Tag Archives: pentathlon

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Ryder Cup 2012: America"s snub to European captains at exhibition match – Charles Sale

America's snub to Euro skippers at exhibition match

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UPDATED:

21:45 GMT, 25 September 2012

The Americans have delivered the first snub to the Europeans in the Ryder Cup build-up by staging a former captains exhibition match in Chicago without inviting any of the visitors to take part.

The Medinah scramble format over 10 holes on Tuesday featured eight ex-American captains – including Tom Lehman, Hal Sutton, Ben Crenshaw and Lee Trevino – as well as celebrities Justin Timberlake and Michael Phelps.

Euro snub: Bill Murray and Justin Timberlake were among the celebrities taking part

Euro snub: Bill Murray and Justin Timberlake were among the celebrities taking part

But there was no European involvement despite the presence on the course of four captains – Colin Montgomerie, Nick Faldo, Sam Torrance and Bernard Gallacher – who are all doing media work and could have made themselves available to play if asked.

The US PGA say they did not know why the exhibition had been set up as a purely American affair, while the diplomatic European stance was that the Americans would have wanted to count in advance on the participants all being in Medinah at the start of Ryder Cup week.

Jose's in control

European captain Jose Maria Olazabal seemed more in control of his emotions in his first solo Ryder Cup press conference on Tuesday than he was as vice-captain to Nick Faldo in the final media session after the USA won in Kentucky four years ago.

Emotions in check: The European captain cut a calmer figure on Tuesday

Emotions in check: The European captain cut a calmer figure on Tuesday

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VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

After Faldo was very reasonably asked what it was like to be a Major winner but a losing Ryder Cup skipper, Olazabal interrupted and aggressively eyeballed the inquisitor.

The Spaniard said: 'I thought the question was not intended in a very nice way. It's my character to jump if I feel something is not right. Nick got hammered because of his picks.'

Significantly, Olazabal has not consulted Faldo over the captaincy. 'We had a little chat but not about the Ryder Cup,' he said.

Sam requires proof

Sam Torrance may be a winning European captain, but that status plus showing his driving licence as proof of identity was not enough to gain him entry to the Medinah media centre.

Pundit Torrance, who fell out with the BBC after he wasn't included in their Masters team for Augusta two years ago, is here working for Sky Sports News.

Stand in line

Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney, who made crass comments about London not being ready for the Olympics, should have been concentrating on big sports event preparations closer to home.

It has taken arrivals at Chicago's O'Hare airport more than three hours to get through immigration controls, with 5 Live pundit Andrew Coltart caught in a three and-a-half hour queue.

No WAGS for big three

The WAGS are more in evidence at the Ryder Cup than at any other sporting event with their role at the official functions and cheerleading on the course.

Yet three of the central figures – Rory McIlroy, Tiger Woods and Jose Maria Olazabal – do not have partners with them.

All smiles: Woods has kept his girlfriends private since his well-publicised divorce

All smiles: Woods has kept his girlfriends private since his well-publicised divorce

Woods has kept girlfriends private since his divorce, McIroy's partner Caroline Wozniacki is playing in a tennis tournament in Tokyo and Olazabal is a bachelor.

However the European captain has his mother Julia and sister Sabina as potential escorts for the gala dinner and opening ceremony. Olly's father Gaspar is missing because of his dislike of flying.

Among former captain Nick Faldo's numerous insensitive comments at the last Ryder Cup in America was that Sergio Garcia and Graeme McDowell were looking for girlfriends in Louisville. Garcia is again unaccompanied but McDowell has his American girlfriend, interior designer Kristin Stape, with him.

Europe 1 USA 0

When it came to the sartorial Ryder Cup competition on Tuesday with the official pictures, the Europeans won by a record margin. Players wear their own choice of shoes, but at least the Europeans' were all white, while the Americans turned up in an untidy collection of different coloured footwear.

Tiger Woods' jumper looked too small, while captain Davis Love's jersey resembled a sack and Woods said his oversized trousers had to be taken in at the waist.

