Tag Archives: panesar

James Anderson praises Alastair Cook"s leadership skills

Anderson praises captain Cook for leading by example with the bat to put England on brink of series win

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UPDATED:

11:21 GMT, 9 December 2012

Relaxing after the win: Jimmy Anderson raises a glass after the win

Relaxing after the win: Jimmy Anderson raises a glass after the win

England paceman James Anderson praised the leadership skills of captain Alastair Cook after leading the side to a seven-wicket win over India in the third Test in Kolkata.

Cook's 190 in the first innings helped set the tourists on their way at Eden Gardens before the bowlers took over to dismiss India for 247 on their second turn at the crease.

That left England with a victory target of 41 runs and, despite a last-minute wobble, Ian Bell and Nick Compton settled nerves to move the team 2-1 ahead in the series with one match to play.

It followed an impressive performance in the second Test in Mumbai last week, and Anderson admits they could not have done it without captain Cook.

'The first Test we saw how it was going to be tough for us,' he told BBC Five Live's Sportsweek.

'We bounced back last week but to come here and put in an equally good performance was something special.

'Cook has been brilliant. The amount of runs he's got in the last three games have been incredible and he's crucial to the team. His first-innings score was a huge factor in us winning the game.

In form: Anderson had a good Test with the ball

In form: Anderson had a good Test with the ball

'He's the sort of guy who likes to lead from the front, lead by example, and he just wants to go out there and show what he can do and hopes everyone follows him. And we're certainly doing that.'

Anderson finished with six wickets in the match, but thinks spinners Graeme Swann (three wickets) and Monty Panesar (five) also deserve credit for the part they played.
'(Swann and Panesar) have been fantastic in the last two games,” said Anderson.

'Monty especially, having not played much international cricket over the last 12 months.
'He's settled back in brilliantly and got us crucial wickets at crucial times, and he's done that throughout the game.

In it together: Anderson says Cook has been a good leader on the tour

In it together: Anderson says Cook has been a good leader on the tour

'With Swanny, we know what we're going to get with him. As in this game, getting the crucial wicket of (Virender) Sehwag which started off that run for us in that session yesterday.'

Anderson is already turning his attention to the fourth Test in Nagpur next week, where England have the chance to secure a 3-1 series win.

But the paceman sounded a note of caution, saying: “We've got a lot of improving to do.

'We're really pleased with the last two wins, but going into the fourth Test we want to win the series outright and put in a really good performance to finish with.

'We really want to focus on the last game and if we can win that and win the series outright we can celebrate after that.'

How have England turned it around so successfully after opening Test defeat in Ahmedabad?

How have England turned it around so successfully after opening Test defeat in Ahmedabad

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UPDATED:

22:37 GMT, 8 December 2012

Outplayed in the opening Test, England will be dreaming of a first series win in India for 27 years if they can finish things off in Kolkata today. Here’s how they have made it happen…

Key omission: Monty Panesar (FILE PHOTO)

Key omission: Monty Panesar (FILE PHOTO)

Picking the right team

The decision to play just one frontline spinner — Graeme Swann — in the first Test in Ahmedabad proved costly. The recall of Monty Panesar might be the single biggest factor in England turning around the series. He took 11 wickets in Mumbai and has five so far in Kolkata.

Preying on ageing stars

A team full of ageing greats such as Sachin Tendulkar (right) unravelled in the second Test. That more focus was lavished on the pitch than England ahead of Mumbai laid bare India’s lack of faith in their own abilities, which the tourists ruthlessly exploited.

Bowling well

Poor team selection in the first Test was compounded by the performance of England’s seamers. Tim Bresnan was axed immediately and Stuart Broad after Mumbai. James Anderson, poor in Ahmedabad, has been superb, while Steven Finn totally eclipsed Broad.

Finally getting big runs

Alastair Cook’s 176 in Ahmedabad, the first of three centuries, kick-started a phenomenal run from the captain and showed his team-mates big runs could be scored. Kevin Pietersen followed in Mumbai as England found the knack of amassing large totals.

