Tag Archives: peacock

Zak Hardaker out of World Club Challenge with injury

Leeds face challenge after injury rules full back Hardaker out of Melbourne clash

By
Ian Laybourn, Press Association

PUBLISHED:

21:08 GMT, 18 February 2013

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UPDATED:

21:08 GMT, 18 February 2013

Leeds will have to find a new full-back for Friday's World Club Challenge against Melbourne Storm after ruling out England international Zak Hardaker with a broken thumb.

The 21-year-old is expected to be sidelined for a month with the injury he sustained in last Friday's 42-14 Super League win over Salford.

Rhinos coach Brian McDermott also confirmed at a press conference at Headingley that prop Ryan Bailey will be out after undergoing minor knee surgery, but that second rower Brett Delaney and prop Jamie Peacock will return after missing the Salford game through injury.

Crocked: Hardaker (centre) has a broken thumb

Crocked: Hardaker (centre) has a broken thumb

Centre Kallum Watkins, who switched to full-back against the City Reds, and Australian recruit Joe Vickery are among the list of possible alternatives for the full-back role.

Vickery, 23, who was born in Exeter but raised in Australia, earned a 12-month contract with the champions after impressing in pre-season trials but damaged ankle ligaments on his debut in the opening game.

'We've a few options,' McDermott said. 'Kallum Watkins is one of them and Joe Vickery is in the mix after making a remarkable recovery.'

BBC clarify decision to hand Team GB and Paralympics GB Team of Year award

BBC clarify decision to hand Team GB and Paralympics GB Team of Year award

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UPDATED:

16:17 GMT, 17 December 2012

The BBC have moved to clarify the thinking behind naming Britain's Olympians and Paralympians collectively as their Team of the Year at the BBC Sports Personality of the Year awards on Sunday night.

Last week, explaining the nomination process, the BBC had stated: 'For the avoidance of doubt this criteria excludes Team GB/Paralympics GB but includes the likes of British Cycling, Rowing Coxless Four and the European Ryder Cup team.'

So when Team GB and Paralympics GB were named as Team of the Year there was understandably confusion at the ExCel Arena and in the living rooms of people watching at home on Sunday night.

Team effort: Victoria Pendleton and Jonnie Peacock picked up the award

Team effort: Victoria Pendleton and Jonnie Peacock picked up the award

Accumulator bets were ruined and many felt that the triumphant European Ryder Cup team were more worthy of the award, but the BBC decided that the success of Britain’s athletes at London 2012 was worth breaking their own rules for.

'The panel had the right to amend the criteria of the awards where there was unanimous agreement to do so,’ a statement read on Monday.

'The panel agreed that it was impossible to split the achievements of Team GB and Paralympics GB into individual disciplines in such a year of triumph and history making, and hence the criteria for the Team of the year was amended accordingly.’

Miracle of Medinah: The Europeans were heavily backed to win team prize

Miracle of Medinah: The Europeans were heavily backed to win team prize

Rugby league: Kevin Sinfield honoured to be England captain for Wales clash

Sinfield delighted to be skipper at last for Tri-Nations clash with Wales

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UPDATED:

23:02 GMT, 26 October 2012

Twenty-two years after first wearing a captain’s armband with Lancashire Under 10s, Kevin Sinfield achieves his biggest personal honour on Saturday when he leads out England for the Tri-Nations clash with Wales.

Despite being marked out during his teenage years as a future national captain it is only now, aged 32 and with Jamie Peacock retired from international rugby, that he gets his chance. But 10 years leading Leeds have steeled him; it is not an opportunity he is likely to waste.

Key man: Sinfield in action for England against Australia at Wembley last year

Key man: Sinfield in action for England against Australia at Wembley last year

Sinfield said: ‘You have to be a leader of some sort just to be in this squad. Every player involved has got different leadership qualities. At 32 you think your time may have passed, but I’m really looking forward to it.

‘The last month with Leeds, then being made England captain, have been some of the most special moments of my career.

‘I love being involved with the England squad and love the morals and standards we’ve put in place.’

