Tag Archives: monty

BBC put Daily Service on Radio 4 instead of England cricket win in India

Cricket listeners miss historic series win …again! Daily Service took Radio 4 priority over India triumph after Ashes blackout

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UPDATED:

18:19 GMT, 17 December 2012

TMS's Jonathan Agnew welcomed listeners back at 10am, after the match had finished

TMS's Jonathan Agnew welcomed listeners back at 10am, after the match had finished

Cricket fans once again missed the climax of a historic England series win on the radio today – and this time they were listening to a hymn instead.

Nearly two years ago, some fans missed the moment England clinched their first Ashes series win in Australia for nearly a quarter of a century because Radio 4 Long Wave was broadcasting the shipping forecast.

This time round, as England secured a first series win in India since 1985, the Daily Service was taking place.

Admittedly there was an inevitability about events on Monday, with the fourth Test in Nagpur heading for a draw long before the end of the final day’s play.

Radio bosses will still have been cursing their luck however, with the final ball of the Test bowled at around 9.50am UK time, just as the Daily Service was being broadcast.

It was left to the BBC’s cricket correspondent Jonathan Agnew to welcome listeners back at around 10am, with news that the game had finished, and England had laid another cricketing ghost to rest.

There are other ways of listening to the BBC’s radio coverage of cricket, including the digital station 5 Live Sports Extra and online. Many listeners however will still only have access to the cricket via Radio 4 Long Wave on their analogue sets.

It goes to show once again that in the hallowed world of Radio 4, no sporting event can interfere with the daily schedule.

Matt Prior celebrates the historic win with Sussex teammate Monty Panesar

Matt Prior celebrates the historic win with Sussex teammate Monty Panesar

England paceman Stuart Broad ruled out of final India Test

Broad ruled out of India Test but England delay decision on Twenty20 series

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UPDATED:

07:51 GMT, 12 December 2012

Stuart Broad has been ruled
out of contention for Thursday's final Test against India because of his
bruised left heel, but have delayed making a decision on his
availabilty for next week's two Twenty20s.

England's Twenty20 captain was highly
unlikely in any case to be selected to play India in Nagpur, when the
tourists will be bidding for a historic 3-1 series win.

Setback: Stuart Broad has been troubled by a heel injury

Setback: Stuart Broad has been troubled by a heel injury

The fast bowler lost form, after first suffering a heel injury in a tour match in Mumbai last month, and was not involved in last week's seven-wicket victory at Eden Gardens.

After suffering more discomfort at net practice yesterday, he was sent for a second scan – which showed exactly the same as the first one he underwent five weeks ago.

Test captain Alastair Cook confirmed the news at his press conference at the VCA Stadium.

'Stuart is out of this Test match,' he said.

'His scan has showed a bruised heel, and we'll assess him over the next day or so to see what happens with the Twenty20.

Focused: England's Monty Panesar

Focused: England's Monty Panesar

'We'll know a bit more when it settles down.'

Broad has endured an especially
miserable tour, in which he did not manage to take a wicket in either of
the first two Tests – and was then dropped for the third, in order to
accommodate fit-again seamer Steven Finn.

'It's the nature of sport, isn't it Some people have good tours, and some people don't,' added Cook.

'Unfortunately, more down to niggles and and illnesses, Broady hasn't quite managed to get into the tour.

'It's frustrating for him, and disappointing for us as a side.

'But we all know the class of Broady, and he'll be back.'

England go to Nagpur, back to where it all started for Alastair Cook and Monty Panesar

England go to Nagpur, back to where it all started for Cook and Panesar

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UPDATED:

23:29 GMT, 11 December 2012

England's last Test at Nagpur was at the city’s old venue, but it was the start of a new era with Alastair Cook flying in from an A tour in the Caribbean to score 60 and 104 not out on his debut.

It was also Monty Panesar’s first Test, which he marked by claiming Sachin Tendulkar lbw as his maiden wicket.

The first of many: Monty Panesar celebrates bowling Sachin Tendulkar in 2006. He accounted for the Little Master Twice in Mumbai

The first of many: Monty Panesar celebrates bowling Sachin Tendulkar in 2006. He accounted for the Little Master Twice in Mumbai

First Test

(Nagpur, March 1-5, 2006)

England 393 (Collingwood 134) and 297 for 3 (Cook 104no).

