Tag Archives: midway

Guan Tianlang fires fine 69 in New Orleans

Guan steals the show again as teenage sensation makes cut in New Orleans while Rose is hot on heels of leader Glover

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

21:10 GMT, 26 April 2013

|

UPDATED:

09:02 GMT, 27 April 2013

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Lucas Glover took his place at the top of the leaderboard at the midway point of the Zurich Classic as Chinese teenager Guan Tianlang once again caught the eye.

American Glover carded a 67 on the second day to add to his opening round of 65 to sit 12 under par overall, one stroke ahead of his countryman Boo Weekley.

But just as many eyes were focused a little further down the leaderboard, where 14-year-old Guan matched his achievement at the Masters by making the cut with nothing to spare, carding a 69 to finish three under for the day and for the tournament in a share of 57th.

In form: Guan Tianlang reacts as his birdie putt just misses on the ninth green

In form: Guan Tianlang reacts as his birdie putt just misses on the ninth green

'I think I played a very good round
today and I made a lot of birdies and a couple of good up and downs,' he
told www.pgatour.com. 'So I think I had a pretty good round.

'Making the cut is one of my goals.
I'm having fun these couple of days, and I hope to play my best and go a
little further into the weekend.'

Guan's round, which contained five
birdies and two bogeys and was watched by huge crowds from start to
finish, took some of the spotlight away from Glover at the top of the
leaderboard.

Teenage kicks: Guan Tianlang playing a tee shot in his second round

Teenage kicks: Guan Tianlang playing a tee shot in his second round

Glover sunk eight birdies against
three bogeys to take over at the top from overnight leader Ricky Barnes,
who undid much of his good work on day one by carding a four-over 76,
12 shots worse than his opening round.

Weekley got his second eagle in as
many days, at the par-four 10th, to sit a shot behind Glover and one
ahead of DA Points, while Morgan Hoffmann was fourth on nine under and
Ernie Els fifth on eight under.

Meeting the fans: Guan signs an autograph for a young fan after finishing the for the day

Meeting the fans: Guan signs an autograph for a young fan after finishing the for the day

Hoffmann, a relative youngster on
tour who, at 23, is till nearly 10 years older than Guan, said of the
achievement of the young Chinese: '[It] is unbelievable. You know, The
Masters and then here, it's awesome…

'I hope he understands what he's doing, because everybody out here is following him.'

Parental guidance: Guan wipes his face after taking water from his mother, Liu Hongyu

Parental guidance: Guan wipes his face after taking water from his mother, Liu Hongyu

England's Justin Rose and Brian Davis
led the European challenge in a group of six men on seven under, one
ahead of Belgium's Nicolas Colsaerts.

Defending champion Jason Dufner just made the cut, like Guan, at three under.

Martin Samuel: Marouane Fellaini was wrong but let"s get to grips with the real problem

OK, Fellaini was wrong but let's get to grips with the real problem

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UPDATED:

22:59 GMT, 16 December 2012

The narrative moves fast in English football but, even so, it can safely be presumed they haven’t changed the rules on the sly midway through the season.

So, as of the weekend, it was still illegal to hold on to another player to prevent his movement. Meaning the first foul that was committed in the Stoke City penalty area in the 59th minute on Saturday was by defender Ryan Shawcross.

That does not justify Marouane Fellaini’s reaction, and is only the tiniest mitigation for an incident that will almost certainly end with a three-match ban for the Everton player, but it is nevertheless an important fact.

Losing his head: Marouane Fellaini's clash with Ryan Shawcross was wrong on many levels

Losing his head: Marouane Fellaini's clash with Ryan Shawcross was wrong on many levels

Losing his head: Marouane Fellaini's clash with Ryan Shawcross was wrong on many levels

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Martin Samuel: You've had your time, Shane. Don't fight the dimming of the light…
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VIEW FULL ARCHIVE

For it makes plain that what happened on Saturday, a clash that could have ended in serious injury, a fractured cheekbone or broken nose, was a direct result of football’s decision to allow wrestling matches in the penalty area.

Fellaini assaults Shawcross primarily because he is being prevented from playing, illegally, and Mark Halsey, the referee, appears happy to let this continue. Football has never had more policemen and yet such little interest in implementing the rules.

The replays clearly show that, directly before Fellaini strikes, Shawcross is gripping him by an upper arm beneath the shoulder, to restrict his run. This is a foul. It isn’t a penalty, because the ball is dead but it is without doubt subject to corrective action.