Working out the spinners

The figures of Ravi Ashwin in England’s second innings in the first Test told their own story as he leaked 111 runs in 43 overs for the solitary wicket of Swann. He was quickly worked out and has since had more impact with the bat. Pragyan Ojha has been India’s best spinner, but he is no Saeed Ajmal.

Sachin Tendulkar"s wait for his next Test hundred goes on: Top Spin at the Test

Top Spin at the Test: The wait goes on as Tendulkar's ton proves elusive

PUBLISHED:

22:56 GMT, 5 December 2012

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UPDATED:

22:56 GMT, 5 December 2012

Sachin Tendulkar’s highest Test innings since he made 80 at Sydney in January could not disguise the fact that his last 29 visits to the crease have failed to produce a Test hundred. That is comfortably the longest century-less drought of his career, stretching all the way back to his 146 in Cape Town in January 2011. The sense of disappointment yesterday at Eden Gardens when he edged Jimmy Anderson to Matt Prior was almost tangible.

Disappointment: Sachin Tendulkar missed out on a century

Disappointment: Sachin Tendulkar missed out on a century

Sachin eclipses sunny record
For all his frustration, Tendulkar did tick off yet another milestone. When he clipped Monty Panesar for a single shortly after lunch, he completed 34,000 runs in all international cricket. He won’t be caught any time soon: next in the list is former Australia captain Ricky Ponting, who retired on Monday with 27,483 runs to his name. Tendulkar also became India’s leading Test run-scorer against England, passing Sunil Gavaskar, who hit 2,483.

Bogie man: Hansie Cronje took Tendulkar's wicket five times in his career

Bogie man: Hansie Cronje took Tendulkar's wicket five times in his career

Cronje chips in on Tendulkar's list
The eight bowlers to have dismissed Tendulkar five times or more in Tests include some of the modern fast-bowling greats: Anderson (eight times), Glenn McGrath (six), Jason Gillespie, Brett Lee and Allan Donald (all five). But one name stands out on the list: the late South Africa captain Hansie Cronje also took Tendulkar’s wicket in Tests on five occasions with his gentle medium-pace — a stat made all the more remarkable by the fact that Cronje managed only 43 wickets in his 68 Tests.

Sharp Samit proves his point
Samit Patel has often incurred the wrath of team director Andy Flower for his lack of sharpness in the field, but his hard work on the boundary led to the run-out that changed England’s day. Virender Sehwag had his eye on a third after working Anderson through midwicket, but Patel chased down the stroke and then flicked the ball up to Steven Finn, who hurled it to Matt Prior at the striker’s end with Sehwag stranded mid-pitch.

On his toes: Samit Patel's alert fielding led to a run-out

On his toes: Samit Patel's alert fielding led to a run-out

Gambhir changes his tune
When Gautam Gambhir was asked how disappointed Tendulkar would be to miss out on a hundred, he replied: ‘It’s not about hundreds or individuals. It’s about what the team does together.’ This hymn to team spirit raised eyebrows among those who recall him exposing the India tail on the fourth morning in Mumbai, where cynics wondered whether he was more concerned with carrying his bat than actually saving a game India went on to lose by 10 wickets.

India v England: If Sachin Tendulkar is on the way out, he"s not going in style thanks to James Anderson

If Sachin really is on the way out, he's not going in style… and that's thanks to brilliant bogey man Anderson

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UPDATED:

12:49 GMT, 5 December 2012

India v England: Third Test

Anderson and Panesar turn the screw on India as only Sachin knock stands between England and paradise at Eden Gardens

This was little short of heroic from England. Condemned to bowl first for the third Test in a row, they overcame a loose start to take charge of a day that had at one stage seemed destined to belong to Sachin Tendulkar.

From 45 without loss off 10 overs, India spent the remaining 80 putting together 273 for 7 – testimony both to the meandering nature of a batting line-up that lacked a firm hand on the tiller once Cheteshwar Pujara had jumped ship, and to the discipline of England’s bowlers.

Monty Panesar and Jimmy Anderson in particular were immense. The extent to which Panesar outbowled Graeme Swann at Mumbai wasn’t reflected by respective match hauls of 11 wickets and eight, but there was little doubt which of his two spinners Alastair Cook felt more inclined to turn to before lunch when he craved control.

