Tag Archives: mohammad

India v England third Test in Kolkata: Five crazy runouts

After Cook is bizarrely dismissed in Kolkata, we take a look at five other crazy runouts

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 7 December 2012

England captain Alastair Cook was run out on 190 as he tried to avoid a throw from Virat Kohli on day three of the third Test against India in Kolkata. He is not the first batsman to be run out in bizarre fashion though. Here, Sportsmail looks at five famous examples…

Allan Donald (Edgbaston, 1999)

South Africa needed one run to beat Australia at Edgbaston and reach their first World Cup final when Lance Klusener hit Damien Fleming to mid-on and started running. But last man Allan Donald didn’t hear his call, dropped his bat, and eventually set off for the single far too late. As Australia’s fielders went berserk, Donald was left to reflect on one of cricket’s cruellest chokes.

Cruel: Australia go wild as Donald is run out

Cruel: Australia go wild as Donald is run out

Cruel: Australia go wild as Donald is run out

Mike Atherton (Lord’s, 1993)

The England opener was on 97 when he turned Australia’s captain Allan Border through midwicket. He and Mike Gatting had run two and Atherton hesitated before setting off for a third. But he changed his mind, before slipping and scrabbling about on all fours as Merv Hughes’s throw from the deep left him stranded on 99. He never did make a Test hundred at Lord’s.

Falling short: Atherton can't get back in his crease

Falling short: Atherton can't get back in his crease

Falling short: Atherton can't get back in his crease

Evasive action: Inzamam is harshly given out

Evasive action: Inzamam is harshly given out

Hanif Mohammad (Karachi, 1959)

Playing for Karachi in a Pakistani domestic game, their Test opener Hanif Mohammad had moved to 498 with a ball to go on the second day. He duly played it to point and set off for two, only to be beaten in search of a 500th run. The batsman at the other end, Abdul Aziz, died later that season after being hit over the heart.

Inzamam-ul-Haq (Faisalabad, 2005)

Pakistan’s captain had played a defensive shot to Steve Harmison during the second Test at Faisalabad when the England fast bowler immediately threw down the stumps. In an attempt to get out of the way, Inzamam jumped in the air – and was wrongly given run out by third umpire Nadeem Ghauri, despite being in his crease when he took evasive action.

Ian Meckiff (Brisbane, 1960)

Australia
needed one to win off the last ball of the Brisbane Test against West
Indies, when last man Lindsay Kline turned Wes Hall to the leg side. But
fielder Joe Solomon reacted quickly, throwing down the stumps at the
striker’s end with Meckiff short of his ground. The result was the first
tie in Test history. There has been only one since.

World Twenty20: Sri Lanka beat Pakistan to make final

Herath and Mendis help Sri Lanka spin past Pakistan to make final

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UPDATED:

17:40 GMT, 4 October 2012

Sri Lanka's spinners carried them through to the final of their home tournament, with a 16-run ICC World Twenty20 victory over Pakistan at the Premadasa Stadium.

Rival openers Mahela Jayawardene and Mohammad Hafeez top-scored with 42 on each side in this semi-final, but it was Rangana Herath and Ajantha Mendis who gave Sri Lanka the edge with five wickets between them after the hosts had posted 139 for four.

Sri Lanka's sixless innings was a curious affair, albeit on a slow and low surface – but Pakistan's run chase ran out of steam against Angelo Mathews and the spinners.

Final chance: Sri Lankan celebrate their victory over Pakistan to make the final in their own country

Final chance: Sri Lankan celebrate their victory over Pakistan to make the final in their own country

SCORECARD

Click here to read the full scorecard

Jayawardene played especially well, as he almost always does, after choosing to bat first.

The captain dominated a first-wicket stand of 63 with Tillekeratne Dilshan, reverse-sweeping expertly against spin and timing and placing his seven boundaries.

But he chipped a catch to short fine-leg off Shahid Afridi, and then Kumar Sangakkara made all except three runs in a stand of 24 until he was caught at long-on off Hafeez.

Umar Gul thought he had struck in the 18th over, Jeevan Mendis lbw to a yorker, only to discover he had overstepped. But two balls later, Gul got Dilshan in near identical fashion – the opener having taken 43 deliveries over his 35.

