Tag Archives: ohuruogu

Sportsmail remembers Superstars as it announces one-off return

Worth the licence fee alone! Sportsmail remembers Superstars as Olympic stars sign-up for one-off revival of TV classic

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UPDATED:

16:36 GMT, 14 November 2012

Never mind Newsnight-gate, who would not willingly pay their licence fee just for the sight of Wayne Rooney doing a Kevin Keegan and falling off his bike while racing against the likes of Lewis Hamilton, Andy Murray, Rory McIlroy, Johnny Wilkinson, Ben Ainslie and the like

Well that’s not going to happen, not in the multi-million football world where players are investments as much as sporting icons.

But BBC’s one-off revival of Superstars this Christmas, featuring a host of British Olympic medallists, could see Mo Farah capsizing his kayak, as you do, or Christine Ohuruogu drowning.

Cult status: Kevin Keegan crashes in original TV show of Superstars

Cult status: Kevin Keegan crashes in original TV show of Superstars

SUPERSTARS RETURN

Britain's Olympic stars are to take part in one-off revival of 1970s cult television show Superstars.

Gold medalists Mo Farah, Katherine Grainger, Jade Jones and Alistair Brownlee will be among 16 competitors who will tackle eight events: track races over 100m and 800m, archery, javelin, a 50m swim, a kayak race, a cycling hill climb and the challenges in the gym tests.

Click here to read more

As severe as the latter may sound, it
was always the fish-out-of-water potential for disaster from one
sportsman trying to master an alien sport that appealed to the
programme’s large following during the 1970s and 1980s.

The defining moment of the show came
in 1976 at, of all places, Bracknell when Keegan, still very much in his
pomp with Liverpool and England, crashed his bicycle during an episode
of European Superstars.

Despite suffering nasty cuts and
abrasions, he insisted on racing again and finishing second on the way
to ultimate victory via a win in the steeplechase.

Viewers loved and admired Keegan for
his courage while laughing at his embarrassment. At least I did and I
think most of the audience felt the same.

The mixture of humour, of great
sportsmen demonstrating frailty and of the participation (at least in
the early days) of some giants of sport proved a potent ratings mixture.

Bobby Moore, no less, Jackie Stewart,
Tony Jacklin and Welsh rugby legend Barry John were included in the
first line up in 1973, though no-one got near David Hemery who became
more famous for the Superstars performances than his victory in the 400
metres hurdles at the Mexico Olympics five years earlier.

Mick Channon, John Conteh, James
Hunt, Gareth Edwards, Daley Thompson and Geoff Hurst – it was very much a
male dominated environment at that time – were others who found
themselves in that place without a puddle having to explain themselves
breathlessly to David Vine.

Stellar cast: Bobby Moore, Joe Bugner and Geoff Capes were among the original Superstars

Stellar cast: Bobby Moore, Joe Bugner and Geoff Capes were among the original Superstars

geoff capes
GOLD STANDARD COMPETITORS

The full list: Alastair and Jonathan
Brownlee, Mo Farah, Robbie Grabarz, Michael Jamieson, Anthony Joshua,
Andrew Triggs Hodge, Peter Wilson, Nicola Adams, Lizzie Armistead, Laura
Bechtolsheimer, Gemma Gibbons, Helen Glover, Katherine Grainger, Jade
Jones and Christine Ohuruogo.

But the real stars of that era were
judo master Brian ‘Squat Thrust’ Jacks and World Superstars champion
Brian Hooper, pool vaulter turned demented kayaker. At least that is how
I remember his thrashing through the water leaving everyone in his
wake.

Part of the attraction was the fierce
competition. While some were prepared to play for laughs, many took it
very seriously indeed. I seem to remember Daley Thompson placing a watch
under his body to monitor his squat thrusts, a move which prompted
Jacks, the King of the Squats, to put an orange in the same place.

Who, like me, remembers Malcolm
MacDonald running the 100 metres in an astonishing 10.9 seconds only to
prove an even more impressive marksman despite having never previously
fired a pistol

Who could forget big scarey boxer Joe Bugner being frightened to attempt the water jump during the steeplechase

Or renowned hellraiser Stan Bowles
literally shooting himself in the foot. Apparently, Bowles and James
Hunt, another notiorious party animal, had been out the night before.

Count me in: Double Olympic champion Mo Farah will be one of those to take part

Count me in: Double Olympic champion Mo Farah will be one of those to take part

Great memories from the days when
live sport was limited almost to the three Rs – racing, rugby and
(w)restling – and Superstars provided some action for the starved sports
nut.