Sinfield’s courage, resilience and intelligence are key attributes, but it is his control and distribution that will be most needed against a Welsh side that lost in France last week.

The Oldham-born stand-off puts one name above all others when he considers his new role as national captain: Ellery Hanley.

Sinfield said: ‘He was the figurehead for British rugby and how he played and led teams left a big mark on me.’

TV: LIVE on BBC2 from 2.30pm.

Jamie Peacock says Leeds Rhinos Super League Grand Final win is best of his eight

Proud Peacock enjoys eighth wonder and colossus says Leeds win is best of the lot

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UPDATED:

19:29 GMT, 7 October 2012

Moments after collecting his eighth Super League winner’s ring, Jamie Peacock sat in the Old Trafford dressing room and declared it the best of the lot.

The former England captain, 34, remains a colossus for Leeds Rhinos. He was the only man to make more than 200 metres in a compelling Grand Final against Warrington, leaving his body covered in bruises.

But his grin was unmistakable. ‘It’s an overwhelming feeling when you win that way,’ he said of the 28-16 win. ‘It justifies all the self-sacrifices and all the difficult decisions we’ve made over the past eight or nine months.

‘You never want to be disrespectful to previous teams you’ve played with but this is the best win.

Serial winner: Jamie Peacock savours victory

Serial winner: Jamie Peacock savours victory

‘We didn’t come into the play-offs with any form. We got beaten by 12 men at Huddersfield (in the last league game of the season), and then we had to beat a great Wakefield side who were in form, go away to Catalan, win at Wigan and then beat a side we’ve never beaten before in a final.

‘To come from behind and have that belief shows a special group.’

Peacock’s exertions were just the tip of a collective effort from Leeds that confirmed their position as the best side British rugby league has produced since Wigan’s team of the late Eighties and early Nineties.

‘The belief in this group is very strong,’ said Peacock. ‘When you’ve been in this position before, it allows you to have faith in the person next to you and trust them in those situations. Our belief never wavered.’

Drive time: Peacock powers on

Drive time: Peacock powers on

Leeds hooker Rob Burrow paid tribute to the rampaging prop.

Burrow said: ‘JP gets more grey every day, but he seems to get younger each week with his performances. He commands respect, and Kev (captain Kevin Sinfield) is the same. You wouldn’t have anyone else captain the side and as assistant captain you’ve got JP — how can you get better than that’

Leeds pounded Lee Briers, with Carl Ablett given responsibility for targeting Warrington’s creative force when Wolves had the ball.

Ablett said: ‘I was just trying to get in his head, letting him know that I was there.’

The tactic left Sinfield clear to guide Leeds to another remarkable triumph. ‘There’s no better kicker under pressure in this country in either code,’ said Peacock.

‘He’s the greatest Leeds captain of all time.’

Jonnie Peacock beats Oscar Pistorius in 100m – London 2012 Paralympics

Go Jonnie, go! Brit star Peacock wins 100m in record time as Pistorius misses medals

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UPDATED:

21:09 GMT, 6 September 2012

British teenager Jonnie Peacock sealed his status as the fastest amputee in the world by upstaging Oscar Pistorius in the biggest race of the Paralympics.

The 19-year-old from Cambridge showed no regard for reputations as he stormed away from the field to win in 10.90 seconds, a new Paralympic record.

Jonnie Peacock

All smiles: Peacock was the class act of the field after storming to victory on Thursday night

He came into the Games as the T44 world record holder but inexperienced on the big stage, but proved he can more than handle the occasion.

Only American Richard Browne could get close to the Briton, claiming silver in 11.03secs.

Over the line: The 19-year-old set a new Paralympic record with a time of 10.90 seconds

Over the line: The 19-year-old set a new Paralympic record with a time of 10.90 seconds

Pistorius, the defending champion, was never in contention, finishing fourth behind fellow South African and room-mate Arnu Fourie, but was quick to embrace Peacock at the finish.

Chants of 'Peacock, Peacock, Peacock' rang around the stadium before the start, which was delayed when Brazilian Alan Fonteles Oliveira appeared to twitch and the field were asked to stand up.

