Tag Archives: polish

Sam Allardyce reveals how he once missed out on Robert Lewandowski

Big Sam: How I missed out on Champions League hotshot Lewandowski

By
John Drayton

PUBLISHED:

08:25 GMT, 26 April 2013

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UPDATED:

09:01 GMT, 26 April 2013

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West Ham manager Sam Allardyce has revealed how he missed out on signing Robert Lewandowski – during his time in charge at Blackburn.

The Borussia Dortmund striker was set to hold talks with Rovers in 2010 as he looked for a move from Polish club Lech Poznan.

But the cash-strapped Blackburn board struggled to find the money and the Iceland volcanic ash cloud put the final nail in the coffin when Lewandowski's flight to England was cancelled.

Dortmund stepped in to secure a deal for a fee reported to be around 4.5million euros and the rest is now history.

On target: Lewandowski was set to hold talks with Sam Allardyce at Blackburn Rovers in 2010

On target: Lewandowski was set to hold talks with Sam Allardyce at Blackburn Rovers in 2010

Allardyce told Sky Sports: 'It's true. He was put forward to sign very strongly by our recruitment staff and unfortunately it was one that got knocked back.

'My distant memory isn't that great but I think (former Rovers chairman) John (Williams) and the board said we are not going to commit that amount of money.

'I think they wanted three or four million euros but we were particularly strapped financially at the time at Blackburn. I watched him play. But I didn't get the chance to meet him.

'I think his agent said he couldn't come over because of the ash cloud, yes. He's probably worth 40 million euros now.'

Missed out: Allardyce was keen to sign Lewandowski but the Rovers board could not find the cash

Missed out: Allardyce was keen to sign Lewandowski but the Rovers board could not find the cash

Allardyce is now left to rue the missed opportunity to sign the Pole who scored four goals against Real Madrid in the UEFA Champions League semi-final first leg on Wednesday night.

He said: 'I think about it every time I see him play.

'He would have had a period of getting used to the level and the physical presence, but with a talent like that it wouldn't have been too long before he started to shine and score goals.

'The level he is playing at now is unbelievable, not just his scoring ability but his ability to retain possession.

'There were a lot of people looking at him at that time as well but we had the edge over everyone else because of the attraction of the Premier League.

'He could have used us as a stepping stone but it didn't happen.'

The one that got away: Lewandowski moved from Lech Poznan to Dortmund for a reported 4.5million euros

The one that got away: Lewandowski moved from Lech Poznan to Dortmund for a reported 4.5million euros

England players to help refund fans

English players to contribute to fans' ticket refund after rescheduling of Poland match

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UPDATED:

18:07 GMT, 17 October 2012

England's players are to part-fund a 50,000 money-back scheme for fans affected by Tuesday night's World Cup postponement in Warsaw.

The Football Association were criticised in some quarters last night when the Three Lions left the National Stadium in Warsaw following the decision to call off Tuesday night's World Cup qualifier with Poland without acknowledging the fans who had made the trip.

Whilst the Polish Football Federation have already confirmed they will refund the cost of tickets for fans unable to attend Wednesday's match, the FA have taken it a step further.

Clean-up operation: The stadium in Warsaw was ready for action on Wednesday morning

Clean-up operation: The stadium in Warsaw was ready for action on Wednesday morning

Clean-up operation: The stadium in Warsaw was ready for action on Wednesday morning

Together with the England Footballers Foundation (EFF), they have agreed to cover the costs of tickets refunds for fans who did remain in the Polish capital.

'The team really appreciate the support we receive away from home,' said England skipper Steven Gerrard.

'We know that fans have spent money and taken time off work to travel to Poland and we don't take it for granted.

'The supporters have the complete respect of the whole squad.'

Refund: England fans will be reimbursed following the farce

Refund: England fans will be reimbursed following the farce

In addition, The FA and players will
invite every one of the 2,500 fans who bought tickets and travelled to
the game to a special England training session at Wembley Stadium or St
George's Park before the end of the season.

It is a significant gesture from the
England ranks and has been agreed following discussions between the FA
and it's official supporters group 'englandfans'.

Hundreds of fans have been attempting
to change flights and secure additional accommodation following last
night's postponement, the first time an England game has been called off
because of the weather since 1979.

Saturated: England manager Roy Hodgson tests out the pitch on Tuesday night

Saturated: England manager Roy Hodgson tests out the pitch on Tuesday night

Poland v England: Roy Hodgson acid test: MATT LAWTON

Acid test: Minnows were devoured, now Roy's boys have bigger fish to fry

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UPDATED:

22:31 GMT, 15 October 2012

The lights went out on Sir Alf Ramsey’s reign as England manager after playing Poland and on Monday night here the lights went out briefly on Roy Hodgson.

It was an electrical fault rather than the fault of England’s footballers, the interview room inside the national stadium suddenly descending into darkness. But it did add, briefly, to the sense of drama ahead of a hugely important World Cup qualifier and it also led neatly into a question about England’s past and those dark days in 1973.

All smiles: Hodgson and Gerrard share a joke at the pre-match press conference on Monday

All smiles: Roy Hodgson and Steven Gerrard share a joke at the pre-match press conference on Monday

After demonstrating his ‘anorak’
knowledge and rattling off a few Polish names involved in those two
matches 39 years ago, Hodgson gave a rather nice response.