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London 2012 Olympics modern pentathlon: Samantha Murray wins silver

Murray helps Team GB end Olympics smiling with modern pentathlon silver

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UPDATED:

17:18 GMT, 12 August 2012

Samantha Murray delighted Team GB fans by claiming a silver medal in the women's modern pentathlon as the London Olympics drew to a close.

Murray was an outside shot to win in the discipline which involves fencing, swimming, showjumping and shooting and running in a combined event.

She was in fourth place before the combined event finale, but overhauled Yane Marques and Amelie Caze to finish second behind Laura Asadauskaite.

More to follow.

Delight: Samantha Murray ended up winning silver

Delight: Samantha Murray ended up winning silver

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London 2012 Olympics: David Svoboda wins men"s modern pentathlon

Svoboda banishes Beijing heartache by winning men's modern pentathlon

PUBLISHED:

18:59 GMT, 11 August 2012

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UPDATED:

19:23 GMT, 11 August 2012

Czech David Svoboda won gold in the
men's modern pentathlon as British duo Nick Woodbridge and Sam Weale
could only finish 10th and 13th.

The home pair went into the final
event, the combined run and shoot, in the top 10 but they could not make
up ground on the leaders in front of a huge crowd at Greenwich Park.

Olympic champion: David Svoboda savours triumph

Olympic champion: David Svoboda savours triumph

Svoboda, who saw his Beijing hopes dashed when his horse fell on him during the show jumping, went into the combined event in first place and overhauled China's Cao Zhongrong on the final one-kilometre run while Adam Marosi of Hungary won bronze.

Woodbridge's 10th place matched the finish of Weale in Beijing, which was the best by a British man for 16 years.

In the first event of the day, the fencing, Woodbridge and Weale both finished with 17 wins from 35 fencing bouts at the Copper Box, which was a little below par, for Woodbridge in particular.

The world number nine was on top form to start with, winning his first five bouts and at one stage topping the leaderboard, but he tailed off rather and had to settle for joint 13th.

The format in pentathlon involves each of the 36 men fighting each other in one-minute bouts, with one hit enough for victory.

Below par: Nick Woodbridge (left)

Below par: Nick Woodbridge (left)

Weale's morning progressed in the opposite way to his team-mate's, with the 30-year-old losing seven of his first nine bouts but recovering to finish in the top half of the field.

Next up was the 200 metres freestyle swim at the Aquatics Centre, which is one of Woodbridge's best events, and his time of one minute 57.32 seconds was the second fastest of the day and enough to move him up to eighth place.

Weale swum his fastest time of the year, 2min 03.40sec, while the event was won by Egypt's Amro El Geziry, who broke his own Olympic record with a time of 1min 55.70sec.

Svoboda was the leading athlete in the fencing, the Czech equalling the Olympic record with 26 victories for 1024 points.

The show jumping is often a game changer, with the athletes drawing their horses at random and having only 20 minutes to acquaint themselves with their animal.

Woodbridge and Weale both performed well to keep themselves in contention, knocking down one fence apiece, although Woodbridge did rack up quite a few time faults.

His score of 1156 was enough to lift him into seventh place, while Weale was ninth after accumulating 1176 points, the seventh best ride of the day.

Hungarian duo Robert Kasza and Marosi both managed clear rounds, as did Italy's European champion Riccardo De Luca.

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London 2012 Olympics: The Brits who struck gold first at the Games

Medals of honour, the Britons who struck gold first at the Olympics

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UPDATED:

01:56 GMT, 28 July 2012

Superb: David Hemery wins gold in Mexico City

Superb: David Hemery wins gold in Mexico City

1948 – DAY 12
Jack Wilson and Ran
Laurie, coxless pair Actor Hugh Laurie's father Ran partnered Wilson to
lift the post-War gloom at Henley.

1952 – FINAL DAY: Harry Llewellyn and Foxhunter, Equestrian Delivered Britain's only gold at Helsinki.

1956 – DAY 8
Gillian Sheen, Fencing First of six Melbourne golds.

1960 – DAY 3
Anita Lonsbrough, 200m breaststroke Set a world record of 2min 49.5sec.

