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Lindsey Vonn in horror ski crash in Austria – pictures and video

American skier Vonn airlifted to hospital with leg injury after horror crash in Austria

PUBLISHED:

14:58 GMT, 5 February 2013

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UPDATED:

19:52 GMT, 5 February 2013

Lindsey Vonn was taken to a hospital by helicopter after crashing and suffering serious injuries in the super-G race at the World Ski Championships.

Vonn, a four-time overall World Cup champion, lost balance on her right leg while landing after a jump. Her ski came off immediately, and Vonn slid off course and hit a gate before coming to a halt.

The American received medical treatment on the slope for 12 minutes before being taken to the hospital.

US Ski Team medical director Kyle Wilkens said she was suffering a torn anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament in her right knee, plus a lateral tibial plateau fracture.

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Crash: American skier Lindsey Vonn was airlifted to hospital after a horror crash in the women's Super G race at the World Alpine Skiing Championships in Schladming, Austria this afternoon

Crash: American skier Lindsey Vonn was airlifted to hospital after a horror crash in the women's Super G race at the World Alpine Skiing Championships in Schladming, Austria this afternoon

Speed: Vonn lost balance on her right leg while jumping and her ski flew off straight away. She appeared to land on her right knee

Speed: Vonn lost balance on her right leg while jumping and her ski flew off straight away. She appeared to land on her right knee

Airlift: Vonn received 12 minutes of treatment on the slopes before being taken away by helicopter

Airlift: Vonn received 12 minutes of treatment on the slopes before being taken away by helicopter

Lindsey Vonn airlifted to hospital after crash

A statement on the US Ski Team’s official website confirmed: 'She will be out for the remainder of this season but is expected to return to racing for the 2013-14 Audi FIS World Cup season and the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi.'

The crash came almost exactly one year before the start of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

Recovery scene: The hospital where Vonn is being treated after being airlifted (below)

Recovery scene: The hospital where Vonn is being treated after being airlifted (below)

Airlifted to hospital

Airlifted to hospital

Vonn returned to the circuit last
month after taking an almost month-long break from racing to fully
recover from an intestinal illness that put her in a hospital for two
days in November.

It was recently reported that Vonn had hired bodyguards to handle the increased media scrutiny of her personal life after rumours she was dating golfer Tiger Woods.

VIDEO: Vonn receives treatment on the slopes

Shock: Tina Maze of Slovenia, the race leader, reacts after seeing the crash on the big screen

Shock: Tina Maze of Slovenia, the race leader, reacts after seeing the crash on the big screen

Rescue: Vonn received medical attention on the piste before being flown to hospital

Rescue: Vonn received medical attention on the piste before being flown to hospital

The helicopter carrying skier Lindsey Vonn to hospital

Poster girl: Vonn's personal life has been the subject of increasing media attention in the States

Poster girl: Vonn's personal life has been the subject of increasing media attention in the States

Pin-up girl: Vonn pictured at a Tiger Woods Foundation event in Last Vegas in April last year

Pin-up girl: Vonn pictured at a Tiger Woods Foundation event in Last Vegas in April last year

Vonn trailed Tina Maze of Slovenia, who won gold, by 0.12 seconds shortly before the crash.

Maze won the race in 1 minute, 35.39 seconds, beating Lara Gut of Switzerland by 0.38. Julia Mancuso of the United States came 0.52 behind in third.

The race, which was postponed for 3 hours because of fog, continued after another 15-minute delay.

Several racers struggled with the conditions.

'It's not a very difficult course but in some parts you couldn't see anything,' Fabienne Suter of Switzerland said.

American skier Lindsey Vonn

Win: Vonn smiles after winning the giant slalom event in Maribor, Slovenia, last week

Win: Vonn smiles after winning the giant slalom event in Maribor, Slovenia, last week

Lindsey Vonn, of the United States, celebrates at finish line after winning an alpine ski, women's World Cup giant slalom, in Maribor, Slovenia

Lindsey Vonn, of the United States, celebrates at finish line after winning an alpine ski, women's World Cup giant slalom, in Maribor, Slovenia

US PGA Championship: Kiawah Island hole-by-hole guide

US PGA Championship: Kiawah Island hole-by-hole guide

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UPDATED:

10:01 GMT, 8 August 2012

Kiawah Island hosts the US PGA Championship this week and the monster South Course is set up to provide one of the hardest challenges the pros will face.

