Tag Archives: natasha

Paul Cox hoping for FA Cup honeymoon against Liverpool after training-ground wedding

Now this really is the magic of the FA Cup! Mansfield boss to get married at TRAINING GROUND ahead of giantkilling bid against Liverpool

By
Ian Ladyman

PUBLISHED:

11:07 GMT, 3 January 2013

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UPDATED:

18:14 GMT, 3 January 2013

Mansfield Town manager Paul Cox will begin the biggest weekend of his life on Friday by marrying his girlfriend at the club’s training ground.

Cox’s team from the Blue Square Premier host giants Liverpool at the One Call Stadium on Sunday in one of the ties of the FA Cup third round.

But Cox will begin the weekend by marrying his girlfriend Natasha Bertin on the training ground next to the stadium after honouring a promise he made to her ahead of the club’s replay with Lincoln in the previous round.

Happy couple: Paul Cox with his bride-to-be Natasha Bertin

Happy couple: Paul Cox with his bride-to-be Natasha Bertin

Countdown: Paul Cox poses at Mansfield's training ground - in front of the marquee in which he will marry

Countdown: Paul Cox poses at Mansfield's training ground – in front of the marquee in which he will marry

Countdown: Paul Cox poses at Mansfield's training ground - in front of the marquee in which he will marry

Having drawn 3-3 at Sincil Bank in the first game, Cox told his partner he would marry her if Mansfield went through and, after a 2-1 win clinched a meeting with Brendan Rodgers’ team, he will keep his word tomorrow when the couple tie the knot in a specially erected marquee.

A Mansfield source said: 'It’s going to be a big three days for Paul.

'He gets married on Friday and then it’s Liverpool on the day of his 41st birthday on Sunday.'

Busy week: Cox is facing a 48 hours at Mansfield

Busy week: Cox is facing a 48 hours at Mansfield

Hope the weather improves... the view at Mansfield's training ground

Hope the weather improves… the view at Mansfield's training ground

Mansfield are currently ninth in the Blue Square after losing out in the promotion play-offs last season.

The club applied for permission to use their full capacity to 10,000 for Sunday’s game but their request was rejected on safety grounds. There will be only 7,500 fans in the stadium, meaning that club will lose in the region of 50,000 in possible takings.

Natasha Jonas shows being a warrior woman is worth fighting for – Laura Williamson

Jonas shows being a warrior woman is worth fighting for

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UPDATED:

00:19 GMT, 12 November 2012

On Sunday August 5 I watched Natasha Jonas make history as the first British female boxer to step into the Olympic ring.

I remember feeling a very strong sense of admiration for what she had achieved and was impressed by the power, speed and technical skill of the sporting contest I was watching. But it also left me feeling churned; unsure if there was any genuine enjoyment in watching a woman getting hit.

So, three months on, I went to Jonas’s gym in Liverpool to try out boxing for myself…

Smiling assassin: Sportsmail's Laura with Natasha Jonas

Smiling assassin: Sportsmail's Laura with Natasha Jonas

In my job, I am used to walking into rooms of men and standing out like the proverbial sore thumb. Jonas’s gym was no different: Natasha Jonas is the only female name on the vests and plaques that decorate the walls and she jokingly referred to the ladies’ changing room as ‘mine’ because, for so long, she was the only one to use it.

This has changed now, given the success of women’s boxing at London 2012, but Jonas and I were the only women as a group of men grunted and sweated their way through a gruelling circuit of exercises using tyres, weights and ropes. It could not have been a more overtly masculine environment, yet it was far from intimidating. Instead, the over-riding feeling was of support.

Jonas trains in her weight, rather than gender, when the British squad meet up in Sheffield, and it felt no different here: they are proud not of their girl, but of their boxer. ‘You think everyone in a boxing gym will be snarling,’ says Jonas, ‘but we’re a proper little family.

‘Everyone still has a laugh but it helped me push myself.’

