Tag Archives: millimetres

Kempton"s conditions are heavy for Boxing Day meeting

Christmas deluge turns Kempton heavy with inspections expected elsewhere

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UPDATED:

22:00 GMT, 25 December 2012

Kempton goes ahead without an inspection despite being hit with more rain on Christmas Day that changed the going to heavy.

Clerk of the course Barney Clifford said eight millimetres of rain fell at the track on Tuesday morning but the course had taken it well.

Clifford added: ‘No inspection is needed. You could still arguably find a few soft patches among the heavy but that is splitting hairs.

Meeting greeting: Kempton's conditions have turned heavy (stock image)

Meeting greeting: Kempton's conditions have turned heavy (stock image)

‘There is a band of showers moving in after midnight but then it should be dry with a sunny day before the next rain front moves in late in the afternoon.’

The prospect of a bright forecast is the Christmas present Kempton has been praying for ahead of its biggest crowd of the year.

But two other courses, Fontwell (8am) and Wetherby (8.30am) face inspections ahead of their most lucrative meetings.

All the remaining jump cards take place on heavy going. Huntingdon was already off and Thursday's Welsh National card at Chepstow has also been abandoned.

The meeting was to have been the BBC’s last racing broadcast before Channel 4 takes up exclusive rights to the sport. The card has been moved to January 5. Leicester inspect at 11am today for Friday’s fixture.

Frankel has been my inspiration, says Sir Henry Cecil

Frankel has been my inspiration, says Cecil as grand Ascot finale approaches

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UPDATED:

22:26 GMT, 18 October 2012

Sir Henry Cecil says that Frankel had inspired him in his battle against cancer as he backed his unbeaten colt to cope with conditions in Saturday's Qipco Champion Stakes at Ascot.

The world's best colt has five rivals headed by 2011 winner Cirrus Des Aigles and John Gosden's Nathaniel but of more concern is the ground described as 'very soft' on Thursday after five millimetres of rain overnight.

Grounds for concern: Cecils main worry for Frankel is the testing going

Grounds for concern: Cecils main worry for Frankel is the testing going

Legend: Frankel getting ready for his final race at Newmarket last month

Legend: Frankel getting ready for his final race at Newmarket last month

With up to eight millimetres further rain possible on Thursday night, Frankel will race on the most testing ground he has ever encountered in his 14th and final run.

Cecil said: 'He has been an inspiration and challenge which I needed so badly. Through my illness, I feel that the help from my wife Jane and the determination
to be there for Frankel has helped me so much to get through the season.

'I was very pleased with Frankel's final piece of work. He gives the impression that he is better than ever and still improving.

Golden memories: Sir Henry Cecil, Tom Queally and Frankel after victory in the 2,000 Guineas at Newmarket last year

Golden memories: Sir Henry Cecil, Tom Queally and Frankel after victory in the 2,000 Guineas at Newmarket last year

'I am pretty confident he will be fine in soft ground but if it's heavy we are in no-man's land. He has never encountered it and, with his action and turn of foot, I cannot be sure he would appreciate it.'

Frankel's jockey Tom Queally is taking heart from Frankel's debut back in August 2010 on ground officially termed soft. He said: 'I was quite taken with his debut when he handled conditions and I was able to bring him up through the gears. It is not an easy thing to do in slow conditions.'

The rain has emboldened punters to take on 1-6 Frankel for the first time this season with Coral reporting support for 4-1 chance Cirrus Des Aigles.

One of the greatest: Frankel on the way to victory in the Juddmonte Royal Lodge Stakes at Ascot in 2010

One of the greatest: Frankel on the way to victory in the Juddmonte Royal Lodge Stakes at Ascot in 2010

However, Nathaniel's jockey William Buick, whose mounts also include Gosden's Great Heavens making a quick reappearance in the Champions Fillies and Mares Stakes after her Arc sixth, remains realistic about his prospects.

Buick said: 'Frankel's unbeatable. On Saturday he'll do what he's always been doing and win and win well. Deep down, I hope he does. Obviously, I am there to try to win but Frankie (Dettori) said to me last night, “Get real.
It's not going to happen”.'

Dettori rides German Derby winner Pastorius with the field completed by Master of Hounds and Frankel's pacemaker Bullet Train.

London 2012 Olympics: Larry Godfrey archer going for gold

Godfrey targets his gold precisely as archer takes aim for medals

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UPDATED:

01:57 GMT, 28 July 2012

Olympics 2012

Larry Godfrey’s world is measured in millimetres. As an archer, the tiniest slip could cost him an Olympic medal.

As an engineer, the same minute error could cost a soldier his life.