India 323 (Kaif 91, Hoggard 6-57) and 260 for 6 (Jaffer 100)

Match drawn

The Little Master later signed the ball, writing on it: ‘To Monty, once in a blue moon, never again mate.’

England’s third debutant in a game that ended in a draw was Somerset’s Ian Blackwell, who scored four runs, failed to take a wicket with his left-arm spin and was never picked again for his country.

First of 23: Alastair Cook celebrates his maiden Test century in Nagpur

First of 23: Alastair Cook celebrates his maiden Test century in Nagpur

The good news for England’s seamers was that Matthew Hoggard returned first-innings figures of 30.5-13-57-6.

India v England: Alastair Cook run out case of after you Claude – David Lloyd

BUMBLE'S TEST DIARY: It's a case of 'after you Claude' for captain Cook but England can rely on their attack

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UPDATED:

18:16 GMT, 7 December 2012

The Alastair Cook run out was a classic case of “after you Claude”.

It’s just a quirk of the game. As usual, the players didn’t know the law but it is very clear – if he had ever grounded his bat he would have been not out.

Umpire Rod Tucker knew straight away, Cook had never regained his ground so he had to go.

After you Claude: Cook was run out in bizarre fashion

After you Claude: Cook was run out in bizarre fashion

PICTURE DISPUTE

We are unable to carry live pictures from the third Test in Kolkata due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations.

The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

India on the ropes

England are exactly where they want to be. That last session they really stepped on it and scored at four-and-a-half an over as India wilted in the field – their fielding was almost comical again.

England are now looking to get a lead of 250, which puts India out of the game.

This pitch will not get any better, there are already signs of wear and tear, and I fully expect England to go 2-1 up unless India can produce something extra special.

No comparison

I expect England to win because their bowlers are infinitely better than their Indian counterparts.

In terms of pace and bounce, India have nobody to match Steven Finn (and he will be a real handful now the bounce is uneven), Jimmy Anderson has completely outbowled Zaheer Khan in terms of swing and the spinners Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann have simply been too hot for India.

Tall order: Finn offers far more pace and bounce than India's seamers

Tall order: Finn offers far more pace and bounce than India's seamers

For whom the Bell tolls

In terms of England’s batting, it’s big ticks for Cook, Nick Compton and Jonathan Trott, plus we had a little cameo from Kevin Pietersen.

But Ian Bell is a touch player and it is so hard to wander back in to Test cricket (after he went home for the birth of his boy) when you are in no form at all and to play well straight away.

Give Samit a good go

I’d really like Samit Patel to get a run in the side at No 6. I think he’s an excellent player and deserves to play ahead of Jonny Bairstow and Eoin Morgan.

Six of the best: Patel deserves a good go

Six of the best: Patel deserves a good go

He scored 33 quality runs but he will know he has still not done enough. However, he should get a prolonged run and play the Tests here and in New Zealand. One thing he is not is an all-rounder. He’s a batter who can roll his arm over.

Shane gets a tonking

Anyone who watched the Big Bash cricket from Australia will have seen Shane Warne bowl two overs for 41! It was so funny.

Warne was miked up and was saying “I’m going to bowl the slider now”… and it disappeared 12 rows back! Next ball he said “right, I’m bowling the googly” and that went even further! Ever the showman he took his cap and said: “Think I’ll go and hide now.”

Maybe that Ashes comeback should be put on ice…

Ian Bell to ring changes in third Test against India

I'll be ringing the changes, insists returning Bell ahead of third Test against India

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UPDATED:

22:30 GMT, 2 December 2012

Back to business for England at the iconic Eden Gardens on Sunday, with a pitch row still raging and a new dad vowing to put cricket into its proper perspective.

As England enjoyed a few days off in the aftermath of their historic win in Mumbai, India have found themselves caught up in an unseemly squabble over the surface for the third Test which starts here on Wednesday.

Prabir Mukherjee, the octogenarian Eden Gardens groundsman who called MS Dhoni’s demand for a turning pitch ‘immoral’, was enjoying his time in the spotlight, happily waving and chatting to all and sundry, while England quietly practised with the series level and the pressure off them.

