Tag Archives: podium

Bernie Ecclestone says Sebastian Vettel was right to overtake Mark Webber in Malaysian Grand Prix

Vettel was right to pass team-mate Webber, says Ecclestone after Malaysia controversy

By
Sunni Upal

PUBLISHED:

18:46 GMT, 27 March 2013

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UPDATED:

23:40 GMT, 27 March 2013

Formula one chief Bernie Ecclestone has backed three-time world champion Sebastian Vettel and said the German was right to ignore team orders and pass Mark Webber to win the Malaysian Grand Prix.

Webber led his Red Bull team-mate Vettel on Sunday before being told to turn his engine down, save his tyres and coast to victory in Sepang.

But world champion Vettel defied team orders and squeezed past Webber on the pit straight in the dying stages to win the race.

Tight: Sebastian Vettel ignored team orders and squeezed past Mark Webber to win in Malaysia

Tight: Sebastian Vettel ignored team orders and squeezed past Mark Webber to win in Malaysia

Authority: Formula One boss Bernie Ecclestone

Authority: Formula One boss Bernie Ecclestone

Vettel later admitted he was wrong to
pass Webber, but Ecclestone disagreed and claimed that the German did
not undermine team principal Christian Horner by ignoring the radio
messages.

He told Sky Sports News:
'If I was Sebastian Vettel, having won three world championships with
the team, and somebody came on the radio to me and started giving me
instructions I’d probably do exactly the same as Kimi Raikkonen did when
he came back when they gave him some instructions the other day and say
“I know what I’m doing”.

'I don’t think he’s (Vettel) undermined
Christian’s authority at all because Christian knows exactly what should
have happened and didn’t happen.

'Put yourself in Christian’s
position. What should he now do Did he give orders in the first place
and if he did how could he then give more orders

'I think what you have to do is think
very carefully and I always say “show me a good loser and I’ll show you
a loser”. Sebastian is not a loser. Sebastian is a winner.'

Stare: The tension between Webber and Vettel on the podium was clear for all to see

Stare: The tension between Webber and Vettel on the podium was clear for all to see

Ecclestone also laughed off any suggestions that Red Bull would suspend Vettel from racing in the next grand prix in China.

He said: 'Leave Sebastian out No I
don’t think I’d give that any consideration! I’d say to Sebastian,
“Sebastian – just don’t make me look an idiot”.'

The Formula One boss does, however,
believe Vettel and Webber can race as team-mates again after speculation
that the Aussie was considering his future with the team.

Ecclestone said: 'Yes, of course they will, obviously they will. I don’t know about (beyond 2013).'

Tension: Webber refused to celebrate with his team-mate on the podium

Tension: Webber refused to celebrate with his team-mate on the podium

Australian Grand Prix: Kimi Raikkonen storms to victory

Raikkonen delivers for Lotus as he storms to victory in Melbourne curtain raiser while Hamilton finishes fifth in Mercedes debut

PUBLISHED:

07:36 GMT, 17 March 2013

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UPDATED:

08:18 GMT, 17 March 2013

Lotus driver Kimi Raikkonen stormed to victory in the Australian Grand Prix in his best race on the Melbourne circuit for six years.

Fernando Alonso came in second while Lewis Hamilton finished fifth in his first race for Mercedes.

Jenson Button finished a disappointing ninth for McLaren, while Sebastian Vettel came third for Red Bull.

Scroll down for leaderboard

Triumphant: Kimi Raikkonen celebrates after winning the first race of the season

Triumphant: Kimi Raikkonen celebrates after winning the first race of the season

1-2-3: Raikkonen (centre) celebrates with second-placed Fernando Alonso (left) and third-placed Sebastian Vettel

1-2-3: Raikkonen (centre) celebrates with second-placed Fernando Alonso (left) and third-placed Sebastian Vettel

Party time: The long wait for F1 fans was over at last as the season kicked off in style

Party time: The long wait for F1 fans was over at last as the season kicked off in style

Cruising: Raikkonen drives through the pit lane after driving the fastest lap of the race and securing victory

Cruising: Raikkonen drives through the pit lane after driving the fastest lap of the race and securing victory

Finnish driver Raikkonen took the lead for good on lap 43 of 58 in a race which had seven different leaders.