Packing a punch: Jonas trains at her gym in Liverpool

Packing a punch: Jonas trains at her gym in Liverpool

The atmosphere is welcoming and relaxed, but it changes when Jonas starts to punch, making an impressive rasping noise as she exhales. I am struck by her drive, power and concentration – and the switch from the smiley, self-deprecating 28-year-old woman who has been gently taking the mickey out of my failure even to put my gloves on properly.

Jonas admits her desire and will to win made the Olympics a ‘stressful’ time. She made history – something she wants to do again at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow in 2014 – but she was beaten by eventual lightweight champion Katie Taylor of Ireland. It was a thrilling fight in an incredible atmosphere that gave the sport the exposure it merited, but that still feels like scant consolation.

‘At the time it was disappointing but I think, in boxing, you are always going to get good and bad draws,’ she says. ‘I think I had a good draw to qualify for the Games, so I can’t complain. I have calmed down.

‘Afterwards I felt a bit of everything: anger, frustration, disappointment.

‘If I had gone in with the attitude of
having nothing to lose then I don’t think it would have hit me so badly.
But I went there to win. It wasn’t being delusional. Everyone can be
beaten in the ring. If I can compete with the best in the world I will
carry on until Rio in 2016. I firmly believe the body can do anything;
it’s whether you can cope mentally. I did find it all a bit stressful.’

On the ropes: Jonas was beaten at the Olympics by eventual champion Katie Taylor

On the ropes: Jonas was beaten at the Olympics by eventual champion Katie Taylor

Jonas will certainly not have to worry about any competition from me in Rio, that’s for sure. As I fluff my way through some attempts at jabs and punches she says kindly: ‘Your top half’s quite good. It’s the bottom half that needs work.’ My legs aren’t that bad, I think, until I realise what she means: I’m constantly overbalancing, leaning forward instead of keeping weight on my back foot. Oops.

The focus of our session is not on strength but on form, while the cardiovascular side of the training – running and skipping – is fun and challenging. I can see why Jonas took to this sport after a knee injury stopped her playing football. More importantly, I realise that getting hung up on the impact of a woman being hit is to disregard the quick thought process and technical preparation needed to land that blow.

It’s captivating and it also helps me to understand what Jonas meant when she used the phrase ‘warrior women’ after her first-round victory in London. I thought it brilliantly summed up the barriers – physical, psychological and social – female boxers had overcome to reach that point, but it implies a cerebral strength, not just a physical one.

‘I didn’t mean “warrior” like I was
going to kill everyone,’ she explains. ‘I think it means being strong
enough to fight for what you believe in. You can be a warrior woman and
be a mathematician, not just a boxer.’

Smiling assassin: Sportsmail's Laura with Natasha Jonas

What they said

It turns out Olympic gold medallist Nicola Adams is bisexual.

The boxer was judged to be No 1 in the Independent on Sunday’s Pink List last week and said: ‘It’s amazing to be on top of a list of such inspiring and influential people. Thanks to everyone for their continued support.’ She’s right: it will be ‘continued support’. Her sexual preference matters not a jot.

… and this is what I've been doing this week

PLEASED to see British gold medallists Laura Trott, Joanna Rowsell and Dani King have been signed by road cycling team DTPC (Dream Team Pro Cycling), which will be part-funded by Bradley Wiggins’ Wiggo Foundation. Developments like this are one of the most crucial components of the London 2012 legacy.

VISITING the O2 arena for the first time since covering GB’s memorable bronze medal in the men’s gymnastics team event at the Olympics. It was bright pink then, but on Wednesday it was blue for the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals tennis. The Team GB flags were still out in force amid the mind-boggling amount of branding, mind you.

WATCHING England beat Fiji at Twickenham. It was a novel experience to watch a game without someone yelling a string of expletives in your ear; to hear a collective ‘oh dear’ when England made a mistake, rather than a barrage of abuse. It felt like a vehicle for people to have a good time, and, with England so firmly in control, I found it particularly strange to support a team without feeling any angst or tension whatsoever.

London 2012 Paralympics: Natasha Baker wins gold number two

Baker breaker! Golden girl beats another Paralympic record on way to second gold of Games

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UPDATED:

12:43 GMT, 3 September 2012

Great Britain's Natasha Baker won her second gold medal of the Paralympic Games at Greenwich Park on Monday.