Bunny: James Anderson dismissed Sachin Tendulkar for 76 at Eden Gardens

Bunny: James Anderson dismissed Sachin Tendulkar for 76 at Eden Gardens

Helped by Tendulkar’s admirable refusal to commit the same errors which had twice cost him against Panesar in Mumbai, England’s left-arm spinner settled into a groove from which he was only budged when Yuvraj Singh hit him for a straight six in the second over after tea.

It was mesmerising stuff, as his two victims would presumably testify: Pujara was undone by one that, deliberately or otherwise, went on with the arm, while Gautam Gambhir cut to slip, where Jonathan Trott was grateful to take one in the guts.

Anderson showed off all his skills. He was unfortunate not to dismiss Gambhir in his opening spell, and underlined his versatility by returning for the 45th over for a stint with the oldish ball.

Virat Kohli was undone by one that left him slightly – India’s batting prodigy has been a desperate let-down in this series – but the wicket that sent Anderson halfway round Eden Gardens was that of Tendulkar, who prodded at the first ball after the post-tea drinks and was well held by a tumbling Matt Prior.

Charmed life: Tendulkar was not convincing despite hitting a half-century

Charmed life: Tendulkar was not convincing despite hitting a half-century

With that wicket Anderson joined Muttiah Muralitharan in a two-man club: only they have dismissed Tendulkar eight times in Tests.

But the context of the game mattered more. At a venue where India had passed 600 in each of their three previous first innings, they were now 230 for 6. (Had Steven Finn not fumbled a glaring chance to run out Ravichandran Ashwin from mid-on in the same over, India would have been 231 for 7.)

For Tendulkar, it was a painful moment. Throughout much of a gripping day, he appeared fated to prove his supporters correct and play the three-figure innings that would silence – temporarily, at least – those who feel he is living on borrowed time.

It was rarely pretty, save for a trio of paddle-sweeps off Swann and one laceration through the covers off Panesar. Mainly, he scored behind the wicket, steering the ball with varying degrees of conviction past the slips. If he really is on his way out, he is not going beautifully.

And yet there was plenty to admire, too. While less gnarled team-mates contrived to surrender their wickets – none more grievously than Yuvraj Singh, who poked a near long hop from Swann to short extra cover – Tendulkar delved deep into his reserves of bloody-mindedness.

No one would have begrudged him a first Test century since January 2011, but England were not in the mood for charity. And that pretty well summed up their day.

Picture dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

Ian Bell to ring changes in third Test against India

I'll be ringing the changes, insists returning Bell ahead of third Test against India

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UPDATED:

22:30 GMT, 2 December 2012

Back to business for England at the iconic Eden Gardens on Sunday, with a pitch row still raging and a new dad vowing to put cricket into its proper perspective.

As England enjoyed a few days off in the aftermath of their historic win in Mumbai, India have found themselves caught up in an unseemly squabble over the surface for the third Test which starts here on Wednesday.

Prabir Mukherjee, the octogenarian Eden Gardens groundsman who called MS Dhoni’s demand for a turning pitch ‘immoral’, was enjoying his time in the spotlight, happily waving and chatting to all and sundry, while England quietly practised with the series level and the pressure off them.

Captain's orders: India's MS Dhoni has demanded a pitch to suit his side

Captain's orders: India's MS Dhoni has demanded a pitch to suit his side

The sprightly Mukherjee has vowed to ignore Dhoni and do things his way, but the bad news for England is that the pitch he wants to prepare is more likely to resemble the low, slow turner of Ahmedabad than the bouncy, jagging Mumbai surface that was such to Monty Panesar’s liking.

‘It will be a true pitch — and it will be up to the players to play well on it,’ said a defiant Mukherjee.

One man who will be happy to play on anything provided is Ian Bell, who flew back to Kolkata two days ahead of the England team’s arrival here after missing the second Test in theory to return home for the birth of his first child.

As it turned out, Joseph William Bell was impatient to appear, and his father, having rushed away from the Test in Ahmedabad, had not left India when he was born.