Stumped: Sri Lanka's wicket keeper Kumar Sangakkara successfully stumps Pakistan's Sohail Tanvir

Stumped: Sri Lanka's wicket keeper Kumar Sangakkara successfully stumps Pakistan's Sohail Tanvir

Missing out: Umar Akmal reacts after he misses to hit a boundary

Missing out: Umar Akmal reacts after he misses to hit a boundary

Thisara Perera and Mathews muscled 16 off Gul's final over, to give Sri Lanka a little breathing space for which they would be mighty thankful later.

Pakistan's reply might have been minus Imran Nazir for a duck, had Dilshan somehow clung on to a very tough diving chance at point off Mathews.

Instead, the first breakthrough did not come until there was 31 on the board when Nazir contrived to edge a forward-defensive at Ajantha Mendis on to his stumps – via pad and ground – in the spinner's first over.

Sharp fielding: Thisara Perera breaks the bails in an attempt to run-out Pakistan's captain Mohammad Hafeez

Sharp fielding: Thisara Perera breaks the bails in an attempt to run-out Pakistan's captain Mohammad Hafeez

Big appeal: Lasith Malinga unsuccessfully appeals for an LBW decision against Pakistan's Imran Nazir

Big appeal: Lasith Malinga unsuccessfully appeals for an LBW decision against Pakistan's Imran Nazir

Hafeez also escaped an early half-chance, when Herath could not hold a diving effort at long-on off Perera – nothing to the let-off the Pakistan captain would get on 24 when Lasith Malinga put down a straightforward one in the same position off Mathews.

The same bowler had already struck twice in four balls, however, when Jayawardene brought him back for the 10th over.

Nasir Jamshed went lbw to one that might have pitched just outside leg; then Kamran Akmal gave himself little chance to adapt to the awkward surface and somehow propelled an attempted big hit only as far as midwicket where Jayawardene himself took an easy catch.

Putting the runs on: Sri Lanka's Jeevan Mendis helps his side reach their total

Putting the runs on: Sri Lanka's Jeevan Mendis helps his side reach their total

Watching it all the way: Tillakaratne Dilshan plays a shot as Pakistan's wicketkeeper Kamran Akmal watches on

Watching it all the way: Tillakaratne Dilshan plays a shot as Pakistan's wicketkeeper Kamran Akmal watches on

Shoaib Malik was bowled by one that spun sharply from Herath (three for 25). But it was the dismissal of Hafeez, stumped on the charge to the slow left-armer, which turned the match Sri Lanka's way – and when the out-of-form Afridi was then bowled first ball, Pakistan were 91 for six.

They still had time to be competitive but were running out of the right men to find the boundaries, and in the end it was too much for Umar Akmal to do on his own.

World Twenty20: Australia through to last four

Australia advance to last four of World Twenty20 despite narrow defeat to Pakistan

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UPDATED:

14:24 GMT, 2 October 2012

Australia sustained a 32-run defeat in their final Super Eights match against Pakistan, but were still able to celebrate a place in the World Twenty20 semi-finals while their conquerors faced an anxious wait in Colombo.

Pakistan will know their fate only after the result of South Africa versus India this evening, but Australia successfully booked their place in the last four as they edgily reached their qualification target of 112 runs.

Their final score of 117 for seven was nowhere near enough to win the match, with Pakistan making 149 for six in the first innings.

We're through: Australia advanced to the semi-finals of the World Twenty20 despite suffering a 17-run defeat to Pakistan

We're through: Australia advanced to the semi-finals of the World Twenty20 despite suffering a 17-run defeat to Pakistan

Starc the Star: Australia celebrate after Mitchell Starc removes Pakistan captain Mohammad Hafeez

Starc the Star: Australia celebrate after Mitchell Starc removes Pakistan captain Mohammad Hafeez

Big hitter: Nasir Jamshed of Pakistan goes for a boundary in the final Super Eight match in Colombo

Big hitter: Nasir Jamshed of Pakistan goes for a boundary in the final Super Eight match in Colombo

Australia skipper George Bailey won the toss and opted to field first, Mitchell Starc making good on that call when he removed the dangerous Mohammad Hafeez for four with the first ball of the second over.

The left-armer should have added the scalp of Nasir Jamshed for a duck two deliveries later, but he was dropped by Glen Maxwell at slip.

Jamshed was soon off the mark and a couple of quick boundaries by Imran Nazir got Pakistan's innings going.

The on-song Shane Watson accounted for Nazir (14) just before the end of the powerplay, but Jamshed continued compiling runs steadily alongside Kamran Akmal.