1964 – DAY 5
Mary Rand, long jump On wet runway and into a headwind, she broke world record, leaping 6.76m.

1968 – DAY 4
David Hemery, 400m hurdles Superb run, went on to win first Superstars TV series in 1973.

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LIVE RESULTS |
EVENT SCHEDULE |
MEDALS TABLE

1972 – DAY 7
Richard Meade, three-day eventing. Also won a team gold in 1968 and 1972.

1976 – DAY 6
Men's Modern pentathlon Adrian Parker, Danny Nightingale and Jim Fox were Britain's victorious trio.

1980 – Day 4
Duncan Goodhew, 100m breaststroke Goodhew blew away his rivals in Moscow.

1984 – DAY 9
Martin Cross, Richard Budgett, Andy Holmes, Steve Redgrave, Adrian Ellison (c), coxed four The first of Sir Steve's five golds at successive Olympics.

Adrian Moorhouse

Power house: Adrian Moorhouse

1988 – Day 3
Adrian Moorhouse, 100m breaststroke Started slowly, but powered back to win by just one-hundredth of a second.

1992 – Day 2
Chris Boardman, individual pursuit Inspired a generation (including Wiggo) by winning Britain's first gold in cycling for 72 years.

1996 – Day 9
Steve Redgrave and Matthew Pinsent, coxless pair Stepped up to win Britain's only gold of the Games. Gold No 4 for Redgrave.

2000 – Day 4
Jason Queally, 1km time trial (cycling) Smashed his PB by more than a second.

2004 – Day 6
Yngling class sailing Shirley Robertson, Sarah Webb and Sarah Ayton won gold one race early.

2008 – Day 3
Nicole Cooke, road race 126km race took place in appalling weather but Cooke hit the gas to win a sprint finish.

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40 years on, Mary Peters says Munich is still weeping

40 years on, Mary Peters says Munich is still weeping… how terrorism scarred the Olympics

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UPDATED:

01:08 GMT, 13 May 2012

Golden moment: Mary Peters wins the gold medal in the women's pentathlon at the Olympic Games in Munich in 1972

Golden moment: Mary Peters wins the gold medal in the women's pentathlon at the Olympic Games in Munich in 1972

To those strolling through the neatly kept Olympic Park here on Wednesday, the two silver-haired women sharing a hug looked like old friends bumping unexpectedly into one another.

But this was not a random meeting. Dame Mary Peters had returned to this city where she had shaped and defined her life to commemorate the 40th anniversary of her Olympic triumph in the pentathlon.

And the woman embracing Peters was
her closest rival Heide Rosendahl, a West German athlete, who won two
gold medals in Munich, but who was beaten to the pentathlon title by the
blink of an eye.

The years have been kind to both.

Rosendahl is a 65-year-old grandmother, who married her American
sweetheart John Ecker and has two sons, David, 36, and Danny, 34, a
pole-vaulter who has been to three Olympic Games.

Peters is a national treasure, at 72 the Lord Lieutenant of Belfast.

'Sharing this anniversary with someone you competed against feels so
emotional,' said Peters, holding the hand of her old athletic foe.

'She is as stylish as I remember.'

The warmth of their reunion melts the decades away.

Rosendahl had begun these Games by winning the long jump gold and ended it with a second from the 100metres relay as 80,000 West Germans screamed her name.

Yet, over a pasta lunch in the Olympic Park, she felt compelled to confess to Peters: 'I could jump pretty good and run pretty good, but at heart I was always a pentathlon girl; this was my favourite event.'

Peters discernibly blushed.

Golden memories: Mary Peters shares the podium with Heide Rosendahl (left) and East German bronze medallist Burglinde Pollak

Golden memories: Mary Peters shares the podium with Heide Rosendahl (left) and East German bronze medallist Burglinde Pollak

To be in their company was to eavesdrop on history. For the 1972 Olympics will be forever washed in the blood of 11 Israeli athletes and coaches, kidnapped then killed by terrorists calling themselves Black September.

Rosendahl recalled how she had been in the women's highrise accommodation in the Olympic Village as armed German security personnel flooded the area.