The 22-year-old, from Uxbridge in Middlesex, took the Grade II freestyle class on Cabral with a Paralympic record score of 82.800 per cent.

Her victory came just 48 hours after
she was crowned Grade II individual champion – also achieved with a
Paralympic record -, and it gave Britain's para-equestrian team a
seventh medal of the Games.

Another one: Natasha Baker wins gold in the individual freestyle dressage

Another one: Natasha Baker wins gold in the individual freestyle dressage

Further medals in each of the last four events today and tomorrow would take them past their record haul of 10 in Beijing four years ago.

Baker, who suffers from an inflammation of the spine, faced tough competition from the likes of reigning freestyle Paralympic champion Lauren Barwick and German rivals Britta Napel and Angelika Trabert.

But she rose to the challenge superbly, delivering a high-class musical routine that was a class above anything else.

Napel (Aquilina 3) and Trabert (Arriva-Avanti) took silver and bronze, respectively, with Ireland's Eilish /09/03/article-0-14D0D1BC000005DC-399_634x453.jpg” width=”634″ height=”453″ alt=”Not bad: Baker was delighted to get her second Paralympic gold at Greenwich ” class=”blkBorder” />

Not bad: Baker was delighted to get her second Paralympic gold at Greenwich

Another record: In each event Baker broke the previous Paralympic record

Another record: In each event Baker broke the previous Paralympic record

London 2012 Olympics boxing: Nicola Adams guarantees bronze at least

Bronze guaranteed for Brit girl Adams as Ireland's Taylor ends Jonas' medal hopes

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UPDATED:

14:32 GMT, 6 August 2012

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LIVE RESULTS |
EVENT SCHEDULE |
MEDALS TABLE

Nicola Adams became the second Great Britain boxer after Luke Campbell to guarantee at least a bronze medal after a comprehensive 16-7 win over Stoyka Petrova in her women’s flyweight quarter-final at ExCeL.

The Leeds 29-year-old was simply too sharp for her Bulgarian opponent, wobbling Petrova with a short left and a right over the top in the first round, and again with a stabbing left in the second to lead 5-3 at the half-way stage.

Winning feeling: Nicola Adams (Blue) celebrates another medal in prospect for Great Britain after her win over Stoyka Petrova guaranteed a bronze at least

Winning feeling: Nicola Adams (Blue) celebrates another medal in prospect for Great Britain after her win over Stoyka Petrova guaranteed a bronze at least

Hit and miss: Adams lands a shot on Petrova, with the Bulgarian missing her jab

Hit and miss: Adams lands a shot on Petrova, with the Bulgarian missing her jab

The shorter Adams continued to do well with her countering lefts in the third, but Petrova, a former world quarter-finalist, was proving a difficult challenge as she pushed forward looking to land hooks with either hand.

Adams, however, was clearly more classy, pulling away to take a six-point lead into the final round and book at least bronze – and a titanic showdown with Indian sensation Mary Kom in the semi-finals on Wednesday.

Natasha Jonas put up a brave fight against Ireland’s seemingly invincible four-time world champion Katie Taylor before the Irishwoman’s power and accuracy saw her book at least a bronze with a clear 26-15 victory.

Red alert: Ireland's four-time world champion Katie Taylor (red) lands a heavy blow on Natasha Jonas

Red alert: Ireland's four-time world champion Katie Taylor (red) lands a heavy blow on Natasha Jonas

Cheer we go: Favourite for the gold Taylor was roared on to victory by thousands of Irish fans

Cheer we go: Favourite for the gold Taylor was roared on to victory by thousands of Irish fans

Roared on by thousands of Irish supporters in an extraordinary atmosphere, Taylor set the pace right from the start, ramming home an early combination as Liverpool’s Jonas sought vainly to match her with counters.

A more even second saw Jonas have more success, rocking Taylor’s head back with a hard right but only incurring the wrath of the Irish fighter, who responded with a crisp combination as they reached half-way with Taylor in a 10-7 lead.