Maybe that diminished sports
portfolio explains part of the reason that why the Beeb have resurrected
this oldie. That and the success of the Olympics, of course.

There are no fewer than 10 gold
medallists taking part in the Christmas special. But most will not
remain household names in the years to come.

Robbie Grabarz wins Diamond League high jump

Grabarz seals Diamond League high jump title with second place finish in Zurich

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UPDATED:

21:44 GMT, 30 August 2012

Robbie Grabarz won the right to compete at his first world championships in Moscow next year when he won the 25,000 prize as the season’s Diamond League champion in the high jump on Thursday night.

A wild card into the championships goes to the winner of each event’s overall winner of Diamond League titles, and Grabarz won by finishing runner-up to Olympic champion Ivan Ukhov in the penultimate League meeting in Zurich.

Winner: Robbie Grabarz competes in the men's high jump event

Winner: Robbie Grabarz competes in the men's high jump event

Grabarz, the Olympic bronze
medallist, had only to beat world champion Jesse Williams to lead the
points scorers, and that was confirmed when Williams crashed out with a
best of 2.25 metres while Grabarz achieved 2.28 at the second attempt.
Ukhov managed 2.31 at the third attempt.

Grabarz admits to having been
penniless in January after his Lottery support was taken away because of
poor performances last year and close to living off his credit card.
Now he has won 52,000 in Diamond League meetings alone, with three
first, two second and a third place.

‘European champion, Olympic medallist and Diamond League winner. I haven’t any words to describe my feelings,’ he said.

Success: Sanya Richards-Ross from the USA celebrates after winning the women's 400m

Success: Sanya Richards-Ross from the USA celebrates after winning the women's 400m

Britain's men's 4x100m relay team, led home by Adam Gemili, also put on a good performance to come home third behind the United States and Jamaica.

There was disappointment for Christine Ohuruogu in the women's 400m, with the Briton finishing last in a race won by American Sanya Richards-Ross.

Hannah England finished a creditable sixth in the 1,500m though, while British compatriot Laura Weightman crossed the finishing line in 13th.

Surprise: Ethiopian Mohammed Aman celebrates his victory over Kenyan David Rudisha in the 800m

Surprise: Ethiopian Mohammed Aman celebrates his victory over Kenyan David Rudisha in the 800m

In other events, Kenya's David Rudisha, who set a new world record on his way to Olympic gold in London, was pipped to victory in the 800m by Ethiopia's Mohammed Aman – who took the Diamond League series as a result.

Another Olympic champion, Jamaica's Shelley-Ann Fraser-Pryce, beat great rival Carmelita Jeter to win the women's 100m in 10.83s.

London 2012 Olympics: Christine Ohuruogu wins 400m silver medal

Ohuruogu loses 400m title to Richards-Ross but battles to silver medal

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UPDATED:

20:15 GMT, 5 August 2012

Christine Ohuruogu has won the silver medal in the women's 400m at the London Olympics.

The defending champion burst into contention on the home straight but was unable to overhaul Sanya Richards-Ross.

More to follow…

Brit special: Christine Ohuruogu running in the 400m

Brit special: Christine Ohuruogu running in the 400m

London 2012 Olympics: Charles van Commenee proud of GB athletes

Van Commenee speaks of pride in GB athletes ahead of Friday's curtain-raiser

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UPDATED:

21:40 GMT, 31 July 2012

UK Athletics head coach Charles van Commenee believes Britain's athletes will make the nation proud with performances in the London Olympics to herald a new golden era in the sport.

Britain won just four athletics medals at the last Games in Beijing, with Christine Ohuruogu claiming gold in the 400m, Germaine Mason (high jump) and Phillips Idowu (triple jump) taking silver and Natasha Danvers (400m hurdles) winning bronze.

Four years on the target is to win double that haul, with at least one of the eight medals gold, but Van Commenee could not be happier with his team's position with just a few days remaining until the athletics programme gets under way.

Proud: The athletics team kick-off their Olympics on Friday

Proud: The athletics team kick-off their Olympics on Friday

'I think we will make the nation proud,' the Dutchman said. 'We are coming from quite far behind [but] this is an important sport in Britain. We have been off the radar for a long time and now we're back at a home Games.

'If these athletes do not make the nation proud then I think it does not look great for the future because it does not look much better than this.'