As none is forthcoming, Fellaini takes matters into his own hands, attempts to wrestle free and, as he passes Shawcross, ducks his head into his opponent’s face. Shawcross collapses. Halsey misses the incident.

For this reason the FA can pass sanction and Everton will lose their key player at a crucial time in the campaign. David Moyes, the manager, is resigned to this and did not complain. To his credit, he as good as invited punishment.

Maybe, by doing so, he felt he was acting for the wider good. Had Moyes defended his player, the fallout would have centred on Fellaini, who got away with several instances of poor behaviour on Saturday.

Instead, with Everton pleading guilty, football would now be wise to study cause and effect.

Fellaini is a physical player. He gives as good as he gets, and one imagines he gets plenty. Even so, he does not usually prioritise butting defenders over scoring goals. If Shawcross’s marking had been old-school, without fouling, this would not have happened.

Football is a contact sport. In the
penalty area, players will be in proximity. Yet over the last decade,
increasingly, defenders no longer guard their man, but grapple with him.

Jose Mourinho’s
Chelsea were masters at it, so are Stoke. And because referees have not
stopped this behaviour, it is encouraged.

Rough and tumble: Grappling at corners and freekicks has become commonplace in football

Rough and tumble: Grappling at corners and freekicks has become commonplace in football

Every penalty area resembles a red-belt judo class these days. The FA, supposed guardians of the game, are content to let this continue.

Fellaini has admitted he was wrong and apologised. There can be no quibbles over punishment.
Yet the wider problem is not being addressed. A single weekend, in which every foul of this nature was met with a warning, then a yellow card (or a penalty if it happened when the ball was in play), would curb it instantly.

Results would briefly resemble rugby scores, but then the crisis would be over, and football would be re-acquainted with the old-fashioned ways of defending. After all, isn’t that exactly what a player like Shawcross is supposed to be about

All about cash for nice little Hearner

Leyton Orient chairman Barry Hearn continues his battle to torpedo any hope of a genuine legacy at the Olympic Stadium.

'This dispute is going to run and run and run,' he said, maintaining his opposition to West Ham United’s tenancy. 'I know, after talking to the London Legacy Development Corporation, that the Olympic Stadium is all about money and nothing about community values.'

The same community values that once led Hearn to consider moving Orient to Harlow or Basildon.
That deal, obviously, wouldn’t have been about money at all. He's all heart, our Barry.

Pay now, judge later

Damien Comolli has been working overtime attempting to justify his record at Liverpool. It boils down to the standard demand of every director of football: judge me in five years.

'I don’t think we made mistakes on the players going out,' he said, 'and whether we made mistakes on the players who came in, time will tell.'

Time has told, old son.

Jordan Henderson

Jordan Henderson

Andy Carroll

Andy Carroll

Stewart Downing

Stewart Downing

Nearly two years down the line, Andy Carroll is on loan to a lesser club, having scored 11 goals for Liverpool — just six in the league — at a cost of 35million.

Jordan Henderson and Stewart Downing can barely get a game. Charlie Adam is gone. There are eight players that have made double figure league appearances for Liverpool this season and only one — Luis Suarez, great acquisition, but hardly out of left field — was signed by Comolli.

The majority were in the team under Rafael Benitez.

'I speak to people and they ask, “What about that deal”' Comolli said. 'I explain and they say, “OK, I see where you’re coming from”.'

Of course they do; they aren’t writing the cheques.

'If you want to talk about Carroll, the situation was quite clear,' Comolli added. 'We were selling two players, Fernando Torres and Ryan Babel, and were bringing two in, Suarez and Carroll.

'Chelsea kept bidding higher and higher for Torres until we got to a point where the difference between their first and final bid was double. We were making a profit and the wage bill was coming down as well.'

In other words, Abramovich was overpaying so Comolli decided it did not matter if John Henry paid through the nose, too. That is why he got the bullet.

He was big-hearted Charlie with another man’s money. Judge him whenever you want but Liverpool will regret giving him even as long as they did.

Arsenal should be wary of dinosaurs like Usmanov

The Australian PGA Championship has probably sunk its last putt in Coolum, Queensland. Blame Jeff.

Jeff is a 26-foot robot plastic replica of a Tyrannosaurus Rex located outside the clubhouse between Coolum’s ninth green and 10th tee. It has been there since the resort club was purchased by billionaire mining magnate Clive Palmer. He is also considering building a dinosaur theme park.

Indeed, Palmer is considering a lot of things, many of them plastered on one of the 60 signs he erected around the course, promoting his pursuits, including a proposed replica of the Titanic.