‘A knowledge of history might give you a sense of perspective but it doesn’t help you win a football match,’ he said.

He’s right, of course, because here
he needs help of a different kind. On Tuesday he needs the players he
selects to help him firmly establish himself as England manager by
securing a victory that will enable him to seize control of a
potentially problematic qualification group.

This is Hodgson’s 11th match in
charge, and the time has arrived for him to prove that he can organise
11 Englishmen to win a match of this significance.

A match that could propel England
that much closer to the World Cup in Brazil and send the manager into
next year optimistic about the future.

Judging by training here on Monday
night, he is leaning towards more experienced players even if he did
talk of ‘a balance between youth and experience’. He does seem to have
changes in mind, and not just the obvious ones like Ashley Cole and
Joleon Lescott.

Warming up: Steven Gerrard leads the England squad in training at the National Stadium in Warsaw on Monday

Warming up: Gerrard leads the England squad in training at the National Stadium in Warsaw on Monday

Warming up: The England squad in training at the National Stadium in Warsaw on Monday

THREE KEY CLASHES

MARCIN WASILEWSKI v WAYNE ROONEY
Few players are as strong as Rooney but Poland’s giant, heavily tattooed centre half will be out to impose his physical presence on the Manchester United star. It will be a major test of whether Rooney really has learned to control his temper.

GRZEGORZ KRYCHOWIAK v STEVEN GERRARD
The surging runs of England’s captain will be a key weapon but first he’s got to shake off the attention of Stade de Reims star Krychowiak. The 22-year-old is building a reputation at his French club as a tough and industrious midfielder. He has also shone at centre half when needed.

ROBERT LEWANDOWSKI v PHIL JAGIELKA
Everton’s centre half has waited a long time to be more than a bit-part player for England — but couldn’t have a tougher chance to prove himself. Polish hopes rest on the Dortmund striker and Bundesliga player of the year last season. Jagielka faces a step up in class to deal with his pace and movement.

Matt Barlow

If the small-sided games they were
playing on Monday night point to what Hodgson has in mind for the Poles,
the fact that Jermain Defoe spent more time than Danny Welbeck
alongside Wayne Rooney, and Michael Carrick played a more central role
than Tom Cleverley, would suggest England’s manager is taking a fairly
pragmatic approach to the game.

It will be harsh on Welbeck if he is
dropped but what Hodgson has created is a system that works for these
England players and the fact Rooney remains in that supporting role to
the main striker is a plus, whatever Gary Neville might feel about the
26-year-old’s career.

Hodgson said he was satisfied with
the progress the team has made under his guidance and as a result felt
confident they were equipped for the challenge that this evening
represents.

‘We’re trying to get there,’ he said.
‘We’re on our way. Since the Euros, the Italy game was quite positive,
Moldova was a good performance.

That has been put into perspective by
the draw at home to Ukraine. But I’m pretty satisfied that we’re trying
to sing off the same hymn sheet.

But after 10 or 11 games, it would be
foolish to suggest we’re the finished article. Of course we’re not.
We’re working. Every time we get to work together, I get the feeling
we’re getting stronger.’

Who's playing England manager Roy Hodgson talks as Jermain Defoe and Danny Welbeck look on

Who's playing England manager Hodgson talks as Jermain Defoe and Danny Welbeck look on

Guess who: Wayne Rooney is set to find out his playing partner up front against Poland on Tuesday night

Guess who: Wayne Rooney is set to find out his playing partner up front against Poland on Tuesday night

CARROLL IS A BUM NOTE

Andy Carroll arrived in Warsaw to be cut down to size by Polish legend Zbigniew Boniek, who said his eight-year-old grandson was more mobile than England’s most expensive footballer.

‘My grandson Mateo moves better on the pitch than Carroll,’ said Boniek. ‘He has better co-ordination and he is very good at golf and tennis.’

Hodgson was less happy to accept that
this match is some kind of judgement day; a ‘must-win game’; a
‘watershed moment’. ‘It seems every match as an international manager is
a watershed moment,’ he said a little dismissively.

‘I don’t really know what that is.
It’s an important moment. But it’s a game of football, a game we’ve
worked hard to prepare for and a game, if we win, can give us a very
good start to our qualifying campaign.

‘But after 36 years the words “must
win” leave me rather cold. Most teams go on the field wanting to win. I
don’t know how you achieve a “must win” other than going out to try and
play.

‘People judge you when they want.
People will always have opinions about how the team have played, or the
way you’ve set it out.

'I’m more than happy with the
response I’ve had from the players so far. They’ve committed 100 per
cent to what we’re trying to do. It’s for others to decide whether
that’s good enough. But I’m fully aware that, when the defeats come, the
criticism will be levelled against me and the team.’

Leading by example: Gerrard is poised to captain England again after missing the San Marino game through suspension

Leading by example: Gerrard is poised to captain England again after missing the San Marino game through suspension

Hodgson has done OK so far. The
performance against Ukraine was disappointing and the quarter-final
encounter with Italy at Euro 2012 exposed the usual deficiencies in the
national team. But he does have a strategy and he does remain unbeaten
in 90 minutes in the 10 games he has contested.

