Tag Archives: platini

John Terry snubs David Bernstein as Chelsea hand back the Champions League Trophy to UEFA

Champions of Europe, we know what we were: Chelsea boys feeling blue as they hand back trophy… and axed England captain Terry snubs handshake from FA chief Bernstein

amidst racism allegations made against him after a clash with QPR defender Anton Ferdinand in October 2011.

The 32-year-old defender later retired from international football in September 2012 after being charged by the FA for the incident after he had been found not guilty of racist abuse in court.

Snub: The moment Chelsea captain John Terry (second left) sensationally snubbed FA Chairman David Bernstein (second right) by refusing to shake his hand

Snub: The moment Chelsea captain John Terry (second left) sensationally snubbed FA Chairman David Bernstein (second right) by refusing to shake his hand

Walking away: After Bernstein talks with Branislav Ivanovic and Petr Cech Terry walks away to avoid having to speak with him

Walking away: After Bernstein talks with Branislav Ivanovic and Petr Cech Terry walks away to avoid having to speak with him

Snub: Chelsea captain John Terry (right), pictured with UEFA President Michel Platini, sensationally snubbed FA Chairman David Bernstein (below, right) by refusing to shake his hand

Snub: Chelsea captain John Terry (right), pictured with UEFA President Michel Platini, sensationally snubbed FA Chairman David Bernstein (below, right) by refusing to shake his hand

Didn't notice: FA Chairman David Bernstein (right) said he wasn't aware he had been snubbed

Didn't notice: FA Chairman David Bernstein (right) claimed he wasn't aware he had been snubbed

Charles Sale predicted trouble

In his Sports Agenda column, Charles Sale revealed that Terry and Bernstein were set to share the stage together. Click here for the story.

bernstein has been speaking to Terry's Chelsea team-mates Branislav Ivanovic and Petr Cech, but when it was his turn, Terry took a step away to avoid speaking to the FA chairman.

Asked about the incident, Bernstein told Sky Sports News: I didn't notice anything, my relationships with everyone in here are really fantastic so I didn't notice a thing. I

'think we should talk about more positive things than that sort of nonsense'

When asked about his relationship
with Terry, Bernstein – who leaves his post as FA chairman in July –
added: 'A little distant.'

He seemed cool on making any attempt to kiss and make up with the Chelsea captain.

'I'm not really terribly concerned,' he add. 'I have other things to think about. In my last three months, I have other priorities.'

Terry was joined by team-mates Frank
Lampard, Fernando Torres and Branislav Ivanovic as Chelsea handed back
the trophy they famously won last May.

We'll have that back: Eleven months to the day after their famous night in Munich, Chelsea have returned the Champions League trophy to UEFA

We'll have that back: Eleven months to the day after their famous night in Munich, Chelsea have returned the Champions League trophy to UEFA

Terry is also unhappy with Bernstein's role in his court case last year where he was cleared of a racism offence though later banned for four matches by the FA.

Terry, also speaking to Sky Sports News, said: 'No, listen it's a difficult one for me. Obviously, he was the one who spoke about me in the court case and said things I don't want to talk on air. It's probably a subject that we should maybe just avoid.'

Asked if he shook Bernstein's hand during before the ceremony, Terry replied: 'No.'

Say goodbye: Chelsea players Petr Cech, John Terry, Fernando Torres and Branislav Ivanovic (left to right) with UEFA President Michel Platini (centre)

Say goodbye: Chelsea players Petr Cech, John Terry, Fernando Torres and Branislav Ivanovic (left to right) with UEFA President Michel Platini (centre)

Perfect Moment: Didier Drogba hits the penalty that won Chelsea the Champions League last season

Perfect Moment: Didier Drogba hits the penalty that won Chelsea the Champions League last season

It was the moment that all Chelsea fans have been dreading, but 11 months to the day after Didier Drogba's penalty completed the most famous night in their history, Chelsea finally relinquished their hold on the Champions League trophy.

In an official ceremony in London, members of the Blues' heroic squad, John Terry, Frank Lampard, Petr Cech, Branislav Ivanovic and Fernando Torres, gave the trophy back to UEFA President Michel Platini ahead of the 2013 final that will be played at Wembley on May 25.

Since that night Chelsea have undergone a tumultuous transformation.

Jubilant: Chelsea players celebrate their victory in Munich

Jubilant: Chelsea players celebrate their victory in Munich

Drogba, the talismanic striker who scored the equalising goal in the dying minutes of normal time before scoring the winning penalty, left the club along with Salomon Kalou and Jose Bosingwa, who played prominent roles in the final, and Raul Meireles, who was excellent in the semi-final win over Barcelona in the Nou Camp, as Chelsea looked add youth to an ageing squad.

Of course, Chelsea also got rid of their Champions League winning manager, Roberto Di Matteo, just six months after lifting the trophy in Germany.

What should have been a glorious campaign as Champions League holders became a disaster for the club as they crashed out of the group stages, becoming the first holders to ever exit the competition that early.

Gone but not forgotten: Roberto Di Matteo (centre) was sacked from the Chelsea jobs just six months after lifting the trophy

Gone but not forgotten: Roberto Di Matteo (centre) was sacked from the Chelsea jobs just six months after lifting the trophy

Mr Chelsea: John Terry was banned from the final but that didn't stop his exuberant celebrations

Mr Chelsea: John Terry was banned from the final but that didn't stop his exuberant celebrations

The board's decision to replace Di Matteo with former Liverpool boss Rafael Benitez was met with loud opposition from Chelsea fans.

Benitez had appealed to fans to get off his back and support the team, and this seems to have happened in recent weeks, leading to an upturn in league form – Chelsea now sit third in the table with a game in hand over fourth placed Arsenal.

Chelsea travel to Anfield this weekend in what will be an emotional return for the current manager – he spent six years at Liverpool, winning the Champions League trophy in 2005 after one of the best comebacks ever seen against AC Milan in Istanbul.

Preparation: Rafa Benitez (second left) prepares to take a team to former club Liverpool for the first time on Sunday

Preparation: Rafa Benitez (second left) prepares to take a team to former club Liverpool for the first time on Sunday

No bearing: Benitez has said that his ties with Anfield will have no bearing on the match - he will be going for three points

No bearing: Benitez has said that his ties with Anfield will have no bearing on the match – he will be going for three points

But Benitez has insisted that his emotional ties with Liverpool will have no bearing on him going for the three points.