Dino-sore: Jeff, the 26-foot robot plastic replica of a Tyrannosaurus Rex at Coolum, isn't pretty

Dino-sore: Jeff, the 26-foot robot plastic replica of a Tyrannosaurus Rex at Coolum, isn't pretty

Also sinking is golf’s credibility as players, including Darren Clarke, walk in Jeff’s shadow.
At least Palmer agreed to turn off the dinosaur’s mechanical roar. Club players and guests traditionally get a mulligan — a chance to replay the shot without penalty — if Jeff bursts into life at the top of a backswing.

The very rich, as F Scott Fitzgerald observed, are very different from you and me. Palmer cannot understand what the fuss is about and wants Coolum to host again next year.

Alisher Usmanov, meanwhile, is perplexed that Arsenal continue to reject his advances and his requests for a seat on the board.

Yet just as Palmer dropped Jeff on an unsuspecting public, so Usmanov – wealthier than Roman Abramovich – offered a glimpse of what Arsenal could be like on his watch, by announcing that Thierry Henry should return to the club, 'but not as a player'.

Decisions, decisions: Alisher Usmanov

Decisions, decisions: Alisher Usmanov

‘I don’t have any powers in terms of decisions but there are a few players with whom I am in contact,’ Usmanov said. My favourite is probably Thierry. He should be involved at the club. He has another role to play; a more important role.

'Take the example of Patrick Vieira at Manchester City. He is also a symbol of Arsenal but is helping another club. We have to avoid that with Thierry.'

Says who

One imagines if Arsene Wenger wants Henry back in any capacity, he is perfectly capable of asking him. And if he wants him as a player, short-term like last season, he would not appreciate having his plans vetoed by an owner who thinks he knows best.

In attempting a populist manoeuvre, Usmanov inadvertently revealed more of his style than was flattering.

Whatever Arsenal’s current predicament, Wenger has more than earned the right to make his own decisions and to be told that Henry’s transfer is off, but his unrequired return in an elevated role is on, is precisely the type of interference that could usher him out of the door.

Usmanov has money and this alone appeals to desperate supporters, but the last thing Arsenal need is a 26-foot dinosaur, roaring his instructions at a neutered manager.

AND WHILE WE'RE AT IT
Expansion explained

We can all see the problem with the Club World Cup. To embrace the global ethos all continents must be represented, yet Europe and South America are overwhelmingly strong, so the tournament contains no mystery, beyond the outcome of the final.

Happy chappys: Corinthians are champions of the world after beating Chelsea in the Club World Cup Final

Happy chappys: Corinthians are champions of the world after beating Chelsea in the Club World Cup Final

The Intercontinental Cup, as the Club World Cup once was, has a tradition lasting 52 years, beginning with a home and away final between the winners of the European Cup and the Copa Libertadores.

Real Madrid lifted the first trophy in 1960, drawing 0-0 with Penarol of Uruguay in Montevideo and then beating them 5-1 in the Bernabeu. This was the best and most dramatic format of all.

From 1960 to 1979 when Olimpia of Paraguay defeated Malmo, there were 10 South American winners and nine from Europe.

Money won, however, and FIFA then switched to a one-off game, sponsored by Toyota, in Japan.
Again, competition stayed even. From 1980 to 2004 there were 13 European winners and 12 from South America.

Expansion then brought the Club World Cup, with a wider range of entrants, a horrid false start in Brazil in 2000, a relaunch in 2005, but basically the same outcome.

Apart from the shock qualification of Mazembe of Congo in 2010, the final has always been between Europe and South America. So as a spectacle, the tournament is moribund.

What is to be done Bruce Buck, chairman of Chelsea, has a good idea.

To strengthen the tournament, he said, it should be expanded to include the winners of the Europa League and its South American equivalent, the Copa Sudamericana. That way, there would be no guaranteed progression and at least one tough match en route to the final.

This season’s tournament would have featured Chelsea and Atletico Madrid from Europe, and Corinthians and Universidad de Chile from South America.

Sao Paulo, who finished fourth in Brazil this season, nine points clear of Corinthians, would already have qualified for next season’s tournament as Copa Sudamericana champions.

Conquering the world: How would Chelsea feel playing three matches in South America

Conquering the world: How would Chelsea feel playing three matches in South America

Buck’s point was that the Champions League became more vibrant by expansion.

Placing the tournament in one of the host cities in Europe or South America — so this year’s edition would have been played in London, Madrid, Sao Paulo or Santiago — rather than a sterile location like Japan or Dubai would also help.