Speaking on the podium, he said: ‘I was pretty
confident before the race. I thought it should be easy to do it.

‘I got a good start and it worked well. I had doubts because
it is the first race and I didn't do any long runs in the winter. But you have
to get through the first laps and go from there.

‘Fernando was catching me at some point so I just wanted to
make sure if the rain comes we have a big gap.

On song: Finnish driver Raikkonen of Lotus led the way in the Melbourne Grand Prix

On song: Finnish driver Raikkonen of Lotus led the way in the Melbourne Grand Prix

No cigar: Fernando Alonso ran Raikkonen close but could not beat his rival

No cigar: Fernando Alonso ran Raikkonen close but could not beat his rival

Down the rankings: Lewis Hamilton finished fifth in his first race for Mercedes

Down the rankings: Lewis Hamilton finished fifth in his first race for Mercedes

Hamilton

‘I was still taking it pretty easy. It was a pretty nice
race. Not too difficult.’

Lotus suggested during winter testing they had taken a step forward from last season, and they underlined that around Melbourne's Albert Park as Raikkonen took the chequered flag for the 20th time in his F1 career.

More to follow.

Holy smokes: Cars lock up their brakes as they approach the first corner of the Albert Park circuit

Holy smokes: Cars lock up their brakes as they approach the first corner of the Albert Park circuit

Frustration: Jenson Button drives in front of Mark Webber but neither driver will be happy with their finish

Frustration: Jenson Button drives in front of Mark Webber but neither driver will be happy with their finish

The gang's all here: The drivers pose for a group shot before the race

The gang's all here: The drivers pose for a group shot before the race

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Michael Jamieson wins 200m breaststroke silver at World Short-Course Championships in Istanbul

Jamieson follows up Olympic silver with second-placed finish at World Short-Course Championships

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UPDATED:

00:19 GMT, 15 December 2012

Michael Jamieson displayed all the hunger and desire that drove him to Olympic silver as he banished the memory of a 'hopeless' morning swim to finish second in the 200 metres breaststroke at the World Short-Course Championships in Istanbul.

It was Great Britain's third medal of the five-day competition after Hannah Miley and Jemma Lowe had claimed gold and bronze respectively on the first day at the Sinan Erdem Dome.

It was also hard-fought given the 24-year-old had only squeezed into the final as the slowest qualifier.

Jamieson was the slowest qualifier for the final after a disappointing morning

Jamieson was the slowest qualifier for the final after a disappointing morning

The Bath ITC swimmer's frustration was clear this morning but that is symptomatic of the hunger that helped drive him on when he was living in Paris without funding in an attic room so small he could stand in the middle and touch both walls and with a shower that doubled as a wardrobe.

Coming into the race it was his team-mate Andrew Willis who stood out, a new English record seeing him qualify fourth.

Tonight's line-up was loaded with quality and the pair needed to be at their best to be in the mix and with 50m to go, Jamieson was second and Willis third.

The Scot dug in, holding off the fast-finishing Russian Viatcheslav Sinkevich to lower his own British record to two minutes 03.00 seconds and claim the silver.

The Scot added World Short-Course silver to his Olympic silver medal

The Scot added World Short-Course silver to his Olympic silver medal

It also took more than three seconds off the time he had swum this morning, one he had described as 'hopeless'.

Willis was overhauled to finish fifth in 2:03.29, 0.21secs off the podium.

Jamieson said: 'It just goes to show the power of psychology.

'To be honest, after I came out of that heat I didn't even want to swim the final after seeing the result, I was just so annoyed.

'But I just went back and dressed myself down a bit – it goes to show you can race best times unrested.

'I just went it for it tonight – it was a bonus to get in so I just decided to go for it from the start.

'I didn't want to lose I guess.'

Britain's Lizzie Symonds finished fifth in the 200m backstroke

Britain's Lizzie Symonds finished fifth in the 200m backstroke

USA's Ryan Lochte was in a league of his own as he broke his 200m medley world record

USA's Ryan Lochte was in a league of his own as he broke his 200m medley world record

The race was won in a new championship record of 2:01.35 by Hungary's Daniel Gyurta, who set a world record in holding off Jamieson at the Olympics, although that was subsequently lowered by Akihiro Yamaguchi, fourth here.