Asked if the likes of team captain Dai Greene, heptathlete Jessica Ennis and rising stars Holly Bleasdale and Adam Gemili could form a new 'golden generation' to rival that of Linford Christie, Colin Jackson, Sally Gunnell and Jonathan Edwards, Van Commenee added: 'I think so. We have a very strong team.

'Four years ago we won four medals only and look at what we have now. No medals won yet, but we have had a great journey and enough to write about and look forward to. We have some exciting athletes.

Steering the ship: Van Commenee (left)

Steering the ship: Van Commenee (left)

'Four years ago, when I started, if I could position myself here, a few days before the Games, knowing what sort of athletes we have in contention now, I would have signed up for that straight away.

'It's a fantastic opportunity. I really feel privileged to be given the opportunity to lead the British team into this exciting moment.'

Bradley Wiggins' historic victory in the Tour de France took the focus off athletics in the lead-up to the Games, but Van Commenee hopes that a number of excellent performances in Stratford can have a more lasting impact than a triumph on the Champs Elysees.

'I think it's important that the impact the result will have will last for a long time,' added. 'It remains to be seen what the impact is of winning the Tour de France. Is that going to be a few days, weeks or years Nobody knows.

'It's important to see two years after the event to see what the event has meant.'

Christine Ohuruogu lays down Olympic marker with dominant performance in London

Ohuruogu lays down Olympic marker with dominant performance in London

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UPDATED:

17:51 GMT, 14 July 2012

Britain's athletes received an
Olympic send-off with an open-top bus parade during a torrential
downpour – but Christine Ohuruogu and Goldie Sayers were singing in the
rain after the Aviva London Grand Prix.

Sayers improved her own British
record in the javelin to claim a bonus of US dollars 5,000 and an early
present ahead of her 30th birthday on Monday.

But reigning Olympic champion
Ohuruogu was perhaps even more impressive as she defied the miserable
conditions to win the 400 metres in a season's best of 50.42 seconds,
powering past world champion Amantle Montsho of Botswana in the home
straight.

The leader of the pack: Christine Ohuruogu beats Amantle Montsho, Natasha Hastings and Rosemarie Whyte at Crystal Palace

The leader of the pack: Christine Ohuruogu beats Amantle Montsho, Natasha Hastings and Rosemarie Whyte at Crystal Palace

'I just wanted to sharpen up for London,' said Ohuruogu, who was last in the same race last year after a 'really appalling' performance and went on to be disqualified from the World Championships in Daegu for a false start.

'I've done all the work so I'm happy that I can take something like that away.

'I knew I had a good chance, I saw her (Montsho) look back so then I thought, 'I've got you now'. It's good that I put the race together and came out with a strong time.

Happy when it rains: Christine Ohuruogu celebrates victory in the 400m

Happy when it rains: Christine Ohuruogu celebrates victory in the 400m

'I'm happy with that. The conditions were not good but it's what we have to work with. You're just trying to stay focused and do the best you can in the race. I am where I am, I can't really complain. I'm fit and healthy and looking forward to the Games.'

Earlier in the afternoon, Sayers threw 66.17m in the first round to better her previous best of 65.75m, which was set when finishing fourth in the Beijing Olympics in 2008.

The 29-year-old also managed 65.74m in the third round to leave Olympic champion and world record holder Barbora Spotakova almost two metres behind in second.

Good form: Goldie Sayers had one of her best days ever

Good form: Goldie Sayers had one of her best days ever

'It's one of the best days in my athletics career. I am delighted,' Sayers said.

'It's going to take further for gold in London but it was good practice in the rain. I hope everyone is going to be doing a rain dance in London because I think it would suit me.

'It's my 30th birthday on Monday so it's a nice present; the drinks are on me! It's been a long time coming and it's very good timing, but as all athletes say, there's definitely a lot more left in there so I just need to find how to get it out at the Games when it matters.'

London 2012 Olympics: Adam Gemili must go

London calling to Adam: Games needs teenage sprint ace Gemili, but still he won’t commit

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 24 June 2012

The poster boy of the Olympic trials waltzed into the history books with an impossibly white-teethed smile that will illuminate London this summer.

Unfortunately, it was a scene from the American equivalent of the selection process that was taking place under leaden skies in Birmingham over the weekend.

The star was a 24-year-old decathlete called Ashton Eaton, who set a world record of 9,039 points. This former college phenomenon with podium-topping confidence to burn presented himself as the box-office hit for American track and field.

