Tag Archives: mornings

Greg Dyke announced as new FA Chairman

Former Man United director Dyke voted as new FA chairman, replacing outgoing Bernstein

By
Charles Sale

PUBLISHED:

11:30 GMT, 21 March 2013

|

UPDATED:

11:54 GMT, 21 March 2013

Former Manchester United director and TV mogul Greg Dyke has been voted through as the next FA chairman, replacing the outgoing incumbent David Bernstein.

Dyke, 65, will replace Bernstein when he leaves the post after two-and-a-half years in July – and takes the helm from Saturday July 13.

Dyke told the FA website: 'Football has always been a big part of my life whether playing 11-a-side on Sunday mornings or six-a-side on Thursday evenings.

Main man: Former United director Dyke will take the helm at the FA

Main man: Former United director Dyke will take the helm at the FA

'I was brought up in a household where my father was much more interested in whether or not you had won at football than whether you had passed your exams. In my case that was just as well.

'I still turn out to play six-a-side some Thursday evenings although at my age I seem to spend more time injured than playing.

'I supported my local team Brentford as a kid where my elder brother was a junior, watched York City while at university and followed Manchester United whenever I could.

'I got involved in how the game was run
when I was first involved in buying sports rights as Chairman of ITV
Sport in the late eighties and later at the BBC.

Game over: Bernstein's (left) tenure at the FA will soon come to an end

Game over: Bernstein's (left) tenure at the FA will soon come to an end

'I learnt a lot in the years when I was on the Board of Manchester United and have seen the other side of the professional game at Brentford.'

The FA said in a statement: 'The Football Association Board has today unanimously approved the nomination for Greg Dyke to be appointed independent FA chairman.

'Dyke, 65, will take over as chairman from David Bernstein when he leaves the post after two-and-a-half years in July – subject to approval by the FA council. The appointment will take effect from Saturday, July 13.

Football man: Dyke's local team while growing up was Brentford

Football man: Dyke's local team while growing up was Brentford – where he became non-executive chairman in 2006

Football man: Dyke's local team while growing up was Brentford

'This follows a recruitment process led
by FA independent director Roger Devlin (chairman of the nominations
committee) with fellow board members Roger Burden and Keith Lamb.

'In a high-profile broadcasting industry career, Dyke has worked as director general of the BBC and managing director of London Weekend Television.

'Dyke has had a long background in football. He was a director of Manchester United in the late nineties and since 2006 he has been non-executive chairman of Brentford Football Club, the team he supported as a boy. He will relinquish this role at the end of the season to take up his new post at the FA.'

Red alert: United director Gill (seen with Dyke) is also on the FA board

Red alert: United director Gill (seen with Dyke) is also on the FA board

Great Britain – we"re world beaters, Daley Thompson

Little Britain, great success: We might be small but we're world beaters

|

UPDATED:

22:48 GMT, 13 August 2012

Sportsmail columnist Daley Thompson looks back on a truly tremendous fortnight of action.

.olympicStats1038148 background:url(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/07_04/bckg308x110.jpg) no-repeat top left; display:block; width:308px; height:110px; padding:0; font-weight:bold
.olympicStats1038148 ul width:98%; padding:2px; list-style:none; position:relative; top:86px; left:6px; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif
.olympicStats1038148 ul li a padding:0 2px; font-size:11px; color:#0cac0c; text-decoration:none
.olympicStats1038148 a:hover text-decoration:underline
.olympicStats1038148 ul li float:left; list-style-type: none; padding: 0;

LIVE RESULTS |
EVENT SCHEDULE |
MEDALS TABLE

The world will go away impressed and with treasured memories that will last a lifetime. We are the biggest little country in the world and a little shy to say how great we are at times. My friend, former Australia cricket captain Steve Waugh, told me the facilities and atmosphere were the best he’s ever seen.

I don’t know what we can do to thank Sebastian Coe. He’s brought the country together and put a smile on everybody’s faces. He’s done an unbelievable job.