The 36-year-old works for Rolls-Royce, repairing the Apache helicopters which British Army pilots fly in the war zones of Afghanistan.

Brit special: Larry Godrey got his Olympic campaign underway on Friday

Brit special: Larry Godrey got his Olympic campaign underway on Friday

‘I’m a small cog in a big wheel of
protecting our country, if you like,’ he says in a Bristolian twang.
‘I’m not on the front line or anything but I do have a small part to
play in keeping those helicopters in the sky.

‘The guys are out there doing their bit, and I’m over here doing my little bit. That’s why I love my job. I get a lot of satisfaction out of it.’

He was battling in his own way on Friday, amid the serene setting of Lord’s cricket ground. He continued this year’s superb form to shoot a personal best in the qualification round of the team event, finishing as the fourth best individual overall.

He and his two team-mates — Simon Terry and Alan Wills — face Ukraine on Saturday at 9am, hoping success will take them to a quarter-final clash with gold medal favourites South Korea. In fact, Godfrey has a better chance in the individual competition which takes place on Friday.

He sees the similarities between his sport and his work and reckons the latter drives his chance of success in the former.

‘(My job) is like Team GB. There are 500-odd athletes and I’m one of them. When I put my colours on for the country, I’m competing for my country, and for myself. The level of pride is the same when an engine comes in and needs a quick turnaround to get it back out into the field. I’ve got a balance of sport and a balance of real life and they definitely complement each other. It’s a lot of hard work because both the jobs are demanding and there’s a lot of dedication but that’s who I am.’

Checking them out: Godfrey has two chances to win a medal in London

Checking them out: Godfrey has two chances to win a medal in London

Godfrey got an apprenticeship at Rolls-Royce when he was 16 to continue a family relationship with the company, his father and grandfather having been employed by them.

Supported by his bosses he stopped work a couple of months ago to concentrate on the Games.

Godfrey confessed his need for precision even extends into home life, which can occasionally infuriate his fiancee Rebecca, who he will marry after the Olympics. ‘I’m a DIY nightmare because I always try to get everything millimetre perfect,’ he admits.

He felt the pain of getting it slightly wrong during his individual bronze medal match at Athens 2004. He lost to Tim Cuddihy of Australia by one point.

Speak to him now and it’s clear he is confident there will be no repeat.

He won World Cup silver in his last major competition in the USA, to go with gold from a World Cup in Turkey earlier in the year.

‘If I’d have medalled in Athens I think I would have stopped,’ he says. ‘So I’m almost glad I didn’t. A gold medal there or a gold medal in London It’s a gold medal in London.

‘It was quite hard though, one point, 10 millimetres away from actually having a medal around my neck. But I’m over it. I’ve learned from it. I’m in the best form of my life.

‘I know I have it in me to compete for the medals.’

Wimbledon 2012: Andy Murray: I must play perfect final against Roger Federer

I must play perfect final to beat Federer and end Britain's title drought, admits Murray

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UPDATED:

22:25 GMT, 6 July 2012

Andy Murray made history by becoming Britain's first Wimbledon men's finalist for 74 years but his message was clear after beating Jo-Wilfried Tsonga: the job's not done.

Another nerve – shredding afternoon ended with Murray setting up a Sunday showdown with six-time champion Roger Federer in his bid to be Britain's first men's singles champion since Fred Perry in 1936.

'It's not the end of the tournament yet,' he said after a 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5 victory clinched with a shot that was in by just 14 millimetres. 'I spoke to Ivan (Lendl, his coach) after the match and it was, “Good job, you did really well. What time do you want to practise tomorrow” That's it, there is no time for anything else.

Sky's the limit: Andy Murray celebrates after defeating Jo-Wilfried Tsonga to reach the Wimbledon final

Sky's the limit: Andy Murray celebrates after defeating Jo-Wilfried Tsonga to reach the Wimbledon final

'I'll just enjoy this evening, go back home and have a nice meal with my girlfriend and play with our two dogs. I won't be celebrating, the time for that stuff comes when I am done.'

Murray, the first Brit in the final since Bunny Austin in 1938, gulped back tears after he had held off a dramatic charge from the Frenchman. Now he must banish the memories of two losing Grand Slam finals against Federer, at the US and Australian Opens, when he failed to win a set.

'I've learnt from those matches and, in tennis, every day is different. Roger is one of the greatest players ever and he's very, very tough to beat here. It's a great challenge, one where I'm not expected to win the match and there will probably be less pressure on me because of who he is.

'I need to try to make sure I play the perfect match on Sunday, and I know that if I play well I'm capable of winning. There's a lot of stress at this time of year. At the end of today's match it was obviously very emotional, it meant a lot to me.'