Barring any late withdrawals, the top 100 players in the world will tee it up in South Carolina.

Here's a look at the track that will make or break them between now and Sunday night.

Tough test: The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island

1st, 396 yards, par four:
One of the narrowest fairways on the course, with a sandy waste on
the right and thick dune grass down the left. The gently undulating
green is tucked into a natural dune area.

2nd, 557 yards, par five:
Ancient live oaks line both sides of the fairway and players have to
decide how much of the salt marsh to bite off. Depending on the wind
there could be the chance to go for the elevated green, set between
sand ridges, in two.

3rd, 390 yards, par four: Shortest
par four. The tee shot is fired across the marsh, with the best
drives finding the plateau on the left. The green is framed by an old
live oak and slopes off to all sides, with the marsh long and left.

4th, 458 yards, par four: Perhaps
the toughest par four on the front nine. Playing against the wind,
players may opt to bail out to the left of this green and try to save
par with a chip.

5th, 188 yards, par three:
The course turns back from east to west for its first par three. An
hourglass-shaped green runs away diagonally from the right. A large
waste area runs from tee to green.

6th, 480 yards, par four: Three
wind-pruned live oaks frame the far side of the fairway. There is
also a waste area and small pond to the left and the green is protected
left and right by more sand.

7th, 579 yards, par five:
Wind conditions will determine the strategy, players having to decide
whether to carry a natural dune area. The second shot can be fired at a
slightly elevated green open in the front.

8th, 198 yards, par three: Becomes
narrower the further the pin is cut into an elevated green framed by
tall live oaks. Any shot missing long or right will find sand.

9th, 494 yards, par four: A
wide fairway sloping down from the right. The putting surface is open
in the front, but there are an assortment of grassy swale and deep
waste areas both left and right.

10th, 447 yards, par four:
A drive down the left-centre to the crest of the fairway will set up a
second shot to a green set down into the dunes. There is a large waste
area to the left front of the green and a deeper, steep-faced waste
area to the back.

11th, 593 yards, par five: Unreachable
in two shots for most of the field. Players must avoid several deep
waste areas right of the fairway. A good lay-up will leave a pitch to a
relatively flat, but exposed and elevated green.

12th, 412 yards, par four: The
widest fairway gives way to one of the narrowest approaches. The
green is guarded closely on the right by a canal, with dunes and thick
native grasses framing the left and rear.

13th, 497 yards, par four: Maybe
the most difficult hole on the inward nine. The players must decide
just how far down they will try to carry the canal. It continues down
the entire right side of the hole.

14th, 238 yards, par three: The
course turns back to the east and plays directly along the beach. A
tee shot missing this severely exposed and elevated green will leave a
severe uphill chip. An extremely deep and dangerous waste area is on
the left.

15th, 444 yards, par four: The
tee shot must find the fairway to set up a mid-iron to a small green
running diagonally away from the player to the right. Waste areas lie
left and back right.

16th, 581 yards, par five: The
tee shot is over a pond to reach a terraced fairway that is higher to
the right side. A long, shallow waste bunker guards the second shot to
the right, with another deeper one guarding the left side.

17th, 223 yards, par three:
The most famous hole on the course. The target over the lake appears
narrow with two deep waste areas to the left. Colin Montgomerie won it
with a double bogey in the 1991 Ryder Cup.

18th, 501 yards, par four: Still
with the ocean as a backdrop, the fairway falls to the right.
Longer players may have a huge advantage if they challenge the
right side. Elevated green is open from the right and runs to
the back left.

BBC could lose Open Championship, warns Peter Dawson

You could lose The Open! BBC warned they must move with the times or risk losing another crown jewel

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UPDATED:

00:05 GMT, 24 April 2012

The BBC is in danger of losing another of its sporting ‘crown jewels’ after organisers of The Open golf championship fired a warning shot on Monday.

Less than a fortnight after the Grand National was screened by the Beeb for the last time, the ruling Royal and Ancient made clear The Open will follow suit unless the corporation raises its performance — and its offer.

The Open is now the only men’s golf event the BBC broadcasts for all four days. R&A chief executive Peter Dawson said: ‘It is a concern. They have to stay in practice and keep up with the advances in technology in broadcasting.