Fifty run salute: Jamshed celebrates his half century as Pakistan beat Australia to give themselves a chance of reaching the semi-finals

Fifty run salute: Jamshed celebrates his half century as Pakistan beat Australia to give themselves a chance of reaching the semi-finals

Butter fingers: Umar Akmal drops his bat as he scrambles through for a single

Butter fingers: Umar Akmal drops his bat as he scrambles through for a single

Jamshed struck Pat Cummins for the first six of the day in the 11th over and followed with a second off Xavier Doherty moments later.

Four more off Brad Hogg brought up Jamshed's 50 and Akmal clubbed a six of his own off the veteran spinner.

Doherty eventually prised out Jamshed for 55 and Starc returned to remove Akmal and Shahid Afridi as he returned three for 20.

Only Abdul Razzaq, with 22 off 17 balls, made a significant contribution in the closing overs.

Australia's dangerous opening pair failed a trial by spin, both Watson and David Warner lbw for eight to Raza Hasan and Hafeez respectively.

Eyes on the ball: Kamran Akmal plays a shot

Eyes on the ball: Kamran Akmal plays a shot

Number three Mike Hussey provided the backbone of the innings, making 54 not out in 47 balls, including the boundary that ensured his side would continue in the competition.

But he was the only man to get to grips with the Pakistan attack.

Bailey hit a four and a six before falling for 15 to Saeed Ajmal, who also deceived Matthew Wade and Cummins with successive balls.

Hafeez and Hasan finished with with two wickets apiece as Cameron White and Maxwell also fell to turn.

ICC World Twenty20 2012: England beat Afghanistan

Wright on cue! England beat Afghanistan in Twenty20 demolition in Sri Lanka

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UPDATED:

16:59 GMT, 21 September 2012

Luke Wright was in scintillating form as England cruised past Afghanistan at the ICC World Twenty20 tournament in Sri Lanka.

The batsman hit an impressive 99 not out as the hopes of an upset for the Afghans went up in smoke with England hitting a total of 196.

England's bowlers showed little mercy either. Graeme Swann and Samit Patel led the charge as the wickets rapidly fell, leaving Afghanistan on a paltry total of 80, equalling their worst ever total in a T20 international.

More to follow.

Star man: Luke Wright (left) was one short of a century, as he hit 99 runs against Afghanistan

Star man: Luke Wright (left) was one short of a century, as he hit 99 runs against Afghanistan

Textbook: Wright put on an incredible display as the Afghans had no answer for the Englishman

Textbook: Wright put on an incredible display as the Afghans had no answer for the Englishman

No mercy: Steven Finn celebrates after taking the wicket of Mohammad Shahzad

No mercy: Steven Finn celebrates after taking the wicket of Mohammad Shahzad

Gotcha! Stuart Broad runs out Karim Sadiq

Gotcha! Stuart Broad runs out Karim Sadiq

Easy does it: The England team celebrate their demolition of Afghanistan

Easy does it: The England team celebrate their demolition of Afghanistan

ICC Twenty20 World Cup: England prepare for Afghanistan test

Fairytale of the unlikely lads from a war-torn land as England prepare for Afghanistan

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UPDATED:

21:30 GMT, 19 September 2012

Mohammad Nabi was born a refugee in the Afghani province of Logar, where a foreign journalist once remarked that 'the most common sight except for ruins are graves'.

When his family relocated to another refugee camp, in the Pakistani city of Peshawar, Nabi began playing tennis-ball cricket. It was the start of an infatuation.

On Wednesday, he cracked 31 in 17 balls against India in the World Twenty20 in Colombo.

Rags to riches: Karim Sadiq gets home as Afghanistan show their improvement in defeat by India

Rags to riches: Karim Sadiq gets home as Afghanistan show their improvement in defeat by India

On Friday, he lines up against England. There are rags-to-riches stories. And then there is the Afghanistan cricket team.

As recently as four years ago, they were taking part in the ICC's lowly World Cricket League Division 5 in Jersey, with the likes of Japan and Mozambique.

Their presence in Sri Lanka, where – by definition – they are one of the 12 best Twenty20 teams, is the equivalent of a team from the Blue Square Premier North doing battle for a Champions League spot.

It is not the first time they have qualified for the World Twenty20. In 2010, they were thrashed by India – who beat them comfortably enough by 23 runs – and South Africa.

