Tag Archives: nuggets

Usain Bolt one step close to legend – COMMENT

Bolt moves one step closer to legend with Olympic record-breaking run

|

UPDATED:

00:03 GMT, 6 August 2012

.olympicStats1038148 background:url(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/07_04/bckg308x110.jpg) no-repeat top left; display:block; width:308px; height:110px; padding:0; font-weight:bold
.olympicStats1038148 ul width:98%; padding:2px; list-style:none; position:relative; top:86px; left:6px; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif
.olympicStats1038148 ul li a padding:0 2px; font-size:11px; color:#0cac0c; text-decoration:none
.olympicStats1038148 a:hover text-decoration:underline
.olympicStats1038148 ul li float:left; list-style-type: none; padding: 0;

LIVE RESULTS |
EVENT SCHEDULE |
MEDALS TABLE

If only he could start. If only he did not party until 5am. If only he was not 95 per cent fit. If only he did not guzzle chicken nuggets.

Just think how good Usain Bolt could be.

But, really, what a performance we witnessed as the world’s most elusive man returned to being the world’s fastest man.

The questions had assailed him across the year and across the globe. He pulled out of competitions, he was in a car crash, he visited his doctor in Germany for magic potions to soothe his back-related injuries, he did not race his training partner and chief rival Yohan Blake other than when he had to — at the Jamaican trials — where he lost.

Close call: Usain Bolt did not run away with the race as he had done four years ago in Beijing, with Blake, Gatlin and Gay all running super quick times

Close call: Usain Bolt did not run away with the race as he had done four years ago in Beijing, with Blake, Gatlin and Gay all running super quick times

Close call: Usain Bolt did not run away with the race as he had done four years ago in Beijing, with Blake, Gatlin and Gay all running super quick times

Here he was back to something approaching his best. His time of 9.63sec was faster than he ran in Beijing four years ago (9.69sec), when his superiority was so great that he launched a mid-race chest-thumping celebration that beguiled the world, if not the IOC president, who thought it disrespectful.

On Sunday he pushed all the way. Yes, he had strolled to the final. But once he got to the start of the big one — 9.50pm London time — he left nothing to chance.

His start was not brilliant but his technique held together. His face told of total application and, given all Bolt’s natural long-striding gifts, it was enough.

‘You guys doubted me and I’ve shown the world that I am the greatest,’ he said. ‘The last 50 metres is where I shine, so I just did that.

‘I’m not concerned by what people
have said. I’ve said it from the start: people can talk. All they can do
is talk. When it comes to the championships, it’s all about business to
me — and I brought it home.’

Bolt’s victory was precisely the
result that athletics needed. He is the star turn, the cavorting
highwire act who reaches out to all ages and colours.

Simply the best: Bolt still crossed the line with daylight between him and the rest

Simply the best: Bolt still crossed the line with daylight between him and the rest

With respect to Blake, the silver medallist, he does not possess the magnetism of Bolt.

As for Justin Gatlin, the bronze
medallist, a victory for him would have represented a desperately low
point in these celebratory Games given his drug-taking habits.

As everyone left the stadium
yesterday — other than us scribblers and a group who hung on to cheer
Bolt’s name — our great former decathlete Daley Thompson’s voice spoke
out, encouraging parents to help their kids take up sport.

It is that near-exhausted word
‘legacy’ that Thompson was addressing. What happens in this stadium will
beget the next generation of our athletes. And no single foot racer
can do more worldwide towards that ideal than the gallivanting hero of
last night.

Yes, it will take schools and clubs
to make themselves available to accommodate newcomers to their ranks,
but the first requirement is for kids to be inspired by Bolt and his
ilk.

We all cherish our Olympic memories
from childhood and are thankful for the nourishment, health-wise and
culturally, that they have given us.

The one hope, which Bolt has
addressed, is that athletics would wither if he fell under suspicion of
drug-taking. He has never failed a test and until he does, should it
ever come, we must celebrate him as a beacon of hope for sport.

Trademark: Bolt strikes his usual pose for the cameras after winning the 100m final in London

Trademark: Bolt strikes his usual pose for the cameras after winning the 100m final in London

Mummy's boy: The sprinter's mother Jennifer and silver medallist Blake join the celebrations

Mummy's boy: The sprinter's mother Jennifer and silver medallist Blake join the celebrations

That sentiment chimes with the
feelgood mood of these Games. You go on to a Tube and people speak to
each other. Yes, on the London Underground with its tradition of blank
faces and averted stares. The stadium roar registers high on the decibel
scale.

