday but the real loser will be Sky Sports following their decision to pull the plug on their long-time poster boy Ricky Hatton.

If any Hatton promotion since the Hitman’s retirement deserved major television exposure it is this one at the Manchester Velodrome.

Scott Quigg, who looks every ounce a world champion in the making, and Rendall Munroe, the former dustman who went close to that distinction with an heroic performance in Japan, come together in a classic British match-up.

Packing a punch: Scott Quigg (R) has a promising future ahead of him in the ring

Packing a punch: Scott Quigg (R) has a promising future ahead of him in the ring

The belt up for grabs this time is for the WBA interim super-bantamwieight title but the winner will be in pole position for a shot at the world championship proper. Mind you, they should be careful which belt they wish for.

The WBA champion, Guillermo Rigondeaux, lived up to his billing as the best amateur to come out of Cuba since fabled heavyweight Teofilo Stevenson with a stunning defence of his title on the undercard of the Manny Pacquiao controversy.

Rigondeaux, a late-starting professional following his defection to Miami after winning two Olympic gold medals, destroyed his American challenger.

Teon Kennedy had been off his feet only once in a one-loss, 20-fight career but Rigondeaux’s pinpoint punching floored him five times on the way to a fifth round stoppage.

Quigg or Munroe might be advised to review the other belt holders.

Tough: Randall Monroe will look to impress his world title contender credentials

Tough: Randall Monroe will look to impress his world title contender credentials

Quigg, the British champion, has prepared with tough sparring in America and although only 23 he admits: ‘The time has come for me to make a statement. I’ve not got to step up or shut up.’

Munroe knows he needs to win to get his career fully back on track.
Both men come to fight and have solid chins so their encounter promises to be explosive and likely to come down to a test of will and stamina.

Quigg is the favourite to come through the sternest examination yet of his glittering potential and assuming he does so a new star of the British ring will be in the ascendancy.

He and Munroe top an action-packed championship bill.

The popular Ryan Rhodes takes on Sergey Rabchenko for the vacant European light-middleweight title. Reformed convict Richard Towers intends putting himself in the heavyweight mix with David Price and Tyson Fury by beating Frenchman Gregory Tony for the also-vacant European championship.

Forget television, this is a show worth travelling to see. All the prime ringside seats have been sold but cheaper tickets are available via the Hatton hotline, 01925755222 or online from Tickemaster, Ticketline or HMV.

Manny's plea to Obama

Manny Pacquiao’s first thought the morning after Saturday night’s bank robbery by Tim Bradley was not for himself but for a fellow countryman.
Hermie Rivera, a close friend who lives in America, is fighting to prevent his son’s deportation to the Philippines.

Gerardo, now married with children and a long-time US resident, was caught up in a government sweep of immigrants because of minor drug offences when a teenager.

The PacMan, in his role as a congressman in his own country, delayed his return home by a day so he could petition president Barack Obama, who he has met and dined with on several occasions, on behalf of the Riveras.

Sad end for tainted Margarito

Tainted: Antonio Margarito

Tainted: Antonio Margarito

Three former world champions have been lost to boxing in less than a week. Shane Mosley, Winky Wright and then Antonio Margarito have hung up the gloves.

For Mosley and Wright, at 40, the time is right.

The saddest figure is Margarito, His legacy is tainted by his gloves being ‘loaded’ for his fight against Mosley and who is being forced to quit by a serious eye injury inflicted during a beating by Manny Pacquiao and aggravated in defeat by Miguel Cotto.

Roach's private jet dash to New York

Freddie Roach flew hurriedly out of Las Vegas on Saturday night but not in disgust at the dodgy decision against Manny Pacquiao.

At a cost of $20,000, the master trainer hired a private jet to take himself and ten of his family and friends to his richly deserved induction into the Hall of Fame in up-state New York.

Frank Warren supporting David Haye v Dereck Chisora is ugly but acceptable – Jeff Powell

The Warren paradox: Supporting Haye v Chisora is ugly… but acceptable as a one-off

|

UPDATED:

23:59 GMT, 14 May 2012

Frank Warren is nothing if not a fighter. We should expect nothing less from a boxing promoter.