Captain's orders: India's MS Dhoni has demanded a pitch to suit his side

Captain's orders: India's MS Dhoni has demanded a pitch to suit his side

The sprightly Mukherjee has vowed to ignore Dhoni and do things his way, but the bad news for England is that the pitch he wants to prepare is more likely to resemble the low, slow turner of Ahmedabad than the bouncy, jagging Mumbai surface that was such to Monty Panesar’s liking.

‘It will be a true pitch — and it will be up to the players to play well on it,’ said a defiant Mukherjee.

One man who will be happy to play on anything provided is Ian Bell, who flew back to Kolkata two days ahead of the England team’s arrival here after missing the second Test in theory to return home for the birth of his first child.

As it turned out, Joseph William Bell was impatient to appear, and his father, having rushed away from the Test in Ahmedabad, had not left India when he was born.

Back: Ian Bell returns to the England squad for the third Test against India

Back: Ian Bell returns to the England squad for the third Test against India

‘I managed to get as far as Mumbai when the baby arrived,’ said Bell, who looks sure to regain his place at the expense of Jonny Bairstow. ‘I would have been there had he been on time but he couldn’t wait! It worked out well, though, in that they came home early so I could spend more time with them.’

Bell had looked distracted in the early weeks of this tour, and the hope now is that his paternity leave will clear his mind and help him improve the poor record in India that, at the moment, is a stain on his international record. His lamentable shot first ball in Ahmedabad summed up his fortunes here.

‘Maybe, sometimes, I’ve tried a bit too hard,’ said Bell. ‘And that shot in Ahmedabad was a sign of me saying, “Right, I’m coming at you”. But after what has happened in the last week or so, my whole attitude has changed.

Raring to go: Steven Finn will be fit for England's next Test against India

Raring to go: Steven Finn will be fit for England's next Test against India

‘Maybe I’ve put a bit too much on myself in the past and beat myself up, but now I just want to go out and trust my ability. I have no regrets about going home — parenthood is the best thing that has ever happened to me. It has given me more of a balance and I can enjoy every day I’m with the England team. That’s what I want to do — go out, not worry about things and enjoy my cricket.’

Steven Finn did not bowl at Eden Gardens on Sunday, but England insisted that was more to do with the fact that he delivered 23 hostile overs for the England Performance Squad last week rather than any worries about his fitness.

Finn, who damaged his thigh in England’s first warm-up game, was due to return to action on Monday with the out-of-sorts Stuart Broad, who bowled for 40 minutes on Sunday, sitting out practice.

The odds remain on Finn playing in place of his vice-captain in a second change to England’s winning team.

James Tredwell called into England squad for India tour

Tredwell called into England squad as cover for spin kings Swann and Panesar

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UPDATED:

10:49 GMT, 29 November 2012

As if further confirmation was needed of England's error in selecting just one spinner for the first Test in Ahmedabad earlier this month, James Tredwell has now been added to the squad for the ongoing tour of India.

The 30-year-old Kent off spinner will join up with Alastair Cook's side on Saturday ahead of the third Test starting in Kolkata next Wednesday.

Cover: Tredwell has been called into England's squad

Cover: Tredwell has been called into England's squad

Having been comprehensively beaten fielding just one spinner in Ahmedabad, England called Monty Panesar into their side to partner first-choice Graeme Swann for the second Test in Mumbai last week and were duly rewarded with a series-levelling 10-wicket win as the pair picked up 19 of the 20 Indian wickets to fall.

Tredwell is unlikely to play in the remaining two Tests unless either Swann or Panesar are injured, though he provides much needed cover in the slow bowling department as no other specialist spinners are in the touring party.

Spin kings: Swann (left) and Panesar (right) took 19 wickets in Mumbai

Spin kings: Swann (left) and Panesar (right) took 19 wickets in Mumbai

'Tredwell has performed really well for us,' said England team director Andy Flower. 'He can make a real impact as a spin bowler. He is arriving in Kolkata on December 1 as cover.

'We have some spinners with the Performance Programme. But Tredwell is a senior spinner and will stay with us for the Tests.'

