Tag Archives: postal

Lance Armstrong posts picture of yellow jerseys

Shamed Armstrong sticks two fingers up at critics by posting picture of himself surrounded by yellow jerseys

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UPDATED:

19:31 GMT, 11 November 2012

Lance Armstrong has posted a picture on Twitter of himself relaxing surrounded by his tainted Tour de France yellow jerseys.

The Texan was stripped of the seven titles after an investigation by the United States Anti-doping Agency found him guilty of using performance-enhancing drugs.

But the image he shared on the social networking site, below the heading 'Back in Austin and just layin' around…', shows him lounging on his sofa below the seven jerseys of his now discredited Tour titles.

Cheek: Lance Armstrong posted a picture of himself lying down surrounded by his yellow jerseys

Cheek: Lance Armstrong posted a picture of himself lying down surrounded by his yellow jerseys

The jerseys are hanging in frames on the walls near the L-shaped sofa, each picked out by an individual lightbulb, with a pair of curtains left open to clearly display the last of them.

Last month, the International Cycling Union (UCI) ratified the sanctions recommended by USADA, who concluded Armstrong and his US Postal team ran 'the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme that sport has ever seen'.

All Armstrong's results from August 1, 1998 were expunged from the record books, including his seven consecutive Tour de France 'wins' from 1999 to 2005, and the 41-year-old was banned for life.

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) also announced last week that it would not appeal against the sanctions, while the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has opened an investigation which could see Armstrong stripped of his road time-trial bronze medal from the 2000 Games.

Figure of fun: A giant effigy of Armstrong was burnt in Kent last week

Figure of fun: A giant effigy of Armstrong was burnt in Kent last week

Armstrong did not cooperate with the USADA investigation and has always denied wrongdoing and though he has since removed the line '7-time Tour de France champion' from his Twitter profile, today's picture is sure to be seen as provocative.

The fall-out from USADA's verdict has been extensive, with 11 of Armstrong's former team-mates receiving six-month bans after admitting their own doping offences in the course of their testimonies against him.

South African mountain-biker David George, who rode with US Postal from 1999 to 2000, was provisionally suspended on Tuesday after testing positive for the banned blood-booster EPO.

Lance Armstrong sanctions backed by WADA

WADA back USADA sanctions against shamed Armstrong

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UPDATED:

00:48 GMT, 3 November 2012

The World Anti-Doping Agency has confirmed they will not appeal against the United States Anti-Doping Agency's sanctions against Lance Armstrong.

USADA recommend that all Armstrong's results from August 1, 1998 were expunged from the record books, including his seven consecutive Tour de France 'wins' from 1999 to 2005, as well as handing the 41-year-old a life ban from cycling.

The International Cycling Union (UCI) last week ratified the sanctions imposed by USADA, who concluded Armstrong and his United States Postal Service team ran 'the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme that sport has ever seen'.

Shamed: Armstrong speaks at a charity event last month

Shamed: Armstrong speaks at a charity event last month

But while the UCI did highlight some criticisms of USADA, WADA appear unequivocal in their support of the findings.

Commenting on the decision, WADA President John Fahey said: 'WADA has no such concerns as to the complete process and the overwhelming weight of evidence.

'Rather it is of the opinion that the actions of USADA have highlighted the need in all cases for athletes to be able to come forward with evidence that will help rid sport of doping cheats.'

Fahey went on to reference the UCI's suggestion that an independent inquiry would be convened to investigate further, though confirmed WADA had yet to be contacted about taking part.

His words appeared to betray some distance between the bodies but Fahey insisted WADA must have a role if any such inquiry was to carry the required weight.

From hero to villain: Armstrong during the 1999 Tour de France

From hero to villain: Armstrong during the 1999 Tour de France

'Following the UCI Management Committee's announcement last week, WADA now awaits with considerable interest the details of the independent inquiry that is proposed, including its composition and terms of reference,' said Fahey.

'It is important that there now be genuine independence and a complete examination of the scenario, with a panel that has full powers of inquiry and access to all required evidence and information.

'Only with the necessary independence and terms of reference will the inquiry be able to properly address the systemic culture of doping that was allowed to develop in cycling during this time.

'WADA has had no communication from the UCI with regards to their upcoming inquiry, nor indeed the Armstrong reasoned decision, nor the UCI Management decisions. WADA will want to contribute to the inquiry if it is established and resourced beyond reproach.