So we should not be surprised that he is wading into the British Boxing Board of Control for threatening to ex-communicate anybody who has anything to do with the supposedly retired David Haye fighting the apparently suspended Dereck Chisora.

In this instance, the gloves are off. Warren has his lawyers in his corner. Nope, nothing new there.

Fighting talk: Warren chats with Haye's trainer Adam Booth at Upton Park

Fighting talk: Warren chats with Haye's trainer Adam Booth at Upton Park

More from Jeff Powell…

Jeff Powell: It's a dog's life! Ricky blasts Sky's reluctance to back Hatton Promotions
30/04/12

Jeff Powell: British boxing returns to its spiritual home… and about time too
23/04/12

Jeff Powell: Leonard v Hagler – 25 years later and the great debate rages on
09/04/12

Jeff Powell: Not bad at all – Tyson can be proud of how he's turning his life around
02/04/12

Jeff Powell: Pacquiao could reject Mayweather millions and QUIT boxing on advice of God
26/03/12

Jeff Powell: Fury joins Klitschko admiration society… but vows to beat the brothers
19/03/12

Jeff Powell: Pacquiao dares Mayweather to $140m fight… can Floyd really turn that down
12/03/12

EXCLUSIVE: Froch set for bet probe reprieve ahead of homecoming fight with Bute
05/03/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

The Board have MPs for cheer-leaders. Yup, those gentlemen who brawl and snarl at each other in the House of Commons bar. It’s getting ugly.

Prize-fighting can be a thing of violent beauty – Muhammad Ali and the two Sugar Rays to name but three – but it is not a Miss Universe contest. It will get expensive.

Boxing does not come cheap and scrapping in the courts can be bankrupting.

The Board almost went under when it had to compensate Michael Watson for the brain damage aggravated by inadequate medical facilities at ringside and it cannot really afford a protracted legal battle.

So like it or not, with European law on his side, Warren is the likely winner.

The two London heavyweights who disgraced their sport and shamed their county will profit from that infamous brawl in Munich by slugging it out in the ring at West Ham’s Upton Park football ground on the night of July 14, possibly to the accompaniment of hooligan rioting.

Again, not a pretty sight.

When it happens Warren will find himself demonised for staging a freak show under the auspices of a boxing federation which would appear to amount to not much more than a man with a telephone and a fax machine in a room in Luxembourg.

But this is not as simple as it seems, either.

British boxing needs a controlling body
and any undermining of the authority of the Board risks plunging the
hard old game into anarchy.

Hammer time: Haye and Chisora will slug it out at West Ham's ground in east London

Hammer time: Haye and Chisora will slug it out at West Ham's ground in east London

Hammer time: Haye and Chisora will slug it out at West Ham's ground in east London

Yet, for years, Warren has been not only a major source of funding for the Board but also a driving force for the post-Watson health and welfare improvements which have made Britain one of the safest countries in the world for boxers.

Nor has he forgotten that when he started out, he had to put on completely unlicensed shows in north London in order to force the establishment to let him break the unhealthy promotional monopoly of the time.

Now he needs this gruesome exploitation of the public's vicarious and morbid fascination with a ghastly incident.

He needs it to sell 42,000 seats – half of which have been snapped up already -and the hundreds of thousands of TV subscriptions which can guarantee the future of BoxNation, the dedicated channel which can provide a much-needed boon for boxing.

Warren is nothing if not a paradox, either. With our Frank you sometimes have to take the good with the not-so-good. And there can be no denying that he has done much to keep boxing afloat on this island through a number of crises down the decades.

What is needed now is a rapprochement.

If Warren can confine himself to
Haye-Chisora as a one-off – giving an absolute undertaking not to repeat
this effrontery – he will offer the Board a path out of a costly legal
minefield … and an escape route from the risk of its own closure.