Tredwell, who was recently named as Kent's new captain, has played just one Test previously – taking six wickets as England beat Bangladesh in Dhaka in March 2010.

England have fantastic four: Kevin Pietersen, Alastair Cook, Graeme Swann, Monty Panesar – Nasser Hussain

Triumph is thanks to fantastic four… but it's time to have a word with out-of-sorts Broad

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 26 November 2012

When you consider where England were after being outplayed in the Ahmedabad Test and then losing the toss in Mumbai, this will go down as one of their great victories. The character they showed to play such exceptional cricket was immense.

It would have been easy for England’s heads to drop after the first Test, amid all the talk of a 4-0 defeat, and that they did not is to the absolute credit of Alastair Cook and Andy Flower in particular.

Cricket is such an individual game and this win was down to four individuals who put in absolutely unbelievable performances – Monty Panesar, Graeme Swann, Cook and, of course, Kevin Pietersen. They beat India at their own game.

Well-earned beer: (clockwise from top left) Graeme Swann, Matt Prior, Alastair Cook, James Anderson and Kevin Pietersen toast victory in the dressing room

Well-earned beer: (clockwise from top left) Graeme Swann, Matt Prior, Alastair Cook, James Anderson and Kevin Pietersen toast victory in the dressing room

More from Nasser Hussain…

Nasser Hussain: 'Public enemy No 1' Pietersen is a genius and he is worth a bit of hassle
25/11/12

Nasser Hussain: England captain Cook comes nicely to the boil in Mumbai
23/11/12

Nasser Hussain: Captain Cook must think on his feet now that the pressure is on
21/11/12

Nasser Hussain: The time has come for you to go out and show us you can play
19/11/12

Nasser Hussain: England can rely on captain Cook on the subcontinent
18/11/12

Nasser Hussain: Old subcontinental demons come back to haunt England
16/11/12

Daily Dossier: Missing Monty is England's achilles in Ahmedabad
15/11/12

Nasser Hussain: Jimmy to set trap for Little Master… but beware new star Kohli and old foe Sehwag
13/11/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

I always thought India would be better off preparing flat pitches rather than ones that turned from the first ball like this did, and I think the surface will be much flatter for next week’s third Test in Kolkata.

That would then pose a question for England as to whether they should somehow try to squeeze a fifth bowler into the line-up. Panesar was quite brilliant in this second Test. We had all the talk about whether he should have more variations or bowl at differing paces but in this game he did what he does best: bowl quickly and get the ball to spin at pace.

In recent times Monty has only played when it has been blindingly obvious that he should, but perhaps England need to change their mind-set and play him unless it is blindingly obvious that he should not.

Sometimes we don’t see what’s in front of our eyes and in Panesar England have a seriously good bowler who has made a strong case for playing more often.

Some of the deliveries he bowled to
Sachin Tendulkar in particular were remarkable and for that reason I
would not be too critical of the Indian batsmen.

I
don’t think India will panic. Tendulkar is enduring a poor run of form
but any batsman in the world would have been out to the balls he faced
in this Test.

All-time great: Sachin Tendulkar has earned the right to choose when to quit

All-time great: Sachin Tendulkar has earned the right to choose when to quit

It would not be wise to write the great man off just yet and, in any case, he has earned the right to decide when he will leave the stage.

I would bring Ian Bell straight back into the team, probably for Jonny Bairstow, and I would sit Stuart Broad down now to have a chat with him about where he’s at. I wouldn’t judge him on this match on that pitch but there is no question that he has been out of sorts in recent times and England have to be sure he is fully fit as they move forward in this series.

Again, it would be unwise to write off someone like Broad, because he is a great competitor who might find the Kolkata conditions more to his liking.

For now England should enjoy the moment. Wins like this do not come around too often and should be savoured. Then the hard work will begin again.

Picture Dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from the Second Test in Mumbai due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and international news organisations. The BCCI has refused access to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to boycott BCCI imagery.