Jamieson added: 'I'm getting there – I've got a collection of silver medals, the next stage is to change the colour of that.

'But Dan (Gyurta) is untouchable just now – it's about time someone closed that gap on him, I'd love to see his medal cabinet, it seems to be growing all the time.

'But fair play to him, he's been the man to beat in the last few years and he is running away with titles at the minute.'

Jamieson and Willis train alongside each other and the latter said: “There is definitely part of me that wants to be keeping up with him or beating him at the same time.

'I think deep down we're pretty competitive against each other in training and it's great, at the same time to have someone to push you.

'He is a great swimmer, he's got the medals coming in now and that is what I should be learning from.'

Another Bath swimmer, Lizzie Simmonds, was fifth in the 200m backstroke in 2:04.55.

The 21-year-old was fourth in London, after which she moved from Loughborough to embark upon a completely different training programme.

The women's 4x100m medley relay finished fourth in a British record of 3:51.85.

Jaz Carlin was fifth in the 400m freestyle (4:02.45) and Sophie Allen finished sixth in the 100m individual medley (59.03).

Ryan Lochte, the 11-time Olympic medallist, was a world apart as he lowered his own world record in the 200m individual medley to 1:49.63.

Dai Greene: Our golden night at London 2012 was hell for me

EXCLUSIVE: Our golden night at London 2012 was hell for me, admits Dai Greene

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UPDATED:

22:43 GMT, 7 December 2012

Three golds on one glorious evening. A stadium rocking. Joy unconfined. 'Ah, the greatest night in British athletics history,' says Dai Greene, 'was the night I came fourth in my semi-final.'

He can finally bring himself to laugh about that – and the toughest point of his life, two days later, when he missed out on a long- predicted medal in the 400 metres hurdles – now that the stadium cacophony has been exchanged for the contemplative quiet of a Bath cafe.

Dai another day: Greene had endured a tough year

Dai another day: Greene had endured a tough year

He is ready to confront the truth that has barely uttered its name in the back-slapping, bus-touring, bunting-strewn euphoria of London 2012: sport can crush as well as exalt.

Nobody knows that more palpably than Greene. Some of our Olympians were simply happy to be at the Games; others merely hoped to mount the podium. Even after his injury-ravaged preparations, he was expected to do so. 'The question all year was not whether I could win a medal,' says the Welshman, 'but whether I could win gold. Simple as that.' Green, after all, was champion of Europe, champion of the Commonwealth and champion of the world. Selected as captain of the British athletics team, he was a proven big-stage performer.

His one anticipated task was to beat Javier Culson, of Puerto Rico, the season's best performer. That assumption was ripped apart on the night Jessica Ennis, Mo Farah and Greg Rutherford reigned in gold.

'The heats had been lovely,' remembers Greene, 26. 'I won nice and easily. The crowd was brilliant and I believed everything was going to be fantastic in the semi-final. It was . . . until I looked inside and saw a few guys there alongside me and thought, “What the hell . . . ” They weren't my pace. They were pulling away. S***. The crowd got quieter and I panicked a bit. It was horrible.

Hurdler Dai Greene

'People always said athletes raise their games for an Olympics but I didn't believe it until I saw it at that moment.' The three men who beat him had all set their season's best. The Dominican Republic's Felix Sanchez, the eventual champion, had run his fastest time for eight years, at the age of 34.

'You do think it has gone t**s up,' says Greene. 'But you don't want to admit it to yourself. You cling to the hope that you still have something special inside you. I just hoped they couldn't run that fast again. But after the semi, yes, I would have been happy just to get any sort of medal, let alone gold.

'I got lane three – that was OK. I stuttered into the last hurdle but, regardless of that, I hadn't got it in me to do better.' America's Michael Tinsley was second to Sanchez, Culson third and Greene fourth.

'This was the biggest competition of my life and I just wasn't in the place I wanted to be,' admits Greene.