Rough with the smooth: Warren has done much to the benefit of boxing

Rough with the smooth: Warren has done much to the benefit of boxing

Since rival promoters such as Barry Hearn and Frank Maloney have condemned Warren, we can presume they will never promote in this country other than under the British Board's jurisdiction.

Such an agreement would leave the original culprits to pay the penalty.

Both Haye and Chisora are talking about beating up the other, then going on to re-challenge the Klitschko brothers for the world heavyweight titles.

Whoever wins, they must both expect the Board to be even less disposed to renew their licenses if and when they re-apply and the Klitschkos still less inclined to do business with them.

Haye v Chisora splits the field

Your responses to last week's question – would you pay to watch Haye-Chisora – revealed 71 per cent ready and willing to cough up while 29 per cent consider the fight a turn-off.

At least there were no don't knows.

Silver lining to Peterson controversy

Last week was not all as bad for boxing as it was painted in some quarters.

The game could have done without the spectre of Haye-Chisora looming onto the horizon but the positive dope testing of Lamont Peterson was good not only for Amir Khan’s health but for the sport.

The inconvenience of the unnecessarily late but inevitable cancellation of this Saturday’s grudge re-match between Khan and Peterson pales before this victory in the war against steroids.

Belt up: Khan (seen with Jeff Powell) should be handed his titles back after the Peterson debacle

Belt up: Khan (seen with Jeff Powell) should be handed his titles back after the Peterson debacle

The Nevada State Athletic Commission and Golden Boy Promotions are to be commended for taking decisive action as soon as they were informed that Peterson was still high on testosterone implanted in his hip prior to his robbery of Khan’s world titles in their controversial December fight.

The sanctioning bodies usually declare a no-contest in these circumstances and order a fight for the vacant titles.

Given the extremity of this case, Khan should be reinstated by the WBA and IBF and then allowed to defend those belts as the rightful champion.

Jeff Powell: Sugar Ray Leonard v Marvin Hagler – Debate rages on

Leonard v Hagler – 25 years later and the great debate rages on

|

UPDATED:

22:18 GMT, 9 April 2012

The first time I saw Marvin Hagler after he lost to Sugar Ray Leonard was when he strolled into Harry's Bar on Rome's Via Veneto with his pet poodle.

He looked as Marvellous as ever but he was no longer interested in fighting. He was happy living in Italy and acting in movies.

Hagler had not boxed since that over-heated night in Las Vegas – and never would again – but he was still ready to argue his corner.

'I believe I beat Sugar Ray,' he said. 'Always will.'

Scroll down to watch a video of the fight

Close call: Sugar Ray Leonard was awarded the victory against Marvin Hagler

Close call: Sugar Ray Leonard was awarded the victory against Marvin Hagler

More from Jeff Powell…

Jeff Powell: Not bad at all – Tyson can be proud of how he's turning his life around
02/04/12

Jeff Powell: Pacquiao could reject Mayweather millions and QUIT boxing on advice of God
26/03/12

Jeff Powell: Fury joins Klitschko admiration society… but vows to beat the brothers
19/03/12

Jeff Powell: Pacquiao dares Mayweather to $140m fight… can Floyd really turn that down
12/03/12

EXCLUSIVE: Froch set for bet probe reprieve ahead of homecoming fight with Bute
05/03/12

Neanderthal brawl needs to be watershed moment for British boxing
27/02/12

Jeff Powell: Manny's inner battle is key to $100m Mayweather showdown
20/02/12

Jeff Powell: Big fight with little interest but a British boxer has a chance to KO Klitschko
13/02/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

This weekend, a quarter of a century later, the debate was raging all over again.

Come this 25th anniversary of the split decision which divided worldwide opinion, the hard old game has still not found the answer to these controversies.

The last few months have been riddled with protests about judging, with Amir Khan's loss of his world light-welterweight titles to Lamont Peterson the most fractious of several involving British boxers.

But none have been disputed so vehemently as Hagler-Leonard at Caesars Palace on April 6, 1987.