I will try to do the best for my team and that is Chelsea,’ said Benitez. ‘I am a professional and that is what I have to do. I cannot forget the time I spent there and the feeling, the atmosphere, the success, the link with the fans and the city — it is my home — but I will try to win. That is what I have to do.

‘This will be quite emotional but I have to concentrate. It will not be easy when you see so many friends around but I will try to concentrate on the game. The players have to believe I can manage the situation and give them help if they need it. Normally, I am not too emotional but now I’m getting older it happens sometimes.’

PS.

This isn't the first time Terry has been involved in handbags over a handshake, although he's usually on the receiving end of the snub…

Wayne Bridge and John Terry

Anton Ferdinand snubs John Terry

Who could forget Wayne Bridge snubs a handshake from Terry after rumours Terry had had an affair with Bridge's former fiance Vanessa Perroncel (left); and Anton Ferdinand snubs Terry after last year's race storm

Football's other hand-shaking controversies

WAYNE BRIDGE & JOHN TERRY: In January 2010 claims Terry had had an alleged relationship with the former partner of one-time team-mate Wayne Bridge emerged, despite Terry being behind a gagging injunction. He was axed as England captain and Manchester City defender Bridge quit international football saying his position in the team – potentially alongside Terry – was 'untenable and potentially divisive'. The teams met just a few weeks later on February 27 but in the traditional pre-match handshake, Bridge refused Terry's outstretched hand.

QPR & CHELSEA: The teams met at Loftus Road on October 23, 2011, after which Terry was accused of racially abusing Ferdinand. The sides were then drawn to face each other in an FA Cup tie in January 2012 with intense focus on whether the pair would or would not shake hands. The then QPR boss Mark Hughes held a meeting with his players and officials over the handshake. Ultimately, the FA decided to scrap the ritual. The Premier League took the same action in April in the first league game between the two since the original incident after Ferdinand's lawyers advised him not to shake Terry's hand. In September 2012, Ferdinand snubbed both Terry and Ashley Cole, who testified for the former at his trial, as did Park Ji-sung, former team-mate of Rio Ferdinand.

PATRICE EVRA & LUIS SUAREZ: Liverpool striker Suarez was given an eight-match ban after being found guilty of racially abusing Manchester United defender Evra in October 2011. The Reds were vocal in their defence of the Uruguayan, a move that did little to endear either them or the player to the general public. Suarez's first start after the suspension happened to be at Old Trafford but it was he who refused the hand of Evra. The Red Devils captain offered his hand to the Uruguay international but he bypassed the Frenchman. Evra did not accept that and attempted to grab Suarez's arm to complete the formalities, but the striker shrugged him off. Rio Ferdinand, further down the line, then refused to shake Suarez's hand.

JOHN TERRY & DAVID BERNSTEIN: Terry's simmering resentment showed itself again today as he confirmed he had rejected the FA chairman's attempt to shake hands. Bernstein was the man who stripped Terry of the England captaincy and despite being cleared at Westminster Magistrates' Court of making a racist insult, he was charged by the FA and banned for four matches. Bernstein insisted he was unaware of the Chelsea player's snub while admitting his relationship with Terry was 'a little distant'. He told Sky Sports News: 'I didn't notice a thing and I think we should talk about more positive things than that sort of nonsense. I'm not really terribly concerned.'

Sepp Blatter blasts UEFA on Euro 2020 that will lack "heart and soul"

Euro 2020 will lack heart and soul… we may as well not call it the Euros! Blatter blasts Platini over plan to host finals in 13 different countries

By
Graeme Yorke

PUBLISHED:

11:41 GMT, 14 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

13:52 GMT, 14 March 2013

FIFA president Sepp Blatter has denounced Michel Platini’s plans to stage the 2020 European Championship across the entire continent and called on UEFA to change the name of the tournament.

Euro 2020 will be held in 13 cities across the continent with the semi-finals and final being played in the same stadium, UEFA announced in January.

But Blatter isn’t impressed with the plans and believes one host country is the best way to deliver
the event.

Wrong: FIFA president Sepp Blatter has criticised Michel Platini's plans to use more than one country for the 2020 European Championship

Wrong: FIFA president Sepp Blatter has criticised Michel Platini's plans to use more than one country for the 2020 European Championship

Euro 2020 details so far

12 cities will host three group stage matches and one knockout round

One stadium will host the semi-finals and final

There will only be one venue per country

In the frame to host the final are Wembley, the Olympic Stadium in Istanbul and the Allianz Arena

He told Kicker magazine: ‘A tournament should be played in one country. That is how you create identity and euphoria.

‘They have fragmented the 2020 tournament. So it is not a European Championship any more. It has to have a different name.’

‘I do not know what name. Such a Euro lacks heart and soul.’

UEFA said that 12 cities would be
awarded a package of three group games plus one knockout-stage game,
either from the round-of-16 or quarter-finals.

A
special 13th package would be awarded, consisting of the two
semi-finals and final with UEFA eager to split the costs for the bigger
tournament and celebrate its 60th anniversary across Europe.

The Swiss sports administrator also said
he planned to end his stint at the top of the world soccer’s governing
body in 2015 if FIFA was strong and stable.

Coming home: Wembley is one of the favourites to host the final after the FA said they would bid

Coming home: Wembley is one of the favourites to host the final after the FA said they would bid

First class: The Allianz Arena in Munich hosted the Champions League final last season

First class: The Allianz Arena in Munich hosted the Champions League final last season

Close contest: The Ataturk Olympic Stadium in Istanbul is also thought to be in with a chance

Close contest: The Ataturk Olympic Stadium in Istanbul is also thought to be in with a chance

Blatter, who took over the FIFA presidency in 1998, added: ‘I want to push through the FIFA reforms at our congress in Mauritius in May, then we go to Brazil for the World Cup in 2014 and after that everything is open.

‘When it is secured that FIFA will
continue to be led like that, that it will remain global and the pyramid
will not collapse then I will gladly hand over the sceptre to a new
president.'