Tearful: Murray looked overcome with emotion after sealing his victory over Tsonga

Tearful: Murray looked overcome with emotion after sealing his victory over Tsonga

Tim Henman led the praise for Murray. The former British No 1, who lost four Wimbledon semi-finals himself, saluted Murray's effort.

'It was unbelievable,' Henman said on BBC2. 'I just hope he's got enough physical and emotional energy left. It was a draining match.

'Andy will like the match-up with Roger and what an opportunity. He's got one monkey off his back with the nation's first finalist in 74 years, so why not kill two birds with one stone.

'If he can get to Federer's backhand, of course he has a chance, but Federer knows this court better than anyone.

'He has lost to Roger in a grand slam final before, but I just feel that it's a great win today, he's been so resilient and he stayed tough. He has to do that on one more occasion.'

Big draw: Fans crowded onto Henman Hill to watch Murray beat Tsonga in four tense sets

Big draw: Fans crowded onto Henman Hill to watch Murray beat Tsonga in four tense sets

A congratulatory message also came from Prime Minister David Cameron.

In a statement, he said: 'It is great news that we have our first home-grown men's finalist at Wimbledon for over 70 years, especially in this exciting Olympics year when the eyes of the world are on the UK.

'I'll be watching the final on Sunday and like the rest of the country, will be getting right behind Andy Murray – I wish him the best of luck.'

Downing Street also confirmed that the Scottish Saltire will fly alongside the Union flag above No 10 on Sunday.

Former Wimbledon winner John McEnroe, covering the match as a broadcaster, added: 'I am really happy for Andy. When I played, I was never under the pressure he was under. It was an amazing effort from him.

Home hero: Murray fans react as they watch his semi-final on television at the Dunblane Hotel

Home hero: Murray fans react as they watch his semi-final on television at the Dunblane Hotel

'You would think the pressure will be
on him in the final because of how long it has been since Great Britain
had someone win it, but Federer wants to tie with Pete Sampras (on
seven titles) and has put pressure on himself.

'Andy will have to play so well to beat him.'

Murray's former Davis Cup captain John Lloyd believes it is written in the stars that Murray will lift his maiden grand slam title on Sunday.

'I always thought that grass would be a good surface for him. It's destiny for him to win it the way that he's played,' he said. 'It was amazing.'

Praise came from Scotland's First Minister Alex Salmond, who said that Murray had lifted the spirits of the country.

'Congratulations to Andy on reaching the final, which is a fantastic achievement. He has played brilliantly right through the tournament and given the whole country a lift with his performances,' he said.

Brit of alright: Fans go wild as Murray seals his progress into the Wimbledon final for the first time

Brit of alright: Fans go wild as Murray seals his progress into the Wimbledon final for the first time

'The whole of Scotland will be right behind Andy on Sunday, and I'll be there in person to help cheer him on.'

Murray's former coach Miles Maclagan lauded the Scot's nerve, telling BBC Radio Five Live: 'All the hard physical work was the easy part for Andy today. It's the steel backbone that he showed in the tough moments which have left me in awe.'

Maclagan now coaches Marcos Baghdatis, who was Murray's third-round victim.

There was no doubting who he was siding with today though as he roared Murray on.

'I feel emotionally drained,' Maclagan added. 'You could see his relief at the end. It was a big moment for him and he has deserved it.'

Team Andy: Hitting partner Dani Vallverdu (centre), coach Ivan Lendl (right) and mum, Judy, watch on

Team Andy: Hitting partner Dani Vallverdu (centre), coach Ivan Lendl (right) and mum, Judy, watch on

That's my boy: Murray's girlfriend Kim Sears was on Centre Court supporting her man

That's my boy: Murray's girlfriend Kim Sears was on Centre Court supporting her man

Pat Cash, Wimbledon champion in 1987, hopes the whole of Britain will get behind the 25-year-old when he takes on Federer.

'The country will hopefully be right behind him and cheer him along,' the Australian said. 'He has played Davis Cup before for his country, but this is an individual event. This is for him and I hope the country enjoys it and gets behind him.'

Richard Krajicek, who won at Wimbledon in 1996, admits the manner of Murray's win over Tsonga was exhilarating.

'Unbelievable,' the Dutchman said. 'I've got goosebumps. It's amazing.

'It's so nice to see such a great guy do well.

Turned out nice again: Murray beat Tsonga under blue skies at the All England Club

Turned out nice again: Murray beat Tsonga under blue skies at the All England Club

'He gets so much criticism and he has now overcome it.

'There was so much negativity about him and this performance was the only way he could overcome that.'