With Leonard coming out of a three-year retirement – prematurely enforced by a detached retina in his right eye – and having boxed only once in the two years before that, Hagler was the 3-1 on favourite to retain his world middleweight title.

Leonard's insistence on the new-fangled championship distance of 12 rounds – instead of 15 – convinced Hagler that his celebrated challenger would be short on stamina.

What Hagler was not to know was that Leonard had prepared not only with orthodox sparring but in full-on fights behind closed doors, complete with referee, time-keeper, 10-ounce gloves and no head-guards.

The ring rust had been shaken off. So much so that Leonard easily won the first two rounds.

There had been much discussion about the contrast in styles – Hagler the big-hitting counterpuncher, Leonard quick and elusive with his flashy combinations.

Standing firm: Hagler remains convinced he beat Leonard

Standing firm: Hagler remains convinced he beat Leonard

Hagler, a southpaw, tried to spring a surprise by starting with an orthodox left lead. But after losing those opening rounds he reverted to his natural stance from the third onwards.

Thereafter those who had paid their ticket money had to make their choice between Hagler the self-pronounced bull and Leonard the matador.

Leonard was accused by some of staging a grand illusion by stealing rounds he did not deserve with attention-catching flurries, the quickness of his hands deceiving the eyes of the judges.

Hagler, who was at his best picking off opponents who came forward, was perceived by others as being exposed as a one-dimensional plodder by Leonard's speeding hit-and-run tactics.

Both those extreme views did a disservice to fighters who were very different but equally great, in their own way.

Hagler, teased and tormented into becoming the aggressor, was often caught on the way in yet still connected with some damaging punches which rocked Leonard, notably in the fifth and ninth.

Leonard, who had planned to attack in hope of exploiting Hagler's occasional vulnerability to cuts, adapted like the natural showman he was, dancing out of trouble and often clipping the champion as he eeled away.

It was a classic match-up, even if Hagler was slightly past his prime at coming up 32 while Leonard, at 29, had been inactive, at least publicly, for so long.

All mine: Leonard celebrates his win in Las Vegas

All mine: Leonard celebrates his win in Las Vegas

There were times, when he changed gear to go on the offensive, when Leonard hit and then blatantly held Hagler but referee Richard Steele declined to deduct a point even though he issued no fewer than 30 warnings.

The fight ended with them furiously exchanging punches on the ropes.

At the bell, Hagler raised his arms in expected triumph. Leonard, fatigued by all his ring movement, sank to the canvas initially but then stood to gesture his claim to victory.

And so to the scorecards. Judge JoJo Guerra was vilified for his 118-110 in favour of Leonard but explained: 'He outpunched, outsmarted and out-boxed Hagler. He dominated by making Hagler come to him and miss and then counter-punching.'

Judge Lou Filippo, who scored it 115-113 for Hagler, said: 'He was doing all the work with his aggression and body shots. Leonard only fought in spurts.'

Watch the final round of this epic battle

Judge Dave Moretti, 115-113 for Leonard, said: 'Obviously Hagler was the aggressor but he was not effective. You can't chase and get hit, then chase and get hit by the harder punches and get the credit.'

Ironically respected British referee Harry Gibbs privately scored it for Hagler, whose team had rejected him as a potential judge. The majority of British commentators went for Hagler.

The pundits from the major American media outlets at ringside voted by six to five in favour of Leonard, with three scoring it a draw.

The official stats counted Hagler throwing most punches,792 to Leonard's 629, but Leonard landing more, 306 against 291.

On my irrelevant card I had Leonard winning by one point, 115-114.

A narrow victory for intelligence over power, with his last-minute decision to draw Hagler out of his comfort zone and onto his slippery counter-punching just giving him the edge.

Leonard smiled: 'I had fun out there.'

Then he retired again, instantly vacating the title. But unlike Hagler – who demanded an immediate re-match but then declined the offer when it came three years later – he was to make the U-turn into a comeback twice more.

Hagler bowed out with a growl: 'He fought like a girl. His punches didn't count.'

Unfortunately for him they did, by the narrowest of margins.