UEFA chief Michel Platini is seen as a possible successor to Blatter.

‘I do not know if he wants to,’ said Blatter. ‘He has an idea about the future of FIFA which he has to explain to the continents at some point. But he has not decided yet.’

On the rocks: Blatter and Michel Platini have usually had an amicable relationship

On the rocks: Blatter and Michel Platini have usually had an amicable relationship

Michel Platini says 2022 World Cup in Qatar must be staged in winter

Qatar World Cup must be staged in the winter to protect players and fans, says Platini

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

11:49 GMT, 2 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

11:49 GMT, 2 March 2013

Michel Platini says the 2022 World Cup in Qatar must be held during the winter to protect the players and fans from the searing desert heat.

Temperatures can exceed 40 degrees in the summer in the middle-eastern country, compared to a more comfortable 17 degrees in the winter.

The finals were controversially awarded to Qatar two years ago with Platini, the UEFA president, one of those who voted in their favour.

Winter World Cup: UEFA President Michel Platini says the 2022 tournament in Qatar must be staged in the winter months to protect players and fans from 40C temperatures

Winter World Cup: UEFA President Michel Platini says the 2022 tournament in Qatar must be staged in the winter months to protect players and fans from 40C temperatures

'I am in favour of Qatar under two conditions,' the former French star told Bild newspaper. 'Because of the heat the World Cup will need to be held in the winter.

'With over 40 degrees, playing football is impossible and for fans it would also be unbearable.

'Also, the neighbouring emirates must be included so that the World Cup is staged throughout the entire region.'

Grand designs: The proposed Al-Rayyan football stadium in Doha, to be built for the 2022 World Cup

Grand designs: The proposed Al-Rayyan football stadium in Doha, to be built for the 2022 World Cup

Spectacular: The Qatar University Stadium in Doha, another one of the proposed venues

Spectacular: The Qatar University Stadium in Doha, another one of the proposed venues

Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Oman and Kuwait are among the neighbouring countries that could be considered.

Platini's proposals will cause chaos to the regular football calendar, with six or seven weeks of disruption to domestic leagues.

Michel Platini: Match-fixing is football"s greatest threat – not racism

Match-fixing – not racism – is greatest threat to football, says Platini (who still wants World Cup 2022 to be moved to the winter)

PUBLISHED:

11:23 GMT, 22 January 2013

|

UPDATED:

11:23 GMT, 22 January 2013

Michel Platini believes match-fixing poses the greatest threat to the future of football as the UEFA president reiterated his desire to switch the 2022 World Cup in Qatar to the winter.

While acknowledging the continued spectres of racism and violence, for the Frenchman throwing a game would sound the death knell for the game.

Making a stand: AC Milan midfielder Kevin Prince Boateng (C) left the playing field during a friendly against Pro Patria amid alleged racist chants earlier this month

Making a stand: AC Milan midfielder Kevin Prince Boateng (C) left the playing field during a friendly against Pro Patria amid alleged racist chants earlier this month

Concerns: UEFA president Michel Platini

Concerns: UEFA president Michel Platini

Speaking to French radio station RTL, Platini said: 'Racism and violence – it is a little beyond our control because it is not just about football but also affects the public.

'On the other hand we're directly concerned by match-fixing. For me, this is the greatest shame.

'If tomorrow, we'll see a game and we already know the result, football is dead.'

Football is waging an ongoing war against racism with Kevin-Prince Boateng recently making a stand by walking off the field with his AC team-mates against Pro Patria because of racist chanting.

Platini expressed his admiration, saying: 'It's great, I really liked it. It was very good, I also called to congratulate Milan.'

Speaking about his wish to reschedule the timing of the World Cup in 2022, the former France midfielder added: 'When I told the Emir of Qatar that I would vote for them, I told him two things.

'First, I would fight for it to be in winter.

'It's 50 degrees in the summer in Qatar. If we do not change the date, there are countries that will never receive the World Cup.'

Change the date: Platini wants the 2022 World Cup in Qatar to be moved to the winter

Change the date: Platini wants the 2022 World Cup in Qatar to be moved to the winter

Michel Platini says Celtic are going out of the Champions League

The Bhoys are going out! Platini says Celtic have no chance of beating Juventus to progress in Champions League

|

UPDATED:

14:50 GMT, 29 December 2012

Michel Platini has written off any chances Celtic may have of Champions League progress.

The UEFA president told delegates at the Globe Soccer Awards in Dubai that Neil Lennon’s next opposition – Serie A leaders Juventus – are guaranteed to be in the quarter-finals.

‘If we look at the Champions League draw, it’s clear that Juventus are already through to the quarter finals,’ the Frenchman said.

You're out! Michel Platini believes Celtic have no chance in the Champions League

You're out! Michel Platini believes Celtic have no chance in the Champions League

The Hoops have had a sensational run in the European competition so far, miraculously giant-killing both Barcelona and Spartak Moscow to earn a place in the last 16.

The Turin side, meanwhile, will be without defender Giorgio Chiellini for the double header.

Platini won six titles as an attacking midfielder, including the European Cup in 1985 and two Scuddetti.

All smiles: Tony Watt scored the second goal against Barcelona at Parkhead

All smiles: Tony Watt scored the second goal against Barcelona at Parkhead

The son of Italian ancestry, Platini’s father was an immigrant from Agrate Conturbia in the province of Novara, and the football chief has long-standing affection for Italian football.

‘Of course, Juve has always been and will always be the team of my heart, where among other things, I won everything at club level.

‘I have been very fortunate in football. I played in the strongest teams for both Nancy and Saint-Etienne, and finally in Juventus, which is the strongest team in the world.’

Jessica Ennis and Mo Farah will have to wait to be Dame and Sir – Des Kelly

After a year of plenty, Sir MoBot, Sir Andy and Dame Jess will have to wait their turn

|

UPDATED:

00:04 GMT, 29 December 2012

The compilation of the honours list has always been something of a murky affair. The perception lingers that a nudge here, a wink there and a generous donation to the right account does no harm at all to one’s prospects of a knighthood.

Trot along to one of the Prime Minister’s barbecues in Buckinghamshire and the chances of the Queen pinning something on your lapel at Buckingham Palace a few months later also appear to improve somewhat.