'This is not a situation in which just because the athlete did not return a positive test there was nothing more the governing body of cycling could do. It has taken a major effort and undertaking from a national anti-doping organisation to gather the compelling evidence following allegations raised by Floyd Landis in 2010.

'This case has resulted in a right and proper sanction for the athlete in question and has served as a revelation to the world of sport. For this USADA must be applauded.'

It was confirmed only on Thursday that the International Olympic Committee had opened their own investigation into Armstrong, with the possible result of the rider being stripped of the bronze medal he won at the Sydney Games in 2000.

Drugs in cycling: Marcel Six banned over missed test

Fresh doping woe for cycling as rider Six banned over missed drugs test

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UPDATED:

11:35 GMT, 26 October 2012

A cyclist has been banned for 18 months for refusing to take a drugs test because he wanted to get home to his sick children.

Marcel Six, riding for the Metaltek Scott team in an event at Canary Wharf in May, told the tester that his wife was anxious about his children and this was backed up by evidence of text messages and phone calls.

An independent national anti-doping panel ruled however that 26-year-old Six was still guilty of refusing to provide a urine sample for doping control and banned him for 18 months.

Dark days: Charges against Lance Armstrong have plunged cycling into chaos

Dark days: Charges against Lance Armstrong have plunged cycling into chaos

The panel said: 'Honourable though the athlete's motives may have been, we have no hesitation in finding that his refusal was not based on any compelling justification.

'To be blunt, even if he agreed to race only at the last minute and under pressure, the fact of the matter is that, if he had time to compete in a cycle race, he had to make time to take the test.

'If, as was later the case, he wished to put his family first, then the time to do that was before he agreed to race rather than when he came to be tested.'

The panel did reduce the usual two-year ban by six months after deciding Six was able to demonstrate 'no significant fault or negligence'.

The ban comes in the wake of Lance Armstong being stripped of his seven Tour de France titles.

The International Cycling Union accepted the findings of a United States Anti-doping Agency investigation which concluded Armstrong and his United States Postal Service team ran 'the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme that sport has ever seen'.

USADA stripped the 41-year-old American of all results from August 1, 1998, including his record run of Tour triumphs from 1999 to 2005, and issued him with a life ban in August, sanctions the UCI have now ratified.

Lance Armstrong stripped of Tour de France titles

Armstrong stripped of Tour de France titles and banned for life as UCI ratify sanctions against disgraced rider

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UPDATED:

13:01 GMT, 22 October 2012

Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles after
the sport's world governing body, the UCI, accepted the findings of the
United States Anti-Doping Agency's investigation.

Armstrong refused to co-operate with USADA, who earlier this month published
a 1,000-page report which concluded the Texan and his United States Postal
Service team ran 'the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping
programme that sport has ever seen'.

Shamed: Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his titles after the UCI endorsed the USADA sanctions

Shamed: Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his titles after the UCI endorsed the USADA sanctions

In accordance with the World Anti-Doping Code, the UCI had 21 days to
respond, until October 31, and president Pat McQuaid today announced the world
governing body would accept USADA's findings and ratified the sanctions imposed
on Armstrong.

It means the Texan has been stripped of all results since August 1, 1998 and
banned for life.

At a media conference in Geneva, McQuaid said: '(The UCI) will not appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport and it will recognise the sanctions that USADA has imposed.

'The UCI will ban Lance Armstrong from cycling and the UCI will strip him of his seven Tour de France titles. Lance Armstrong has no place in cycling.'

Endorsement: UCI chief Pat McQuaid confirmed the governing body accepted the Lance Armstrong sanctions

Endorsement: UCI chief Pat McQuaid confirmed the governing body accepted the Lance Armstrong sanctions

Eleven former team-mates of Armstrong testified against him to USADA, receiving six-month bans.

These suspensions were also ratified by the UCI, which thanked the riders for giving evidence against Armstrong.

McQuaid added: 'The UCI will also recognise the sanctions imposed on the riders who testified against Lance Armstrong; UCI indeed thanks them for telling their stories.'

Banned: Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour titles by the USADA, but claims he was the victim of a 'witch hunt'

Banned: Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour titles by the USADA, but claims he was the victim of a 'witch hunt'

The UCI, particularly the leadership of McQuaid and honorary president Hein Verbruggen, who was president at the time of Armstrong's record run of Tour success, have met criticism over the USADA investigation.