Peters, meanwhile, had come back from a shopping excursion for a team-mate's wedding present, 24 hours after she won gold, to a scene of chaos, confusion and ignorance.

This was an age when news travelled slowly, and could be massaged, as Peters discovered.

'I saw a Bulgarian girl in a lift and asked, “What's happening” She replied: “Kidnap, kidnap but everything OK''.'

It was not, of course.

Once the truth emerged of the kidnap, then botched rescue attempt at a nearby airport, the world had been irrevocably changed.

If the Olympic Games could be murderously hijacked for political reasons, then no event, no location, could ever be considered sacrosanct again.

Horror at the Games: Black September terrorists brought bloodshed to the Israeli team quarters

Horror at the Games: Black September terrorists brought bloodshed to the Israeli team quarters

Peters said: 'To us, the Olympics was a celebration bringing together the youth of the world in peace and harmony. At that time, there was no reason for it to be made any more secure than any other event.'

Even as the two women laughed as they pondered old photographs of themselves, surveyed precious memorabilia from their days in Munich four decades past, and watched footage from their duel involving the 100m hurdles, shot putt, high jump, long jump and 200m, there was an undeniable sense of shared heartache.

Rosendahl revealed that as confirmation of the terrorist attack belatedly filtered through to athletes in the Olympic Village, she had gone to the quarters of the Israeli women.

'We'd been in a training camp with them, and I supposed they would be all crying in one another's arms,' she said.

Horror at the Games: Armed German security personnel prepare to tackle the Black September terrorists

Horror at the Games: Armed German
security personnel prepare to tackle the Black September terrorists

'Instead, they were ready to go on the street and fight. They were soldiers, or acted like them. That gave me the feeling that the Games had to go on, that I had to go on.'

Peters agreed.

'The Games had to go on after a day of mourning,' she said.

'But I'm still upset that I did not know there was a memorial service here for the Israelis who died.'

Outside the Olympic Stadium, Peters wiped a tear as she visited the memorial erected to the dead men.

'When we were walking alone, Heide told me that the West German and
East German athletes from 1972 will come together at a track meet here
in June, but there is no formal recognition of the 40th anniversary of
these Games,' said Peters.

'I think that Munich still weeps.'

To Peters, the Olympics was ironically a stage to brighten the news agenda in Northern Ireland, if only for a few days.

In 1972, almost 500 people were killed in Sectarian violence in the
Province and she said: 'I wanted to make the people at home happy in
some small way.'

And how she accomplished that ambition.

On
the first day, she equalled the world record in the 100m hurdles,
recorded her personal best for the shot in pentathlon and soared 5ft 11
in the high jump after everyone else was eliminated.

'When
I see film of myself clicking my heels in the air and blowing kisses, I
am astonished,' she laughed. 'It's so out of character.'

Golden greats: Mary Peters, a 33-year-old secretary with the build of a shotputter, is congratulated by stylish German pentahlon rival Heide Rosendahl, 25, in 1972

Golden greats: Mary Peters, a 33-year-old secretary with the build of a shotputter, is congratulated by
stylish German pentahlon rival Heide
Rosendahl, 25, in 1972

Reunited in happiness... and tears: Peters and Rosendahl shared their memories of Mary's triumph in the pentathlon... and the tragedy of the 11 Israelis killed by terrorists at the Munich Games

Reunited in happiness… and tears: Peters and Rosendahl shared their
memories of Mary's triumph in the pentathlon… and the tragedy
of the 11 Israelis killed by terrorists at the Munich Games

From her bag last week she produced her competition bib numbered 111 and presented to her by British team official Arthur Gold.

'Now, that had to be an omen,' chuckled Peters.

But the second day played to the strengths of Rosendahl.

However, the German had a bad break, as she explained.

'I jumped over seven metres and it
was a clean jump, but ruled a foul,' she said. 'It could have given me
the points to win gold.'

But for a reference point she chose the chequered football history between the Germans and England, a metaphor here for Team GB.

'Sometimes a goal is given, sometimes it isn't, so I have no complaints,' said Rosendahl.