'After that I didn't want to speak to anyone. I went to get food in the canteen and then to find Malcolm (Arnold, his coach) to get my phone off him. I don't think I rang Sian (his girlfriend). I texted her to say I was OK and that we would speak tomorrow.

'I went to my room. It was hard to sleep. Usually you get over a disappointment in a few days. But with this you knew you would never get another chance.

Down and out of medals: Greene finished fourth in London

Down and out of medals: Greene finished fourth in London

Down and out of medals: Greene finished fourth in London

'Every day got slightly better. I was going through a process. I wasn't asking for help.' Greene's Olympics ended with fourth place in the 4×400 metres relay, bringing him close to tears.

'I didn't want to talk athletics for weeks,' he says. 'I didn't watch the Olympics after that. I barely watched the Paralympics. I didn't go on the London parade. I didn't see it on telly.'

What few people understood was the extent of Greene's injury. He had surgery on his left knee almost exactly a year ago but barely talked publicly about the ongoing problems he suffered. He did, however, type some painful and honest notes prior to the operation. In them he says: 'I'm a world champion. I can't be injured. I felt in great condition. I saw pain as a weakness.'

Nearly a month after surgery, and still having five hours of physio a day, he was thrilled to run 400m flat in the super-slow time of 2min 20sec. Even as late as April, he had to fly back from a training camp in Portugal for urgent treatment, his inability to stay compact by bringing his heel up to his buttocks as he hurdled having upset the rest of his body.

His fastest run of the year came at a Diamond League meeting in Paris, but his paucity of sustained training left him unable to improve on, or even sustain, his time of 47.84sec. His best at the Games was 48.19sec, in the semi-final. Now able to rationalise his performance, and happier after breaks in the south of France and New York, Greene is back in full training.

'These experiences make you a stronger person,' he says. 'Now my body is holding up. The volume of work I am doing is going up. I have my world title to defend in Moscow next year. Felix is eight years older than me so, yes, the next Olympics in Rio are definitely a realistic target. But for now I am not thinking too much about that. I am just excited about being an athlete again.'

F1 title won"t be tainted – Fernando Alonso

Title won't be tainted, insists Alonso despite underhand tactics in Texas

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UPDATED:

23:18 GMT, 22 November 2012

Fernando Alonso is adamant his title will not be tainted if he pulls off a miracle at the Brazilian Grand Prix this weekend and beats Sebastian Vettel to the prize.

That Alonso stands any chance of overhauling his Red Bull rival is thanks in no small part to Ferrari’s dubious tactics at the United States Grand Prix.

In order to move Alonso up to seventh place on the grid, and the clean side of the track, Ferrari deliberately sabotaged Felipe Massa’s gearbox to demote the Brazilian five places at the start.

In with a chance: Fernando Alonso (left) could still win the title

In with a chance: Fernando Alonso (left) could still win the title

The plan worked like a dream with Alonso making up three places on the opening lap before eventually finishing third, meaning a podium finish at Interlagos and misfortune for Vettel would see the Spaniard crowned world champion for a third time.

But deflecting any criticism of the tactic, Alonso claimed that by being upfront about their skulduggery any suggestion of impropriety had been dispelled.

In control: Sebastian Vettel

In control: Sebastian Vettel

‘I’m proud of my team,’ said Alonso. ‘It was a strategic decision, to start on the clean side with both cars.

‘Because it worked quite well, maybe the people were not very happy but I’m proud of my team, more than anything it’s because they said the truth when we changed the gearbox. Not many teams are able to say the truth when they make a strategic decision.

‘We don’t need to go too far this year with some of the races where we have had some doubts about teams and which position they will start from, depending on limits they were finding in the regulations.’ However, Vettel, while not criticising his title rival, claimed that Red Bull would never use such a strategy to boost his chances.

‘What they do is not in our hands,’ said Vettel. ‘I didn’t follow up if Felipe had a real trouble with the gearbox or not but as I said it’s not our job to focus on these things.

'Obviously it is a different approach compared to my team but that’s how life is. I think everyone handles certain situations in a different way.’