How close was it Very. And when a fight is that close it's really too close to argue with the result. Well, only for 25 years and counting.

And when all is said and done, these disputed decisions are part of prize-fighting, part of the fascination, part of the life-blood of this bleedin' old game.

'Happy' Fury planning for Klitschkos

Tyson Fury

Tyson Fury, five stones lighter and with the burden of depression lifted by his infant son's survival of a life-threatening respiratory ailment, goes to Belfast on Saturday to fight not so much for the Irish heavyweight title as for a world championship shot at one of the Klitschko brothers.

This clash with Martin Rogan was not the preference for Fury (right) but as a member of the travelling community he is making the trip with an eye to where it might lead thereafter.

He also goes into it saying: 'What happened with my boy has put my life in perspective. Made me appreciate what is really important and happy with everything I have.'

He also believes he will be ready for Wladimir or Vitali Klitschko – both of whom are reviewing potential challengers at the moment – after this fight.

Fury v Rogan will be live on Channel 5 on Saturday night.

Groves relishing German test

George Groves, having pulled out of a re-match with Kenny Anderson, has landed a challenge for the world super-middleweight title against Robert Stieglitz in Germany on May 5.

This, after only 15 pro fights including the grudge victory over fellow Brit and Olympic champion James DeGale.

Sitieglitz will be making his fifth defence of the WBO belt in this, his 44th professional fight.

Bring it on: George Groves is looking forward to fighting Robert Stieglitz

Bring it on: George Groves is looking forward to fighting Robert Stieglitz

But he has been stopped twice in his career and is the most vulnerable of the world champions in this division.

So let us hope the likeable and improving Groves does not go the way of Amir Khan, Darren Barker, Martin Murray and Matthew Macklin, twice, among British fighters beaten in recent world title fights away from home.

Groves says: 'Stieglitz is a great fighter but I believe I have the attributes to beat him.'

Indeed he may. But if he does bring home the title he would be wise to gather more experience by defending it, rather than taking on just yet the other world champions at super-middleweight, Andre Ward and Lucien Bute or Carl Froch.

Stieglitz-Groves will be live on BoxNation (via Sky Channel 456) on Saturday May 5.

Nigel Doughty: Nottingham Forest chairman will be sorely missed

Doughty was Forest chairman, supporter, true Red and will be sorely missed

It would be remiss not to begin this week's Midlander without reference to the tragic news that broke on Saturday afternoon about Nigel Doughty.

It would be apt at this point if I could pay tribute to him as a person, a fella that I knew well.

But that wasn't the case. He did not need a profile. He did not want to interact with the media.

True fan: Doughty made huge efforts to make sure he watched every match

True fan: Doughty made huge efforts to make sure he watched every match

More from Neil Moxley…

The Midlander: Morgan has no choice now but to stick with Mick
03/02/12

The Midlander: Villa's youth of today offer hope for tomorrow with promising NextGen display
26/01/12

The Midlander: Murray wants England's future success to be built at St George's Park
20/01/12

The Midlander: Wolves must aim higher if Morgan's spending claims are to be believed
13/01/12

The Midlander: Right or wrong Debate over Milijas's red card rages on…
06/01/12

The Midlander: Monty and Mad Dog's thirst for success and CSI Aston Villa – it must be time for my 2011 awards
29/12/11

The Midlander: So, who should Villa plump for in the January sales
23/12/11

The Midlander: How the Sky Blues have come crashing down since THAT magical FA Cup win in 1987
16/12/11

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

I have had an outstanding request to speak with him for the past decade. There was never any chance whatsoever that it would be granted.

He only ever did one interview per season – on the phone – with the Nottingham Evening Post.

So what I'm about to say is taken from third parties who did deal with him on a regular basis. The media guys at Forest and Mark Arthur.

I certainly can recall several conversations with the chief executive which ended: 'That's not Nigel's style.'

What then was his style

According to the guys in the media who had to connect him up to the internet wherever he was in the world to watch Forest play, he was a fanatic.