'I always considered Mary the favourite. She's British and a fighter, as she showed.'

The fate of the Olympic gold hung on the 200m, tailor-made for Rosendahl.

'It was my worst event,' said Peters.

After
what seemed an eternity as times were processed into points without a
computer, Rosendahl walked with her arms outstretched towards Peters.

'Only then did I know I'd won Olympic gold,' said Peters, clutching
Rosendahl's hand again, as a TV production team from BBC Northern
Ireland filmed for an upcoming documentary.

'It was such a magical moment. I knew I wouldn't have another chance, you were so much younger.'

Rosendahl replied: 'No, at 26, I was already a grandmother of the track!'

Peters was awarded victory by 0.1sec with an Olympic and world record score of 4,801pts, 10 more than Rosendahl.

At two previous Olympics, in Tokyo, where Peters was fourth, and Mexico, where she finished ninth, she was deemed too congenial to be a champion.

'I'd learned to realise I was too friendly to everybody,' she agreed. 'That's the way I am; I can't change my personality. Yet, by the time we got to Munich I was focused on winning. No way was I going home without a gold medal.'

On your marks: Mary Peters sprints away from the blocks in the 200 metres

On your marks: Mary Peters sprints away from the blocks in the 200 metres

But the drama for both women was far from over.

Sinisterly, they both attracted death threats.

Peters was warned at her celebration reception in the Olympic Tower that an Irishman had called the BBC in Munich to warn she would be killed if she returned to Belfast.

Her late father, Arthur, who surprised her by travelling to the Games from his new home in Australia, asked her to go back with him.

'My home was in Belfast, my life was there and the people I loved were there,' she insisted.

When she touched down in Belfast, at an airport surrounded by barbed wire, she was overwhelmed by the outpouring of affection in such troubled times.

'There was a gold Rolls-Royce for me and a band playing, “Congratulations”. People were hanging over the barbed wire with flowers, it was wonderful. I never felt worried about going home as I always felt comfortable in any part of Belfast. But I wasn't allowed back in my flat for three months.

Flying high: Peters attacks the long jump in 1972

Golden girl: Mary Peters

Flying high: Peters attacks the long jump in 1972 (left) and showing off the gold medal she won in Munich

What Peters did not know until last
week was that Rosendahl had spent the final days of the Games living at a
secret address under armed guard after German authorities received a
threat to her life.

'My boyfriend John, who became my husband, joined me in a hotel,' she explained.

Her practice sessions for sprint relay were held behind closed doors.

'Someone said they wanted to kill me, it was difficult,' said Rosendahl.

So
much shared history brought these two delightful women together here
last week where they both scaled the peaks of their ability, but can
never forget how these Games were coloured in blood, as well as gold,
silver and bronze.

Peters
asked Rosendahl to honour her with her presence at her 40th anniversary
dinner in September at the Grand Opera House in Belfast, where her
legacy is most visible in the shape of the Mary Peters Track and the
Mary Peters Trust.

'I
can't thank Heide enough for coming,' said Peters. 'We both experienced
trauma here, but we are both still rounded people and didn't let it ruin
our lives.'

As she studied the Olympic Stadium a final time, she reflected: 'If I had not been Olympic champion what would I be doing now'

Dame Mary Peters may never have featured in the rich-list, but if fortunes were measured by memories acquired and friendships made, her wealth is incalculable.

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British team grab bronze at Modern Pentathlon World Championships

British team grab bronze at Modern Pentathlon World Championships

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UPDATED:

19:04 GMT, 7 May 2012


Medal winner: Great Britain's Katy Burke

Medal winner: Great Britain's Katy Burke

The Great Britain women's team relay opened their campaign at the 2012 Modern Pentathlon World Championships with bronze in Rome.

The trio of Katy Burke, Kate French and Katy Livingston came home in third place behind Germany and China on the opening day in Italy.

With 12 teams contesting the relay, the British trio were eighth after the fencing and climbed to fifth after the swimming.

With the third best riding performance of the day, the British trio went into the run/shoot in fourth place behind leaders Korea, with reigning champions Hungary second and Germany third.