The Polish will pose problems despite
Jakub Blaszczykowski’s absence with injury. As Hodgson was quick to
acknowledge, with players like Robert Lewandowski they could be a threat
to England’s World Cup ambitions.

Hodgson spoke of the ‘responsibility’
both he and his captain, Steven Gerrard, shoulder tonight. Gerrard
spoke of his pride in joining Ashley Cole in winning their 99th caps.

Focused: Ashley Cole in training following the revelation he has refused to sign a new deal at Chelsea

Focused: Ashley Cole in training following the revelation he has refused to sign a new deal at Chelsea

Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain

Danny Welbeck

All white on the night: Oxlade-Chamberlain and Welbeck both scored in the win over San Marino on Friday night

At the back of the room, David
Bernstein, the FA chairman, listened intently. So did Adrian
Bevington, the managing director of Club England.

It all added to the sense of occasion, the sense of importance, and the sense that England need to improve.

The defensive frailties that were
apparent against Ukraine have to be eradicated. For that reason it could
be an important contest for Carrick, as well as the back four.

But there also has to be more fluency and finesse, and more of a killer finish in England’s forwards.

‘Historical moments don’t really
interest me,’ said Hodgson last night. ‘I don’t ever dismiss history,
but it’s about what we’re trying to build. It’s about working for today
and tomorrow.’

Today needs to go well so that tomorrow is not half as uncomfortable as it was for Ramsey. The smart money says it will do.

Poland v England - all you need to know

Ryder Cup 2012: Chicago bearpit is America"s 13th man – Martin Samuel

Hope you packed earplugs! Chicago bearpit is America's 13th man

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 27 September 2012

A critical hole, Phil Mickelson called the 17th at course three, Medinah Country Club. He said its amphitheatre effect gave it a special significance. ‘You can really feel it as you play,’ he added.

And the United States will be hoping to feel it at Medinah this week, particularly on Sunday when the Ryder Cup hits its peak. They will be hoping to feel it from a breed known as the Chicago sports fans, much ballyhooed around these parts.

Just about every American player who has trooped through the media tent this week has fielded a question about the frenzy of the local support. Even Luke Donald, an Illinois resident for 15 years, was asked to characterise what makes a Chicago sports enthusiast special.

Patriot: An American golf fan watches play during Thursday's practice round ahead of the Ryder Cup

Patriot: An American golf fan watches play during Thursday's practice round ahead of the Ryder Cup

So notorious is this fervour that Saturday Night Live had a recurring sketch about it. Bill Swerski’s Superfans ran for two seasons, 1991 and 1992, and typically featured a group of blowhard Chicagoans gathered in the sports bar run by Mike Ditka, legendary coach of the Chicago Bears NFL franchise. They would gorge, smoke, drink and predict outlandishly huge victories for their favourite sports teams.

Skits had them discussing who would win out of Ditka and a hurricane (Ditka, unless the hurricane in question was Hurricane Ditka) or how many points Michael Jordan would score for the Chicago Bulls if he played the entire game alone, on a recliner (he might be kept to under 200).

The dialogue would invariably end in a heart attack caused by the over-consumption of Polish sausage — pronounced sassage — or a toast to ‘Da Bears’ or ‘Da Bulls’. All around the table wore dark sunglasses and thick moustaches, like Ditka.

On Sunday, the uniform is intended to be red, as the PGA of America implore those attending Medinah to show their support for the home team. Be our 13th man, is the instruction. Chicago sports fans will need every last drop of energy, however, if they are to drag this American Ryder Cup team over the line. For those sitting at the back of that critical 17th watching practice rounds on Wednesday, the home team were offering very little to paint the town red about.

Long before a hapless flunky had managed to roll the team buggy down a steep slope, there was disquiet in the bleachers. The 17th is a 193-yard par three across water, and, although no player got wet, not enough hit the green for the comfort of the home crowd, not even Tiger Woods. From the 12th hole, water is a feature at Medinah, with the 13th and 15th, in particular, offering the risk-reward combination that makes for thrilling matchplay.

Watery grave: The hazard by the seventeenth green could claim some high-profile victims this week

Watery grave: The hazard by the seventeenth green could claim some high-profile victims this week

‘The 13th will be vital momentum-wise as you’re heading down the stretch,’ said Mickelson. ‘My take on the 15th is that it is an easy birdie laying up, but while it is technically reachable from the tee, it is really not possible to drive. As disappointing as it will be for fans, we have to play what’s in front of us, and the lowest score will be the shot laying up.’

Desperate measures, however, may dictate otherwise. An impending defeat might inspire one last bid for glory. Here’s Bubba Watson on the same dilemma: ‘With my four-wood, depending on wind conditions, I can reach the 15th. There are a lot of factors that go on with that: wind, pin location, how I’m hitting that day, where we are in our match. They will all determine what goes on at that moment.’

Also by then, the boisterous mood may be pulling the participants in some strange directions, not least as cold canned beer was being sold even in the stands during practice rounds, just as it is in American sports arenas. Vendors walked with the supplies in cooler trays hung from the neck. ‘Beer man here!’