Allegations have been made against the UCI, which McQuaid dismissed.

'UCI has nothing to hide in responding to the USADA report,' he said. 'The UCI has called a special meeting of the UCI management committee next Friday to discuss this report and the measures which the UCI wishes to put in place in order that we are never faced with such a situation in the future.'

Not so magnificent seven: Armstrong's wins have been erased from the Tour de France record books

Not so magnificent seven: Armstrong's wins have been erased from the Tour de France record books

While addressing the past, McQuaid was steadfast in his belief that cycling has a positive future.

He added: 'This is a landmark day for cycling. Cycling has endured a lot of pain as it has absorbed the impact of the USADA report.

'UCI promised to prioritise our analysis of the report and to provide an early response and we've done that.

'My message to cycling, to our riders, to our sponsors and to our fans today is: cycling has a future.

Support: Cyclists gathered to listen to Armstrong's address at the start of the annual Team Livestrong Challenge in Austin on Sunday

Support: Cyclists gathered to listen to Armstrong's address at the start of the annual Team Livestrong Challenge in Austin on Sunday

'This is not the first time that cycling has reached a crossroads or that it has had to begin anew and to engage in the painful process of confronting its past.

'It will do so again with renewed vigour and purpose and its stakeholders and fans can be assured that it will find a new path forward.

'We're here to answer your questions and to say to the cycling community: UCI is listening and is on your side.

'We've come too far in the fight against doping to return to our past.

'Cycling has a future and something like this must never happen again.'

Armstrong always protested his innocence, but he has lost support from some of his major sponsors since USADA's report was made public.

Nike, Trek and Anheuser-Busch, brewers of Budweiser, all severed their ties with Armstrong, while fashion brand Oakley are reviewing their position in the wake of the doping scandal which has transcended sport.

Armstrong has also stepped down from his position as chairman of his cancer charity, Livestrong.

He made his first public appearance on Friday at the 15th anniversary celebration of the charity. He said to the 1,700-strong gathering: 'I am truly humbled by your support.

'It's been an interesting couple of weeks. It's been a difficult couple of weeks for me and my family, my friends and this foundation.

'I say, “I've been better, but I've also been worse”.'

Lance Armstrong sanctions ratified by UCI

Finally… UCI ratify Armstrong sanctions after years of ignorance over doping

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UPDATED:

11:15 GMT, 22 October 2012

Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles after
the sport's world governing body, the UCI, accepted the findings of the
United States Anti-Doping Agency's investigation.

Armstrong refused to co-operate with USADA, who earlier this month published
a 1,000-page report which concluded the Texan and his United States Postal
Service team ran 'the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping
programme that sport has ever seen'.

In accordance with the World Anti-Doping Code, the UCI had 21 days to
respond, until October 31, and president Pat McQuaid today announced the world
governing body would accept USADA's findings and ratified the sanctions imposed
on Armstrong.

It means the Texan has been stripped of all results since August 1, 1998 and
banned for life.

At a media conference in Geneva, McQuaid said: '(The UCI) will not appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport and it will recognise the sanctions that USADA has imposed.

'The UCI will ban Lance Armstrong from cycling and the UCI will strip him of his seven Tour de France titles. Lance Armstrong has no place in cycling.'

More to follow…

Shamed: Lance Armstrong, who finds out on Monday whether the USADA's report will be accepted by the UCI, spoke to participants at The Livestrong Challenge Ride in Austin, Texas, on Sunday

Shamed: Lance Armstrong, who finds out on Monday whether the USADA's report will be accepted by the UCI, spoke to participants at The Livestrong Challenge Ride in Austin, Texas, on Sunday


Fanbase: University of Texas college football fans sport Livestrong, Armstrong's cancer-fighting charity, t-shirts during their cancer-awareness game

Fanbase: University of Texas college football fans sport Livestrong, Armstrong's cancer-fighting charity, t-shirts during their cancer-awareness game

Banned: Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour titles by the USADA, but claims he was the victim of a 'witch hunt'

Banned: Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour titles by the USADA, but claims he was the victim of a 'witch hunt'


Support: Cyclists gathered to listen to Armstrong's address at the start of the annual Team Livestrong Challenge in Austin on Sunday

Support: Cyclists gathered to listen to Armstrong's address at the start of the annual Team Livestrong Challenge in Austin on Sunday

Lance Armstrong $100k UCI donation again linked to alleged drug test cover-up

Armstrong's $100k UCI donation again linked to alleged drug test cover-up

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UPDATED:

20:00 GMT, 15 October 2012

Fresh questions have emerged over the 'triangle' involving disgraced Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, a payment by him to the International Cycling Union (UCI) and a drug-testing laboratory.