Hats off: Lord Sebastian Coe delivered a quite remarkable spectacle

Hats off: Lord Sebastian Coe delivered a quite remarkable spectacle

THE PROPER THANK YOUS…

The blazers will be putting in their orders for New Year honours about now, but we should save our heartfelt thanks for the people who really deserve it — the athletes, their coaches and their parents who have all spent many years preparing their charges for these Games. It’s the early dark mornings, training in the snow and rain, and the long car journeys to competitions in the middle of nowhere when nobody knows your name that build the belief and attitude which win you a place on the team. In Beijing there was no involvement from the local people. London has been a happier place and a more inclusive Games. The volunteers have been amazing and one of the best things that happened was G4S not being able to complete their job. It meant the armed forces came in and they were brilliant.

Heroes: Troops stepped in at late notice to become an integral part of the Games's success

Heroes: Troops stepped in at late notice to become an integral part of the Games's success

Three British moments I loved

Watching Tim Baillie and Etienne Stott win the canoe slalom. They had seven pairs going after them so it was really tense for about 25 minutes.

The 45 minutes in the Olympic Stadium on the first Saturday was magical. First Jess Ennis won gold, then Greg Rutherford and then Mo Farah. You can’t beat that.

Katherine Grainger winning after all the pain of those silvers at other Games. I was so happy for her.

THE GREAT DEBATE…

If you follow Sir Steve Redgrave’s theory, then there is a new greatest in town — Sir Chris Hoy. He has six gold medals so should therefore be considered the best Olympian we’ve had, overtaking Redgrave. The greatest is dead, long live the greatest. However, if you agree with my theory that such a title is impossible to give to one athlete, then we can all still enjoy endless hours of pub talk about who our favourites are and their merits. So welcome to my round table of greatness, Chris, where there is room for many.

MOAN No 1…

I don’t understand why the relay team failed again. They are fast enough and they should have won a medal. Our sprinters are rubbish on the world stage — an Olympic semi-final is the best they can hope for — but as a relay team we have a chance. It’s their only way on earth of winning a medal, so they should have been prioritising it ahead of the individual event, practising all the time. It’s delusional to think they can do anything on their own and a real shame.

Over the line: Great Britain's relay team should have won a medal

Over the line: Great Britain's relay team should have won a medal

BEST OF BRITISH…

I thought we’d do as well as we did and it’s great because we want and need British heroes. Now it’s important that the sports clubs across this country are ready for all the kids who are going to want to get involved. That’s what will ensure our success for the next 20 years. The Australians were brilliant from 2000 till about a year ago. They’ve become complacent. They haven’t continued to change. Look at the cycling. They did well in the World Championships and thought that would be enough. It wasn’t. Sport is so competitive that you always need to look to improve and we must do that if we want to keep being this successful.

Backward step: Australia won six cycling medals at the velodrome - one gold, two silver and three bronze

Backward step: Australia won six cycling medals at the velodrome – one gold, two silver and three bronze

And three non-British moments

My favourite of the whole Games was David Rudisha winning the 800 metres. The way he ran the race was unbelievable.

The 200m butterfly where Michael Phelps just got beaten in the final length by South Africa swimmer Chad le Clos was so exciting. Phelps could never lose that event — it was unthinkable.

The women’s volleyball final between Brazil and the USA was incredible, with some great rallies. I went to a pool match and the USA won so it was a surprise to see Brazil beat them.

THE BIG DIP…

Most of the athletics competitors will be out earning a living again in the next few weeks. But this will be the end of the year for some other sports. And a lot of competitors will go back to normal life and their jobs. It is tough for some people — most feel a bit flat after an Olympics because coming off that high and back to normality is difficult. I never found it a problem because I was so focused on training for the next event. The key is to go back to training only when you feel comfortable. In the meantime, just enjoy it, see your friends and family, and ride the wave. Then one day you’ll wake up and want to train again.