Golden boy: Ashton Eaton broke the world record in the men's decathlon

Golden boy: Ashton Eaton broke the world record in the men's decathlon

QUALIFIERS SO FAR

WOMEN: Sophie Hitchon (hammer), Christine Ohuruogu and Shana Cox (400m), Tiffany Porter and Jessica Ennis (100m hurdles), Shara Proctor (long jump), Goldie Sayers (javelin), Perri Shakes-Drayton and Eilidh Child (400m hurdles), Eilish McColgan (3,000m steeplechase), Laura Weightman (1500m), Holly Bleasdale and Kate Dennison (pole vault), Jo Pavey (5,000m), Margaret Adeoye and Anyika Onuora (200m).

MEN: Steve Lewis (pole vault), Greg Rutherford (long jump), Dai Greene and Jack Green (400m hurdles), Andy Baddeley and Ross Murray (1500m), Adam Gemili (100m), Robbie Grabarz (high jump), Nick McCormick (5,000m), Martyn Rooney and Conrad Williams (400m), James Ellington and Christian Malcolm (200m), Lawrence Okoye (discus), Andrew Osagie (800m), Andrew Pozzi and Lawrence Clarke (110m hurdles).

Five thousand miles away from Eugene, Oregon, at the Alexander Stadium, Walsall Road, Birmingham, there were a few hundred empty seats in the 10,000-capacity arena. What the Midlands would have given for a jaw-dropping British hero.

Jessica Ennis was here but not competing in her chief Olympic endeavour, the heptathlon; Mo Farah selfishly withdrew from the 1500 metres after winning his heat with scant regard for the paying punter; and contrary triple jumper Phillips Idowu was absent, either malingering or injured.

Into that void galloped 18-year-old Adam Gemili, the Londoner of Moroccan-Iranian descent, who despite coming second on Saturday to Dwain Chambers is the only Briton who has qualified for the Olympic 100m.

So given his raw talent, having taken up full-time sprint training only last autumn, what debate could there possibly be about his participation in the first home Games this country has staged since soap rationing was scrapped

Question mark: Adam Gemili has not yet committed to running at the Olympics

Question mark: Adam Gemili has not yet committed to running at the Olympics

Over to Michael Afilaka, his coach, who said Gemili was ‘an emotional wreck’ on Saturday evening after competing with the big boys. ‘We’ll make the decision on whether he goes to the Olympics later on, maybe this week,’ he explained.

‘The thing you’ve got to remember is this is a young kid and everyone is getting carried away. It’s not about the world juniors (in Barcelona mid-July) versus the Olympics. It’s always been about the world juniors for us. This is just a bonus.

‘You’ve got to be sensible and it’s my job to make sure we set it up fine. If we go for it, it’s got to be in line with the original plan and as part of his development.’

Asked if it was not a win-win situation, Afilaka said: ‘No. We have an issue with good young kids who just don’t develop. If you throw him into the cauldron of the Olympics and he gets burned he might never recover. Being a home Olympics makes no difference. It’s brutal. From getting kitted out to walking into the Olympic Stadium, and it’s very unforgiving. It’s not about grabbing the chance. He’s not just a young kid; he’s young to athletics and we’ve got to manage that.’

Double act: Dwain Chambers and Gemili could represent Team GB

Double act: Dwain Chambers and Gemili could represent Team GB

Afilaka’s concerns are understandable but you could turn his argument on its head. God forbid, but Gemili’s career could be finished by this time next year, let alone when the Rio Olympics come round four years from now.

Why deny him that chance I cite Daley Thompson, as garlanded a decathlete as Eaton dreams of being. He was picked for the Montreal Olympics of 1976, aged 17. He finished 18th but said: ‘I wouldn’t have won in Moscow four years later if I hadn’t gone to Montreal with the experience it gave me.’

Ironically, the cast of non-qualified athletes who go to the European Championships in Helsinki in a final attempt to meet the required standard would not be dawdling over whether to go as Gemili’s people are. He could race against Usain Bolt. He could make the semi-final.

The sport, too, would benefit from the excitement his emergence in the purest, most electrifying of Olympic disciplines would generate. The 800 athletes competing here comprised the biggest entrance since 1972. But, still, athletics, pushed to the edge of TV schedules and struggling for crowds, owes it to itself to build on the momentum triggered by this Olympic frenzy.