Civil servants, politicians and bankers pick up gongs for doing little more than their day job, while, according to a report earlier this year by the Commons Public Administration Select Committee, it still remains the case that not enough ‘normal people’ are being recognised on the list.

Ben Ainslie

Bradley Wiggins

Sirs: Ben Ainslie (left) and Bradley Wiggins have been awarded knighthoods after their sporting successes

More from Des Kelly…

Des Kelly: Rafa was right… the sight of Sir Alex ranting at THREE officials on the touchline laid waste to the feeble Respect campaign
28/12/12

Des Kelly: All you need for the festive season… my Christmas gift guide for all sports fans
21/12/12

Des Kelly: British lessons for foreign players Let's start with Monty Python
14/12/12

Des Kelly: Platini's flight of fancy will give fans travel sickness while greedy UEFA swell their coffers at YOUR expense
07/12/12

Des Kelly: Bridge boo boys should be careful what they wish for… or Roman might end up giving them their old Chelsea back
30/11/12

Des Kelly: I'm sorry, but Chelsea are an utter disgrace
23/11/12

Des Kelly: Ibrahimovic's goal was NOT the greatest ever scored
16/11/12

Des Kelly: Just man up like Rod and let your teardrops explode
09/11/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

But the relationship between sport and honours has always been more straightforward. It is essentially a meritocracy, stripped of politicking and intrigue. If you win, you are rewarded. Glories equal honour. Medals equal gongs. In fact, we don’t want our sports stars to be ‘normal’ at all.

The trouble this year is they were too extraordinary. The gold rush of a glorious Olympic summer where Team GB collected 29 gold medals led Downing Street to issue curmudgeonly briefings about how there would be an honours ‘cutback’ even before another 34 golds at the Paralympics.

Faced with the prospect of nearly half the audience at the Sports Personality Of The Year Awards being called Dame This or Sir That, the Prime Minister called a halt. As a result there is no Sir MoBot. No Sir Andy of Dunblane. No Dame Jessica of the Steel City, either.

In any other year, this illustrious trio would have been guaranteed the very highest accolades of the land for their inspirational performances.

They not only succeeded in their chosen fields, their golden glow was reflected across the nation as they brought the country together for moments of collective joy and patriotism, the intensity of which has rarely been seen before.

But on this occasion, they have had to drop down a rung or two, ‘victims’ of our incredible sporting success, if we dare use such a word in this context.

Mo Farah

Double gold: Mo Farah

Jessica Ennis

Poster girl: Jessica Ennis

Andy Murray

Main man: Andy Murray

DM.has('rcp',”twitter”);

Twitter Avatar

Loading tweets…

When Kelly Holmes took double gold on the track in Athens in 2004, she was made a Dame without argument. When Mo Farah achieved a similar feat in London this summer winning the 5,000m and 10,000m, he was handed a citation for a CBE instead.

Paralympian Sarah Storey is a Dame, but all-conquering wheelchair athlete David Weir is not named a knight, he has a CBE. There are only so many knights and dames a nation can accommodate, even on a special Olympic honours list. But it is not a snub to miss out and it would churlish to regard it as such.

Some of the sports stars not being called to the Palace this year have long careers ahead and there is time enough for knighthoods, honours and accolades. What might seem like a contradiction now can surely be addressed in lists ahead.

At least cycling has two knights of the road; Sir Dave Brailsford for his pursuit of excellence with the British team and Sir Bradley Wiggins, or Sir Wiggo as he will surely be known, for his historic Tour de France triumph and Olympic gold. There are two Sirs on the waves as well, with David Tanner, performance director of Britain’s rowing team and sailor Ben Ainslie collecting knighthoods.

But being a history-maker is not necessarily enough. When Andy Murray finally landed Britain’s first men’s Grand Slam tennis title in 76 years at the US Open during an era when men’s tennis is as strong as it has ever been, he still admitted it ‘would be a little rash’ to give him a knighthood. The committee agreed, handing him an OBE.

The idea that he has been denied,
though, is preposterous. Murray is 25. To make him Sir Andy at 25 would
be premature in the extreme. Fred Perry, Britain’s last great men’s
tennis champion, was never given an honour. However it is certainly a
far cry from the list of 2003 when Tim Henman was given an OBE just to
‘add interest’ to the list.

Making her mark: Sarah Storey was named a Dame in the New Year Honours list

Making her mark: Sarah Storey was named a Dame in the New Year Honours list

In truth, no athlete, sportsman or sportswoman competes with these ceremonial honours in mind. The distinction that truly counts is the medal hung around their neck on the podium or the trophy they receive at the climax to a tournament.

Sports stars receive honours enough, and most of them would happily cede their place on the list to a charity worker or a member of the Armed Forces if that were the choice. But as a nation we enjoy having sporting heroes and it is a fine problem to have too many for once.

Who said the honours system was ever consistent, anyway Want the proof Some inherit a title because their father was made a Baronet, like Sir Mark Thatcher. And then there’s Sir Jimmy Savile. I could go on.

David Luiz free-kick joins David Beckham and Roberto Carlos on list of greats

Bolt from the Blue! Luiz joins Becks, Carlos and co… but which free-kick is the best

|

UPDATED:

18:04 GMT, 23 December 2012

David Luiz silenced Aston Villa this afternoon with a spectacular free-kick, bundling lightening precision, the perfect dip and total confidence into his execution.

Appearing to almost side-foot it over the wall and forcefully into the back of the net, Luiz’s free kick is a must-watch.

His technique and finish are likely to be talking points for the festive week’s highlights, but did it take our breath away in the same fashion as Roberto Carlos against France or Cristiano Ronaldo against Portsmouth

Here is Sportsmail's picks of the free kicks.

Bolt from the Blue: Luiz scored a stunning free-kick

Bolt from the Blue: Luiz scored a stunning free-kick

Roberto Carlos v France (Tournoi de France, 1997)

Possibly one of the greatest ever goals –
never mind free-kicks – Carlos’s heartbreaker against France prompted
endless scientific analysis to evaluate whether or not the stunning
outside-of-the-boot, left-footed rocket was a fluke.