The UCI have admitted they accepted a donation of more than US $100,000 from Armstrong in 2002, but have strongly denied it was connected to any cover-up of a positive test.

Armstrong's former US Postal team-mate Tyler Hamilton has testified that he [Armstrong] bragged he had managed to have a positive finding covered up.

Accused: The USADA labelled Lance Armstrong (left) a 'serial cheat'

Accused: The USADA labelled Lance Armstrong (left) a 'serial cheat'

Around about the same time, the head of a drug-testing laboratory in Lausanne, Switzerland, admitted to meeting Armstrong and separately were also given free use of a blood analysing machine by the UCI.

A report by the USADA last week labelled Armstrong a 'serial cheat' and a bully who enforced 'the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme that sport has ever seen'.

Dr Michael Ashenden, acknowledged as the foremost expert in blood doping and the man whose test caught Hamilton, said there were clear conflicts of interest.

Ashenden told BBC Radio Five Live programme 'Peddlers – Cycling's Dirty Truth': 'The UCI should never have accepted money from Armstrong under any circumstances.

'But if they took money after they were aware there were grounds to suspect Armstrong had used EPO, it takes on a really sinister complexion.

'We know Armstrong paid the UCI more than US $100,000 and around that time the UCI gave the Lausanne laboratory free use of a blood analyser worth US $60-70,000.

'That's what I mean by a triangle: the laboratory meets with Armstrong, all of this takes place at about the time that Floyd Landis and Tyler Hamilton said under oath that Armstrong bragged he had managed to have a result covered up.'

Dick Pound, the former president of the World Anti-Doping Association (WADA), said the UCI could have made greater efforts to have caught drug-taking cyclists.

Questions: Tyler Hamilton alleges Armstrong said he had a positive test covered up

Questions: Tyler Hamilton alleges Armstrong said he had a drug test covered up

He said: 'They could certainly have done things to ensure they caught more people.

'It's generally acknowledged now that for a governing body to promote its sport and to police it puts them in an impossible conflict. The UCI have always been in a difficult position and their behaviour has not always been what you would hope it to be.

'There was certainly generalised knowledge that there had been some payments from Armstrong to the UCI.

'It's hard to think of the UCI as a charity and Lance somebody filled with [charitable] spirit.'

A former aide of Armstrong's told the BBC programme she was used as a 'drug runner' during her time working for the US Postal team.

Emma O'Reilly, who was Armstrong's personal masseuse and assistant in the 1990s, says she rented a car to travel down to Spain to pick up tablets from US Postal team director Johan Bruyneel before returning to France and giving them to Armstrong.

She said: 'Johan gave me the tablets, very discretely, without letting anybody else know that I was getting them, and the following day we want back up to France and then the following morning I met Lance in the car park at McDonald's and just handed them over.'

On Friday, Bruyneel quit as general manager of the RadioShack Nissan Trek team by mutual agreement, having chosen to contest the USADA charges in an arbitration hearing.

The USADA report states one rider testified 'his use of prohibited substances was performed at the direction and with the full knowledge and approval of team director Johan Bruyneel'.

The UCI were not available to comment but have previously vehemently denied there was a cover-up of any positive test by Armstrong.

Lance Armstrong scandal: Matt White admits role in doping

Fallout from Armstrong doping revelations continues as cycling chief White quits

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UPDATED:

12:47 GMT, 13 October 2012

Stepping down: White has admitted his involvement in the doping scandal

Stepping down: White has admitted his involvement in the doping scandal

GreenEDGE Cycling sports director Matt White has stepped down from his position after admitting to taking part in doping during his time as a team-mate of Lance Armstrong with US Postal in the early 2000s.

White, who has now also stood down from his role with Cycling Australia's national men's high performance program, admitted doping was part of US Postal team's strategy.