I hope I'm not speaking out of turn, but Forest 'webmaster' Geoff Peabody told me on numerous occasions how difficult he found it sometimes to hook the chairman up to the 'net while he was on a yacht somewhere.

I'm sure one of those occasions was the Derby fixture – a lunchtime kick-off a couple of years ago when the late chairman was on holiday in the Caribbean and had to get up at 6am to get his Forest 'fix.'

No matter where he was, the owner would move heaven and earth to see his team.

There was a moving tribute to him paid by Alastair Campbell, about how proud this self-made man was to show off the replica European Cup in Forest's boardroom.

About how once he had pulled off a deal which netted him a cool 300m profit six years ago, he decided to pump yet more cash into his club.

He really didn't have to. He surely must have known by then what he had let himself in for. But no. He kept pumping in the cash, desperate to bankroll Forest's return.

I thought that David Pleat hit the right note.

'He was a thoroughly decent man,' he said. 'He had a passion for the club. He was generous and kind.

Tribute: Forest fans paid tribute to their former owner

Tribute: Forest fans paid tribute to their former owner

Tribute: Forest fans paid tribute to their former owner

'I have met many people in football and Nigel, for all his wealth, had real humility. I never saw him angry. And if he lost a football match, he did so with dignity.

'He loved Forest. It was his pride. He was determined to get the club back to the promised land.'

No matter what gripe anyone had with his leadership the fact that he lost with dignity and loved his football club will reach out to every single football supporter out there – not just Reds' fans.

So, to my mind it would be fitting if the club marked his contribution by naming a part of the ground or the Academy after him. I believe he paid off the outstanding debt on the Trent End, for instance.

At its' most basic level, Nigel Doughty's financial input was almost incidental.

He was part of the very fabric of Nottingham Forest. He was a supporter long before he made his money.

And, like any fan, it was part of him too. And, irrespective of his legacy, in the first instance his passing should be treated as such.

Nigel Doughty was a true Red.

What's in a late goal

Joy if you have just scored it, obviously. And frustration if you are on the receiving end.

The psychologists would have a field day explaining why it is that some teams manage to force the issue while others have it forced upon them.

And so we turn to two Midlands' teams this week for whom scoring and conceding goals late on seems to be more than just co-incidence.

For instance, at St Andrew's Chris Hughton's team have now found the net on a staggering 20 occasions when the game has been going into its' final last ten minutes.

Over 30 per cent of their total tally of 63 so far this season have been netted in that time. On countless occasions this season it has added one point, or maybe two, as it did against Portsmouth in midweek.

Flying high: City are right in the hunt for a promotion spot

Flying high: City are right in the hunt for a promotion spot

While at the Ricoh Arena, the opposite is the case.

Coventry City would be sitting in a far healthier position were it not for their repeated late collapses.

Twenty points have been tossed away – on occasion in the most ridiculous of circumstances.

Notwithstanding the almost farcical effort at Selhurst Park earlier this season (letting in two during injury time) they then show they have learned no lesson at all by falling to defeat at Bloomfield Road in pretty similar fashion.

Just when you thought it couldn't get any worse, Ipswich Town show that it is no fluke and take home the points with yet another late goal.

I know Andy Thorn has his issues but these late aberrations are costing his team hugely.

It's horribly demoralising for everyone concerned. But it's got to be pointed out and hopefully an issue made out of it for discussion because it's costing the Sky Blues hugely.

Snow joke: Coventry's late showing have seriously hampered their progress

Snow joke: Coventry's late showing have seriously hampered their progress

Finally, those who think Randy Lerner is just a figurehead at Aston Villa…read on.

The record-breaking shirt deal, signed with Macron this week, carried the proviso that Villa should be responsible for the distribution.

Lerner has decreed that this should be done by the club, enabling it to find out who and where its' supporters are.

It will be a labour-intensive process for merchandising boss John Greenfield and his team but the club will benefit from it in terms of its' marketing reach, hopefully boosting income streams.

He might have struggled with money going out, but it seems he is not so green when it comes to money coming in.