LIVE: India v England, day four, second Test, Mumbai

LIVE: India v England – the action on day four of the second Test in Mumbai

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UPDATED:

06:46 GMT, 26 November 2012

Stay up to date with all the action on day four of the second Test between England and India with Sportsmail's
unrivalled team. We'll deliver over-by-over coverage as the action
unfolds in Mumbai while our brilliant team of writers update
with their insights from the ground. Tweet your thoughts to: @jamesandrew_ or email [email protected]

India v England: Essentials

India: G Gambhir, V Sehwag, CA Pujara,
SR Tendulkar, V Kohli, Y Singh, MS Dhoni (Captain, wkt), R Ashwin, H Singh, Z Khan, PP Ojha

England: AN Cook (Captain), NRD Compton, IJL Trott, KP Pietersen, JM Bairstow, SR Patel, MJ Prior (wkt), SCJ Broad, GP Swann, JM Anderson, MS Panesar

Umpires: A Dar (Pak) and T Hill (NZ)

Match referee: R Mahanama (SL)

India won the toss and elected to bat

First innings: India 327, England 413

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3.45am: Good morning and welcome to Sportsmail's live coverage of the fourth day of the second day between India and England in Mumbai.

And if you are an England fan then it promises to be an exciting morning with the chance of victory with a day to spare.

Yesterday, Kevin Pietersen lead the way with the bat and then it was the turn of Monty Panesar to leave India in a spin with the ball, can he do the same this morning

3.50am: Play is due to get underway at 4am (UK time) and Gambhir and Harbhajan will be the men in the middle for India as they try and lead the fightback.34th over: India 127-7 (Gambhir 58, Harbhajan 6)

34th over: India 127-7 (Gambhir 58, Harbhajan 6)

Monty Panesar opens the bowling for England, and Harbhajan makes a statement of intent with the first ball, smashing the ball over mid-on for FOUR. Gambhir then shows his intent with a FOUR from a loosner on the leg side. 10 runs from the first over for India.

35th over: India 128-8 (Gambhir 59, Khan 0)

Graeme Swann is the bowler at the other end. Gambhir works one away off the pads for a single.

WICKET: Harbhajan c Trott b Swann 6

Breakthrough for England in the second over. Swann gets some good bounce on the ball and it comes off the gloves and is a simple catch for Jonathan Trott at slip.

36th over: India 129-8 (Gambhir 60, Khan 0)

Panesar finds his range and after 10 from his first over, India manage just one off the over from Gambhir.

37th over: India 131-8 (Gambhir 61, Khan 1)

Gambhir takes a single off the first ball, in normal circumstances he would try and keep the strike as much as possible, but in this case, every run counts so he has to take the single when they are on offer. Khan gets off the mark with an inside edge.

Spin twins: Swann (right) and Panesar (left) mopped up the final few wickets for England

Spin twins: Swann (right) and Panesar (left) mopped up the final few wickets for England

38th over: India 131-9 (Gambhir 61, Ojah 0)

Panesar gets the chance to bowl at Khan.

WICKET: Khan C Prior b Panesar 1

England's excellent start to the morning continues as Panesar gets in on the act. Khan goes for a slog sweep and miss-times the shot and get a huge top edge and Prior gets himself into position to take a simple catch.

Ojha is the final man out in the middle.Wicket maiden for Monty.

39th over: India 131-9 (Gambhir 61, Ojha 0)

Hugh shout for LBW off Swann's first ball to Ojha, but the ball was probably turning too much. Maiden for Swann.

40th over: India 136-9 (Gambhir 62, Ojah 4)

Gambhir continues to take runs when they are on offer and expose the tail. One off the first ball. Ojha then hits a FOUR as he drills it down the ground. Next ball Ojha gets an inside edge to the ball and Swann takes the catch at slip. But for some reason Umpire Dar does not give it out, a quite bizarre decision.

Last man out: Gautam Gambhir was the final wicket to fall

Last man out: Gautam Gambhir was the final wicket to fall

41st over: India 136-9 (Gambhir 62, Ojah 4)

Swann chips in with another maiden.

42nd over: India 139-9 (Gambhir 64, Ojah 5)

Ojha gets an inside edge off the first ball and takes a single. India then go for two of the penultimate ball and it is nearly a run out, poor running from India, but they do get home.

43rd over: India 140-9 (Gambhir 64, Ojah 6)

Ojha takes a single with a thick outside edge.