Physicians
determined he meant it, the violent swerve into the net to bounce in off
the post and everything, so nobody questioned it ever again.

VIDEO: Bend it like Carlos…

Jose Luis Chilavert v Argentina (World Cup qualifier, 1996)

Unsurprisingly the only goalkeeper on our list, Jose Luis Chilavert’s beautiful dispatch against Argentina for Paraguay in 1996 is sublime – if not one for the purists.

Maybe it’s also the bulldog on his jersey, and his lack of goal celebration practice, which makes this so entertaining.

VIDEO: Forget the free-kick, check out the celebration!

Michel Platini v Spain (Euro 1984 Final)

If only his politics could be quite so direct. Platini at his peak was something else, and his free-kick against Spain in the final was near-perfect, and when goalkeeper Luis Arconda spilled his effort, all it took was for Bruno Bellone’s late chip to secure the trophy.

VIDEO: Platini heaps pain on Spain…

Cristiano Ronaldo v Portsmouth (Premier League, April 2008)

His look-at-me, screaming celebration was replicated on calendars, t-shirts, mugs, more t-shirts… You name it.

Nobody wanted to forget the incredible way this masterful player lined up his shot from 30 yards, lashing the ball into the very top corner, the fact it earned him a brace within three minutes or his victorious reaction.

VIDEO: Cris of death from Ronaldo…

David Beckham v Greece (World Cup qualifier, 2001)

Called upon to avoid a Greek tragedy at all costs, Beckham’s 30-yard free-kick will always have a place in the history books. Curling it lethally past Antonis Nikopolidis, Becks not only booked England into the 2002 World Cup, avoiding a play-off, but perhaps achieved the zenith of his amazing career.

When he finally calls time on football, this footage is guaranteed to appear over and over again.

VIDEO: Becks spares England from Greek tragedy…

Ken Bates programme notes: No mention of Chelsea but he blasts UEFA and FIFA

Leeds chief Bates snubs Chelsea in his programme notes… and blasts UEFA and FIFA's 'antics'

|

UPDATED:

20:14 GMT, 19 December 2012

Leeds chairman Ken Bates has not mentioned Chelsea in his programme notes ahead of the sides' Capital One Cup clash.

Bates used to be the Blues' owner and in the build up to the game even described Wednesday night's clash as 'like getting a new Bentley with your mother-in-law in the passenger seat and watching it go over a cliff'.

He was at Stamford Bridge for 21 years before leaving in 2004, and taking over at Elland Road.

Strong words: Ken Bates is unimpressed with both UEFA and FIFA

Strong words: Ken Bates is unimpressed with both UEFA and FIFA

Instead of writing about his former
club he has blasted UEFA’s decision to spread Euro 2020 across different
countries and has suggested countries will be awarded matches in return
for votes in forthcoming elections.

UEFA president Michel Platini
confirmed recently that Euro 2020 will take place in more than one
venue, prompting fears that many fans will not be able to afford to
travel.

Writing in the
match programme ahead of his club’s Capital Cup tie against Chelsea,
Bates said: 'The antics of UEFA and FIFA continue unabated (no pun
intended).

Who are ya

Football fans often like asking their opponents the question 'who are ya' when they full well know who they are.

But both Leeds and Chelsea supporters would be entitled to look at this team-sheet handed out at Elland Road and wonder just who 'Marko Marvin' was.

Marko Marvin

German attacker Marko Marin admittedly
hasn't featured much for the Blues since his summer switch – but you
wouldn't have thought he'd been out for long enough for people to forget
his name.

'UEFA’s latest daft idea is that the European Nations Cup is played at venues throughout Europe.

'This could mean the games are staged at anywhere from Dublin to Moscow, Belgrade or even Jerusalem!

'The logistics of implementing this idea would be horrendous, least of all for the PBF (Poor Bloody Fans).

'The competition coincides with the height of the holiday season, which will put pressure on aircraft seat capacity, trains and hotel rooms, to say nothing of the cost involved.

'You can expect two or three small countries to get a venue, thus securing their votes in the next UEFA/FIFA elections.'

Bates also turned his attention to FIFA’s decision to award to 2022 World Cup finals to Qatar.

'There have always been suspicions about staging the World Cup in Qatar,' said Bates.

Shake on it: Rival managers Neil Warnock and Rafa Benitez exchange pleasantries before the game

Shake on it: Rival managers Neil Warnock and Rafa Benitez exchange pleasantries before the game

Daft! Bates' verdict on Michel Platini and UEFA's decision to host Euro 2020 across the continent

Daft! Bates' verdict on Michel Platini and UEFA's decision to host Euro 2020 across the continent

'(FIFA president) Sepp Blatter claimed the reason is by going to new countries it is spreading the word and helps take football to a much wider audience.

'But Australia, who lost out, has a much higher population of over 22 million, compared to Qatar, approximately 1.8m. The climate in Qatar in summer often exceeds 100F, but now there is the suggestion it be switched to winter.

'That’s nothing compared to the irreversible financial damage it would do to domestic football. This madness must be stopped in its tracks.

More reason for anger: Sepp Blatter and FIFA were also a target because of their decision to host the 2022 World Cup in Qatar

More reason for anger: Sepp Blatter and FIFA were also a target because of their decision to host the 2022 World Cup in Qatar

'The Association of European Leagues, the FAs and domestic leagues should join common cause and say enough is enough.

'If FIFA persists with this scheme they should collectively boycott the event and not make their players available. The ultimate sanction will be to resign from this incompetent organization and see it collapse.

'Both UEFA and FIFA speak with forked tongue. They say that clubs should reduce the size of domestic competitions to reduce players’ fatigue, at the same time increasing international fixtures includes fatuous friendlies, all for profit.'

British lessons for foreign players? Let"s start with Monty Python – Des Kelly

British lessons for foreign players Let's start with Monty Python

|

UPDATED:

00:00 GMT, 15 December 2012

The Football Association has produced a 92-point plan to tackle racism within football. Nice and concise, that. You’d think they might have rounded it up to 100 just for symmetry. But, on the plus side, at least if they ever throw the book at somebody it might actually hurt.

Let me spin through a couple of the key announcements that you might have missed. First, there is a proposal that foreign players and managers arriving in England will be required to attend lessons in 'British culture'.