Out of the running: Pistorius (far right) was a distant fourth

Out of the running: Pistorius (far right) was a distant fourth

A faulty rather than a false start was the verdict and the added tension did not affect Peacock, who was able to race off on a lap of honour draped in the Union Flag.

Peacock's victory crowned a golden night for Great Britain, coming minutes after David Weir had continued his relentless pursuit of quadruple gold by making it three out of three with yet another masterful ride, this time to win the 800m title.

Gracious in defeat: Pistorius embraces Peacock

Gracious in defeat: Pistorius embraces Peacock

Peacock told Channel 4: 'It's absolutely surreal. For the past four days, this event being quite late on, you've got these guys going out getting gold and you just want to be part of that.

'This Games is definitely a legacy and to be part of that is amazing.

'I knew this crowd was going to be intense. Dave Weir going minutes before – I knew he'd win, and I knew the crowd would be on a high. We'd had a great day so far, Hannah opened up the evening with a gold. I knew they were going to do that.

'[But] I didn't think it was going to be that crazy, I was like, who's going to get a bigger cheer, Oscar or me

'It was just surreal. I had to tell them to be quiet after a while. 'I was really annoyed with my start yesterday. This time I actually knew I could push. About 60m I started to think, “oh c**p I'm in the lead. What's going on here”

'I was rocking a little bit. It was crazy.'

Pistorius was quick to hail Peacock's gold, telling Channel 4: 'What we've seen tonight is the start of an amazing Paralympics sprinter.

'I've just been watching it on the screen again and it was a great performance. 'I can't imagine how happy he must be to do this in front of his home crowd.

'Well done, it's a great time for him. He's still young and he's got a great future ahead of him.

'I was hoping to finish in the medals but the 100 is not my thing. My room-mate (Fourie) pipped me on the line for third.' Pistorius admitted he is now hoping for gold in his favourite event, the 400m.

'I'm desperate for that,' he said. 'I'm looking forward to the 400m.'

Flying the flag: The British star enjoys a lap of honour in front of his home crowd

Flying the flag: The British star enjoys a lap of honour in front of his home crowd

London 2012 Paralympics: Jonnie Peacock and Oscar Pistorius T44 100m final

Peacock equals Paralympic record to ease through to final showdown with Pistorius

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UPDATED:

19:04 GMT, 5 September 2012

British teenager Jonnie Peacock defeated Oscar Pistorius' conqueror to reach the 100 metres final with an emphatic heat victory at the Olympic Stadium.

The 19-year-old, who looked relaxed and confident in his blocks, got off to a flying start and came home in 11.08 seconds, equalling the T44 Paralympic record.

It was a baptism of fire for Peacock, who lined up against American world champion Jerome Singleton and Brazilian Alan Fonteles Oliveira, the 200m gold medallist whose blades so incensed Pistorius

Streets ahead: Britain's Jonnie Peacock powers home to win his 100m T44 heat

Streets ahead: Britain's Jonnie Peacock powers home to win his 100m T44 heat

Only the top two advanced along with
two fastest losers, but the Cambridgeshire athlete is not the world
record holder with a best of 10.85secs for nothing.

Peacock,
who lost his right leg below the knee to meningitis aged five, easily
finished ahead of Singleton, who was second in 11.46s.

Oliveira was third in 11.56.

Peacock, who received a huge ovation
when introduced to the crowd, said: “It was nuts out there when they
called my name and my mates and family were by the start line and it
relaxed me. I haven't been nervous at all.

'I'll have to go back now and look at the video, the end of the race wasn't as controlled as I'd like it to be.

'I need to keep my core stronger and
my start could have been better, but that race into that kind of wind (a
1.6m/s head wind) could have been worth 10.90 or 10.95, which would
have been my fastest ever first round. I'll come back stronger tomorrow.

'I expected a few of the guys to push me more to be honest, I didn't think I'd win by so much, so I'm happy.'