44th over: India 142-9 (Gambhir 65, Ojah 6)

Panesar gets one to turn sharply and it goes past Prior for a bye and then Gambhir goes onto his back foot to work one round the corner for one.

44th over: India 142-9 (Gambhir 65, Ojah 6)

WICKET: Gambhir LBW b Swann 65

That is it! Swann takes the final wicket of the innings with an LBW that Tony Hill has no hesitation in raising his finger, despite a hint of bat before it hit the pad. While two wrongs don't make a right, England will feel justice is done after the clear catch was not given a couple of overs ago.

INDIA ALL OUT FOR 142

1st over: England 8-0 (Cook 4 Compton 0)

England need just 57 runs to win the Test. Ravi Ashwin opens the bowling and the first ball goes for four byes. Alastair Cook then tries a cut shot and get an inside edge and sees it away for FOUR.

2nd over: England 13-0 (Cook 4 Compton 5)

Nick Compton looks to be positive from the start and smashes the ball from Ojha down the ground for FOUR, he then takes a single off the next ball.

3rd over: England 21-0 (Cook 4 Compton 13)

Ashwin bowls a full toss to Compton and the England batsman does not miss out as he times the ball perfectly as he drives the ball wide of mid-on for FOUR. Compton seems to be in a hurry, he takes another FOUR with a reverse sweep.

4th over: England 25-0 (Cook 7 Compton 14)

Cook takes a single off the first ball from Ojha. Compton takes a single, these two don't look like they want to hang around for too long, they want to get the job done as quickly as possible. Cook adds a couple more.

Positive play: England batsman Nick Compton scored 30 not out as the tourists won

Positive play: England batsman Nick Compton scored 30 not out as the tourists won

5th over: England 31-0 (Cook 11 Compton 16)

Leg bye off the first ball, and then Cook takes a single off the second ball, these two are rotating the strike well. Cook finds the gap and gets the ball wide of point and take three runs.

6th over: England 38-0 (Cook 11 Compton 22)

Good footwork from Compton as he hits a maximum down the ground for a flat SIX. England have broken the back of this total, they need just 19 more to win.

7th over: England 43-0 (Cook 15 Compton 23)

Harbhajan Singh is on to bowl for India. Cook drives the ball off the pads for three and then Compton drives one to long-on for one. Big shout for LBW for Cook, but it is outside the line.

8th over: England 45-0 (Cook 15 Compton 24)

One bye off the first ball, Compton, who is playing very positively, gets a single.

Professional job: Alastair Cook saw England home to victory

Professional job: Alastair Cook saw England home to victory

9th over: England 50-0 (Cook 18 Compton 26)

Cook tucks one away off Singh for a and they come back for two as England get the target down to single figures. Compton works one away for a single.

10th over: England 58-0 (Cook 18 Compton 30)

Ashwin is back on for India and the first ball is sent to the boundary. Compton gets forward and then rocks back and cuts the ball away, the fast outfield sees it over the rope for FOUR. Four more runs come from a wayward ball that goes away for four byes and THAT IS IT. ENGLAND WIN THE SECOND TEST BY 10 WICKETS

ENGLAND WIN THE SECOND TEST BY 10 WICKETS AND THE SERIES IS LEVEL AT 1-1 WITH TWO TESTS TO PLAY

A very professional days play by England. Panesar and Swann did the job with the ball and then Cook and Compton took no time at all to chase down India's target.

Kevin Pietersen is awarded the man of the match for his 186 in the first innings.

Time to deliver: England and India will play the second Test at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai

Time to deliver: England and India will play the second Test at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai

Picture Dispute

We are unable to carry live pictures from the Second Test in Mumbai
due to a dispute between the Board of Control for Cricket in India
(BCCI) and international news organisations. The BCCI has refused access
to Test venues to established picture agencies Getty Images and Action
Images and other Indian photographic agencies. MailOnline consider this
action to be a strike against press freedom and supports the action to
boycott BCCI imagery.

Kevin Pietersen and Monty Panesar puts in magical display

Pietersen puts in genius display as England are spinning to victory in Mumbai Test

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UPDATED:

11:30 GMT, 25 November 2012

Towards the end of a traumatic year for English cricket, here was a day to gladden their fans’ hearts.