Done it: James Ellington celebrates winning the men's 200m final at the trials

Done it: James Ellington celebrates winning the men's 200m final at the trials

What else have we learned this weekend First, we were reminded that trials which are not a sudden-death shootout, in the way the American and Jamaican systems are, lack knife-edge drama.

Conclusions on form were hard to establish. The wind was swirly, the temperature low. It was not conducive to fast times. Take world champion Dai Greene’s 49.47sec in winning the 400m hurdles, though his personal best is 47.88sec.

He was our only serious gold medal hope to compete here, at least in his favoured discipline, and not too perturbed by his performance. He goes to Diamond League meetings in Paris and London believing he will run faster and find focus in quicker company. For others, the ultimate importance of the trials was palpable. None more so than James Ellington, who placed himself on eBay to find a sponsor, namely King of Shaves.

‘The best day of my life,’ declared the heavily tattooed entrepreneur after winning the 200m and becoming the 33rd athlete to secure his selection in the weekend. ‘It’s what every athlete dreams of: winning the National Championships in Olympic year.’ Now for London. Gemili included, please.

London 2012 Olympics: Daley Thompson picks 5 to watch at Team GB trials

My five to watch at the Olympic trials for Team GB

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UPDATED:

07:05 GMT, 22 June 2012

It's a totally different experience and atmosphere from the Olympic Stadium, but the Olympic trials are an even more important date because if you can't do it here you might not be going to the Games. Another unknown is the weather – you could get tropical heat or a thunderstorm. It makes it exciting, hard to get the qualifying standard and stressful. Good luck…

DWAIN CHAMBERS
100M
HOLLY BLEASDALE
POLE VAULT

Britain's Dwain Chambers

Britain's Holly Bleasdale

If he was in any kind of shape he would have qualified by now. If he finishes in the top two but doesn't hit the qualifying time, he will have to chase the time somewhere else – energy you don't want to waste when you should be preparing for London.

She had an outstanding indoor season. After making the sort of heights she was (4.87m), there is no reason why she shouldn't be around the medals in London. But she needs to find her form again, to give herself confidence as much as anything.

LAWRENCE OKOYE
DISCUS

CHRISTINE OHURUOGU
400M

Lawrence Okoye

Christine Ohuruogu

He's got everything but experience (less 400 metres than two years' real training) – and experience is one of the most important aspects of throwing. He's thrown 68.24 metres, the British record, and doing that at the Games will put him in medal contention. I just hope he doesn't live up to the saying, 'experience is what you get five minutes after you needed it'.

She has struggled in the last few years. It's just nice to see her – while not really at her best – coming into some sort of form. Christine must be struggling a bit for confidence, not so much from being beaten but from not running well.

ADAM GEMILI 100M

Adam Gemili

I’m really looking forward to seeing how he does. He has run 10.08sec so he is the fastest Brit this year and should be confident. Adam is also young so there’s not a lot of pressure on him. He’s favourite to win the 100m at the trials but he has to go out there and do it.

P.S. JENNY MEADOWS 800M

I'm sorry Jenny has had to pull out with an achilles injury. She can still be picked at the discretion of selectors. I hope they do that. I like Jenny. Good luck to her.

Mini has created the 'Britalian Job', a London 2012-themed film paying homage to the 1969 classic, to celebrate its partnership with Team GB and ParalympicsGB. To view the film click here

London 2012 Olympics: Daley Thompson picks 5 to watch

Double Olympic gold medal winner picks 5 to watch at the Olympic trials

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UPDATED:

23:37 GMT, 21 June 2012

It's a totally different experience and atmosphere from the Olympic Stadium, but the Olympic trials are an even more important date because if you can't do it here you might not be going to the Games. Another unknown is the weather – you could get tropical heat or a thunderstorm. It makes it exciting, hard to get the qualifying standard and stressful. Good luck…

DWAIN CHAMBERS
100M
HOLLY BLEASDALE
POLE VAULT

Britain's Dwain Chambers

Britain's Holly Bleasdale

If he was in any kind of shape he would have qualified by now. If he finishes in the top two but doesn't hit the qualifying time, he will have to chase the time somewhere else – energy you don't want to waste when you should be preparing for London.

She had an outstanding indoor season. After making the sort of heights she was (4.87m), there is no reason why she shouldn't be around the medals in London. But she needs to find her form again, to give herself confidence as much as anything.