The admission is another damning claim against seven-time Tour de France winner Armstrong who has had 11 of his former team-mates give evidence against him to the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).

White issued a statement today after
earlier being accused of cheating by 2006 Tour de France winner Floyd
Landis while with the US Postal team from 2001-2003.

The statement said: 'I am aware my
name has been mentioned during talks that USADA has had with former
team-mates of mine in their investigation regarding doping activities at
the US Postal Service team.

'I am sad to say that I was part of a team where doping formed part of the team's strategy, and I too was involved in that strategy.

'My involvement is something I am not proud of and I sincerely apologise to my fans, media, family and friends who trusted me and also to other athletes in my era that consciously chose not to dope.'

White stopped racing in 2007 before moving into positions with Slipstream-Chipotle (now Garmin-Sharp) and GreenEDGE.

He said one of the main reasons he stopped racing was the desire to help change the sport with the team's founder Jonathan Vaughters and David Millar.

Scandal: The full extent of Armstrong's doping has been uncovered

Scandal: The full extent of Armstrong's doping has been uncovered

'I stopped my racing career because I had the opportunity to be part of something that had the potential to actually change cycling,' White said.

'The ideas about a clean team that Dave Millar and Jonathan Vaughters spoke to me about back then, were ones that the sport desperately needed.'

White said he understood the criticism the sport had received but believes the culture is slowly changing.

'As a sport, cycling has received a lot of criticism regarding doping and rightfully so – but certain teams have also lead the way in fighting an otherwise never-ending battle to ensure that professional cycling can stay clean,' he said.

'This battle starts from within and we have had great success in changing this in the current culture in our sport.

'I am convinced that this battle will need constant monitoring and we must learn constructively from the past.

'The approach that many riders of my generation had cannot be repeated, and I believe that cycling now has the most rigorous and complete testing regimes of any sport.'

Johan Bruyneel leaves RadioShack after Lance Armstrong scandal

Disgraced former mentor of Armstrong leaves RadioShack after drug revelations

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UPDATED:

18:52 GMT, 12 October 2012

Johan Bruyneel, Lance Armstrong's team manager on the American's seven Tour de France wins, is quitting as RadioShack Nissan general manager by mutual agreement.

Bruyneel was named in the United States Anti-Doping Agency report released this week which said he was one of the people who had helped Armstrong organise doping within the US Postal Team.

'In light of these testimonies, both
parties feel it is necessary to make this decision since Johan Bruyneel
can no longer direct the team in an efficient and comfortable way,'
RadioShack Nissan said in a statement.

Disgraced: Armstrong (left) with Bruyneel in 2004

Disgraced: Armstrong (left) with Bruyneel in 2004

Belgian Bruyneel was Armstrong's team manager when the Texan won his seven Tours from 1999-2005 as well as during his two Tour rides in 2009 and 2010 after his comeback from a three-and-a-half year retirement.

Meanwhile, former world road race champion Mark Cavendish believes cycling is one of the cleanest sports because the cheats get found out, and says it is unfair to judge today's riders on past events.

The 27-year-old told Sky Sports News: 'The same question I always get is, “how can cycling move forward”

'Well, it is moving forward and it has been – but people won't let it.

Disgraced: Armstrong (left) with Bruyneel in 2004

'There's going to be cynics, there's going to be people with closed minds, and there's going to be stuff that comes up from the past.

'That's not fair to tarnish the riders who are doing it now with the brush they don't deserve to be tarnished with. It's a stupid, closed-minded view on it.

'Cheating happens everywhere – in every sport, in every country, in every aspect of life.'

He added: 'In my mind, I think cycling is one of the cleanest sports because it catches the cheats and throws them away.'

Tyler Hamilton implicates Lance Armstrong

Hamilton implicates former team-mate Armstrong in institutionalised doping offences

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UPDATED:

13:06 GMT, 3 September 2012

Lance Armstrong's former team-mate Tyler Hamilton has lifted the lid on what he claims was institutionalised doping at the US Postal Service team.

In his new book The Secret Race, extracts from which were reproduced in The Times on Monday, Hamilton said Armstrong's former team was 'two years ahead of what everybody else was doing' in terms of its alleged doping activities.