Streets ahead: Britain's Jonnie Peacock powers home to win his 100m T44 heat

Pistorius appeared unaffected by the storm he has caused with his comments about Oliveira's blade length by winning his 100m heat in 11.18.

The South African finished 0.16 ahead of American Blake Leeper, who also uses the longer blades.

The 25-year-old claimed before the Games he was not expecting to retain his 100m title, having largely neglected the event to focus on fulfilling his dream of making the 400m at the Olympics, but he looked comfortable on Wednesday night.

The times in the second two heats ensured Alan too made it through as a fastest loser, setting up a mouthwatering final tomorrow night which looks too close to call.

Pistorius, Oliveira and the two Americans will also go up against each other later on Wednesday in the T42-46 4x100m relay.

Pistorius has since admitted his outspoken attack on the length of the blades worn by Oliveira in the immediate aftermath of the 200m final was badly timed.

The South African publicly questioned International Paralympic Committee regulations, claiming longer blades are giving his rivals an unfair advantage.

Oliveira won the gold in 21.45secs and Pistorius said: 'He's never run a 21-second race and I don't think he's a 21-second athlete.

'The guys are just running ridiculous times and they're able to do so.'

Charge: South Africa's Oscar Pistorius also made it through to Thursday's final

Charge: South Africa's Oscar Pistorius also made it through to Thursday's final

Pistorius apologised the following
day for his comments and the IPC said he would not face censure, with
the two parties set to meet to discus the issue.

The fact remained, though, that had
the 25-year-old, who had to settle for silver in 21.52s, matched the
world record 21.30 he ran in the heat in that final he would have won.

The blades worn by the likes of Oliveira and Leeper were within IPC rules, having been measured and approved before the race.

It is understood Pistorius'
objections relate to the complex formula used to calculate the maximal
allowable height for each athlete.

Pistorius cannot switch to longer
blades if he wants to carry on competing in non-disabled competition as
they have to conform to stringent IAAF regulations.

He had to win a lengthy legal battle
with the governing body at the Court of Arbitration of Sport for the
right to compete in the first place.

South Africa have made an official
complaint to the IPC that athletes are switching the size of their
running blades, but the governing body said they have found no evidence
to back their claims.

Paralympics 2012: Oscar Pistorius plays down T44 100m chances

Pistorius plays down chances of T44 100m glory as favourite says: I'll take bronze!

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UPDATED:

15:10 GMT, 28 August 2012

Oscar Pistorius has admitted he does not fancy his chances of winning the most highly-anticipated race of the London Paralympics.

The Blade Runner's showdown with British sprinter Jonnie Peacock in the T44 100 metres final next Thursday night is the hottest ticket of the Games.

The South African is the defending champion, but the event took a back seat as he focused on his history-making ambition, which he achieved, of qualifying for the Olympics over 400m.

Centre of attention: South African sprinter Oscar Pistorius (R) has played down his chances of winning Thursday's T44 100m final

Centre of attention: South African sprinter Oscar Pistorius (R) has played down his chances of winning Thursday's T44 100m final

Only last week the 25-year-old raced for the first time over 100m in 16 months.

'I think it's important to note I haven't run a 100m personal best in five years,' said Pistorius, who will also race in the 200m, 400m and 4x100m relay in London.

'It's not really my event so, although I do feel threatened, I don't feel helpless. As Jonnie and those guys focus on the 100m, my focus is on the 400m, on the opposite side of the spectrum when it comes to sprinting.

'If I can just get in the top three I think I'd be very happy.

Focused: Pistorius goes through his paces during a training session at Mayesbrook Park Arena in Barking

Focused: Pistorius goes through his paces during a training session at Mayesbrook Park Arena in Barking

'My focus is on trying to defend my titles, but then I have to be realistic and say the 400m and the 200m are the events I am better suited at.'

Pistorius, who will carry the South African flag for the first time at Wednesday's opening ceremony, revealed he had lost 11 kilograms since the 2008 Beijing Games, but had spent the last three weeks in the gym to bulk up as much as possible for the shorter sprints.

