Tag Archives: policeman

Mario Balotelli donated his wages to charity before David Beckham started

Beckham may be about to donate his PSG wages to charity, but Balotelli started doing the same thing a while ago…

, when he and Brown became an item, and when his fame grew even further.

One particular celebration now known as the “Hulk pose” went viral on the internet – something Brown says Balotelli truly revelled in while revealing he also used his fame to avoid a speeding fine when in Manchester.

'Mario googled himself obsessively to see how popular he was,' Brown said.

Settling in: Milan hope Balotelli can become a key member of their new-look side

Settling in: Milan hope Balotelli can become a key member of their new-look side

'He loved the web craze where people were photo-shopping the “Hulk” pose he did after scoring for Italy in the semi-final [of Euro 2012] and was beside himself when it made it on to Fifa 13.

'We were out in his Bentley once and he got stopped for speeding. But the policeman's face lit up when he saw it was Mario and let him off in return for an autograph!'

VIDEO Balotelli happy to be training with AC Milan

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Sao Paulo win Copa Sudamericana after "security guards attack Tigre players"

Brazil nuts! Copa Sudamericana ends in chaos as final is abandoned after 'security guards pull guns and beat up players'

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UPDATED:

09:54 GMT, 13 December 2012

The image of Brazilian football in the lead up to the 2014 World Cup was seriously tarnished when the final of the Copa Sudamericana was abandoned as visiting club Tigre accused security officials of pulling guns on them and beating the players.

After a goalless first leg in Argentina, Sao Paulo took a 2-0 lead on home turf with goals from Lucas Moura and Osvaldo.

But things took a sour turn at half-time as fighting broke out between the players as they made their way off the pitch.

All over: The referee abandoned the match between Tigre and Sao Paulo

All over: The referee abandoned the match between Tigre and Sao Paulo

Scrap: Sao Paulo (in white) and Tigre ended up fighting before the referee called time on the clash

Scrap: Sao Paulo (in white) and Tigre ended up fighting before the referee called time on the clash

Tigre then refused to return for the second half, claiming their players had been attacked by security guards in the dressing rooms.

Chilean referee Enrique Osses abandoned the match after a 30-minute delay, awarding the victory to Sao Paulo, who were then presented with the trophy in a formal ceremony.

Tigre coach Nestor Gorosito claimed armed security officers had beaten his players and pointed guns at them during half-time. He said goalkeeper Damian Albil had a gun pointed at his chest.

'During the break, a big guy came in
with a gun,' he said on Fox Sports. 'Some policeman started to hit some
of my players. We tried to defend ourselves. They pulled two revolvers.
We’re not going to play anymore.

'My players fought with the security
people for 15 minutes. Then the police arrived and the incidents
continued. What happened is disgraceful. There are several players hurt, but none serious.'

Crossbar challenge: Fans managed to get on to the pitch after Sao Paulo won the Copa Sudamericana

Crossbar challenge: Fans managed to get on to the pitch after Sao Paulo won the Copa Sudamericana

Gorosito also complained about the treatment his team had received throughout their preparations for the match.

'We
trained two hours away from our hotel, and it took us more than an hour
to get to the stadium,' he said. 'We were unable to warm up on the
pitch.'

Tigre president Sergio Massa said
Wednesday was one of the most shameful days in Brazilian football
history and urged the Argentinian Football Federation (AFA) to take
strong action.

Massa told the AFA official website: 'We need to show the people everything that happened, the assaults and injuries.

'When we went into the dressing room after the first half, there were 15 security people that were hitting the players. They struck us.

'For Tigre today was an historic day. The referee told us he was going to suspend the game and ended up doing that. It was all a mess, football should be a celebration.'

Tigre security chief Ruben Pasquini said in La Nacion newspaper: 'It was an ambush. They were waiting for us. (Midfielder Ruben) Botta has an injured eye. They put a gun in the chest of Albil. (Midfielder) Gaston Diaz was also hurt.'

Solid back four: Police stand outside the dressing rooms after the Copa Sudamericana final was abandoned

Solid back four: Police stand outside the dressing rooms after the Copa Sudamericana final was abandoned

You're not coming on: Security guards line the pitch as the officials make their way off

You're not coming on: Security guards line the pitch as the officials make their way off

Referee Osses said: 'We did not see anything, but we have heard some things about what happened.