MY SPORT SHONE…

It was the best athletics meet ever. The performances to win events were staggering. Nobody would have thought that Andrew Osagie’s 1min 43.77sec would be good enough only for last place in the 800 metres. Mo Farah was unreal, too. Everyone thought he had a good chance of a medal but he surpassed that. Some people think that Usain Bolt was not as successful as he was in Beijing, because he wasn’t breaking as many records. But no-one has won those titles in consecutive Games like he has. He can continue if he wants — he’s a young man — but he might struggle to find the motivation because he could have better things to do. You have to really want it. Moving up to the 400m won’t happen either because it takes much more training.

Motivation: After two consecutive gold medal triple-hauls, where does Usain Bolt go from here

Motivation: After two consecutive gold medal triple-hauls, where does Usain Bolt go from here

MOAN No 2…

The Badminton World Federation’s decision to ban those players for trying to lose to secure an easier match after their round-robin was the worst thing at the Games. They had created that format, they knew what was going to happen. All the athletes were trying to do was improve their chances in a system they’d been given. It’s not that much different from a runner deliberately slowing down to save energy and finishing fourth when he knows the top four qualify from a race. The BWF created rules which made losing appealing — it should be a straight knockout in future.

He must stay: Charles van Commenee has done a splendid job

He must stay: Charles van Commenee has done a splendid job

DON’T GO, CHARLES…

Charles van Commenee hasn’t done a bad job. His problem is that he’s backed himself into a corner by saying he needed to deliver eight medals. But, of the six we did win in athletics, four of them were gold, which is the equivalent to 20 silvers, in my opinion. What else is he going to do He’s already the highest paid in that job in the world, so where else would he go

Interview by Alex Kay

Six Nations 2012: George North exclusive

George North exclusive: Sportsmail's new columnist ahead of the Six Nations

The RBS Six Nations kicks off this weekend with the focus on a new look England. However, in Wales one young man has already made himself a star. And here Sportmail's new columnist George North opens up about life at the top of the game.

The World Cup was one hell of an experience

It feels like years ago now but I will keep hold of it — my first World Cup, my first full competition for my country.

Welcome: George North has signed up as Sportsmail's Six Nations columnist

Welcome: George North has signed up as Sportsmail's Six Nations columnist

With Ireland approaching we’ve looked back and spoken about that quarter-final. It was probably our best performance but in some ways Samoa was more significant. It was must-win, we were getting smashed up by these massive Islanders and we still came away with the victory. The whole team grew in confidence after that.

I owe the supporters a thank you

Like all the players and the management, I really do want to thank the fans for their incredible support and for being so passionate while we were out there.

It doesn’t take a genius to work out there is pressure on us now after how well we performed and it did help probably being out of the picture for a little bit, just free to get our training done and get our prep in.

Personally, I try not to listen to any hype too much because it can get in the way of training.

Powering through: North is one of the most exciting in his position in the world

Powering through: North is one of the most exciting in his position in the world

The Poland training camps are as much a mental as physical battle

Early mornings, long days. The work was similar to our pre-World Cup training camps but we couldn’t do the same volume because it was a shorter turnaround.

It was so cold in Gdansk that nobody really wanted to be there but we know it is all for a good purpose so you just get on with it.

The day starts at 6am with ‘monitoring’, which is a weigh-in and your saliva and urine tests for hydration levels, then the first session in the gym starts an hour later. We did a fitness session on the beach — it was so cold there was snow on the sand. I couldn’t get my head around that.

Work ethic was always important to me because it had to be…

I believe it’s my work ethic that has got me here today. In Wales, there is a lot of competition to get a look-in and being from North Wales meant I didn’t get many chances.

The geography means all of the rugby is based in Newport, Llanelli, Swansea and Cardiff. It is better now but we hardly got any chance to play in South Wales so taking your chances was key. It’s something I’ve always believed in: if you work hard you’re rewarded.

They are moving Under 20 home Six Nations matches to North Wales now which will be a great thing.

…it was something I learned from my old man

Both my parents have had a massive impact on my life. My dad always said: ‘When you’ve got a chance, work until you’ve nothing left because you might not get another.’

I have an older brother and two older sisters who are the complete opposite to me. The joke in the family is that my brother got the brains and I got the brawn. He’s the A-class student and I’m the A-class lump.