Lee Westwood says he was pursued by a supporter dressed as a ghost at Valhalla in 2008, the last time America won. ‘He kept jumping out and shouting “Boo!”,’ he recalled. Chicago’s sports fans are unlikely to be more refined, or even as subtle.

The players’ reaction to that could cut either way, of course. The eyes of Davis Love, America’s captain, filled with tears as he answered a mundane question concerning Mickelson two days ago, and Watson — known as Blubba after breaking down on winning this year’s Masters — admits he has already shed tears during practice rounds.

Inspired: Phil Mickelson (left) says he is relishing the atmosphere at Medinah Country Club

Inspired: Phil Mickelson (left) says he is relishing the atmosphere at Medinah Country Club

‘The first day going up on the first tee, I had a pretty big roar, and that was special to know that the crowd was behind us, behind me,’ he said. ‘It was an honour and I might have teared up a little bit, but nobody noticed, so it was good.

‘It’s just that trophy. It’s funny, it’s just that little trophy we want to win so bad. And it’s the United States flag. The military wears that flag everywhere they go; they give us the freedom to play golf, to play the Ryder Cup. People I’ve never met fight for our freedom, so I hope to hit some good shots for them.

‘I haven’t been in the military and unless there’s a draft I’m not going to be, so this is the one chance I get to represent our country and, I hope, represent it well. The passion comes from that. All the people that pull for me, even the ones who don’t like me in the US — now they cheer for me in this one event.’

Yet does America care as much as Bubba When the Chicago Tribune wrote last year of the city’s drive to attract more visitors, the prospect of hosting the Ryder Cup north-west of downtown did not rate a mention beside the G8 and NATO summits that took place in May. Nor is the city alive with Ryder Cup fervour. Sports talk here still centres on the NFL and the prospect of the Chicago White Sox reaching baseball’s post season.

Spooky: Lee Westwood (right) says he was pursued by a spectator dressed as a ghost at Valhalla in 2008

Spooky: Lee Westwood (right) says he was pursued by a spectator dressed as a ghost at Valhalla in 2008

So if the Ryder Cup has wider importance it is that it engages America in team competition against the rest of the world. The Olympics aside, that does not happen too often. FIFA are doing their best but the progress of US soccer players in the World Cup is hardly headline news back home. America still engages on its own terms: sending NFL teams to play a one-off fixture at Wembley rather than nurturing a global contest; calling a domestic baseball competition the World Series. The growth of the Ryder Cup, therefore, is uncharted territory.

‘It seems like each two years everything doubles,’ said captain Love. ‘The people watching, the number of cameras. Our country has caught on, thanks to Seve Ballesteros and Bernhard Langer, really. It’s like the America’s Cup yacht races — I never heard too much about them, until we started losing. Then everybody got real interested. The PGA was having a tough time selling the Ryder Cup, but those guys made it something America is now passionate about.

‘There are golf fans who don’t know much but the Ryder Cup. We just went through an Olympics, and this is our Olympics. People realise our team is going up against an unbelievable team from Europe, and they want to see what happens.’

Bill Swerski’s Superfans would at this point predict a United States victory, 29-0, with Mike Ditka carding 52 while playing with a billiard cue, but realistically this should be another European win. It may, however, need steely resolve and a set of ear plugs.

‘Walking to the first tee on Tuesday, I knew we weren’t in Wales any more,’ said Matt Kuchar. ‘There was such an eruption of excitement when we got to there: it was an awesome feeling being on home turf.’

A Golf Channel poll, however, has 71 per cent of voters making America the underdogs. Whether Medinah can be another Valhalla for the men in red may well be out of the hands of Chicago’s sports fans.

Wimbledon 2012: Why Serena Williams isn"t loved – Laura Williamson

No love game for winner Williams in SW19

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UPDATED:

21:53 GMT, 8 July 2012

As the seeded players and the few remaining ‘big names’ of ladies’ tennis quietly tiptoed away from Wimbledon last week, an over-arching sense of resignation took their place.

‘She’s going to win it, isn’t she’ Sigh.

‘She’, of course, is Serena Williams who, of course, won the ladies’ singles title on Saturday, later adding the doubles crown with her sister Venus.

The only surprise was that it took Serena longer than an hour to swat Agnieszka Radwanska, a player bidding to become No 1 in the world, out of her way.

Dominant: There was a certain inevitability about Williams' victory

Dominant: There was a certain inevitability about Williams' victory

That’s five Wimbledon ladies’ singles titles for the younger Williams sister; the last barely 12 months after she spent almost a year off the tour with a foot injury and a blood clot on her lungs. That is remarkable.

John McEnroe called Serena ‘the greatest female player that’s ever played this game’. I think her influence goes even further, beyond the tennis court: she deserves to be considered among the greatest female athletes we have ever seen.

But will she ever be feted and remembered warmly on the grass courts of SW19 No. Not a chance. We will never fall in love with Serena Williams.

Centre Court politely clapped her achievement on Saturday, but it was respectful, distanced applause. The crowd spent most of the match shouting for ‘Aggy’, willing this slight Polish girl to make a fist of it against the overpowering force firing 17 aces past her from the other end.