Taylor dominated the third, forcing Jonas to take a standing count from a hard right, as she moved 19-11 ahead, and Jonas took another count in the last as the imperious Taylor charged home to a thoroughly convincing win.

London 2012 Olympics: Natasha Jonas focused on winning gold

History maker Jonas marks British women's boxing bow with victory

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UPDATED:

16:04 GMT, 5 August 2012

Natasha Jonas shrugged off her history-making moment in the London 2012 boxing ring at ExCeL and insisted she is fully focused on winning the fight of her life on Monday to secure an Olympic medal.

Jonas became the first female boxing Olympian from Great Britain when she stepped through the ropes to beat American Queen Underwood 21-13 on the first day of the inaugural women's boxing competition.

But the 28-year-old Liverpudlian is more focused on the task ahead of her tomorrow, when she must fight and beat Ireland's four-time world champion Katie Taylor – widely regarded as the best female boxer in the world – to secure a medal.

Let's hear it for the girl;! Jonas is confirmed as the winner of her bout

Let's hear it for the girl;! Jonas is confirmed as the winner of her bout

Jonas said: 'History and records are great but I'm here at the Olympics and I don't want to just make up the numbers.

'I believe Katie and I are two of the
best boxers in the world at our weight and it's unfortunate that we have
fight so early. She's the world champion but with a crowd like that I
think I have every chance.'

Jonas believes she is a much better
fighter than for the pair's last meeting at the Strandja Cup in Bulgaria
in February 2011, when Jonas, having only recently joined the full-time
programme, was beaten 6-3.

Jonas added: 'When I fought her I was
still in awe of her reputation, which no-one can dispute. She's a
world-class boxer and a great ambassador for the sport.

History maker: Jonas became the first female British boxer at the ExCel

History maker: Jonas became the first female British boxer at the ExCel

History maker: Jonas became the first female British boxer at the ExCel

'But I'm a different boxer to who I
was two years ago. I did what I had to do to qualify and now I've got
started at the Olympics in front of an unbelievable crowd.'

Jonas boxed cleverly against her
experienced American opponent, a former world silver medallist, who
hurled big right hands but frequently failed to penetrate the
Liverpudlian's tight guard.

Flicking scoring jabs in response,
Jonas allowed Underwood to dictate the early pace and shade the first
round 4-3, but stormed back in the second to move ahead, and enjoyed a
spectacular third in which she increased her lead to five points.

Jonas had her best round in the last,
landing a right hand which forced Underwood to take a standing count,
before leaping for joy when the verdict was announced to move her one
big win from a guaranteed medal.

Gold standard: Jonas hopes to land a medal in the coming days

Gold standard: Jonas hopes to land a medal in the coming days

Des Kelly: Perdue, the bin girl who"s far from rubbish

Des Kelly: Perdue, the bin girl who's far from rubbish

PUBLISHED:

21:00 GMT, 1 August 2012

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UPDATED:

21:00 GMT, 1 August 2012

When men say they like ‘strong women’,
they aren’t usually thinking of the type who are capable of hurling a
washing machine across the room.

So I’d advise any gentlemen who are feeling insecure about their masculinity to avoid the women’s weightlifting at London 2012.

In times past, the typical male would
demonstrate their alpha status by dragging the wife back to the cave by
her hair. But the rise of women’s liberation and hairdressing costs have
put paid to that.

Now just one assigned task defines
manhood — and that is to put the bins out. Modern women need little else
from the male of the species.

Raising the bar: Wales' Natasha Perdue in action

Raising the bar: Wales' Natasha Perdue in action

But weightlifter Natasha Perdue has
stolen even that duty away. The 37-year-old is on the council bin round,
chucking rubbish away when she’s not lifting weights.

Like all the women in this 69kg class,
the chirpy Perdue is surprisingly small but formidably strong. I know
this because she shook my hand and I’ve had to type this article with my
left hand and right elbow as a result.