'We saw there were some injuries to the Tigre players but I don't know what caused them.'

CONMEBOL official Romer Osuna said: 'The referee abandoned the game because it was not right to play on.

'This decision is final. It is a shame that a continental final finished in this fashion.'

The city of Sao Paulo is one of the
host venues for the 2014 World Cup, although matches will be played at
Corinthians' Arena de Sao Paulo and not the Morumbi.

Massa felt the incidents had cast a shadow over Brazilian football.

Explosive: Sao Paulo supporters celebrated as fireworks lit up the sky

Explosive: Sao Paulo supporters celebrated as fireworks lit up the sky

'It's one of the most shameful pages in Brazilian football. We came to play a game of football, not a war,' he said. 'All this makes us very sad.

'We don't want to win or lose a game in the offices but the AFA are going to have to make a strong protest.'

Sao Paulo had dominated the first half with Lucas, playing his final match before joining Paris St Germain, at the heart of everything.

He scored the opener in the 23rd minute, pouncing on the ball to fire home after Willian Jose's progress towards goal had been blocked.

Lucas turned provider for the second, playing a fine ball for Osvaldo to run through and lift the ball over Damian Albil.

Cop that: Police officers patrol the pitch after Tigre players refused to be play on and the match was called off

Cop that: Police officers patrol the pitch after Tigre players refused to be play on and the match was called off

However, Lucas had also been on the receiving end of several tough challenges, with one elbow to the face drawing blood.

Sao Paulo goalkeeper Rogerio Ceni, who had handed Lucas the captain's armband at the end to allow the departing star to lift the trophy, was shocked by the way the match ended, but claimed the Tigre players had been overly aggressive on the pitch.

'We don't know what happened, but the Tigre players came to Brazil to fight, not to play,' he said. 'I really don't know what happened in the dressing rooms.'

Capture the moment: The Sao Paulo players pose for pictures after their controversial triumph

Capture the moment: The Sao Paulo players pose for pictures after their controversial triumph

Brad Jones ready to start against West Brom

Jones living the dream as keeper set for Liverpool berth for West Brom clash

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UPDATED:

22:37 GMT, 25 September 2012

Brad Jones affords himself a wry smile as he recounts a conversation that he vividly remembers taking place 22 years ago.

It took place in the classroom of his school in Perth and it was one with which everyone would be familiar; it was the day when a teacher came around and asked each pupil to boldly declare what they wanted to be when they grew up.

‘He came up to me asked what I was going to be – I told him that I was going to play for Liverpool,’ said Jones, taking up the story.

Ready: Brad Jones has been a fan of Liverpool since he was a young boy

Ready: Brad Jones has been a fan of Liverpool since he was a young boy

‘He replied: “no, no – what do you really want to do.”

The other kids were saying things like fireman, policeman or whatever. I was the only one who played football.

‘So when I said I wanted to play for Liverpool it was like “okay, move on, next.’

It was a long time ago when I was living in the suburbs of Perth, where no-one played football. A few people from school have been in touch since, thanks to Facebook and Twitter.

‘They saying things like ‘we saw you on TV, we never doubted you.’

It’s funny going back because the school’s exactly the same – there are still no football pitches. It’s just Aussie Rules and cricket there. But it was always football for me.’

Jones is in good spirits as he takes a trip down memory lane.

It is common for new Liverpool signings to say that they supported the club all their lives but there is no spin on the tale the goalkeeper tells.

His mother’s family come from Liverpool and he still has memorabilia dating back to the 1980s.

‘I’m sure there are photos of me at 6, 7, or 8 years old running about the house in every kit there was,’ said Jones, who will start Wednesday’s Capital One Cup tie at West Bromwich with Brendan Rodgers expected to ring the changes.

‘My mum’s family used to send them over. I had every poster, every magazine and my dad’s still got the 1987 yearbook, even though it’s in bits now. This was not just a move for me, it was an achievement.

‘There were two things I said when I was eight. One was that I was going to play for Australia. The other was playing for Liverpool.’