That’s partly the British inclination to cheer for the underdog, but it showed we still don’t know how to solve a problem like Serena.

To watch Williams is to be impressed by her power, swagger, physical stature and astonishing reserves of mental grit, but it is not always an enjoyable, entertaining experience.

Family affair: Williams celebrates with her father Richard and sister Venus

Family affair: Williams celebrates with her father Richard and sister Venus

Family affair: Williams celebrates with her father Richard and sister Venus

More from Laura Williamson…

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01/07/12

Laura Williamson: Women's football so needs a repeat of its 'Yes!' moment
24/06/12

Laura Williamson: We're not in 1962, UEFA has to tackle gay jibes
17/06/12

Laura Williamson: Jonas will box clever but some just can't handle it
10/06/12

Laura Williamson: Why we must not disable our sense of humour
03/06/12

Laura Williamson: Why even the elite suffer to compete
27/05/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

There are seldom any lingering coos of admiration when she hits a ferocious backhand down the line. Instead you recoil, awe-struck and slightly shocked, in the same way you might react to someone taking a punch. It is athleticism not aestheticism that underpins her performances.

It is not Serena’s fault her only consistent challenger happened to be her sister, or that she is so gifted she can go from almost ‘not making it’ to yet another Wimbledon title. These things should be celebrated, but instead we dwell on the negatives: the women’s tour is weak, the current players lack personality and, quite frankly, most people would rather see Maria Sharapova glammed up in a photo-shoot.

So would it be different if Williams were a man Yes, it probably would. We are still not comfortable with seeing a woman generate such incredible power; of it being a female in purple knickers thundering down aces at 120mph.

The Williams’ incredible success has come by challenging the limits of women’s tennis, providing something very different to what went before. This has worked to their credit on the court but left them isolated off it. The difficulty with Serena is that she challenges us – our ideas about what we want our female athletes to look like – too.

Quote of the week

American journalist to Angelique Kerber after her Wimbledon quarter-final win over Sabine Lisicki: ‘Can you just talk us through your past 12 months’

No wonder she puffed out her cheeks. Our friends across the pond have a slightly different way of working to us Brits. We want to know what car you drive and what your dog’s called; they want to know how you felt at 0-30 down in the fourth game of the second set.

Curveball: Sabine Lisicki was knocked out in the quarter-finals

Curveball: Sabine Lisicki was knocked out in the quarter-finals

… and this is what I've been doing this week

Shouting at the television (come on, you know you do it too) as Mark Cavendish seemed to come from nowhere to win the second stage of the Tour de France on Monday in stunning style… Speaking to a ‘super excited’ Oscar Pistorius after he found out he will become the first man to compete on the track at the Olympic and Paralympic Games… Shivering on Centre Court as Williams won her fifth Wimbledon title. Martina Navratilova got a blanket, but sadly not me.

Performance of the week

There have been many to choose from over the past seven days, but world champion and Sportsmail columnist Dai Greene’s personal best of 47.84sec in the 400m hurdles in Paris brought a smile. The Americans have said he isn’t quick enough to win Olympic gold, so his fastest-ever run came as a timely response.

Euro 2012: Russia fined for fan fireworks

Kicked while they're down! Eliminated Russia hit with fine over crowd trouble

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UPDATED:

10:32 GMT, 18 June 2012

UEFA have fined the Russian Football Union for the ugly scenes which marred their Euro 2012 match against Poland.

However the punishment of €30,000 (24,300) does not mean the suspended six-point deduction Russia incurred last week will be activated.

UEFA announced on their website: 'The Football Union of Russia (RFS) has been fined €30,000 for the setting off and throwing of fireworks by spectators, displaying of illicit banners and the invasion of the pitch by a supporter at last week's UEFA EURO 2012 Group A match against Poland in Warsaw.

Provocative: Ugly scenes marred Russia's Group A clash against Poland

Provocative: Ugly scenes marred Russia's Group A clash against Poland

Euro 2012 email button

'The case in question and decision do not have any impact on the probation period for the sanction imposed on the RFS following the incidents at their first match against the Czech Republic in Wroclaw. This means the six-point deduction is still currently suspended.'

The suspended points punishment was meted out following the improper behaviour of Russian fans in the Czech match, with the RFS also fined €120,000 euros (96,761).

The Polish Football Association (PZPN) have also been fined €4,000 (3,230) for the setting off of fireworks by spectators at the match against Russia. which finished 1-1.

Russia and co-hosts Poland were knocked out of Euro 2012 after finishing in the bottom two of Group A.

Euro 2012: UEFA slam Poland and Russia fans" violence but won"t promise action

UEFA slam Warsaw violence that marred Euro 2012… but won't promise to take action

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UPDATED:

14:19 GMT, 13 June 2012

UEFA have condemned the violence that marred Poland's European Championship match with Russia, but it was unclear whether either team would face any sanctions.

Beyond issuing their own statement, European football's governing body was unavailable for comment about Tuesday night's events in Warsaw that saw 184 people arrested and, according to reports, at least 24 injured.

Trouble flared after a march by thousands of Russia supporters came under attack by masked hooligans.