Lewis Hamilton sticks obscene message on his McLaren helmet again

Lewis Hams it up by sticking obscene message on his McLaren helmet again

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UPDATED:

23:53 GMT, 16 November 2012

If anyone could upstage Formula One's return to the United States amid a potential championship decider with one crass act it was Lewis Hamilton in practice.

He emblazoned his helmet with the initials H.A.M. – short for hard as a m*****f*****.

Tough guy: Lewis Hamilton shows off his helmet

Tough guy: Lewis Hamilton shows off his helmet

We can deduce that was the nudge-nudge meaning because he tweeted the same initials at the Belgian Grand Prix at Spa in August, advising his followers to look up the meaning if they did not know it.

It remains to be seen whether he will be told to remove the offending words ahead of qualifying on Saturday, or Sunday's race.

The timing is embarrassing because the ruling body, the FIA, warned drivers only a few days ago to moderate their language after Kimi Raikennon and Sebestain Vettel both swore in the heat of the moment on the podium in Abu Dhabi.

Lewis Hamilton of McLaren

Hamilton's McLaren team have regularly failed to exercise any form of discipline over their occasionally errant driver. They did not even fine him when he posted secret team telemetry on line, also at Belgium.

That may partly have been because they were trying to woo him into staying with them, but now he has agreed to join Mercedes next year they may take a more hard line approach.

Drivers generally gave high marks for the new $400 million track hosting the first U.S. Grand Prix since 2007.

'It's a great track to drive,' added Hamilton, who won the world championship in 2008.

'Generally, the track is cool all around. The turn one is pretty unique going uphill. It's definitely not easy. I think a lot of people are going to have some troubles this weekend.'

Richard Hughes crowned champion jockey

Hughes is champion after his years of frustration

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UPDATED:

21:47 GMT, 10 November 2012

Richard Hughes, four times a runner-up in the race to be crowned Britain's champion flat jockey, was celebrating at last after landing the 2012 title.

Hughes, accompanied to the podium by his son, Harvey, to receive his trophy at Doncaster, said: 'It's a great feeling, much better than runner-up!'

Daddy cool: Richard Hughes and his son Harvey

Daddy cool: Richard Hughes and his son Harvey

A stream of winners from Richard Hannon consistently boosted Hughes, 39, on the way to the top with multiple winners Libranno, Havana Gold and Toronado contributing to his final tally of 172 winners – 41 more than second-placed Silvestre de Sousa.

Lewis Hamilton: McLaren gaffes have cost me title fight with Sebastian Vettel

Hamilton: McLaren gaffes have cost me a title fight with Vettel and Alonso

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UPDATED:

13:18 GMT, 6 November 2012


Down and out: Lewis Hamilton was forced to retire while in the lead of the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix on Sunday

Down and out: Lewis Hamilton was forced to retire while in the lead of the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix

Lewis Hamilton believes McLaren failures have cost him the chance of winning the world championship this season.

Hamilton, who joins Mercedes on a three-year deal in 2013, was forced to retire from the lead of Sunday's Abu Dhabi Grand Prix following a fuel-pump problem on lap 20.

It marked his second retirement from a winning position in five races after gearbox gremlins dashed hopes of a victory in Singapore.

Earlier this season a pit-stop gaffe by McLaren cost him major points in Bahrain while he was relegated to the back of the grid in Spain after his team left him short on fuel in qualifying after he had secured pole.

He was then involved in collisions in
Valencia and Belgium while his race was brought to a premature end in
Germany after suffering damage to the floor of his McLaren.

Phil Duncan F1 blog

‘I’ve been on pole position seven times this year and I have only won three of them,’ Hamilton, who is 90 points adrift of championship leader Sebastian Vettel said.

‘In the other ones we’ve had failures and issues with pit stops and so on.

‘If my car was as reliable as Sebastian’s or Fernando’s (Alonso) this year I would be right up with them now. Maybe ahead, who knows’

Hamilton however, is only fifth in the championship after failing to secure a podium finish since he won the Italian Grand Prix in September.

But the 2008 world champion, who has suffered four retirements from the last nine races, remains hopeful he will end his 14-year association at McLaren with one final victory.