Back: Ian Bell returns to the England squad for the third Test against India

Back: Ian Bell returns to the England squad for the third Test against India

‘I managed to get as far as Mumbai when the baby arrived,’ said Bell, who looks sure to regain his place at the expense of Jonny Bairstow. ‘I would have been there had he been on time but he couldn’t wait! It worked out well, though, in that they came home early so I could spend more time with them.’

Bell had looked distracted in the early weeks of this tour, and the hope now is that his paternity leave will clear his mind and help him improve the poor record in India that, at the moment, is a stain on his international record. His lamentable shot first ball in Ahmedabad summed up his fortunes here.

‘Maybe, sometimes, I’ve tried a bit too hard,’ said Bell. ‘And that shot in Ahmedabad was a sign of me saying, “Right, I’m coming at you”. But after what has happened in the last week or so, my whole attitude has changed.

Raring to go: Steven Finn will be fit for England's next Test against India

Raring to go: Steven Finn will be fit for England's next Test against India

‘Maybe I’ve put a bit too much on myself in the past and beat myself up, but now I just want to go out and trust my ability. I have no regrets about going home — parenthood is the best thing that has ever happened to me. It has given me more of a balance and I can enjoy every day I’m with the England team. That’s what I want to do — go out, not worry about things and enjoy my cricket.’

Steven Finn did not bowl at Eden Gardens on Sunday, but England insisted that was more to do with the fact that he delivered 23 hostile overs for the England Performance Squad last week rather than any worries about his fitness.

Finn, who damaged his thigh in England’s first warm-up game, was due to return to action on Monday with the out-of-sorts Stuart Broad, who bowled for 40 minutes on Sunday, sitting out practice.

The odds remain on Finn playing in place of his vice-captain in a second change to England’s winning team.

England embroiled in row over "doctored" wicket after groundsman speaks out

England embroiled in row over 'doctored' wicket after groundsman speaks out

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UPDATED:

22:24 GMT, 1 December 2012

Picture dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from England's tour of India due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India
(BCCI) and international news organisations. The BCCI has refused access
to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action
Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this
action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to
boycott BCCI imagery.

The build-up to the third
Test in Kolkata has been overshadowed by an extraordinary row which saw
the Eden Gardens groundsman step down after branding India captain
Mahendra Singh Dhoni's request for a pitch which turns from day one as
'immoral'.

The 'Eden Pitch War' has dominated
the news in this cricket-obsessed country. It started when Dhoni, out to
avenge a 4-0 whitewash in England last year, asked for 'rank turners'
after India's nine-wicket win in the first Test at Ahmedabad.

Although that backfired in Mumbai,
where England spinners Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar took 19 wickets
between them to propel their side to a memorable win, Dhoni repeated the
request for a turning wicket here.

Controversial: The Eden Gardens ground where the next test will take place

Controversial: The Eden Gardens ground where the next test will take place

That led to the Board of Control for Cricket in India putting intense pressure on Prabir Mukherjee, the 83-year-old groundsman, to cede to their captain's demands.

They included flying in their own groundsman – East Zone's Ashish Bhowmick – last Wednesday, four days after Daljit Singh, the chairman of the BCCI's pitches committee, had inspected the track.

Mukherjee asked for a month's leave citing health reasons sparked by the strain of the situation.

He was later persuaded to backtrack after talks with Jagmohan Dalmiya, president of the Cricket Association of Bengal. But not before he had fired an embarrassing broadside at Dhoni and the BCCI.

Mukherjee, curator at Eden Gardens since 1985, said: 'I'm not in a position to accept this. It's illogical and immoral to tamper with the pitch as per the request of the captain. I've never done it in my life and I'm not about to do it now. They're trying to take advantage of people and I don't want to be hanged if anything goes wrong.

Asking too much: India captain MS Dhoni

Asking too much: India captain MS Dhoni

'Dhoni is asking for a square-turner from the first day. This is immoral. The BCCI have taken money for a five-day Test. But Dhoni is asking for a square-turner where the match will end in three days. You are robbing people of two days' play.

'If the India captain says he wants the moon, do you give it to him'

Mukherjee and Dhoni have a history, with the India captain branding the wicket he prepared for last year's one-day match against England 'ugly' despite winning.