He may have to play second fiddle to Pepe Reina but there is no doubting the pride Jones has in telling people he plays for Liverpool and to spend time in his company, it is clear to see he is now in a much happier place.

Standing in the way: Pepe Reina is first choice for the Reds

Standing in the way: Pepe Reina is first choice for the Reds

The past year, after all, has been the hardest of his life. He lost his little boy, Luca, last November after prolonged battle with illness.

The pain and grief of losing a child will never leave a parent but he has evidently found a way of managing.

‘A year ago football was on the back burner to be honest,’ said Jones. ‘It wasn’t something I was too worried about.

'It was difficult at the time do to both. To have what was going on in my personal life and come in to push and get a game was not going to work.

‘This season is completely different. I came in probably three or four weeks before I was due back because I was itching to get going, because I felt this was the year I really had to crack on. It’s about showing Brendan (Rodgers) I am worthy of being here.’

With Brazilian goalkeeper Doni away from the club for personal reasons, Jones will continue to play back up to Reina and will be ready to take his chance when opportunities such as the one at The Hawthorns emerge.

Focused: Jones is willing to take whatever opportunities he can get under Rodgers

Focused: Jones is willing to take whatever opportunities he can get under Rodgers

‘Playing two, three, four games or whatever was great but I don’t just want that,’ said Jones, who was signed by Roy Hodgson from Middlesbrough for 2million in August 2010.

‘There is something about coming in every day that makes everything you have sacrificed worthwhile.

‘I would not walk away at all if I was given the opportunity to stay. When I got the phone call to say Liverpool were interested it was unbelievable, but last year was hard because I wasn’t involved and it did get to a point where I started thinking I’d have to look at something else.

‘I couldn’t justify sitting there as a No 3. The difference now is I get these opportunities and as long as I keep proving I can do it, hopefully I will get more.

'For as long as the manager wants me at the club, I am willing to be here.’

No wonder. It has, after all, has been his life’s ambition.

David Luiz no punishment over tackle is crazy – Tony Pulis

There's no justice unless Luiz is banned for nasty tackle on Walters, blasts Pulis

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UPDATED:

21:00 GMT, 23 September 2012

Tony Pulis has questioned the FA's rule that no retrospective action can be taken if players are booked after David Luiz received only a yellow card for a reckless challenge on Jonathan Walters.

The defender flung himself two-footed at Walters with Stoke hitting Chelsea on the break in stoppage time before the hosts prevailed 1-0.

Luiz was fortunate not to make more contact with the forward, just clipping Walters’ shin as he hurdled the tackle. The Stoke player reacted angrily.

Aftermath: David Luiz (centre) was booked for a late and dangerous tackle on Stoke striker Jonathan Walters (floored), who later reacted with fury (below)

Aftermath: David Luiz (centre) was booked for a late and dangerous tackle on Stoke striker Jonathan Walters (floored), who later reacted with fury (below)

Aftermath: David Luiz (centre) was booked for a late and dangerous tackle on Stoke striker Jonathan Walters (floored), who later reacted with fury (below)

But referee Michael Oliver only gave Luiz a yellow card, leaving Pulis angry that further punishment could not be handed out.

The Stoke manager said: ‘The worst thing is that Luiz’s challenge is a very, very poor one, but because the referee’s seen it and booked him he’s not going to miss a game.

‘It’s like a policeman watching a bank
robber rob a bank and because he’s seen it, the police are going to let
him off. Whereas, if he didn’t see him, they’re going to arrest him.
It’s crazy. Ridiculous. But I don’t make the rules. I’m just a football
manager.’

Stoke were only trailing by Ashley Cole’s 85th-minute goal. The defender finished off a fine passing move from Chelsea, getting on the end of Juan Mata’s back-heel flick on the turn to chip the ball over Asmir Begovic from close range.

Chelsea had pushed forward for Oscar’s corner when Walters picked up the ball on the edge of his own box and dribbled at speed in search of an equaliser.

Oscar was booked in the second half for diving in the area and there was another debatable incident when Branislav Ivanovic went down in the box. He was not booked but Oliver did not give the penalty.

Roberto Di Matteo defended his players, saying: ‘Oscar’s is a penalty. I don’t think he should have been booked at all. There was contact.'