I quit! Hamilton is leaving McLaren for a new start at Mercedes next year

I quit! Hamilton is leaving McLaren for a new start at Mercedes next year

‘If you start from pole you generally should win the race unless you have major issues,’ he continued. And I did [have major issues] in about half the races I started from pole.

‘But we’ve still got two races and if the car can perform as it did here I’ll have another chance.

‘It would be an incredible way to go out. But I’m kind of relaxed on that thought as it would have happened today. I was quickest all weekend. I got pole position so that’s one step to going out on a high.

‘I couldn’t have done any more. And like I say, I’ve got two more races. It’s still not impossible we can win one of those.’

Ahead of the inaugural United States Grand Prix in Austin later this month, Hamilton added: ‘I’m going to go there with the same mentality and enthusiasm in the hope that we can win that one.

‘I would love to win the first US Grand Prix and be the first to win there. And to be honest I don’t think I’ve ever had a circuit where I’ve been able to put my name to it as the first person to win. ‘

Kimi Raikkonen and Sebastian Vettel swear in Abu Dhabi on live TV, forcing BBC"s David Coulthard to apologise

Raikkonen and Vettel turn the air blue on live TV, forcing BBC's Coulthard to apologise

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UPDATED:

22:41 GMT, 4 November 2012

BBC pundit David Coulthard was left red-faced after Kimi Raikkonen and Sebastian Vettel both swore on live television.

When Coulthard asked Raikkonen to describe his emotions after winning the first race of his comeback at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, the 2007 world champion said: ‘Not much really. Last time you guys was giving me s*** because I didn’t really smile enough.’

Vettel then caused further embarrassment during the post-race podium presentation saying: ‘It was obviously a chance to f*** it up and we didn’t do that,’ in reference to his third-placed finish after Red Bull’s qualifying blunder which left him stranded at the back of the grid.

Turning the air blue: Both Kimi Raikkonen (second left) and Sebastian Vettel (right) embarrassed David Coulthard (second right)

Naughty boys: Both Kimi Raikkonen (second left) and Sebastian Vettel (right) embarrassed – and drenched – David Coulthard (second right)

Coulthard, a 13-time race winner, then issued an apology for the bad language used.

Raikkonen, who became the first driver to win a race for Lotus since Ayrton Senna’s victory at the 1987 Detroit Grand Prix, has previous in swearing on live television.

Phil Duncan F1 blog

He infamously told Martin Brundle he was ‘having a s***’ after the television pundit asked why he’d missed a presentation by Pele ahead of the 2006 Brazilian Grand Prix.

Raikkonen nor Vettel can blame their poor use of language on the champagne usually dished out on a Formula One podium.

As in neighbouring Bahrain, the top three drivers in Abu Dhabi are given non-alcoholic rose water instead.

Lance Armstrong Olympic bronze medal investigated by IOC

Armstrong's Olympic bronze medal at risk after IOC launch probe into Sydney ride

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UPDATED:

11:53 GMT, 1 November 2012

The International Olympic Committee will launch an investigation into Lance Armstrong's 2000 Olympics bronze medal after the American was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles in the biggest doping scandal to hit cycling.

Armstrong, who won a time trail medal
at the Sydney Games, was stripped of his 1999-2005 Tour victories last
month when the International Cycling Union (UCI) ratified a U.S.
Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) decision to erase his results from August 1998.

'The IOC will now immediately start the process concerning the involvement of Lance Armstrong, other riders and particularly their entourages with respect to the Olympic Games and their future involvement with the Games,' an IOC official said on Thursday.

On the podium: Lance Armstrong won bronze at the 2000 Sydney Olympics

On the podium: Lance Armstrong won bronze at the 2000 Sydney Olympics

A USADA report that included
testimonies from several former team-mates against him and themselves,
called it the 'most sophisticated, professionalised and successful
doping program that sport has ever seen'.

Armstrong, who overcame cancer to dominate the sport, has always denied doping and maintains he never failed a drugs test.

Fallen giant: Lance Armstrong has been stripped of his Tour de France title

Poking fun: Armstrong is this year's celebrity guy in Edenbridge, Kent

Fallen giant: Armstrong has been stripped of his seven Tour de France titles and has even been chosen as this year's celebrity guy at Edenbridge in Kent