While these events, which laid bare the BCCI's attempts to bully an elderly man, are embarrassing for Dhoni, coach Duncan Fletcher and the board, matters are made worse by Mukherjee's personal circumstances.

His wife and daughter died within six days of each other in May and his dedication was such that he did not take a day off.

Having won his battle with the BCCI, Mukherjee returned to Eden Gardens, with groundstaff claiming the pitch would only turn later in the match.

Monty Panesar: At last I"m fulfilling my potential

Panesar: At last, I'm showing the 'Inner Monty' (but I'd still like to bat a bit better)

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UPDATED:

23:30 GMT, 1 December 2012

Picture dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from England's tour of India due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India
(BCCI) and international news organisations. The BCCI has refused access
to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action
Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this
action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to
boycott BCCI imagery.

Eleven wickets in Mumbai, including a
glorious double over Sachin Tendulkar, did not merely signify a
successful return to Test cricket for a left-arm spinner seemingly stuck
in the international wilderness.

According to Monty Panesar, the
performance that helped secure only England's second Test win on the
subcontinent in almost three decades was also the culmination of a
two-year search for the 'Inner Monty'.

Left out of the first Test when
conditions in Ahmedabad screamed for his inclusion alongside Graeme
Swann, Panesar might have thought his latest England outing was going to
pan out like most of the others since the first Test of the 2009 Ashes;
thanks for coming, better luck next time.

Cool customer: Monty Panesar has worked on the mental side of his game

Cool customer: Monty Panesar has worked on the mental side of his game

But with an exquisite exhibition of orthodox slow left-arm bowling, the 'Montster' was back.

Now, as the third Test in Kolkata approaches, it is India who are under scrutiny and Panesar revealed that, as much as his journey back into the team was about finding a way forward as a bowler, it was also about finding himself as a person.

'When I was out of the side, that was a period when I needed to reflect,' he said.

'I felt I needed to know which direction to take my game. I wanted to take on the responsibility for my own learning so I invested in myself on and off the pitch by going to people away from the England Cricket Board.

'I did some work with Neil Burns [the former Essex wicketkeeper], who runs a sort of a mentoring organisation, and Dr Ken Jennings, a sports psychologist.

'We worked together on the emotional perspective and the mental side of things, seeing what was important for me as a cricketer. I helped build emotional resilience and mental focus. It's given me more sense of who I am. People were saying I needed to have lots of variations. I felt I needed to go back to my strengths, rather than trying to be a bowler I cannot be.

'When I first came into the international arena I was very shy. I'd defer to coaches, captains and players. I wouldn't speak to the coaches or anyone. Put a ball in my hand and I'd be happy to bowl line and length. Now I have a clearer understanding of who I am, what I can bring to a team.'

Inner Monty: Panesar is pleased with his progress

Inner Monty: Panesar is pleased with his progress

What he brought to England in Mumbai was a way back into the series.

'Coming into the Test I felt under a lot of pressure,' he added. 'I knew I had to be at my best, so my self-belief had to be high. I had to have that mindset where I don't take things for granted but I commit to my processes.

'For instance, when I bowled that ball to Sachin which bowled him, the previous ball was a short ball, so when I was walking back I was thinking: “Get my mind right. How is my breathing” All these things are on the checklist in my mind I was ticking off. It was like I was doing a service on me … an MOT.'

And how he passed it.

He added: 'I know I'm not the world's best batter or fielder, despite all the effort and improvements I've made. I want to play all forms of cricket, to improve in these areas.'

Investec, the specialist bank and asset manager, is the title sponsor of Test match cricket in England. Visit the Investec Cricket Zone at investec.co.uk/cricket for player analysis, stats, Test info and games.

Ricky Ponting retires: An apology to the Australian legend… We"re sorry for all the jibes and most of all, for calling you Ratty

Ricky Ponting – an apology: We're sorry for all the jibes and most of all, for calling you Ratty

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UPDATED:

11:12 GMT, 29 November 2012

Ricky Ponting we are sorry.