It reached its zenith on Saturday
night with the cacophony that cheered on Mo Farah to his 10,000m win,
just after Greg Rutherford and Jessica Ennis had started the athletics
gold rush.

In terms of electrifying capacity,
last night’s race may not have equalled Ben Johnson’s epoch-making run
in Seoul in 1988, before the race was discredited as the most infamously
dirty track deed of all time, or of Bolt’s Beijing pyrotechnics.

It was though, still the fastest race
ever, Olympic or otherwise. Seven of the finalists went under 10sec,
with only Asafa Powell, who pulled up, spoiling the single-figure
neatness.

‘It was wonderful,’ said Bolt of the
atmosphere. ‘I knew it was going to be like this. There wasn’t a doubt
in my mind that it was going to be loud and it was going to be great.
You can feel that energy, so I feel extremely good and I’m happy.

‘This win means I’m one step closer to being a legend. I have the 200m to go.’

As everyone in the stadium
recognised, his status as the presiding genius of the sprinting world
is not in doubt. He just had to show up and prove the point in the blink
of an eye.

London 2012: Training is a real stretch for Usain Bolt as fitness questions grow over sprint king

Loosening a tight Bolt… training is a real stretch as fitness questions grow over sprint king

|

UPDATED:

23:20 GMT, 25 July 2012

Olympics 2012

Not everything is as it appears in the well-manicured image presented by Usain Bolt Ltd.

Sure, the main man is a joker who loves to party into the small hours – and beyond – of the Jamaican morning. He is a chilled dude with a toothy smile and an appetite for chicken nuggets.

All that is real, but still aspects of Bolt's character jar. It is not his start-line nonchalance, exaggerated for showboating effect, that rankles – no, that is part of the fun. What rankles is that his minders build a high wall around him, keeping the world away and the cash registers ringing.

Enlarge

Pushing the limit: Bolt grimaces as his physio goes to work but coach Mills looks relaxed

Pushing the limit: Bolt grimaces as his physio goes to work but coach Mills looks relaxed

The secrecy invites questions. The absence of answers begets suspicion. That was the case when he failed to show for an open training session on Tuesday.

Was he injured

Was his participation in the Olympics in doubt

On Wednesday, as these exclusive pictures show, he was flat on his back. But before his rivals get carried away, he was smiling, too.

Pull the other one: Mills and Bolt succumb to a fit of the giggles

At the Jamaican's base in Birmingham
he was able to train – his programme included some starts – before
having a long stretching session. Bolt's coach, Glen Mills, shared a
joke with him and laughed loudly while the physio pushed and pulled the fastest legs in history.

The scene told us that Bolt looks likely to be on the start line for the 100 metres final a week on Sunday.

However, we do not know in exactly what condition. After his recent
defeat by training partner Yohan Blake at the Jamaican trials, and a
second unexpected trip to the German doctor Hans Muller-Wohlfahrt
earlier this month, some doubts must linger.

Down in London's Olympic Park the
question was not so much about Bolt's fitness as about the legality of
Jamaican sprinting. Innuendo suggested, one questioner said, that
testing there was not the most stringent on the planet.

Pull the other one: Mills and Bolt succumb to a fit of the giggles

Pull the other one: Mills and Bolt succumb to a fit of the giggles

David Howman, the World Anti-Doping
Agency boss, responded by saying he had visited the island last year.
'Satisfactory,' was his overall verdict. Well, it sounded an
unsatisfactory answer, given how dominant Jamaican sprinters – men and
woman – are.

Nor has every
one of their samples proved clean. No less than Bolt's chief rival and
the fastest man this year, Blake, tested positive for the stimulant
methyl-xanthine in 2009. It was a drug not yet on WADA's banned list
but, perhaps unreasonably, he was still suspended for three months.

So I
raised the subject of drugs with Mills, the influential guru to a
generation of Jamaican sprinters, including Bolt and Blake, and a devout
Christian.

'People will
say anything,' he said. 'Track and field may have contributed to that
kind of scepticism as unfortunately a number of outstanding athletes
have tested positive, even in the recent past.

'That casts doubt on everybody who runs fast. But drugs are not the
only thing that can make people run fast. Hard work and ability get the
job done.

Usain Bolt of Jamaica celebrates winning the men's 200m final

Challenge: Bolt wants to win a gold medal in London

'If you are
saying that Jamaicans, because they run fast, are on drugs then I see
that as a witch-hunt. Jamaicans would say those allegations are down to
a bad mind or some kind of envy.