Scroll down for video

Scuffle: Polish fans clash with their Russian counterparts outside the National Stadium

Scuffle: Polish fans clash with their Russian counterparts outside the National Stadium

On the charge: Polish police forces sprint into action

On the charge: Polish police forces sprint into action

Visiting fans inside the stadium also unfurled a giant banner that read, 'This is Russia', something that could be seen as a taunt about the decades of Moscow control over Poland during the Cold War.

Euro 2012 email button

UEFA said in a statement: 'UEFA condemns the isolated incidents that occurred yesterday in Warsaw prior to and after the Poland-Russia match, when some groups of known troublemakers pelted the police with missiles and attacked fans irrespective of the team they were supporting.

'Those arrested and charged will have to be dealt with by the relevant authorities.

'UEFA's philosophy is to create a welcoming environment coupled with a low-profile approach to policing. The focus should be on facilitating the enjoyment of the matches by genuine football fans and isolating the tiny percentage of troublemakers.

'UEFA is in a constant dialogue with the public authorities in order to achieve this aim.

This is going to hurt: A fan gets ready to feel the force of the Policja

This is going to hurt: A fan gets ready to feel the force of the Policja

'UEFA is determined that the overwhelmingly peaceful and festive atmosphere that has so far pervaded at UEFA Euro 2012 will be continued right up to and including the final in Kiev on Sunday 1 July.'

Polish authorities earlier apologised for the bloody clashes on what was 'Russia Day' and urged severe sanctions for those proven to be involved.

Among those arrested by the 6,400 police on the streets following reinforcements from other cities were 157 Poles and 24 Russians.

'When it comes to our hooligans, I hope the prosecutors and especially the courts will be strict,' interior minister Jacek Cichocki told a news conference, sentiments echoed by prime minister Donald Tusk.

Cichocki said the detained Russians would likely be expelled from Poland and banned from Europe's border-free Schengen area for five years.
On the march: Approximately 5,000 Russia fans make their way to Warsaw's National Stadium

On the march: Approximately 5,000 Russia fans make their way to Warsaw's National Stadium

Poland's sports minister Joanna Mucha said the 'shocking' violence had left her feeling 'ashamed'.
The skirmishes saw riot squad officers use water cannon and fire tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse marauding fans. Ten police officers were treated for injuries.

UEFA, meanwhile, must decide whether the 'This is Russia' banner represents an extremist symbol.
If so, the Russian Football Union can expect further disciplinary action after a case was opened against them following their opening Group A game against Czech Republic.

Riot police fired plastic bullets and tear gas to quell violent scenes as the Euro 2012 venue became a battleground for football hooligans.

Parts of Warsaw were turned into a bloodbath as Polish and Russian fans clashed ahead of their 1-1 draw in Group A.

Euro 2012

Police in Warsaw have made over 183 arrests relating to clashes between Poland and Russia fans and expect to add to that number as investigations continue.

The hooligans are back and this is the face of the tournament now, in a frightening and hostile city.

The battles took place close to the Fan Zones where, earlier in the day,
the party people of Poland and Russia mixed freely as they drank beer,
banged drums and watched Greece take on the Czech Republic before the
main event in Group A.

There was blood on the pavement, supporters were lying injured but still
the fans carried on fighting with each other and the police, who came
under fire from a barrage of bottles and bricks.

Street violence: A Russian and Polish fan hit each other during the violence

Street violence: A Russian and Polish fan hit each other during the violence

In full force: Russian fans are escorted by Polish riot police in Warsaw

In full force: Russian fans are escorted by Polish riot police in Warsaw

Running riot: Unruly Polish fans carry road blockades as they clash with police in Warsaw

Running riot: Unruly Polish fans carry road blockades as they clash with police in Warsaw

Poland versus Russia was always going to be a volatile fixture given the history between the two countries.

Prior to the match, which ended 1-1
at the National Stadium, thousands of Russian fans marched on the
capital's Poniatowski Bridge to mark Russia Day, considered a
provocative gesture by some Poles whose nation was subjected to decades
of rule by Moscow during the Cold War.

Flashpoints occurred there, as well
as at the designated Fanzone in Plac Defilad Square, with reports of
lesser disturbances during the match.

Police are understood to have deployed water canon and rubber bullets as part of their response.

Clash: Polish and Russian fans kick each other

Clash: Polish and Russian fans kick each other

Taking action: Police try and re-gain control as violence breaks out

Taking action: Police try and re-gain control as violence breaks out

Taking charge: Police arrest fans in Warsaw prior to the Euro 2012

Taking charge: Police arrest fans in Warsaw prior to the Euro 2012

Street fighting: Fans clash on Russia Day

Street fighting: Fans clash on Russia Day

All out attack: Fans attack in Warsaw

All out attack: Fans attack in Warsaw

Apprehended: But were restrained by police soon afterwards

Apprehended: But were restrained by police soon afterwards

All out war: Polish and Russian fans clash in the streets

All out war: Polish and Russian fans clash in the streets

Led away: Polish riot police detain a fan

Led away: Polish riot police detain a fan

A statement, released via
www.policja.pl, read: 'There are more than 183 hooligans caught by the
police because of disorders in Warsaw – firstly during the march to
National Stadion, secondly in the Fanzone in Plac Defilad Square.