LAWRENCE OKOYE
DISCUS

CHRISTINE OHURUOGU
400M

Lawrence Okoye

Christine Ohuruogu

He's got everything but experience (less 400 metres than two years' real training) – and experience is one of the most important aspects of throwing. He's thrown 68.24 metres, the British record, and doing that at the Games will put him in medal contention. I just hope he doesn't live up to the saying, 'experience is what you get five minutes after you needed it'.

She has struggled in the last few years. It's just nice to see her – while not really at her best – coming into some sort of form. Christine must be struggling a bit for confidence, not so much from being beaten but from not running well.

ADAM GEMILI 100M

Adam Gemili

I’m really looking forward to seeing how he does. He has run 10.08sec so he is the fastest Brit this year and should be confident. Adam is also young so there’s not a lot of pressure on him. He’s favourite to win the 100m at the trials but he has to go out there and do it.

P.S. JENNY MEADOWS 800M

I'm sorry Jenny has had to pull out with an achilles injury. She can still be picked at the discretion of selectors. I hope they do that. I like Jenny. Good luck to her.

Christine Ohuruogu focused second Olympic gold

Ohuruogu focused on 'ultimate' goal of winning second consecutive Olympic gold

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UPDATED:

19:00 GMT, 23 May 2012

Christine Ohuruogu is determined not to let anything deflect her focus from the 'ultimate job' of delivering another Olympic 400 metres gold in London.

The 28-year-old has just returned from a training camp in Los Angeles, where she continued a low-key build up to the Games.

Since her Beijing triumph in 2008, Ohuruogu has suffered from injuries, and endured the bitter disappointment of disqualification from the 2011 World Championships in Daegu.

Fully focused: Ohuruogu is going for her second Olympic gold

Fully focused: Ohuruogu is going for her second Olympic gold

However, in March the British sprinter delivered a timely reminder to her rivals with a stunning run to help Britain win the 4x400m relay at the World Indoor Championship.

American rival Sanya Richards-Ross, who was favourite to claim gold in Beijing four years ago but had to settle for bronze, feels Ohuruogu always 'shows up' when it matters most at the major championships.

'It is nice that other people are saying that kind of stuff about me, but I am just trying to make sure I get everything in place for the summer. My focus has never been off the ultimate job,' said Ohuruogu.

'I just focus on my job and what needs getting done, everything else in my book is just extra distractions.

'I don't really read too much into my run at the World Indoors.

'I just make sure what I have on my plate is very full and take on what I know I can manage.

'I am satisfied I did all I could while out in LA, so I am cool with that, but from now on, I will be staying quite local.

'There has been nothing to shout home about, but I am satisfied I am getting done what I need to.'

Ohuruogu was at Crystal Palace training alongside actresses from the Fast Girls film, which premieres at the Odeon West End in Leicester Square on June 7.

Happy memories: The Brit celebrates in Beijing in 2008

Happy memories: The Brit celebrates in Beijing in 2008

The British one-lap star was brought up in Newham, just a stone's throw away from the Olympic Park.

With hype only set to increase over the coming weeks as the Olympic torch works its way around the country and on to Stratford, Ohuruogu believes the real impact of the Games may not be felt until it is all over.

'The London Games will be special, but I don't want to be running on emotion,' said Ohuruogu, who returned the only athletics gold for Team GB in Beijing.

'I am quite hardened to that now, the excitement has gone and it is just work, nothing else.'

Ohuruogu added: 'For a lot of us, it will be just about trying to get through the Games, it won't be until afterwards when you realise the value and the importance of it.

'Everybody now is just focused on getting to the Games and performing as well as they can.'

Aviva has been backing the GB & NI Team since 1999. Now it's your turn. #BackTheTeam on Twitter or search for 'Aviva Athletics' on Facebook.

London 2012 Olympics: 4 x 400m women finish fourth

British women suffer relay bad result as Olympic preparations suffer blow

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UPDATED:

20:50 GMT, 29 April 2012

Britain’s women’s 4 x 400 metres relay team came down to earth with a bump in their first outing together since winning the World Indoor title last month.

They finished fourth at the Penn Relays in Philadelphia with the same quartet of Shana Cox, Nicola Sanders, Christine Ohuruogu and Perri Shakes-Drayton who won the gold medal.

Worryingly for the four women, they were eclipsed by more than seven seconds by the victorious team from the United States.

Not this time: Britain's women were unable to repeat their world success

Not this time: Britain's women were unable to repeat their world success