Goran Ivanisevic beat Henman in the last four on his way to winning Wimbledon as a wild-card entry in 2001.

The 40-year-old told BBC Radio Five Live that Murray must seize his chance.

'It's great for Andy,' Ivanisevic said. 'It's great for British tennis, for Scottish tennis. It's been such a long time, but if he doesn't win the press will hammer him.

'He needs to win somehow. I wish him all the best because he deserves to win a grand slam.'

Never say die: Frenchman Tsonga battled back to take the third set from Murray

Never say die: Frenchman Tsonga battled back to take the third set from Murray

Ivanisevic lost three Wimbledon finals before winning the tournament and he does not want Murray to experience the beaten feeling on Sunday.

'You don't want to lose in the final, believe me. I know what that feels like,' Ivanisevic added. 'But maybe this will be his year. He needs to do whatever he can to win the trophy.'

Golf's world No 1 Luke Donald watched on admiringly from the Royal Box and hopes the Scot can be part of a momentous month for British sport.

'Seeing great players in any sport is inspiring,' Donald said. 'Federer was pretty impressive against Djokovic, but I think everybody is behind Andy.'

Donald, who flew in from America earlier this week, defends the Scottish Open at Castle Stuart next week and then heads to Royal Lytham in Lancashire for the Open Championship.

David Lloyd: Broad"s scrambled legs worth shelling out for

Broad's scrambled legs worth shelling out for

That scrambled single during Stuart Broad's excellent counter-attack was a coach's dream.

When Duncan Fletcher was coach he would pull to one side any player run out and ask them: 'Where was your dive'

Broad used every inch of his 6ft 7in
frame to make his ground by millimetres and had the awareness to jump up
and scamper another single. Excellent cricket.

Scroll down for more

Scramble: Broad dives to avoid being run out

Scramble: Broad dives to avoid being run out

POWER TO HIS ELBOW

There was much debate during the first Test and before the second about the legitimacy of Saeed Ajmal's bowling action.

Well, I have made a few enquiries and I understand that the umpires in this series have no problems with it at all.

And that means that nothing will be done by the International Cricket Council either.

JIMMY'S DESERT SPAT

Looked like divorce was on the cards
for England couple Jimmy Anderson and Graeme Swann when they had a
marital skirmish in the afternoon.

Grumpy old Jimmy told his mate in no
uncertain terms that he wanted him closer at second slip, reminding me
of the forthright exchanges they have in Dickie Pinks, a salubrious
hostelry in Jimmy's home town of Burnley.

Spat: James Anderson in a marital dispute

Spat: James Anderson in a marital dispute

STUART'S BROADSIDE

England had to battle to gain a good
first-innings lead – with perfect, positive batting from the lower
order, which took the attack to Pakistan.

Broad used his height to get a big stride in and dispersed the field with a couple of big shots.

He forced the fielders to where he wanted them – not where Misbahul-Haq wanted them.

More from David Lloyd…

Bumble in the desert: Trott not a gallop but no matter in these conditions
26/01/12

Bumble in the desert: No public transport, but at least we have a crowd
25/01/12

Bumble in the desert: There's been plenty of time for tee out in the UAE
23/01/12

Bumble in the desert: Saved by a snick as Strauss and Co mull over technology doubts
19/01/12

Bumble in the desert: Bit of a relief that it's a snog-free zone
18/01/12

Bumble at the Test: Ajmal's new delivery It's just like watching Gilo!
17/01/12

Cowpats, concrete and the M62: Bumble's guide to weird and wonderful cricket grounds
16/01/12

Bumble at the Test: The beer's not cheap out here but the DJ put me in a spin
16/01/12

VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

MOVE IT FOR MONTY

Wonderful to see Monty Panesar, the housewives' favourite, back in business and the question now is, how does he get in the England team regularly

The answer comes when Tim Bresnan is fit again.

Move Matt Prior to six, bring in Bresnan at seven and leave out Eoin Morgan to make room for Monty in a five-man attack. Simples…

SHE'S NO OIL PAINTING

A surreal Test series, this. Not only are we playing in the middle of the desert but we also have two female German press officers looking after us.

One of them bears a striking resemblance to Helga from TV's 'Allo 'Allo and seems more interested in finding the Fallen Madonna with the Big Boobies.

No sign of Herr Flick yet, mind.

AUF WIEDERSEHEN BET

Talking of Germans, Martin Kaymer has let me down over the road at the golf club. He's missed the cut!

Still, my dirhams are riding on a Spaniard, an Irishman and a Scotsman now – so come on Sergio Garcia, Rory McIlroy and Paul Lawrie.

Might even be able to pop over and cheer them on this Sunday if England do the business on Saturday.