Burke handed over to French in third place after two shoots and runs, and Britain were still third when French passed on to Livingston.

Livingston dropped out of the top three in her opening shoot, but produced a strong final run to secure Britain's first medal of the championships.

China climbed from seventh to lead the field at the end of the final round of shooting, but Olympic champion Lena Schoneborn overhauled 2009 individual world champion Qian Chen on the final run to ensure Germany took gold.

The Britons are next in action on Thursday when Heather Fell, Samantha Murray, Freyja Prentice and Mhairi Spence contest the women's semi-finals aiming for places in the final on Saturday.

The championships are the final qualification event to reach the individual events at the 2012 Games. British athletes must finish in the top three in the individual competitions to achieve the qualifying standard. Thereafter the only other opportunity to qualify for the Games is through the Olympic ranking list.

So far Britain's Jamie Cooke and Freyja Prentice have achieved the qualifying standard, but with a maximum of two places per gender per nation available, neither are guaranteed places on the team.

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Tom Daley wins gold in Tijuana

Delight for Daley as silver streak has golden lining with win in Tijuana

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UPDATED:

21:55 GMT, 22 April 2012

Tom Daley has broken a run of three silver medals in the FINA World Diving Series with a gold in the final round in Tijuana, Mexico.

He won with his best score of the series (562.85) and scored a perfect 10 on his final dive, confirming his status as the main Olympic opposition to the absent Chinese Qiu Bo.

Daley also won bronze in the synchro event with Peter Waterfield. GB's men's three-metre synchro pair Chris Mears and Nick Robinson-Baker won silver and Tonia Couch and Sarah Barrow got bronze on the women's platform.

Gold standard: Daley took the top prize in Mexico

Gold standard: Daley took the top prize in Mexico

Bronze age: Murray came third in Russia

Bronze age: Murray came third in Russia

Murray's bronze

Samantha Murray, 22, a student at the
University of Bath, improved her prospects of Olympic selection when she
won her first medal in modern pentathlon's World Cup series in Russia.

Roaring Rooney

British athletes Martyn Rooney and Lawrence Okoye are today on top of the world having met the criteria for Olympic selection. In his first 400m race of the season, Rooney ran 44.92sec – his fastest time for two years.

While Okoye threw the discus 66.77m – the furthest throw of the year – at the same meet in Walnut, California.

The pair must finish in the first two places at the Aviva Olympic Trials now to earn their places in London.

Sent to Coventry

Ten pounds is how much a ticket costs for the last Olympic football qualifier between Senegal and Oman in Coventry, with the draw for the tournament on Tuesday.

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LONDON 2012 OLYMPICS: Four Team GB Modern Pentathletes into World Cup final

Fantastic four: Fell, Livingston, Murray and Burke all make modern pentathlon final in Russia

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UPDATED:

23:23 GMT, 19 April 2012

Great Britain will have a full complement of four modern pentathletes in Saturday’s final at the World Cup in Russia.

Fab four: Heather Fell, Katy Livingston, Samantha Murray and Katy Burke will all compete at the Modern Pentathlon World Cup in Russia

Fab four: Heather Fell, Katy Livingston, Samantha Murray and Katy Burke will all compete at the Modern Pentathlon World Cup in Russia

Olympic silver medallist Heather Fell, Katy Livingston, Samantha Murray and Katy Burke all progressed safely through Thursday’s semi-finals as they look to boost their hopes of making the team for the London Games.

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London 2012 Olympics: Jessica Ennis reveals secret tactic: Be rude to family and friends

Ennis reveals secret tactic to achieve Olympic gold: Be rude to family and friends!

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UPDATED:

10:47 GMT, 19 April 2012

Jessica Ennis has revealed her focus on Olympic glory in London will necessitate being 'rude' to friends and family.

Ennis is desperate to win gold on home soil this summer, especially after losing her world heptathlon and pentathlon titles in the space of seven months.