Also, by 2015-16, one in 10 referees and coaches will have to be of ethnic origin as 'it is reflective of national demographics', starting at the grassroots level.

Association of Silly Talks: the FA's initiative is nothing but a patronising display of political box-ticking

Association of Silly Talks: the FA's initiative is nothing but a patronising display of political box-ticking

More from Des Kelly…

Des Kelly: Platini's flight of fancy will give fans travel sickness while greedy UEFA swell their coffers at YOUR expense
07/12/12

Des Kelly: Bridge boo boys should be careful what they wish for… or Roman might end up giving them their old Chelsea back
30/11/12

Des Kelly: I'm sorry, but Chelsea are an utter disgrace
23/11/12

Des Kelly: Ibrahimovic's goal was NOT the greatest ever scored
16/11/12

Des Kelly: Just man up like Rod and let your teardrops explode
09/11/12

Des Kelly: No Chelsea player heard Terry abuse Ferdinand… now they're blessed with the hearing of a piano tuner
02/11/12

Des Kelly: The finger of blame will only point at you, Roberto
26/10/12

Des Kelly: Now it is time for football's three monkeys to wise up
19/10/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

Shall we put aside the other 90 recommendations for now, as these two absolute belters should provide enough material for the time being.

I ask you, has there ever been a more patronising display of political box-ticking in sport than these two misplaced edicts Is the FA seriously going to lecture foreign footballers on culture and set out actual race quotas

This has all come about because FA chairman David Bernstein was dragged into No 10 Downing Street to have his knuckles rapped by a Prime Minister that spotted football was on the news a bit more lately.

Sensing an opportunity, David Cameron declared ‘something must be done’ and, lo and behold, the result is English Football’s Inclusion and Anti-Discrimination Action Plan.

It’s a grand title. Politicians just love documents that include words like ‘action’ and ‘plan’ in the same sentence. They look ever so assertive up on the bookshelf. But it’s largely unenforceable guff.

Let’s start with those lessons on British culture for foreigners. Who would be suited for the formidable task of teaching imported sportsmen on 200,000 a week about Britain

The job is likely to fall to some hapless FA apparatchik armed with a Powerpoint presentation that shows a pint of bitter, a Monty Python sketch and a list of the occasions when using the N word is considered unacceptable (Handy tip for foreigners: it’s pretty much all occasions).

Of course, this initiative would have a great deal more impact if it was fronted by a couple of experienced ex-England internationals. Two former captains of the national side, for instance. I wonder if Rio Ferdinand and John Terry might help

I’d also like to know which foreigners qualify for these condescending seminars Will thoroughly Anglicised American, Australian and Dutch players have to sit through these lectures or are they not foreign enough

Fighting talk: Football has hit the headlines for the wrong reasons

Fighting talk: Football has hit the headlines for the wrong reasons

Fighting talk: Football has hit the headlines for the wrong reasons

Is it only for black players and South Americans and is that racist
Besides, surely this is British culture A British-German Royal family, British-Polish plumbers, British Indian restaurants, British-South African cricketers and a British-Pakistani taxi driver all sitting in a British-Irish pub.

The principles underpinning all this are obviously commendable. Of course racism is wrong and should be punished. Role models from all corners of society should be encouraged to join the game, too. But I am utterly sick to the back teeth of people using football as an exercise in social engineering.

There are so many contradictions on matters of race alone. Sport has to be a meritocracy, a system based on individual ability and achievement. That is its essence. Once you impose false quotas it becomes a clumsy, superficial charade.

/12/14/article-0-0143621D00000578-760_468x341.jpg” width=”468″ height=”341″ alt=”Acceptable face of sport The cycling team was an all-white cast” class=”blkBorder” />

Acceptable face of sport The cycling team was an all-white cast

The FA stamp their feet and complain with justification that UEFA’s pathetic attempts to tackles football’s ills are insulting, exemplified by the piffling 65,000 fine imposed on Serbia for a night of racism and violence. But this country has to put its own house in order.

When a so-called fan was caught on video at Chelsea making an alleged (I have to say that) monkey gesture at Manchester United’s Danny Welbeck, the Crown Prosecution Service reviewed the footage and somehow decided there wasn’t enough evidence to proceed with charges of a racially aggravated public-order offence.

Having seen the images, I am at a complete loss over what more evidence they might have required. Which leads me on to the general argument that football is supposedly doomed.

Depending on your news outlet of choice this week, the game is either ‘ungovernable’, ‘teetering on the brink’ of something, or not like it used to be in the good old days when people drank Bovril and smoked Woodbines.

On the plus side, rates of lung cancer and emphysema are down due to the absence of the filter-free gaspers, there’s more on offer at grounds than scalding Bovril, and fewer deaths in the ground, too. I thought I might mention that, since it’s quite important.

Follow Des on Twitter…

More from Des here: @DesKellyDM

Not all bad then, I think we can agree. It can be a hostile and unpleasant environment on occasion, but head into the city centre at chucking out time this weekend and it won’t be much different. So it’s not all football’s fault, despite what the doom-mongers say and we should remember that it can be a joy, too.

A small section of people throw coins because they are irresponsible scum and they think they will get away with it. If CCTV evidence is as unreliable as the CPS have demonstrated, the authorities must intervene.

If coins and missiles are thrown, sections of the ground should be closed. If a thug hurls a seat on the pitch, leave that stand empty for the next fixture and those nearby will shop the perpetrators in their midst soon enough.

Erecting nets behind the goals and around corner flags at the grounds where missiles are thrown is a perfectly reasonable response, too.
There is a spurious counter- argument that this will inevitably lead to the return of fences, but that is not the case.

Nets are used at grounds on the continent and if they save an eye, then they are worth it. And if no coins are thrown, they can be taken down again.

The FA cannot complain about the safety of players on foreign fields and dismiss the perils here at home.

If they do, I only hope someone has the netting handy for when people start throwing stones at England’s glasshouse.

First prize for overblown nonsense goes to Beeb

At least by the end of tomorrow night we should be able to bid farewell to one deeply irritating phenomenon for a month or two.

It relates to the BBC Sports Personality of the Year and always occurs in the moment a champion conquers their particular sport.