Take bat: Nabi cracked 31 in 17 balls against India on Wednesday

Take bat: Nabi cracked 31 in 17 balls against India on Wednesday

Top Spin

But they arrived in the Caribbean two years ago after wins over Ireland and Scotland and have beaten Canada and the Netherlands, who themselves embarrassed England at Lord's in 2009.

'Everyone likes cricket in Afghanistan,' said Nabi. 'There are a lot of fans now. We will try hard in this tournament to do something for our nation.'

Like Nabi, the big break for fast bowler Hamid Hassan came during a game against a touring MCC side, led by former England captain Mike Gatting, at Mumbai in 2006. While Nabi scored a century, Hassan had Gatting caught behind for a duck – in spikeless boots.

The following year, the bandana-wearing Hassan, whose family fled Jalalabad when he was six after the Mujahideen ousted the invading Soviets, went on to become the first Afghani to play at Lord's, representing MCC against a Europe XI.

Leader: Mangal (left) has captained Afghanistan since 2007

Leader: Mangal (left) has captained Afghanistan since 2007

When he helped his country qualify for the 2010 World Twenty20, his family – previously anti-cricket – sacrificed a lamb. Playing for MCC against Nottinghamshire in a Twenty20 match in Dubai in 2008, he took a hat-trick.

Nawroz Mangal, 27, has captained Afghanistan since 2007. When he began his career, having learned his cricket – like many of his team-mates – in a Pakistani refugee camp, the sport was largely a mystery in a land more readily associated in foreign minds with the Taliban, futile wars and the illegal opium trade.

Now, Mangal claims more than 500,000 of the nation's 30million inhabitants are playing cricket.

'After participating in this World Cup, if we do better, I expect 30 to 40 per cent of the population to start playing it,' he said.

If that may be optimistic, Mangal wants cricket to bring at least some measure of hope to a war-ravaged nation.

'This would be a positive sign to bring the youth into sports instead of them having wrong influences,' he said.

'I would say this could be a positive step towards bringing peace to the country as well.'

Stuart Broad's team need to beware. For these remarkable Afghanis, cricket is rather more than a sport. And after their defeat by India, they will be playing for their lives.

ICC World Twenty20 2012: India beat Afghanistan

Dropped catches cost Afghanistan chance of historic upset as India win by 23 runs

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UPDATED:

18:24 GMT, 19 September 2012

Dropped catches cost Afghanistan the chance of a famous upset against India in the ICC World Twenty20 as they were beaten by 23 runs in Colombo.

After Gautam Gambhir and Virender Sehwag were dismissed early on, Virat Kohli benefited from a ball dropped over the boundary for six on his way to 50 and Suresh Raina had two let-offs in making 38.

The pair led India to 159 for five and though Mohammad Nabi led a spirited run-chase, India made a winning start ahead of their clash with England on Sunday.

Close but no cigar: Dropped catches cost Afghanistan the chance of an upset against India

Close but no cigar: Dropped catches cost Afghanistan the chance of an upset against India

Shapoor Zadran screamed in celebration in the third over as Gambhir edged onto his stumps for just 10 runs before Mohammad Shahzad snaffled a poor shot from Sehwag to embarrass the left-armer for eight.

Yuvraj Singh announced himself with a huge six but he was soon dismissed by Karim Sadiq as he sliced a cut straight to Shapoor.

After such a strong start, Afghanistan's attack began to falter, a series of dropped catches helping Kohli reach his half-century.

But Dawlat Zadran would soon remove the middle-order batsman, Nabi taking the catch and then adding another scalp when he scooted the ball under Raina's bat in the 20th over.

This is how it's done: Yuvraj Singh expertly takes a catch

This is how it's done: Yuvraj Singh expertly takes a catch

I'm stumped: Dawlat Zadran of Afghanistan is bowled by Lakshmipathy Balaji

I'm stumped: Dawlat Zadran of Afghanistan is bowled by Lakshmipathy Balaji

Mahendra Singh Dhoni added 10 runs to India's tally from the last two deliveries and Afghanistan were set a target of 160 runs for victory.

They made a promising start, openers Shahzad and Nawroz Mangal putting on 26 before the former slogged the ball straight to Yuvraj at mid-on.

Yuvraj then trapped Mangal lbw with his very first delivery before forcing Sadiq into an aimless hit towards Gambhir.