There are already enough challenges
facing a journalist trying to cover women’s weightlifting. The biggest
test is to convey accurately just how much effort is involved in this
sport, because what these women do is extraordinary. With veins bulging
like Madonna’s arms and eyes bulging like Madonna’s arms too, they
thrust almighty loads above their heads.

The best way to explain this is to
imagine that the lumps of metal on the end of the bar are actually two
baby elephants. Add that those baby elephants are making a terrible
noise at being hoisted into the air and you’ll also capture the sound
coming out of the lifter’s mouth while all this is happening.

More from Des Kelly…

Olympic diary: It's all for one… but none for all as GB's Musketeers flop
31/07/12

Des Kelly's Olympic diary: Handball! (But there isn't a footballer in sight)
30/07/12

Des Kelly's Olympic diary: Drug testing needed for beach volleyball crowd
29/07/12

Des Kelly: Let's hear it if you're British
27/07/12

Des Kelly: A message to all the Olympic moaners… BELT UP!
20/07/12

Des Kelly: I swear, it should not have come to this
13/07/12

Des Kelly: The man to trust at Arsenal is not RVP, Usmanov or Kroenke… it's Wenger
06/07/12

Pearce got it right, and backing Beckham makes you a loser too!
29/06/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

But they don’t just lift the weight,
they must also stand perfectly still and control the quivers of exertion
vibrating through every fibre of their body as they wait for the judges
to say they are happy.

The trick is for three lights to
signal it is a ‘good lift’ before the competitor’s head explodes with
the strain. Then the baby elephants… sorry, weights are hurled to the
floor, sending out a shockwave that dislodges roof slates on the Houses
of Parliament.

I weigh 85kg and some of these women,
standing little more than 5ft tall, are lifting nearly double that.
Which means I am a baby elephant and need to go on a diet.

At the ExCeL, Perdue emerged on to the stage, blinking into the lights and visibly nervous. Her first attempt at 92kg failed.

During the Commonwealth Games in Delhi two years ago, she simply folded and failed to register a lift. There were worrying signs of a repeat in London when she faltered and dropped the bar.

She tried a smile but she looked daunted by the crowd and the responsibility. Admittedly, she did have another weight to bear. Her late father, Terry, competed at the 1968 and 1972 Games, finishing in a best place of 10th. Perdue was a British karate champion and took up weightlifting only after her dad’s death. Her great fear was that she would let him down.

Her second effort was successful but Perdue’s legs wobbled and gave way as she left the stage. It looked like a faint and was later described as a leg spasm.

Lifting spirits: Perdue completes a lift in agony

Lifting spirits: Perdue completes a lift in agony

One lift at the snatch (a lift straight up with locked elbows), was enough to take her into the second round, where she lifted a respectable 113kg in the clean-and-jerk (on to the chest and then above the head). After that, she was pulled out of the competition. It was enough.

Back to the daily grind: Perdue

Back to the daily grind: Perdue

‘I know Dad was looking down,’ she said. ‘Even mentioning him does something to my insides and I get very emotional. To think he did all of this 40 years ago.

‘When I was young I never looked at him as an Olympian. He was just Dad. If only I’d asked him about the Games. You kick yourself for not doing that.’

Perdue certainly wasn’t rubbish. Her combined total of 205kg gave her fourth place in the B final. North Korea’s Rim Jong Sim went on to claim gold with a total of 261kg.

‘I’ve felt special here and I’ll miss it, silly as it sounds,’ Perdue added. ‘But it’s back to work and reality for me. I’m going home to Swansea where I hope I’ll get my job back.’

I’d like Perdue to be my local bin woman. With her, there’d be none of this weight limit nonsense or worries about whether the lid was up. She’d just grab my wheelie bins, one on each Olympic bicep, and throw them in the back of the truck.

Then I found out Perdue’s job is to drive the dustbin lorry, not fill it. And on hearing the news, there was a man somewhere nodding and saying: ‘Quite right too. That’s my job.’

Daily X-ray

Today’s scanner test — a brand new garlic crusher. It didn’t even raise a beep. It’s not just the security that’s being forgiving with all things French. We appear to be letting them have a lot of medals, too.