Even as they are punching the air with delight in their moment of glory, you can guarantee some clown in the room will declare: ‘They’re bound to win Sports Personality now!’; the logic being a world title, gold medal or astonishing personal achievement is merely a step towards ‘the real prize’ — which is a BBC trophy once won by Greg Rusedski, bless him.

When Bradley Wiggins crossed the line in Paris as Britain’s first winner of the Tour de France, do you imagine he thought: ‘That’s sure to get me on stage with Sue Barker’

Motivation SPOTY is hardly at the front of sports men and women's minds

Motivation SPOTY is hardly at the front of sports men and women's minds

Motivation SPOTY is hardly at the front of sports men and women's minds

Does anyone believe that while the European Ryder Cup team were dancing in delight after their comeback, they were also wondering if they might topple the Olympic Gamesmakers in a BBC poll Of course not.

It’s an overblown, self-congratulatory evening; one that has a little more happy footage than usual this year, which will make a pleasant change, thanks to the glorious Olympics and some notable triumphs for Britain elsewhere.

For all the enthusiastic hype, Wiggins is a cert. This is tough on Andy Murray, Mo Farah, Jess Ennis, Rory McIlroy and the countless others who tasted success in Britain’s greatest sporting year.

But Wiggins is a British pioneer in his sport — a genuine first in his sport for his country — and he has deserved all the honours and trinkets that will come his way. Let’s not pretend they are the real prizes, though.

Club World Cup Win or lose, no one cares

Chelsea could be crowned Club World Cup champions in Japan. What a prize. This famous tournament dates back all the way to 2000. It has been a constant in the calendar ever since they stopped arguing about the format in 2005, renamed it in 2006 and rejigged the schedule in 2007 and once again in 2008. What history. What tradition.

Apologies, there’s some punctuation missing there. I meant: What history What tradition The competition is a colossal waste of airline fuel and nothing more than another FIFA junket. Win or lose, nobody really cares.

Who cares Chelsea are battling to win the Club World Cup in Japan

Who cares Chelsea are battling to win the Club World Cup in Japan

Euro 2020: Michel Platini"s flight of fancy will give fans travel sickness – Des Kelly

Platini's flight of fancy will give fans travel sickness while greedy UEFA swell their coffers at YOUR expense

|

UPDATED:

23:01 GMT, 7 December 2012

The EasyJet 2020 European Championship has a certain ring to it. The Ryanair-miles 2020 Nations Cup is not beyond the bounds of possibility.

Don’t scoff. The plan is already at the departure gate. UEFA chief Michel Platini has helped himself to Duty Free and he is now wheeling his latest idiotic idea through the Nothing To Declare But My Greed channel at airports across Europe.

The new UEFA wheeze is to take what is widely regarded as a fantastic international tournament of concentrated excellence and dismantle it; ruining the format by scattering Euro 2020 games throughout the continent, having already diluted the quality for the 2016 tournament by increasing the number of competing nations from 16 to 24.

Greed: UEFA president Michel Platini (below) wants to rip up a superb football tournament for his new vision

Greed: UEFA president Michel Platini (below) wants to rip up a superb football tournament for his new vision

Greed: UEFA president Michel Platini (below) wants to rip up a superb football tournament for his new vision

DM.has('rcp',”twitter”);

Twitter Avatar

Loading tweets…

There has been no great clamour from supporters for this. No fans’ groups have lobbied for change, demanded more teams, or more travel. But there is money to be had and the souvenirs are already on the drawing board. Top of the list is the ‘UEFA travel mug’ — because that’s how they see you.

Sponsors, advertisers, television executives, marketeers, travel operators, hoteliers and, crucially, UEFA delegates are rubbing their hands with glee at his proposed tournament. But, as ever, one key part of football is forgotten in the ‘exciting, new format’. The supporters.

The paying public are expected to shut up, cough up and be downright grateful for the chance to watch a first-round game in Dublin and then fly to Berlin and Istanbul for the remaining group matches.

When Platini was asked in a press conference how he thought an England supporter could afford to go from one airport to another, he shrugged: ‘As you know, there are budget airlines.’

If there was enough money on the table, I wouldn’t put it past football’s arrogant little Napoleon to play the first half of a match in one city and the second in another.

No matter that the new Euro format will cost you a fortune. Forget that it will be a logistical nightmare, even if games are grouped in smaller geographical regions. Abandon the thought that the competition might have the feel of a national festival with its own character, cuisine and quirks. That will all be lost — and you have no say in it.

You are considered no more than sheep. You are herded from one place to another with little consideration and treated with the kind of like-it-or-lump-it contempt Michael O’Leary reserves for his Ryanair passengers. But at least he usually has the nous to keep the ‘ordeal’ cheap. Not that it will stay that way when the fixtures are announced. Those budget airlines will cash in like everyone else.

Remember these glorious Euro moments Stuart Pearce after scoring his penalty against Spain in 1996

Paul Gascoigne celebrates his stunning goal against Scotland

Who can forget these golden Euro moments Stuart Pearce (left) and Paul Gascoigne (right) celebrate in 1996

Boy wonder: Wayne Rooney celebrates his second goal in England's 4-2 win over Croatia in Lisbon in 2004

Boy wonder: Wayne Rooney celebrates his second goal in England's 4-2 win over Croatia in Lisbon in 2004

Danny boy: England striker Welbeck (left) scores against Sweden with a brilliant backheel

Danny boy: England striker Welbeck (left) scores against Sweden with a brilliant backheel

More from Des Kelly…

Des Kelly: Bridge boo boys should be careful what they wish for… or Roman might end up giving them their old Chelsea back
30/11/12

Des Kelly: I'm sorry, but Chelsea are an utter disgrace
23/11/12

Des Kelly: Ibrahimovic's goal was NOT the greatest ever scored
16/11/12

Des Kelly: Just man up like Rod and let your teardrops explode
09/11/12

Des Kelly: No Chelsea player heard Terry abuse Ferdinand… now they're blessed with the hearing of a piano tuner
02/11/12

Des Kelly: The finger of blame will only point at you, Roberto
26/10/12

Des Kelly: Now it is time for football's three monkeys to wise up
19/10/12

Des Kelly: Really, what are these people who support Armstrong on
12/10/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

Football is one of the few mass entertainment industries that does not put its paying audience first. Fans are fleeced every season as clubs owned by billionaires and oligarchs hike up ticket prices.
A new first, second and even third strip appears in the ‘megastore’ every season. Kick-off times are designed to suit TV schedulers, or set for the convenience of viewers in the growing markets of the Far East.