Asghar Stanikzai edged into Dhoni's gloves next ball and though Samiullah Shenwari survived the hat-trick ball, a third wicket fell in six deliveries when he was caught and bowled by Ravichandran Ashwin.

Nabi and Shafiqullah breathed new life into the run chase with giant sixes but the latter soon walked after a contentious lbw call off Irfan Pathan's bowling.

Nabi's effort of 31, including two fours and two sixes, came to an end in the 17th over as he lifted Ashwin straight to Ishant Sharma.

Najibullah Zadran spanked Balaji to the cover boundary but was then run out, with Balaji dismissing Dawlat Zadran to wrap up the innings.

On that got away: Virat Kohli benefited from a dropped catch on his way to a half century

On that got away: Virat Kohli benefited from a dropped catch on his way to a half century

South Africa say Dale Steyn and AB de Villiers are not at centre Kevin Pietersen text storm

South Africa claim Steyn and De Villiers are not at centre KP text storm

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UPDATED:

17:53 GMT, 11 August 2012

South Africa denied that Dale Steyn and AB de Villiers were the players at the centre of the Kevin Pietersen text message storm.

The tourists' team manager Dr Mohammad Moosajee admitted that texts were exchanged but insisted that Steyn and De Villiers were not the ones who were involved in the latest Pietersen controversy.

Not me: South Africa claim Dale Steyn was not one of the players who received text messages from Kevin Pietersen

Not me: South Africa claim Dale Steyn was not one of the players who received text messages from Kevin Pietersen

When asked if they were the two players who had been sent texts by the England star, he replied: 'I can confirm they did not receive texts, that's what I have been saying, a lot of what has been written is not correct.'

He also denied that the messages were in any way derogatory towards Pietersen's England team-mates.

Controversy: Pietersen says the Lord's Test could be his last

Controversy: Pietersen says the Lord's Test could be his last

'There were text messages but it was banter. Some of these guys have got relationships with overseas players from the IPL (Indian Premier League). But some of what has been reported is totally incorrect.

'We don't want to get ourselves drawn into it because it's not our issue at all. It's very difficult to talk about what is happening in other people's dressing rooms but at the moment, it's for them to sort out.'

Former Pakistan cricket captain Salman Butt released from prison

Butt out of jail: Former Pakistan skipper released early after match-fixing sentence

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UPDATED:

10:29 GMT, 21 June 2012

Disgraced former Pakistan cricket captain Salman Butt has been released from prison early.

The ex-Test captain was jailed for 30 months at Southwark Crown Court in November for match-fixing. But he was released last night, his lawyers, 25 Bedford Row, said.

The 27-year-old was the orchestrator of a plot to bowl deliberate no-balls in the Lord's Test against England last summer.

Out of jail: Salman Butt has been released

Out of jail: Salman Butt has been released

His teammates Mohammad Asif and Mohammad Amir were also jailed for bowling the fraudulent no-balls, but have since been released.

Mazhar Majeed, 36, the corrupt London-based sports agent at the heart of the fixing scandal, was jailed for two years and eight months.

Former world number two Test bowler Asif, 29, was freed from Canterbury Prison last month after serving half his sentence.

Amir, 19, who had been tipped to become one of the all-time great fast bowlers, was released from Portland Prison in Dorset in February after serving half of his six-month sentence.

All three players are serving five-year bans from cricket imposed by the International Cricket Council (ICC).

Taken away: Butt leaves Kilburn Police Station in London last year

Taken away: Butt leaves Kilburn Police Station in London last year

It is believed Butt has been deported because he was freed under the early removal scheme, which allows foreign nationals to be released up to nine months before their normal release date as long as they are deported.

A Prison Service spokeswoman said: 'We do not comment on the release date of individual prisoners.

'Under the early removal scheme, foreign national prisoners may be removed up to nine months before their normal release date, providing they are being deported from the UK.'

Butt's lawyers said the opening batsman was leaving for Pakistan today and was expected to land in the early hours of tomorrow morning local time.

They said in a statement: 'Today, following his release from HMP Canterbury, Salman Butt will be returning to Pakistan accompanied by his barrister, Yasin Patel. They are expected to land in Pakistan at 3am on Friday June 22 2012.

'Butt's early release has been obtained by the efforts of his legal team and in particular Yasin Patel.