Sorry for accusing you of cheating. Sorry for pilloring your unsporting behaviour (of which there's been plenty). We're even almost sorry for calling you Ratty Ponting – but not quite.

Like all the greatest villains, we loved to hate you. Like all Australians, we've loved making fun of you. Above all else we loved beating you – and we'd gotten used to that.

The sad truth is we wish more of our sportsmen and women were like you. And that's why we must say sorry.

Ratty Ponting

Ricky Ponting

King Rat: How Sportsmail mocked Ponting in 2009 (left) inspired by the surely Aussie's image (right)

Almost fond farewell: Ricky Ponting has announced his retirement from international cricket at a press conference in Perth. Sportsmail owes him an apology

Almost fond farewell: Ricky Ponting has announced his retirement from international cricket at a press conference in Perth. Sportsmail owes him an apology

Kevin Pietersen's Twitter reaction

Ricky Ponting RETIRES…. ONE OF THE GREATS! I always got excited playing AUS, so I could watch him bat up close. Well done Punter! #legend

Your dogged determination, fierce patriotism and considerable talent made you a fearsome adversary.

We have loved your two-facedness. Remember Cardiff in 2009 You blew your top when we… sorry England, sent 12th man Bilal Shafayat on with spare gloves as Monty Panesar and James Anderson were grinding out a famous draw. Stalling for time, you said. You'd know all about that, cobber.

Old Trafford, 2005… your Aussies were clinging on for a draw when out pops little Stuart MacGill, 12th man, with a towel – yes, a towel! – for flustered Glenn McGrath as he and Brett Lee fought off a late onslaught.

We have loved your on-field lack of grace. Off it you're a charmer, a sporting prince. But when Michael Hussey was the only Aussie to applaud Alastair Cook's century in the Fifth 2010/11 Ashes Test at Sydney we lapped up your snarling unsporting behaviour.

Enlarge

Glove affair: How the Daily Mail covered the controversial Cardiff Test in 2009 when Ricky fumed at England's 12th man

Glove affair: How the Daily Mail covered the controversial Cardiff Test in 2009 when Ricky fumed at England's 12th man

Rodent times: How Ratty Ponting appeared in our pages in 2009

Rodent times: How Ratty Ponting appeared in our pages in 2009

We'll ignore you claiming Phil Hughes's catch when Cook was on 99, which clearly hit the turf first.

If one of ours hadn't celebrated the new year by making your mob chase leather around the park, we'd have really been angry. Your reaction just wasn't cricket, old bean.

We still love Gary Pratt for what he did to you. The sub fielder running you out at Trent Bridge in 2005 was not the best bit. Your fuming and finger-pointing at England coach Duncan Fletcher, who was sitting up in the pavilion was classic King Rat.

You were angry. You were hurt. We were laughing. So was big Dunc.

Ricky Ponting, Australian captain, is run out by England substitute fielder Gary Pratt

Gary Pratt (centre), substitute fielder for England, is congratulated by team mates after running out Ricky Ponting

Making a Pratt of himself: Ponting is run out (left) by substitute fielder Gary Pratt, who was hailed by England's Test stars (right) at Trent Bridge during the famous 2005 Ashes Series

Then there were the runs – we haven't loved those. All 2,476 of them against England at an average of 44.21. Not quite your overall 52.21, but still formidable.

In 2009 this newspaper dubbed you Ratty Ponting in a bid to put you off your stride. You averaged 48.12 in that series including a memorable 150 at Cardiff, but England still triumphed.

As a foe we celebrate you. As a cricketer we applaud you. As a personality we shall miss you.

There are some out there who will hope you add another century to your prolific haul of 41 at Perth tomorrow.

You'll understand of course, that we hope you get a duck.

Goodbye Ricky, it's by no means good riddance.

Farewell: Australia's Ricky Ponting always celebrated like it was his first victory

Farewell: Australia's Ricky Ponting always celebrated like it was his first victory

Sachin Tendulkar"s future in doubt as he heads towards 40

Whispers grow louder about Tendulkar's future as he approaches 40

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UPDATED:

22:30 GMT, 27 November 2012

The future of Sachin Tendulkar was on the lips of almost every Indian after the selectors made just one change to a 15-man squad for next week’s third Test.