Nineteen-year-old Peacock broke the 100m world record with a run of 10.85 seconds in June and Pistorius admitted his progress has taken him by surprise.

All smiles: Pistorius is the main attraction as the Paralympics get ready to launch into action

All smiles: Pistorius is the main attraction as the Paralympics get ready to launch into action

'He improved by more than half a second,' he added. 'You never see that, especially in the 100m, it just doesn't happen. He is a huge threat.'

But there are also the likes of American Jerome Singleton, who beat Pistorius at the 2011 IPC World Championships to worry about, as well as a rival more closer to home.

'Arnu Fourie is my room-mate,' he said, before joking: 'It's going to be a bit awkward the night before the final. I might have to drop some sleeping pills in his water or something.'

England 20 Exiles 32: McNamara says young side will benefit after comprehensive defeat

England 20 Exiles 32: McNamara says young side will benefit from comprehensive defeat

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UPDATED:

23:25 GMT, 4 July 2012

England coach Steve McNamara believes his emerging players will benefit from the comprehensive defeat by the Exiles.

McNamara's new-look side were no match for their vastly-experienced opponents as the Exiles cruised to a 32-20 victory at Huddersfield's Galpharm Stadium to avenge last month's defeat at Langtree Park.

Exiles skipper Brett Hodgson, who missed the first game through injury, scored two of his side's six tries and kicked four goals for a personal haul of 16 points while winger Francis Meli also touched down twice.

Victors: Exiles celebrate their win

Victors: Exiles celebrate their win

McNamara's decision to rest four regulars, with three others unavailable including the newly-retired Peacock, gave tonight's side an experimental look but the coach insisted his fringe players had not ruined their chances of further representative honours.

'We exposed a lot of our young players all at the same time,' he said. 'They will improve from that.

'If you throw another couple of senior blokes alongside those young people you'd see a different performance and possibly a different result.

'I don't think they're further away at all. This will make them even closer to being selected further down the track.

'We've said all along it's about building a squad and a programme that gives us the best chance of winning the World Cup at the end of 2013.

'I'm grateful to the Exiles. Some or our players have not and will not experience that again until they play another international.'

Stopped in his tracks: Eorl Crabtree is tackled by Brett Hodgson (left) and Kylie Leuluai

Stopped in his tracks: Eorl Crabtree is tackled by Brett Hodgson (left) and Kylie Leuluai

England were soundly beaten in most departments as the Exiles produced a performance full of flair.

'We weren't good enough tonight,' McNamara added. 'We were clearly second best. We're representing England so we're disappointed we didn't get the win.

'We felt we had a team capable of doing that and we prepared as if we were going to win that game.

'We didn't get off to the best start. I thought we were a bit shaky and vulnerable at the start and I thought their experience really told in the end.'

England captain Jon Wilkin, who took over on a one-off basis from the retired Jamie Peacock, said the match presented an opportunity for Super League players to play at a more intense level.

'I've played against Australia and New Zealand and the intensity of tonight's match is up there,' he said.

'The relentless nature of international rugby is something we struggle to recreate in Super League.

Rare highlight: Josh Charnely goes over for a try

Rare highlight: Josh Charnely goes over for a try

'Games in Super League are often punctuated by penalties and stoppages and come the end of the year it's a more fluid game.

'Tonight there were only two penalties in the game and it mirrors exactly what a Test match is like.

'I know I feel the benefit for it and the rest of the team certainly did despite a disappointing loss.'

Exiles coach Daniel Anderson was delighted with the way his much-changed side responded to their 18-10 defeat at St Helens.

'We made some adjustments,' he said. 'We had some different personnel but we wanted to represent the Exiles' brand of rugby and that is a skilful brand of rugby and I thought we showcased that in dry conditions.

'Even though we scored points, we had a lot of other opportunities and probably butchered a couple.'

London 2012 Olympics: Jonnie Peacock breaks world record

Peacock breaks world record to underline Paralympics potential

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UPDATED:

21:32 GMT, 1 July 2012

Jonnie Peacock set a 100 metres world record in amputee sprinting as a guest at the US Paralympic trials.