'Among the kept persons there are fans of both teams – Russian and Polish.

'There are 10 persons, who are
injured: 7 Polish, 2 Russians and 1 German – their lives are not in
danger concerning the information from the medical services.

'The police operation is still
lasting. The police officers are checking the surveillance system,
police cameras and still (plan to) identify the hooligans who took part
in the disorders. Further arrests are planned.'

The number of related injuries is reported to have subsequently risen to 15.

Battle scar: A Pioland fan shows off a rubber bullet wound

Battle scar: A Pioland fan shows off a rubber bullet wound

A Warsaw police spokesperson also
said: 'We are still monitoring the situation and trying to identify the
supporters involved. The operation is not over from our side as we
continue in our attempts to catch those who are causing trouble.'

Trouble flared despite an
unprecedented security operation in the Polish capital, where
authorities had been extensively trained in anti-riot operations prior
to the tournament.

Tuesday's violence is is the latest
blight on the competition, which is being co-hosted by Ukraine, with
UEFA already indicating they will launch investigations into allegations
of racist chanting in games involving Spain and Italy, and Russia and
the Czech Republic.

Prior to the tournament, some Dutch
squad members complained of hearing racist abuse during a training
session at Wisla Krakow's stadium.

Prepared: Polish police were ready for a large number of Russia fans marching through Warsaw

Prepared: Polish police were ready for a large number of Russia fans marching through Warsaw

Peaceful: Russian supporters wave the flag of the former Soviet Union prior to the Group A game with Poland

Peaceful: Russian supporters wave the flag of the former Soviet Union prior to the Group A game with Poland

Sadly, there is a sinister tone to
the tournament now, something that drove people off the streets when
they should have been celebrating this enormous fan gathering.

Instead, they were running for their
lives and cowering in shop doorways as police armed with batons and riot
shields attempted to restore order.

It was shameful and shocking, wiping the smile off the face of European football.

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Euro 2012: Franciszek Smuda challenges Poland to claim their place among the elite by beating Czechs

Smuda challenges Poland to claim their place among the elite by beating Czechs

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UPDATED:

23:37 GMT, 12 June 2012

Poland manager Franciszek Smuda believes the 1-1 draw with Russia proved his side have enough quality to reach the knockout stages of Euro 2012.

The co-hosts went behind when Alan Dzagoev fired the Russians in front in the 38th minute with his third goal of the tournament.

But Jakub Blaszczykowski hit a wonderful 58th-minute equaliser and Poland arguably enjoyed the better chances to steal all three points.

Unstoppable: Jakub Blaszczykowski fires one of the goals of the tournament

Unstoppable: Jakub Blaszczykowski fires one of the goals of the tournament

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Instead, the lowest-ranked team in the competition settled for a second draw following their opener against Greece.

Smuda was pleased and has called on his side to beat the Czech Republic in their last Group A match and show they are worthy of a quarter-final spot.

'It is getting better and better. Today's match proved that we are good enough to win against the Czech Republic,' he said.

Leading the way: Blaszczykowski takes the plaudits of the proud Polish fans

Leading the way: Blaszczykowski takes the plaudits of the proud Polish fans

'Our team can see that we have a chance of reaching the knockout stage and we will do everything we can to use that chance.'

'In 2011 we came together to build a new team, and when you do that you do not always play perfectly, but we have played a lot of good matches.'

Smuda admits playing on home turf brings a different kind of expectation but believes things are becoming easier to deal with as the tournament progresses.

Laying down the gauntlet: Franciszek Smuda wants to see Poland in the last eight

Laying down the gauntlet: Franciszek Smuda wants to see Poland in the last eight

'The pressure is always there. It is not getting any greater – in fact it was probably at its worst before the first game. Now that the tournament is up and runnin, and the first game is out of the way, the adrenalin level is lower and the pressure is dipping.

'Now we have a few days to prepare and to rest, to recover and regain our freshness.'

Russia boss Dick Advocaat, whose side impressed with a 4-1 win over the Czechs in their opener, was frustrated by the result.

He felt Russia were deserving of the
victory, but admitted there was little his players could do about
Blaszczykowski's moment of magic.

On target: Little Alan Dzagoev won a header in Poland's box to give Russia the lead

On target: Little Alan Dzagoev won a header in Poland's box to give Russia the lead

'I thought Russia were a better team than Poland, but it was a very good game and we played really well. It was a pretty good result because they had 40,000 people behind them, and that is a big advantage.

'The first win was nice and I really thought this one was going to end 1-0 because we controlled the game. We won that first game 4-1, but this one was like an away game, and you just have to accept that their equaliser was a beautiful goal.

'When you score a goal like he (Blaszczykowski) did, you must be a good player. It was a nice goal. But if you are objective you would say that both teams worked hard, but Russia had more possession and created more.'

Euro 2012: Fears over violent clashes between Russia and Poland fans

Warsaw alert over invasion of Russians ahead of Poland clash

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UPDATED:

22:22 GMT, 11 June 2012

The Russian Football Association and Warsaw security authorities have both issued pleas for calm from supporters prior to the potentially explosive game between Poland and Russia in the Polish capital.

Ten thousand Russia fans have tickets for a game that falls on 'Russia Day', the date marking the end of the Soviet Union in 1990.