Daily moan

One New York Times columnist has dubbed the London Games ‘the mall Olympics’ because the Westfield shopping centre is nearby. Oh, do shut up. Americans created shopping malls. And if there were no shops here, everyone would moan that the park was miles from anywhere.

London 2012 Olympics: Charles van Commenee proud of GB athletes

Van Commenee speaks of pride in GB athletes ahead of Friday's curtain-raiser

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UPDATED:

21:40 GMT, 31 July 2012

UK Athletics head coach Charles van Commenee believes Britain's athletes will make the nation proud with performances in the London Olympics to herald a new golden era in the sport.

Britain won just four athletics medals at the last Games in Beijing, with Christine Ohuruogu claiming gold in the 400m, Germaine Mason (high jump) and Phillips Idowu (triple jump) taking silver and Natasha Danvers (400m hurdles) winning bronze.

Four years on the target is to win double that haul, with at least one of the eight medals gold, but Van Commenee could not be happier with his team's position with just a few days remaining until the athletics programme gets under way.

Proud: The athletics team kick-off their Olympics on Friday

Proud: The athletics team kick-off their Olympics on Friday

'I think we will make the nation proud,' the Dutchman said. 'We are coming from quite far behind [but] this is an important sport in Britain. We have been off the radar for a long time and now we're back at a home Games.

'If these athletes do not make the nation proud then I think it does not look great for the future because it does not look much better than this.'

Asked if the likes of team captain Dai Greene, heptathlete Jessica Ennis and rising stars Holly Bleasdale and Adam Gemili could form a new 'golden generation' to rival that of Linford Christie, Colin Jackson, Sally Gunnell and Jonathan Edwards, Van Commenee added: 'I think so. We have a very strong team.

'Four years ago we won four medals only and look at what we have now. No medals won yet, but we have had a great journey and enough to write about and look forward to. We have some exciting athletes.

Steering the ship: Van Commenee (left)

Steering the ship: Van Commenee (left)

'Four years ago, when I started, if I could position myself here, a few days before the Games, knowing what sort of athletes we have in contention now, I would have signed up for that straight away.

'It's a fantastic opportunity. I really feel privileged to be given the opportunity to lead the British team into this exciting moment.'

Bradley Wiggins' historic victory in the Tour de France took the focus off athletics in the lead-up to the Games, but Van Commenee hopes that a number of excellent performances in Stratford can have a more lasting impact than a triumph on the Champs Elysees.

'I think it's important that the impact the result will have will last for a long time,' added. 'It remains to be seen what the impact is of winning the Tour de France. Is that going to be a few days, weeks or years Nobody knows.

'It's important to see two years after the event to see what the event has meant.'

London 2012 Olympics rowing: Team GB women"s eight reach final

Dutch of class as Team GB women's eight qualify in fourth for final at Eton Dorney

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UPDATED:

10:25 GMT, 31 July 2012

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LIVE RESULTS |
EVENT SCHEDULE |
MEDALS TABLE

Great Britain women's eight qualified for the Olympic final after finishing fourth in the repechage at Eton Dorney.

The race was won in thrilling fashion by Holland, who held off a strong challenge from Romania, with Australia in third.

The British crew, bronze medallists at the world championships last year, finished a length behind in fourth to claim the last available place in Thursday's final.

Team GB women's eight crew (right to left) Victoria Thornley, Katie Greves, Annabel Vernon, Natasha Page, Lindsey Maguire, Jessica Eddie, Louisa Reeve and Olivia Whitlamfinished fourth in the repechage at Eton Dorney

May the fourth be with you: Team GB women's eight crew (right to left) Victoria Thornley, Katie Greves, Annabel Vernon, Natasha Page, Lindsey Maguire, Jessica Eddie, Louisa Reeve and Olivia Whitlam finished fourth

Marshall marches on to claim first women"s world boxing crown for GB

Marshall marches on to claim first women's world boxing crown for GB

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UPDATED:

15:58 GMT, 19 May 2012

Savannah Marshall has been told she can reign at the top of her sport for years to come after being crowned Great Britain's first women's boxing world champion in Qinhuangdao, China.