The Football Supporters’ Federation told me the number of away supporters attending matches in this country is falling because of unrealistic ticket prices and punishing travel costs.

But despite that backdrop of economic hardship, Platini thinks it is the right time to launch another pan-European flight exodus. I’m not sure how this sits with UEFA’s green initiatives. During this summer’s European Championship I was actually sent a press release for UEFA’s ‘eco-friendly fan camp’.

It said: ‘In the middle of a big city we will show how easy it is to take care of the environment — you will find eco-tips on how each of us can have a positive impact for the benefit of the environment.’

I didn’t quite make it to UEFA’s ‘Eco fan camp’, but one tip I might suggest is not to ask armies of football supporters to zig-zig across Europe on a jetplane for no discernible reason other than greed and political brokering.

But then I remembered Platini was a key backer in Qatar’s 2022 World Cup bid.

If he can melt the ice caps with all those Euro flights, the Middle East might be quite habitable by the time the tournament comes around.

We could all just stay at home, of course.

Sinking without trace

British Swimming has finally issued its overdue report into the 25million failures at the London Olympics pool. I think Rebecca Adlington summed up the conclusions rather well.

‘It’s an absolute mess,’ she said. ‘It told us nothing we didn’t already know. I feel insulted, disheartened and saddened by the way they have ignored us, the swimmers, in all of this.’

Highlights included the fact that British Swimming had delivered a lot of fifth-place finishes, as if that was going to justify massive public funding.

Let down: Rebecca Adlington has spoken out about her disappointment with British Swimming

Let down: Rebecca Adlington has spoken out about her disappointment with British Swimming

The panel’s chairman, Craig Hunter, said: ‘Systems and processes in place did not function as well as they should, particularly over the final period of the quadrennial cycle.’

What that gobbledegook actually means is ‘they completely cocked it up in Olympic year’.

Having a performance director that lived in Australia didn’t help. But the year ahead is shaping up as another shambles, since the nation’s swimmers are currently unable to plan their training programmes because they have not been told when the world championship trials will be.

Meanwhile, top 200 metres swimmer Ellen Gandy, a poster girl for the 2012 Games, has decided she has more chance of success with Australia at the next Olympics.

About time too…

Queens Park Rangers have cancelled their
Christmas party. Asked why this had happened, a club spokesman
announced: ‘Have you seen the league table’

And in that moment there
was a sign that sanity was finally taking hold in west London.

At least performance chief Michael Scott and senior coach Dennis Pursley had the decency to resign in the wake of all this turmoil. British Swimming chief executive David Sparkes is still in place.

He said: ‘If you look at all the results, across all the disciplines, I don’t think there’s any justification for me to consider my position at this time.’

Interesting. Aside from the one silver and Adlington’s two bronzes in the pool, it seems Sparkes believes a bronze medal in diving, a single match won between both the men and women water polo teams, a fifth by the synchronised swimmers, and Paralympic successes are enough for him to cling on. So well done the Paralympic team. You saved British Swimming’s chief executive.

Adlington, the most successful British swimmer of the modern era, said of the current state of the sport: ‘It’s stupid . . . it’s a mess . . . people needed guidance.’

In doing so, the 23-year-old spoke more sense in an angry plea for her sport than I’ve ever heard from the defensive, self-preserving suits running around on expense accounts.

In fact, if the proud Adlington ever decides to quit competitive swimming, I’ll join any campaign to make her chief executive.

Cook's recipe for success leaves a sweet taste

Tennis, golf, cycling and athletics have all provided the nation with sporting icons this year, but surely cricket’s finest batsman deserves to take a bow, too.

England’s Alastair Cook somehow combines understated modesty with supreme assurance. He scores runs when it matters, and does it with the unhurried artistry of a true master.

At the age of 27, Cook is already shattering records. But there are no displays of ego, no celebrity magazine shoots, no tattoos, no fraternising with the enemy, no mercenary dashes to collect dollars or rupees and no doubts about his loyalty or intent. Cook is just quality and class.

Brilliant and modest: England captain Alastair Cook is breaking batting records while staying grounded

Brilliant and modest: England captain Alastair Cook is breaking batting records while staying grounded

It’s open season if you fancy threatening the ref

It's
official. From now, it is perfectly possible to justify violent and
threatening behaviour against a referee. You just have to claim that you
thought you heard them say something nasty.

John
Mikel Obi was handed a fine of around five days’ wages and told he was
not allowed to play football for three matches in response to the crime
of launching himself into the officials’ dressing room in a fury.
Reports allege that he shouted at referee Mark Clattenburg that he would
‘break his legs’.

Ox is a stand-up guy

If his football talents desert him, Alex
Oxlade-Chamberlain might care to hone his obvious gift for comic timing.

As the Arsenal player accepted the Best International Newcomer award
from the Sports Journalists’ Association at the Tower of London ceremony
this week, he opened an eloquent chat with the ever-professional Jim
Rosenthal with a fine quip.

The Gunners’ Ox said: ‘It’s an honour to
win… well, anything really.’

But the FA were able to understand
why: ‘At the time he threatened the referee, the player genuinely
believed that the referee had racially abused him. But for that factor,
the suspension would have been significantly longer.’

What
absurd tosh. Just because some player was running around with a
misplaced sense of grievance, it doesn’t give him licence to boot in
doors or issue warnings of grievous bodily harm.

This
insipid, pathetic sanction is another nail in the coffin of the
Football Association’s increasingly limp ‘Respect’ campaign. It is not
the message that the game should be sending out during a week when
amateur players in Holland beat a linesman to death.

Clattenburg
abused nobody and the FA itself said he had no case to answer. Had
Mikel been involved in an incident like this in a Sunday league match,
the punishment would have been significantly greater.

Remember,
Clattenburg missed four games — and he hadn’t done a thing. Mikel will
miss three games after being found guilty. What a joke.