First Kevin Pietersen lived up to the name of the fake Twitter account that caused so much angst in the summer and produced an innings of pure genius. Then England’s spinners got to work on India’s batsmen.

That’s right: England’s spinners got to work on India’s batsmen. It feels strange even writing it. The Mumbai Test was supposed to be just another part of India’s masterplan to humiliate England on turning pitches and show them that winning a series 4-0 is simply a matter of being granted home advantage by the fixtures computer.

Pure genius: Kevin Pietersen showed his class in the Mumbai Test

Pure genius: Kevin Pietersen showed his class in the Mumbai Test

So sure was MS Dhoni of his tactics –
and why wouldn’t he have been after the horror show of England’s first
innings at Ahmedabad – that he demanded a Wankhede pitch which would
turn from the first ball. He wanted, he said, to take the toss out of
the equation. He got his wish. And, barring a miracle tomorrow, it
appears to have blown up in his face.

There
is, though, no accounting for special talent, and it’s only fair to
point out that the highest score in England’s 413 after Alastair Cook’s
122 and Pietersen’s 186 was Nick Compton’s 29. Between them, Cook and
Pietersen made three-quarters of England’s runs.

But that’s the deal in international
cricket, and of India’s trio of spinners, only Pragyan Ojha looked even
vaguely capable of coming to terms with it.

Cook
was superbly stoical once more, the first player to score a hundred in
each of his first four Tests as captain. At this rate, you wouldn’t bet
against him extending the sequence to five at Kolkata.

Spinning to victory Monty Panesar was in devastating form too

Spinning to victory Monty Panesar was in devastating form too

Pietersen doesn’t do stoical, and
thank God for that. It misses the point to harp that he has shown
England what they were missing, because his gifts have never been in
doubt.

But when he plays like this – driving
against the spin, paddling over his left shoulder, slog-sweeping for
six – the only thing to do is sit back and enjoy.

After that, it was all about Graeme
Swann and Monty Panesar, who both invoked the spinner’s elixir of
bounce, bite and turn – qualities curiously lacking in Ravi Ashwin and
especially Harbhajan Singh.

From 30 without loss, India’s batsmen
looked as clueless as England’s had done on the second evening and
third morning at the Sardar Patel Stadium, though there was a certain
sadness about the ease with which Panesar worked over Sachin
Tendulkar.

An all-time great, he is danger of
leaving Test cricket with a whimper. Walking off to virtual silence from
his home crowd, he may have reflected that – with apologies to
Pietersen – there really are very few fairytales in sport.

Nasser Hussain: Cook comes nicely to the boil in Mumbai

Captain Cook comes nicely to the boil in Mumbai

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UPDATED:

19:58 GMT, 23 November 2012

Give Alastair Cook a job to do and he learns on his feet very quickly. We have seen it with his batting and on Friday we saw it with his captaincy.

The difference between Cook's leadership in the first Test and here was marked. England picked the right side in Mumbai and then Cook turned to Monty Panesar early when he could have been stubborn and bowled Graeme Swann ahead of him.

Good day: Alastair Cook and Monty Panesar

In control: Alastair Cook

Cook employed attacking fields with men round the bat and realised how important a position gully was on a pitch that turned and bounced.

It was all going well for England until Cheteshwar Pujara spoiled their day and I genuinely don't know what I would do to get him out at the moment. I think we are going to be seeing a lot more of him in the next few years.

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Perhaps Cook could have been a bit more ruthless with Stuart Broad and left him stewing at long leg because he leaked runs whenever he bowled and, in a relatively low-scoring game, those runs could be vital come Monday or Tuesday.

Sometimes you have to be unpopular with a player as a captain and, even if it had meant bowling Panesar and Swann into the ground, Cook should not have turned to Broad as much as he did because it was clearly not his day.

It is difficult to put your finger on what's wrong with Broad but these pitches have been unresponsive for seamers.

In the summer it seemed his pace was down but he blamed the speed gun and then England said he had reduced his pace deliberately to concentrate on accuracy. He bowled very well in subcontinental conditions last winter, and it would have been harsh to leave him out here after one bad game (batsmen get several chances), but he is clearly going through one of those difficult spells.