Great Britain performance director Rob McCracken hailed Marshall's 17-15 win over Elena Vystropova of Azerbaijan and insisted: 'As long as she continues to work hard, Savannah can achieve anything she wants in the sport.'

Marshall's historic middleweight victory came on her 21st birthday, and means the Hartlepool fighter will now head towards the London Olympics as one of the favourites to claim a gold medal.

Headshot: GB's Savannah Marshall (blue) lands a punch on Azerbaijan's Elena Vystropova

Headshot: GB's Savannah Marshall (blue) lands a punch on Azerbaijan's Elena Vystropova

Clearly overwhelmed by her achievement, Marshall said: “It's been an amazing week and to come away as world champion and with a place at the Olympics is pretty incredible.

'It's great to go one better than last time (world silver in 2010) and now I am just looking forward to the Olympics, and making sure I am in the best possible shape to be successful in London.'

Marshall's win completed a highly successful tournament for the women's team, with her team-mates Nicola Adams and Natasha Jonas also doing enough to book Olympic places at flyweight and lightweight respectively.

Eyes on the prize: Savannah Marshall in action

Eyes on the prize: Savannah Marshall in action

Earlier, Adams had missed the chance to pip Marshall to the historic honour of being Britain's first female gold medallist when she was beaten 14-10 by China's world number one Ren Cancan.

Adams, who lost to the same fighter two years ago, said: 'I wanted the gold today and sadly it was not to be, though overall I have to be happy with my week. The Olympics are the big prize, and I hope to go one step further in London.'

The scene was set for Marshall, who had come through a difficult draw to reach the final and was not in for an easy ride against the big-punching Azeri, who bloodied Marshall's nose in a torrid round three.

Focus: Savannah Marshall enters the ring

Focus: Savannah Marshall enters the ring

But boxing behind the stiff jab that had seen her past an illustrious series of opponents, Marshall held her nerve, never giving up the two-point lead she had established at the halfway stage.

McCracken added: 'Savannah has performed superbly throughout the competition and to come away as world champion from such a tough draw in a high-class field is an indication of her immense talent.

'Since we started the women's programme in 2010, all of the squad have worked incredibly hard to get to where they are today. Their achievements are a well deserved reward for their dedication and commitment.'

No quarter: Savannah Marshall and Elena Vystropova clash

No quarter: Savannah Marshall and Elena Vystropova clash

Marshall's win sparked celebrations in her home town of Hartlepool, with her coach at the Headland club, Tim Coulter, admitting: 'Savannah has done the home town proud. It is unbelievable to think we have got a world champion.'

As well as bronze for Jonas, Lancashire's Lisa Whiteside made it a total of four medals for the British team as she was awarded her bronze medal in the featherweight category, which is not an Olympic weight.

Ireland's Katie Taylor won her fourth consecutive gold medal and underlined her status as Olympic favourite as she beat Jonas' conqueror Sofia Ochigava of Russia 11-7 to take the lightweight crown.

Taylor, who pulled away after being level at the halfway stage, said: 'I'm delighted with the win. It was always going to be a game of patience and I caught her with some clean shots in the third round.'

A bout of success as female boxers Adams, Jonas and Marshall edge nearer to Games

A bout of success as female boxers Adams, Jonas and Marshall edge nearer to Games

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UPDATED:

22:12 GMT, 15 May 2012

Three of Britain’s female boxers are close to Olympic qualification after wins at the World Championships in Qinhuangdao, China.

Flyweight Nicola Adams, lightweight Natasha Jonas and middleweight Savannah Marshall yesterday reached the quarter-finals.

They could book London 2012 spots with one or two more wins, depending on the placing of European rivals.

Getting close: Adams

Getting close: Adams

Don’t miss a minute

Fans in Britain who missed out on Olympic tickets will be able to see all the action live on mobile devices. The BBC will stream every event to PCs, mobiles, tablets and internet-connected televisions.