The 19-year-old from Cambridge ran 10.85sec, eclipsing the previous world best set by 2004 Paralympic champion Marlon Shirley by 0.06sec.

Main man: Jonnie Peacock looks set to be a threat at the Paralympics

Main man: Jonnie Peacock looks set to be a threat at the Paralympics

He said: ‘I knew if I could beat these guys, who are the best in the world, then it would bode well for London. My second goal was to run under 11sec.’

Sprint rival Oscar Pistorius tweeted: ‘Looking forward to a very fast race at London 2012!’

Jamie Peacock quits as England captain

England captain Peacock quits international stage but will play on for Leeds

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UPDATED:

05:12 GMT, 26 June 2012

England captain Jamie Peacock has announced his retirement from international rugby league with immediate effect.

The 34-year-old Leeds prop has decided to call time on his 12-year career on the international stage, although he will play on with Leeds, having recently signed a new two-year contract taking him to the end of 2014.

His decision to step down from England now means coach Steve McNamara will have to find a new skipper for next Wednesday's second international origin game against the Exiles as well as the 2013 World Cup.

Peacock, who made his England debut against Russia in the 2000 World Cup and led England for the last time in their 18-10 win over the Exiles earlier this month, said he made his mind up to retire from international duty in January.

Stepping down: Peacock (right)

Stepping down: Peacock (right)

'The last achievement I felt I could have with England would be to right the wrong and beat the Exiles team and this has happened,' he said in a statement released through the Rugby Football League.

'To play and captain your country is the highest honour within the game and this was a decision that was not taken lightly.

'In 2000, when I made my debut, it was beyond my wildest ambition and dreams that I would then go onto represent my country nearly 50 times and captain them for seven years.

'I felt that the time would be right for me to step down and solely concentrate on playing for my club.

'The focus for Steve McNamara and the England team has to be the objective of trying to win the Rugby League World Cup next year and for the next generation of players to be part of that process.

'While I feel there are deficiencies within Super League, the one aspect for me that made this decision easier was the huge amount of exciting young talent coming through the elite competition in this country.

Mission accomplished: Peacock wanted to beat the Exiles before stepping down

Mission accomplished: Peacock wanted to beat the Exiles before stepping down

'I feel now is the time for the younger players to rise to the challenge of trying to be the dominant force in world rugby league over the next few years.

'Whenever I have captained or played for my country against the best in the world I have always enjoyed rising to the challenge and played with passion, commitment and honesty. I believe that this current England team will continue to do the same.'

Peacock, who was awarded the MBE in this year's New Year Honours list, has represented England 22 times and amassed 26 appearances for Great Britain.

He missed the 2009 Four Nations Series down under after undergoing a knee re-construction but made a full recovery in time to lead England to the 2010 final against Australia.

Peacock added: 'I'd like to record my sincere thanks to the England fans and the RFL for their full support throughout my international career.

'I would also like to thank all the players I stood shoulder to shoulder with while representing Great Britain and England.

Proud record: Peacock played 48 times for England and Great Britain

Proud record: Peacock played 48 times for England and Great Britain

'For me, one of the greatest pleasures of representing your country was becoming friends and going into a rugby league battle with players I held in high regard and respected from competing against them at club level.

'I'm also grateful to all of the managers, coaches, media and administrators I've worked with, who have all contributed to my career.

'I'm looking forward to assisting in a capacity away from playing and I'd like to wish Steve McNamara and the current England team success over the next two years, especially in their efforts to win the World Cup.'

McNamara said: 'Jamie Peacock is rugby league's ultimate warrior. It has been a privilege and an honour to coach Jamie at international level.

'He has given every ounce of blood, sweat and tears to the national set-up and it will be a massive challenge to replace such a fantastic athlete and captain.

'He is the perfect role model for any aspiring junior wanting to be the best they can be. The way he inspires those around him is his distinct quality.

'Jamie's qualities will not be lost as he will have a major part to play in the overall England programme going forward as we continue to build to the Rugby League World Cup next year.'