I lost my wooden spoon at the World Cup

The youngest player in the squad has to carry a giant wooden spoon. In the last week I lost it. Ninety-two hours later — and about 12 room raids — I finally found it in Adam Jones’ room. It cost me three figures in fines and the boys wound me up. I wasn’t happy. It kept changing hands and I was always just behind it.

Get in shape: The Wales embarked on a challenging training camp in Poland, which included cryotherapy chambers

Get in shape: The Wales embarked on a challenging training camp in Poland, which included cryotherapy chambers

We don’t stay in camp all week

It varies depending on our schedule. We generally go home on Wednesday and Thursday but away games are different. I’ve never played in Dublin but it’s probably the closest game for my family because they still live in North Wales.

The boys have been telling me it’s a great stadium to play in and it will be two countries who love to play. They play physical and they play fast but they like to play rugby. It’s one of those you wish you could watch sometimes!

I’m a member of ‘the original wolf pack’…

…but I can’t tell you any more! It’s on my Twitter page and it’s between me and my team-mates. I’m not very good at gaming, but I like to get online and play with the boys – a bit of Call of Duty and a bit of FIFA. It’s supposed to be rest time but I’m sure some of the boys’ heart-rates should not go that high on a day off.

I want to play a bit of golf but I don’t have enough time off. I won’t mention my handicap because I haven’t played in so long but Rhys Priestland is a bit of a golfer.

Tribute: North has hailed the retired Shane Williams

Tribute: North has hailed the retired Shane Williams

I am wary of ‘second-season’ syndrome

It's something a lot of players go through and something I want to minimalize. There is going to be a lot of expectation and I’ve got to deal with it.

It’ll be OK as long as I don’t forget why I’m there – if you lose focus you lose out. Does that make sense or do I sound like a nut case

I’m not too bad on the superstitions

Compared to my team-mates, at least. I start off with my left sock, then my right sock, left boot, right boot, then I pull my socks up and tie my laces in the same order, left then right. That’s the one thing I have to do before I go on to the pitch.

Shane Williams is a great loss – for me and for Wales

Ask any Welsh wing at any level who is your favourite player and I guarantee you nine out of 10 will say ‘Shane Williams’. I learned so much from him, watching him, playing against him, playing with him, even talking to the guy.

But if he felt it was time to retire then I back him to the hilt. The boys are winding me up saying he’s the new agility guru coming in to teach us to side step.

Injuries are the nature of the beast

This run of bad luck has felt like a bit of a low blow but you can’t get away from playing rugby without getting injuries. It’s bound to happen and we’ve just got to manage them and work around them.

The quality we’ve got means those who come in can still do the same job. Every dog has its day. It all comes back to that lesson: if you have a chance, you take it.

George North is supporting RBS RugbyForce, the community rugby programme that is improving club facilities across the nation. To register your club for the RBS RugbyForce Weekend on June 2 and 3, visit: www.rbs.com/rugbyforce

Getting to know George North

I'm not a massive fan of books but I am reading 61 Hours by Lee Child which was given to me by a close friend Andy McCann. It's taking me ages to get through because I read a chapter and then fall asleep.

I don’t have any quirky pastimes but I have started collecting the key cards from hotels. It’s not like I have to, only if I remember.

I have a cat and a dog. The dog is called Bess and the cat is called Splodge – don’t ask, it’s a very long story.

Wolf pack: Despite being the youngest, North is a key member of the dressing room

Wolf pack: Despite being the youngest, North is a key member of the dressing room

I don’t really have a favourite holiday destination. I don’t really have enough time if I’m honest. Hopefully after the Six Nations I’ll get some rays on a beach and relax, or go home and see the family in sunny North Wales.

I watch a lot of DVDs and try to go to the cinema as much as I can. It’s a great way to chill out. I’m more into action and comedy – but I can’t stand horror movies.

When I was growing up I really played every sport I could. I didn’t play anything to a high level really, but I just couldn’t bear to be still for very long.