Accused: Tyler Hamilton claims Lance Armstrong and other members of the US Postal Service team took blood-boosting drugs

Accused: Tyler Hamilton claims Lance Armstrong and other members of the US Postal Service team took blood-boosting drugs

The revelations come amid increased
scrutiny regarding drugs use in cycling, after the US Anti-Doping Agency
(USADA) last week announced its intention of stripping Armstrong of his
seven Tour de France titles following the Texan's announcement that he
would no longer contest long-standing doping charges.

Hamilton and Armstrong rode together for the US Postal team from 1998 to 2001, a period that delivered three of Armstrong's Tour wins.

Hamilton, who has twice been banned for doping offences, has previously spoken out against both Armstrong and the team in interviews with federal criminal investigators.

One of the team's techniques, Hamilton claims, was the use of blood doping, whereby an amount of a rider's blood was extracted, stored and then re-injected to boost the red blood cell count.

'With the other stuff, you swallow a pill or put on a patch or get a tiny injection,' Hamilton wrote.

'But here you're watching a big clear plastic bag slowly fill up with your warm dark red blood.

Claim: Hamilton, who has been banned twice for doping offences, has accused Armstrong in his book

Claim: Hamilton, who has been banned twice for doping offences, has accused Armstrong in his book

'You never forget it.'

Hamilton also alleged that at the 1999 Tour Armstrong's gardener, named only as Phillipe, followed the riders on a motorbike carrying a flask containing vials of the blood-boosting drug EPO.

'When we needed Edgar [Allan Poe, a slang term for EPO], Phillipe would zip through the Tour's traffic and make a drop-off,' he claimed.

Hamilton also questioned the quality of the doping tests the riders were subjected to.

Armstrong has never failed a doping test, a fact frequently held up by his supporters as proof of his innocence, but Hamilton wrote: 'They weren't drug tests. They were more like discipline tests, IQ tests.

'If you were careful and paid attention, you could dope and be 99 per cent certain that you would not get caught.

'They've got their doctors, and we've got ours, and ours are better. Better paid, for sure.'

Armstrong's representatives were not immediately available for comment about the book's claims.

Armstrong has always denied using drugs throughout his career.

I've done nothing wrong: Armstrong has denied ever using performance enhancing drugs in his career

I've done nothing wrong: Armstrong has denied ever using performance enhancing drugs in his career

Tour de France 2012: Bradley Wiggins rant at doping question

Tour leader Wiggins in ferocious expletive-laden rant after doping question

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UPDATED:

16:49 GMT, 8 July 2012

Bradley Wiggins responded with an expletive-laden rant to a question over doping in cycling after successfully defending the yellow jersey on stage eight of the Tour de France.

The 32-year-old Team Sky rider is seeking to become the first British winner in the 99th edition of the Tour and entered the race as one of the favourites after wins in the Paris-Nice, Tour de Romandie and Criterium du Dauphine stage races this season.

Not so mellow yellow: Bradley Wiggins reacted angrily to questions after he retained the leader's jersey on stage eight of the Tour de France

Not so mellow yellow: Bradley Wiggins reacted angrily to questions after he retained the leader's jersey on stage eight of the Tour de France

Not so mellow yellow: Bradley Wiggins reacted angrily to questions after he retained the leader's jersey on stage eight of the Tour de France

After the 157.5-kilometre route from Belfort to Porrentruy, won by Thibaut Pinot (FDJ-Bigmat), Wiggins holds a 10-second advantage over defending champion Cadel Evans (BMC Racing) ahead of Monday's 41.5km time-trial to Besancon.

After stage eight, Wiggins was asked about Team Sky's recent performance on stage seven.

Attacks: Lance Armstrong continues to fight off allegations of doping during his pomp

Attacks: Lance Armstrong continues to fight off allegations of doping during his pomp

The British backed team were dominant throughout, provoking some commentators to compare the squad with that of seven-time winner Lance Armstrong's United States Postal Service squad in their heyday – and the cynics who suggest riders have to take drugs to win the Tour.

Wiggins said: 'I say they're just f*****g w*****s. I cannot be doing with people like that.

'It justifies their own bone-idleness because they can't ever imagine applying themselves to do anything in their lives.

'It's easy for them to sit under a pseudonym on Twitter and write that sort of s**t, rather than get off their arses in their own lives and apply themselves and work hard at something and achieve something.

'And that's ultimately it. C***s.'