But Pulis accused Chelsea’s players of ‘simulation’ and putting the referee under pressure.

He said: ‘You’ve got to let the referee referee the game and I felt Michael Oliver did smashing at times, especially for the number of times players went into the box and fell over. That’s enormous pressure and I don’t think we should stomach that.’

London 2012 Olympics: Opening ceremony gaffe of 1948

Flagging up concerns! Legendary Bannister remembers 1948 opening ceremony gaffe

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UPDATED:

13:58 GMT, 24 July 2012

If you look closely at pictures from the opening ceremony of the 1948 Olympics, the last Games to be held in Britain, you might notice the British flag is smaller than the others. It is also flying from a brass-tipped pole, rather than the standard wooden-tipped one.

But without the quick thinking of Roger Bannister, the first man to break the four-minute-mile, the British team might not have had anything to march behind in the parade of athletes at all.

Despite a truck-full of flags, it quickly emerged that the Union flag was missing.

History: London last hosted the Olympic Games in 1948, at Wembley

History: London last hosted the Olympic Games in 1948, at Wembley

Big help: Without Roger Bannister, seen here earlier this month, GB may not have had a flag in the opening ceremony

Big help: Without Roger Bannister, seen here earlier this month, GB may not have had a flag in the opening ceremony

'Panic,' explains Bannister, now an 83-year-old retired neurologist. 'The commandant said to me 'Roger, go and find that flag which is at the back of my car in the car park'. So we tore back in a jeep, hooting to get the various spectators out of the way.

'We found the car, but had no key. So I took a brick and smashed the window. A policeman who was in charge saw, and an army sergeant had to restrain him and say what we were doing.'

Bannister, 19 at the time, got the makeshift flag to the team just as the procession into the stadium was beginning.

He laughs as he recalls the story.

'So there we are: my small contribution to the 1948 Olympics.'

More than 60 years later, Britain is on the cusp of hosting the Olympics again. The austerity and the weather may be the same, but cyclist Chris Hoy, who Sportsmail revealed would be the host nation's flag bearer, will presumably be hoping that the organisation will be a bit better.

The formal tradition of a nation's athletes parading behind their country's flag started in Athens in 1906, although the first official Olympics Games to feature it was the 1908 London Games.

According to legend, it was then that the US flag bearer, athlete Ralph Rose, controversially refused to dip the Stars and Stripes before the Royal Box like every other nation, apparently establishing a practice now enshrined in US federal law.

Controversy: At the 1960 Games, Formosa, now Taiwan, used the opening ceremony to show their displeasure at being forced to change their name from the Republic of China to Formosa

Controversy: At the 1960 Games, Formosa, now Taiwan, used the opening ceremony to show their displeasure at being forced to change their name from the Republic of China to Formosa

Rose, perhaps apocryphally, has said to have proclaimed his reasoning was because, 'this flag dips to no earthly King'.

The Olympic parade of athletes was also the first time many countries ever encountered each other.

It was only at the 1936 Olympics in
Berlin, for example, that Liechtenstein and Haiti discovered that their
national flags were identical. Both the land-locked European country and
the Caribbean island had standards of a blue horizontal bar over a red
one.

As a direct result, Liechtenstein decided to add a gold crown.

First time: Anita Lonsbrough carried the flag

First time: Anita Lonsbrough carried the flag

Built around such a powerful symbol of a country's sovereignty, the ceremony was also an opportunity for emerging nations to assert their independence.

Following the Chinese civil war in the late 1940s, the newly Communist People's Republic of China (PRC) refused to partake in the Olympics in protest at the inclusion of the Taiwan-based Republic of China (ROC) as both struggled to be recognised as the real China at the Games.

A PRC stunt at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics saw the ROC's flag, red with a white sun on a small blue square, changed for the newly Communist mainland China's standard, the yellow stars on a red background.

Four years later in Rome, the ROC's flag bearer defied Olympic committee instructions to march under a sign saying Formosa (modern day Taiwan). Instead, their sign read 'Under Protest'.

It was not until 1980 that the ROC developed the distinctive Taipei Olympic flag, paving the way for PRC athletes to return to the Games in 1984 as the sole delegation called China.