Warned: The BBC were told to up their game at a Royal & Ancient press conference on Monday

Warned: The BBC were told to up their game at a Royal & Ancient press conference on Monday

'They know we have our eye on them, for sure. They are also well aware they need to come off the financial plateau they are on with regard to The Open at the moment.'

Dawson’s comments will alert not only Sky but possibly ESPN as well. The R&A already have a contract with the American broadcaster to show The Open in the States.

The Open is on the B list of crown jewels, which means a highlights package has to be made available to be shown on terrestrial television. But it is the live rights that are the glittering prize and Sky would pay a fortune if given the chance.

As for keeping up with advances in technology, Dawson will have noted the Masters was shown in 3D on Sky this month.

Strengthening the R&A’s case is the fact the professional game is on a high in the UK, with the world’s top three players all hailing from these shores. Darren Clarke’s Open victory last year was watched by 6.1 million viewers, the highest figure for eight years.

The BBC once covered 24 days of live men's golf a year but that number has now dwindled to just six, comprising The Open and the weekend’s play from the Masters.

Magic moment: Darren Clarke's win at The Open last year was enjoyed by millions watching the BBC

Magic moment: Darren Clarke's win at The Open last year was enjoyed by millions watching the BBC

Dawson also had a dig at the stunt of having former England cricket captain Michael Vaughan conducting interviews at Augusta. 'It did seem a rather unusual choice,' he said.

The BBC’s contract with the R&A
runs until 2016, and they have two time-honoured trump cards: they can
offer the widest possible audience and they have shown The Open for more
than half a century.

But Dawson’s comments send a clear signal they would be making a grave mistake to overplay these.

'Who knows who else will be in the market by then' asked Dawson. 'Maybe ESPN for all I know.'

Jim
McArthur, chairman of the championship committee, said: 'The Open has
been shown on the BBC for 50 years and we’d like that to continue.

'But
we recognise they show a number of sports and their coverage of golf
has dropped dramatically, so we’re keeping an eye on it.'

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Tradition: Peter Alliss has been commentating on the BBC for decades

Tradition: Peter Alliss has been commentating on the BBC for decades

The BBC argue they cannot afford live golf any more, so there does not seem much chance of them coming off the financial ‘plateau’ Dawson is talking about.

Only last month it was announced that Sky will now be the only place to watch live play from the European Tour's flagship event, the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth, and the Scottish Open in July.

At the Masters, the BBC’s voice of golf Peter Alliss said: 'It’s sad, it’s the end of an era. The racing has gone and Formula One has gone. It’s very hard to compete with someone with seemingly unlimited funds. The BBC can’t compete.'

A BBC spokesperson said: 'The BBC have only recently signed a new deal for The Open golf until 2016. We are completely committed to this event and are looking forward to bringing the Championship to audiences for the next five years.’

Dawson was speaking at the R&A’s traditional press gathering, where his candour on a number of subjects made for a refreshing contrast to the desperate flummoxing of Masters chairman Billy Payne at Augusta.

The alarming increase in the use of
the belly putter and the on-course antics of Tiger Woods were two more
subjects that vexed him.

Having a go: Dawson hit out at Tiger Woods

Having a go: Dawson hit out at Tiger Woods

On
the former, he admitted the R&A had watched with dismay as many
younger players had taken up the belly putter and are looking again to
see if the wretched thing meets all the rules regarding method of
stroke.

That’s the good
news. The bad news is that, even if it doesn’t, it will be 2016 and the
next rules update before action is taken.

As for Woods, Dawson didn’t mince his words when asked about the player’s swearing and spitting.

'There’s no denying it is an unedifying spectacle,' he said.

The
shrill sound of mobile phones will be heard again this year after a
five-year ban following the 2006 edition at Hoylake, when their
continual use drove a number of players to distraction.

This
year’s Open will be staged the week before the Olympics, and the
R&A have been pleasantly surprised it appears to be having no
impact.

Dawson expects up to 200,000 people to make it to Lytham, always one of the most popular venues on the rota.

'We’re in good shape and feel fortunate to be able to say that.'

What a shame the same can’t be said about golf on the BBC.

Memorable: Millions have watched classic sporting moments in years gone by

Memorable: Millions have watched classic sporting moments in years gone by