'The former Pakistan Test cricket captain will return to his homeland following his conviction and sentence in the United Kingdom back in November 2011 at the Southwark Crown Court.

'It is expected that, on his return, he will work with his barrister in relation to the next step in his endeavours to return to the cricketing world.'

Butt's barrister, Yasin Patel, said the cricketer was “tired and jaded” but would begin his efforts to return to the sport.

In the spotlight: Butt arrives at Southwark Crown Court last year

In the spotlight: Butt arrives at Southwark Crown Court last year

He said: 'Salman Butt has had to endure a great deal of suffering, strain, pressure and humiliation over many months, both personally and on behalf of his family.

'His return back home will allow Salman to spend time with his family and relatives. He will get to see and hold his son whom he has not seen since his birth in November last year.

'He can now return to his beloved homeland, start to rebuild his reputation and begin the long process in his efforts to return back to top-level cricket. He is tired and jaded.

'Once he has had a little rest, you can rest assured that Salman Butt will talk to the media when the time is right.'

The fixing scandal emerged after an undercover News of the World reporter approached Mazhar Majeed in August 2010 pretending to be a wealthy Indian businessman seeking major international cricketers for a tournament.

The sports agent was secretly filmed accepting 150,000 in cash from the journalist as part of an arrangement to rig games.

Majeed promised the reporter that Asif and Amir would deliver three no-balls at specific points during the Test between Pakistan and England at Lord's from August 26 to 29 2010.

He claimed he had been carrying out fixing for two and a half years and had seven players from Pakistan's national side working for him.

Explaining why he bowled a no-ball when Majeed said he would, Asif alleged that Butt told him: 'Run faster, f*****', moments before his delivery.

London 2012 Olympics: Taekwondo"s Aaron Cook to discover Games decision this week

D-Day dawns for Cook as the golden hope clings onto his Olympic dream

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UPDATED:

22:48 GMT, 5 June 2012

Aaron Cook will learn in the next 48 hours whether his controversial Olympic non-selection will be upheld.

British Taekwondo will reconvene their selection panel on Wednesday, when they are likely to nominate Lutalu Muhammad for the third time instead of Cook, the world No 1 who opted out of their high-performance programme last year.

If they persist in selecting world No 7 Muhammad, the British Olympic Association will then be asked to ratify the baffling selection.

Kicked out Cook (right) may not be selected for London

Kicked out Cook (right) may not be selected for London

The BOA will meet this on Wednesday afternoon or Thursday, with two options on the table: either to go along with the decision, despite having previously taken the unprecedented step of rejecting the same nomination, or play the ‘nuclear’ card by stripping British Taekwondo of their power to run the sport.

The second, incendiary possibility is likely to be averted because the British Taekwondo panel have agreed to abide by the BOA’s four-fold recommendations concerning how the process is run — to allow a BOA legal representative to attend the hearing; not to attach disproportionate weight to the head shot rule, which the selectors claim favours Mohammad; to allow both fighters representation from their coaches; to encourage each panel member to vote rather than abstain.

It is understood the BOA would also be reluctant to decertify British Taekwondo because that would likely spark a long legal wrangle and encourage any disgruntled non-selected athlete in other sports to seek the same redress.

Decision time: Cook should discover this week if he will be selected for the Taekwondo team

Decision time: Cook should discover this week if he will be selected for the Taekwondo team

However, if British Taekwondo abuse the procedure, the BOA could be provoked into pressing the button. Certainly, tension between the two parties remains high. For example, British Taekwondo were reluctant to agree to allow Cook’s coach, Patrice Remarck, to take part in the meeting until the BOA confirmed on Tuesday that they did not expect him to be present for the deliberations or voting.

Clarification of the terms of the panel meeting delayed the release of British Taekwondo statement confirming Wednesday's hearing for several hours.

The panel will be comprised of the same core characters as the last time it met — Gary Hall, the performance director; Joseph Salim, the high-performance coach with responsibility for the -80kg category under discussion (thought he will not vote); Steve Jennings, a colleague of Hall and Salim; Paul Green, a coach and ex-international taekwondo fighter who was formerly coached by Hall; and Dr Steve Peters, the non-executive director who is British Cycling’s team psychiatrist.

Brtitish Taewkwondo’s statement said of their panel: ‘These are highly regarded experts in the sport and their technical knowledge, experience and expertise has been responsible for Great Britain winning 15 medals (six gold) during the last three major championships.