But there are expected to be twice as many Russians in Warsaw and some 5,000 have planned a march to mark their national day. To many Poles, whose rivalry with Russia extends well beyond football, this is a provocative demonstration.

Red alert: Authorities are preparing for any potential violence

Red alert: Authorities are preparing for any potential violence

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The imagery in the Polish press in the build-up to the Group A match, which could take Poland to the brink of elimination should they lose, has been nationalistic and militaristic.

A famous Polish Army victory over the Russian Bolsheviks in 1920 in Warsaw has been invoked, with Poland manager Franciszek Smuda mocked up in a uniform of the time.

The headline translates as 'Faith, Hope, Smuda,' – a play on an old army motto: 'Faith, Home, Motherland'.

Tabloid Super Express chided Russian complacency that they will win tonight – 'In 1920 they also thought that and… they got a spanking.'

It is not an occasion that requires such hype and, with some Russian fans involved in unpleasant scenes inside and outside the Wroclaw Stadium after the Friday's game against the Czech Republic, there is a fear of further and more serious incidents.

Ewa Gawor, head of Warsaw security, said she had spoken to the Russian march organisers.

Clampdown: There have been a number of violent outbreaks despite the huge police presence in both host countries

Clampdown: There have been a number of violent outbreaks despite the huge police presence in both host countries

Clampdown: There have been a number of violent outbreaks despite the huge police presence in both host countries

'I've asked them for peaceful
behaviour, not to provoke anyone in the streets,' said Gawor. 'We want
this festival to be peaceful. We have had such assurances, nevertheless
we will be watchful.'

Sergey Fursenko, head of the Russian FA, had already addressed some of the scenes in Wroclaw.

'We consider some of the country's fans who attended Russia's opening Euro 2012 match conducted themselves discreditably and acted dishonourably,' he said.

'We appeal to all our fans who are currently in Poland. Please remember that you represent your country. Please respect yourself, your motherland and your team.'

Inflammatory: Local press have made references to Poland's victorious 1920 battle against the Bolshevik Army, known as the Miracle on the Vistula

Inflammatory: Local press have made references to Poland's victorious 1920 battle against the Bolshevik Army, known as the Miracle on the Vistula

Fursenko and manager Dick Advocaat led a
Russia delegation to the memorial in Warsaw for former Polish President
Lech Kaczynski, who was killed two years ago in a plane crash in
Russia.

Many Poles regard his death as suspicious, their anger compounded by the fact that he was travelling to Russia to mark the 70th anniversary of the Katyn massacre, when thousands of Polish soldiers were murdered by Soviet troops during the Second World War.

On the pitch Poland will also be concerned. They failed to beat Greece on Friday, then Russia put four past the Czech Republic.

Euro 2012: Arrests made after violent clashes between Ireland and Poland fans

Polish police make 14 arrests after violent clashes between Ireland and Poland fans

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UPDATED:

13:12 GMT, 10 June 2012

Polish police say they have arrested 14 football fans involved in a brawl that broke out overnight ahead of the European Championship match between Ireland and Croatia.

The fighting, which involved glass bottles and chairs being thrown, took place around 1am on Sunday morning on the main square of Poznan.

Arrests: Police intervened during violent clashes and detained 14 fans

Arrests: Police intervened during violent clashes and detained 14 fans

Arrests: Police intervened during violent clashes and detained 14 fans

A police official, Andrzej Borowiak, said police detained 10 Poles, three Irish fans and one Croat, and were still trying to determine what role they had in the fight.

Video footage showed chairs toppled on the square and police arriving in force to make arrests.
Ireland and Croatia meet for their first Group C match at Euro 2012 later Sunday.

The violence comes after Russia fans attacked stadium stewards Friday night in Wroclaw.

Trouble: The violence erupted between Polish, Croatian and Irish fans

Trouble: The violence erupted between Polish, Croatian and Irish fans

Trouble: The violence erupted between Polish, Croatian and Irish fans

Trouble: The violence erupted between Polish, Croatian and Irish fans

Europe's football rulers have opened
disciplinary proceedings against Russia over the behaviour of their fans
during their Euro 2012 win against the Czech Republic.

A large group of fans were caught on camera attacking stewards in a walkway at the stadium in the Polish city of Wroclaw.

Reports claimed that four
members of stadium staff were
taken to hospital and released
later that evening.

Worry: A number of violent clashes have already blighted the tournament

Worry: A number of violent clashes have already blighted the tournament

Worry: A number of violent clashes have already blighted the tournament

'After having looked at
security reports and available
images, UEFA has opened
disciplinary proceedings against
the Football Union of Russia for
the improper conduct of its
supporters,' said a UEFA
statement.

Russia's football federation warned its fans that hooliganism could cost the team vital points at Euro 2012 after UEFA opened disciplinary proceedings

In a statement posted on its website, the Football Union of Russia called on its large contingent of traveling fans to 'Respect yourself, your home and your team.'

High spirits: Fans had been milling together and enjoying the atmosphere before events turned sour

High spirits: Fans had been milling together and enjoying the atmosphere before events turned sour

High spirits: Fans had been milling together and enjoying the atmosphere before events turned sour