With seamer Ashok Dinda coming in for the injured Umesh Yadav, the players who lost so heavily here have been given the chance to redeem themselves in Kolkata. And all eyes will be on Tendulkar.

India’s most marketable export has endured runs of bad form before but his failure at the Wankhede, where he was removed twice for eight by Monty Panesar, means he has scored 153 runs in his last 10 Test innings.

Doubts: Sachin Tendulkar will be 40 in April and his future in the game is being discussed frequently by Indian media

Doubts: Sachin Tendulkar will be 40 in April and his future in the game is being discussed frequently by Indian media

Barely a news show goes by in India without a former player commenting on Tendulkar’s future. He turns 40 in April and locals are fretting.

Seven times in those 10 innings Tendulkar has been bowled or lbw; previously, those modes of dismissal accounted for only 38 per cent of his innings. ‘My concern is whether that great mind is tired of concentrating as the way he has been getting bowled suggests,’ said former Test spinner Maninder Singh.

India fans have other concerns, too, and the selectors rowed back from their plan to name a squad for the last two Tests.

Fail in Kolkata, it seems, and you may miss out in Nagpur.

No 6 Yuvraj Singh and off-spinners Harbhajan Singh and Ravichandran Ashwin are particularly vulnerable.

India v England: Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann join the spin doctors

Top Spin at the Test: Dynamic duo of Panesar and Swann join the spin doctors

By
Lawrence Booth

PUBLISHED:

21:24 GMT, 26 November 2012

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UPDATED:

21:24 GMT, 26 November 2012


Legend: England off-spinner Jim Laker

Legend: England off-spinner Jim Laker

English spinners took 19 wickets in a Test for the first time since 1958, when Jim Laker (11) and Tony Lock (eight) knocked over a poor New Zealand side for 67 and 109 at Headingley.

That pair were also responsible for the one game in which Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann’s Mumbai match haul of 19 for 323 has been bettered by English slow bowlers. At Old Trafford in 1956, Laker and Lock shared all 20 Australian wickets — or rather, Laker claimed 19 to Lock’s one.

Panesar’s the third man

Had umpire Aleem Dar not reprieved Pragyan Ojha when he edged Monty Panesar to leg slip on the final morning, Panesar would have returned the best match figures by an English spinner in a Test in Asia.

Instead, he had to settle for 11-210, which placed him third, behind fellow slow-left armers Nick Cook (11-83 v Pakistan at Karachi, 1983-84) and Hedley Verity (11-153 v India at Madras, 1933-34).

History boys

This was only the second time in 12 years that India have lost a Test at home after winning the toss and batting first — the grimace on Alastair Cook’s face when he called incorrectly on Friday morning was understandable.

In fact, they rarely lose at home at all: this was only their seventh defeat in 56 Tests in India since they went down to Steve Waugh’s Australians in Mumbai in March 2001.

Spin kings: Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar celebrate in the dressing room

Spin kings: Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar celebrate in the dressing room

Swann’s soaring to new heights

India’s captain MS Dhoni insisted that England’s spinners outbowled India’s principally because Monty Panesar was quicker through the air.
But where did that leave Graeme Swann

The off-spinner — who during the course of the match overtook John Snow to move into 13th on England’s all-time Test wicket-taking list — claimed eight for 113.

By contrast, India’s two offies, Ravichandran Ashwin and Harbhajan Singh, managed just four for 251 between them.

No 'I' in Team, Gautam

Gautam Gambhir raised a few eyebrows on the final morning when he appeared to place his desire to carry his bat — something only three Indians have ever managed — above the team needs.

Twice, Gambhir exposed his tail-end colleagues with a single off the first ball of an over, prompting Shane Warne, sitting in the commentary box, to tweet: ‘Surely Gambhir should not be taking singles I think as he has been in poor form he wants a not out !!!!! Team first please…..’

Picture Dispute

We
are unable to carry live pictures from the Second Test in Mumbai due to
a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and
international news organisations. The BCCI has refused access to Test
venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images
and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action
to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott
BCCI imagery.