'The thing about drugs is that I have a
distinct line between a person who inadvertently finds something in
their system, a stimulant or something, that is widespread in cough
syrup, supplements or whatever, as against somebody who is on a
deliberate drug programme, knowingly, willingly planned.

'That is a clear indication of a
person who is corrupt and I have no tolerance for that. I don't think
anybody should be banned for life, though. My Christian values speak of
forgiveness. They should be punished, yes; banned for life, no.' Bolt
is on record as saying he must win at least an Olympic title here in
London to be considered a legend, seeing multiple successes at major
championships as the true yardstick of such status.

In that attempt, he will face the American Justin Gatlin, who was
banned for four years after testing positive for testosterone, and whose
presence in the 100m final would serve as an emblem of the doping
menace. So how many in those eight lanes will be fuelled illegally

Mills said: 'I don't know. You can't ask me that. It is impossible to
guess. I would hope it is nought. Even WADA could not tell you. If they
knew, the athletes wouldn't be there.

'But I would love to see a clean sport. I could never feel good
winning anything having knowingly set out to cheat to win. No.'

Sports pictures of the day: May 14

Sports images of the day: Our picture editor's selection

UPDATED:

11:50 GMT, 14 May 2012

Each day, MailOnline sports picture editor Dave Muir will choose his favourite photographs from around the world in the past 24 hours.

Enjoy today's selection right here…


Aisen Chen and Huo Liang of China dive during the Synchronized Men's 10m Platform Final at the Fort Lauderdale Aquatic Center

Aisen Chen and Huo Liang of China dive during the Synchronized Men's 10m Platform Final at the Fort Lauderdale Aquatic Center

Miami Marlins player Emilio Bonifacio hits Giancario Stanton in the face with a shaving cream pie after Stanton hit the ninth-inning game-winning grand slam

Miami Marlins player Emilio Bonifacio hits Giancario Stanton in the face with a shaving cream pie after Stanton hit the ninth-inning game-winning grand slam

Filipino-American Brian Viloria (left) hits Mexican Omar Nino Romero during their WBO flyweight championship boxing fight in Pasig city

Filipino-American Brian Viloria (left) hits Mexican Omar Nino Romero during their WBO flyweight championship boxing fight in Pasig city

Iker Casillas of Real Madrid CF holds up the La Liga trophy as he celebrates with team-mates after the La Liga match between Real Madrid CF and RCD Mallorca

Iker Casillas of Real Madrid CF holds up the La Liga trophy as he celebrates with team-mates after the La Liga match between Real Madrid CF and RCD Mallorca

Los Angeles Lakers' Jordan Hill fights for a rebound with Denver Nuggets' Kenneth Faried during Game seven of their NBA Western Conference basketball playoff series

Los Angeles Lakers' Jordan Hill fights for a rebound with Denver Nuggets' Kenneth Faried during Game seven of their NBA Western Conference basketball playoff series

Arsenal owner Stan Kroenke bids for LA Dodgers

Kroenke to splash the cash… but no boost for Arsenal as American bids for LA Dodgers

Arsenal owner Stan Kroenke has finally moved to open his chequebook… with a bid for MLB team Los Angeles Dodgers.

The man they call Silent Stan is understood to be fronting one of 12 groups interested in purchasing the baseball team. Others include former LA Lakers basketball star Magic Johnson.

Silent Stan: American Kroenke took a controlling stake in Arsenal in April 2011

Silent Stan: American Kroenke took a controlling stake in Arsenal in April 2011

Kroneke already owns franchises in all other major American sports, namely the NFL's St Louis Rams, the NBA's Denver Nuggets, the NHL's Colorado Avalanche, and Major League Soccer's Colorado Rapids.

Husband of the WalMart heiress, the 54-year-old took a controlling stake in Arsenal in April last year but has riled supporters with his lack of investment and failure to reveal a plan for the club.

The world famous Dodgers are facing financial meltdown and were put under bankruptcy protection last summer by outgoing owner Frank McCourt, who will later this year pay his former wife Jamie an 85m divorce settlement.

Help us out: The Gunners are facing a fight to hold on to their Champions League place

Help us out: The Gunners are facing a fight to hold on to their Champions League place

The Boston native was in 2002 beaten to the purchase of the Red Sox by John W. Henry, now owner of Liverpool.

Former Dodgers manager Joe Torre, one-time owner Peter O'Malley and former agent Dennis Gilbert are also on the shortlist.