‘The process for recruiting coaching and performance staff is open and transparent.’

Mohammad Aamer: I was stupid to cheat cricket

Aamer: I was stupid to cheat cricket after being befriended by captain Butt

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UPDATED:

22:32 GMT, 19 March 2012

Mohammad Aamer has talked for the first time about his shame over the Lord’s spot-fixing scandal that ended with him in prison, claiming that money was not his motive for deliberately bowling two no-balls.

The brilliant teenage fast bowler, banned from all cricket for five years for his part in an affair that also saw his captain Salman Butt and team-mate Mohammad Asif imprisoned, says the shame involved in cheating the game made him feel ‘as if someone had shot me and I simply didn’t exist any more. That I was dead. One day I was on top of the world and the next I came crashing down’.

Overstepping the mark: Mohammad Aamer was imprisoned after pleading guilty to fixing allegations after bowling no-balls in a Test match

Overstepping the mark: Mohammad Aamer was imprisoned after pleading guilty to fixing allegations after bowling no-balls in a Test match

Overstepping the mark: Mohammad Aamer was imprisoned after pleading guilty to fixing allegations after bowling no-balls in a Test match

Aamer, back in Pakistan after serving half his six-month sentence, showed remorse, regret and guilt in an interview with Mike Atherton for Sky Sports and does not seek to justify his wrong-doing.

But he also provided a barely credible explanation of how he lurched into the clutches of the fixers, led by Butt, when he had the cricketing world at his feet in 2010 aged 18.

Senior figure: Aamer claims he was befriended very early on by captain Salman Butt

Senior figure: Aamer claims he was befriended very early on by captain Salman Butt

Aamer was befriended by Butt when he became involved in the Pakistan set-up in a move which saw him clearly being groomed for what lay ahead.

Aamer said Butt had ‘joked’ about spot-fixing during his early days with the team then the senior man introduced him to a ‘businessman’ called Ali while playing in Dubai.

Ali contacted him ahead of the Edgbaston Test against England asking for Aamer’s UK mobile number and bank account details.

Police, in their subsequent investigation, found texts sent by Aamer to Ali on the eve of the later Test at The Oval which said ‘yes’, ‘yes what’, ‘for how much’, ‘what needs to be done’, ‘it would be too much friend’ and ‘so in the first 3 bowl whatever you like and in the next two do 8 runs’.

It was these messages which led Justice Cooke, in his summing up at Southwark Crown Court at the end of a case in which Aamer pleaded guilty to corruption charges, to question the innocence of a boy from a village outside Rawalpindi who to many is more victim than criminal.

‘I was sat waiting for someone and I was bored. I was curious and I asked myself what exactly he wanted from me. I had to find out,’ is Aamer’s explanation for the texts.

Sting: Mazhar Majeed was introduced to Aamer shortly before the now infamous Test match at Lord's

Sting: Mazhar Majeed was introduced to Aamer shortly before the now infamous Test match at Lord's

Fast forward to the Lord’s Test and Aamer was warned by disgraced agent Mazhar Majeed, also introduced to him by Butt, that the ICC knew about his texts to Ali but that he could get him out of trouble. As long as he bowled two no balls for him.

‘I was stupid to do it but I was panicking so much that it didn’t occur to me how ridiculous this was,’ said Aamer. ‘I knew I was cheating cricket and it was a horrible feeling. But I thought they were saving me. Then I did it.’

Aamer claims Majeed never mentioned money to him but later gave him 1,500, which he put in a safe at the team hotel. It was this money, paid by the News of the World’s undercover reporter as part of their successful sting, that sealed Aamer’s fate.

Backlash: Butt, Mohammad Asif and Aamer were vilified in their homeland

Backlash: Butt, Mohammad Asif and Aamer were vilified in their homeland

Backlash: Butt, Mohammad Asif and Aamer were vilified in their homeland

‘Everybody thinks I did it for the money but I want to clarify this is not the case,’ said Aamer. ‘They told me I was in trouble with the ICC for texting Ali. Salman took advantage of my friendship. That’s why I’m so angry with him.’

Aamer, 19, says, during his journey to prison, he felt that he ‘would never think about cricket again nor play it’.

It would be a tragedy if this impressionable young man is lost to the game for good and he deserves credit for showing regret.

But he remains more sinner than sinned against and, if his story stops more fixing, it will have served its purpose.