For former Olympic swimmer Anita
Lonsbrough, being chosen as Britain's first female flag bearer for the
1964 Tokyo Games was the experience of a lifetime.

'It
was a great honour and a pleasure as well. Of course it was a little
bit frightening. When you walk out, you walk through a tunnel and
suddenly you're in the arena and there's this great noise that greets
you.'

Wheely happy: Sir Chris Hoy will carry the flag in London, as he did in Beijing

Wheely happy: Sir Chris Hoy will carry the flag in London, as he did in Beijing

Although the British team normally wore hats during the parade of athletes, an exception was made for Lonsbrough, who was worried her hat would be blown off by the fluttering flag.

'I used to wear my hair up, so instead they got me a pink velvet ribbon to put round my hair which matched the hats,' laughs Lonsbrough.

Hoy, who will be carrying the British flag for the second time, said on Monday: 'To lead out your team at a home Olympics is truly a once in a lifetime opportunity and one that I can't wait to experience in just a few days time.'

Bahrain Grand Prix: Bomb wounds seven policeman

Further doubts over Bahrain GP as seven policeman are wounded by bomb

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UPDATED:

20:38 GMT, 9 April 2012

Events at this weekend's Chinese Grand Prix are in danger of being overshadowed by uncertainty over whether the following race in Bahrain will go ahead amidst continued political unrest in the Gulf state.

At present, Formula One teams are working on the principal that the Bahrain Grand Prix is still on despite concerns over the safety of their employees and misgivings about staging a race in a country whose human rights record has been brought into question.

Up in flames: A flash-bang grenade is thrown by police as they storm a march

Up in flames: A flash-bang grenade is thrown by police as they storm a march

Such concerns are sure to have been heightened by the news that seven Bahraini policemen were wounded on Monday, three of them seriously, by a home-made bomb during a protest near the capital Manama calling for the release of an activist on a two-month hunger strike.

'We consider this an act of terrorism,' a Interior Ministry spokesman said of the explosion.

Running battle: Protestors clash with the police on Sunday

Running battle: Protestors clash with the police on Sunday

One team principal, who did not wish to be named, admitted: 'I feel very uncomfortable about going to Bahrain. If I'm brutally frank, the only way they can pull this race off without incident is to have a complete military lock-down there.

'I think that would be unacceptable, both for Formula One and for Bahrain. But I don't see any other way they can do it.'

Violence: The Bahrain is due to go ahead next Sunday

Violence: The Bahrain race is due to go ahead next Sunday

With groups opposed to the ruling Bahrain royal family heavily critical of the decision to return the grand prix to the calendar following its cancellation last year, and with potentially violent protests expected to increase in intensity as the race on April 22 draws ever closer, teams have put in place contingency plans in the event it is called off yet again.

It is expected that most teams will fly their personnel to Middle East states such as Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman and Qatar rather than directly to Bahrain following Sunday's race in Shanghai.

On the Button: Bahrain hasn't hosted a grand prix since the season opener in 2010

On the Button: Bahrain hasn't hosted a grand prix since the season opener in 2010

Thus, if the race does indeed go ahead as planned teams face only a
short flight to Bahrain to carry out their normal grand prix
preparations.

But in the
event it is cancelled, the majority of Formula One personnel can fly
home to Europe without ever setting foot in Bahrain.

The worst case scenario for the teams is, of course, for the race to be
cancelled once they have installed themselves at the Sakhir circuit as a
consequence of the situation on the ground deteriorating to such an
extent that it is not deemed safe to proceed.

Trouble: There have been growing calls to scrap this year's Bahrain Grand Prix

Trouble: There have been growing calls to scrap this year's Bahrain Grand Prix

World motorsport governing body, the FIA, insist they are monitoring
events in Bahrain on a daily basis and remain in constant contact with
the government authorities who continue to assert it is safe to stage
the race.

Meanwhile, Formula One supremo Bernie Ecclestone remains adamant the grand prix will go ahead.

Ecclestone is due in China this weekend as is FIA president Jean Todt
with the teams certain to seek a meeting with the Formula One power
brokers regarding the situation in Bahrain.