The 26-year-old had enjoyed a long unbeaten run until finishing second behind Russia's Tatyana Chernova in Daegu last year, while even a personal best was not enough to retain her World Indoor title in Istanbul, where Olympic champion Nataliya Dobrynska returned to form with a new world record.

Final hurdle: Ennis is on the countdown to London... be wary if you are a family member or friend

Final hurdle: Ennis is on the countdown to London… be wary if you are a family member or friend

And that means Ennis will be more focused than ever when she competes in London in August, where her parents, sister and fiance Andy will be in attendance.

'If I step out into the stadium I don't look for my family and friends and if I do catch their eye I completely ignore them,' said Ennis, speaking at the launch of Jaguar's Academy for Sport, of which she is an ambassador.

'I want to stay so focused so I blank them out and probably come across as quite rude.

'It can be a distraction, you just have to blank them out. You don't want any other thoughts creeping into your head, anything that just slightly distracts you is a big negative.

All smiles: Ennis is looking forward to heading abroad in a holding camp ahead of the Games

All smiles: Ennis is looking forward to heading abroad in a holding camp ahead of the Games

'I don't even know where they are sat most of the time, but they'll just catch your eye and I'm like, 'Damn, I don't want to see them!' They know the deal, that I'm trying to compete and it's not about waving to the crowd and smiling to my family so they understand.'

Ennis is relishing the pressure of competing in a home Games as Britain's athletes look to meet their target of eight medals, one of them gold.

Neil Wilson

But she admits it is a good idea for the team to escape the hype at home by spending time in a holding camp in Montegordo in Portugal immediately before the Games.

'I think the holding camp is a great idea,' the Sheffield athlete added. 'It's a great set up in Montegordo. It will be great just to get away out of the country, you are not switching your TV and seeing everything and you escape from it a bit.

'That will be the only time I get away before the Games.'

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Mo Farah could miss World Indoor Championships

Farah could miss World Indoor Championships after finishing second in Birmingham

Mo Farah could be a notable absentee when Great Britain name their team for the upcoming World Indoor Championships in Istanbul next month.

The world 5,000 metres champion revealed after running in Birmingham on Saturday he and his coach Alberto Salazar had yet to decide whether he would race over 3,000m in Turkey.

The United States-based athlete endured an off day at the second city's NIA as he was beaten into second by Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge over two miles, despite setting a new European record for the rarely-run distance.

Struggle: Mo Farah finished second in the two mile race in Birmingham

Struggle: Mo Farah finished second in the two mile race in Birmingham

The 28-year-old said: 'I'll have a chat with my coach. We'll just see how it goes. I don't know what he will say.'

The two-time European indoor champion, who was clearly working hard to just finish second in Birmingham, revealed the decision over his participation would depend on how he recovered from the race.

'There was nothing guaranteed (before Saturday's race). We (Salazar and Farah) said we could go, it just depended how the race went here (in Birmingham), how I felt,' Farah added.

Jessica Ennis will be on the team as she defends her pentathlon title against the Tatyana Chernova, the Russian who took her world heptathlon title in Daegu last summer.

Decisions, decisions; Farah (left) could skip the World Indoor Championships

Decisions, decisions; Farah (left) could skip the World Indoor Championships

The Sheffield athlete was in scintillating form in Birmingham, running a world leading time in the 60m hurdles, but ruled out doubling up in Istanbul.

The pentathlon and the heats for the 60m hurdles both take place on the opening day of competition on March 9.

On competing in both events, Ennis said: 'No way, it's not something I've really thought about. It's great to be that competitive in the hurdles, but I need to focus on the pentathlon.'

In fine form: Jessica Ennis showed her Olympic preparations are on track

In fine form: Jessica Ennis showed her Olympic preparations are on track

Pole vaulter Holly Bleasdale joins Ennis as a genuine medal contender after an outstanding start to the season, while Anguilla-born long-jumper Shara Proctor will be named in the team on the back of breaking the British indoor record in Birmingham.

The world indoors, which takes place from March 9 to 11, will see many of Britain's athletes take on their rivals for Olympic gold in London this summer.

UK Athletics head coach Charles van Commenee will name his team at midday on Tuesday.