One imagines the bid to claim the title of world champions would carry greater cachet if Chelsea’s task involved three matches in South America, against Monterrey of Mexico, Universidad de Chile and a final against either Corinthians or Atletico Madrid. Just a thought.

Are you sitting comfortably

Sir Dave Richards, chairman of the Premier League, is to be grilled at a Football Association board meeting this week over his character witness support for John Terry.

The FA considers Richards’ stance during Terry’s hearing a conflict of interests. Yet the FA brings these disciplinary cases and also commissions and rewards the members of the independent tribunal.

This as good as places the jury in the pay of the prosecution. No conflict of interests there then, gentlemen.

Merry Christmas

Well, that’s it from me until the New Year. I know we don’t usually do presents, but if you’ve got a machine that can receive apps, search for Radio Soulwax and download a file called Dave.

Sixty minutes of pure pleasure. If you like David Bowie, that is. And, if you don’t, seriously, what’s the matter with you But it’s free, so either way, Happy Christmas.

.

Mark Clattenburg returns as fourth official at Tottenham

Clattenburg backed to take charge at Chelsea as return passes without incident

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UPDATED:

00:09 GMT, 26 November 2012

Mark Clattenburg made his return to football on Sunday as the boss of his referees’ union said he hoped it would not be ‘too long’ before the 37-year-old took charge of a Chelsea game.

Clattenburg was the fourth official at White Hart Lane, the first time he had worked since being accused of making a racist remark to John Mikel Obi on October 28.

After being cleared by the FA, it was a straightforward way to get back into the action, with little to do other than hold up the board for substitutions.

Quiet chat: Mark Clattenburg with West Ham boss Sam Allardyce

Quiet chat: Mark Clattenburg with West Ham boss Sam Allardyce

He occasionally needed to remind the rival managers and coaching staff to desist from encroaching out of their technical areas but his only real intervention was when Jermain Defoe fouled James Tomkins midway through the second half.

Sam Allardyce wanted a booking for the Spurs striker which would have seen him sent off but he calmed down and put an arm around Clattenburg while making his point.

Afterwards, Allardyce said: ‘I just said that I’m glad to see him back and get on with your refereeing. I’m sure he’s itching and ready to be back in the middle.’

Welcome back: Clattenburg officiated for the first time since his race case

Welcome back: Clattenburg officiated for the first time since his race case

Meanwhile Alan Leighton, national secretary of Prospect, the referees’ union, believes Clattenburg is still able to officiate a match involving Chelsea despite the incident.

‘I think if there was too long a delay in refereeing Chelsea then the issue gets dragged out again,’ he said.

‘The key issue for Mark is getting back to refereeing and getting back to normal, and that means refereeing Chelsea as soon as he possibly can.’

Arsene Wenger unhappy with Andre Santos

Wenger slams Santos for swapping shirts with Van Persie midway through United defeat

|

UPDATED:

18:09 GMT, 5 November 2012

Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger has let Andre Santos know that swapping shirts with Robin van Persie midway through Saturday's defeat to Manchester United was unacceptable.

The Brazilian left-back was team-mates with Van Persie until the striker's acrimonious departure to Old Trafford during the summer.

Santos endured a torrid time against United and also came under scrutiny for exchanging shirts with the Holland international at half-time of a game in which Arsenal slumped to a 2-1 defeat.

Slammed: Andre Santos (left) was criticised by fans and now his manager after trying to swap shirts with Robin van Persie at half-time during Arsenal's 2-1 defeat to Manchester United

Slammed: Andre Santos (left) was criticised by fans and now his manager after trying to swap shirts with Robin van Persie at half-time during Arsenal's 2-1 defeat to Manchester United

Centre of attention: Santos was in training on Monday ahead of Arsenal's Champions League tie against Schalke

Centre of attention: Santos was in training on Monday ahead of Arsenal's Champions League tie against Schalke

Reports suggested Santos could be dropped from Tuesday's Champions League tie at Schalke as a result but, while angry with the left-back, Wenger was keen to downplay the incident.

'I spoke about that but I don't want to make too much of a big story of that,' the Arsenal boss said.

'I believe that was not the right thing to do at all, but that is not an explanation for our bad performance on Saturday.'

Wenger was not the only one to hit out at Santos after the ill-advised shirt-swapping.

Arsenal fans were furious with the Brazilian's decision to pursue Van Persie, particularly after the defender had delivered a poor performance in the first 45 minutes in Manchester.

Former Arsenal midfielder Ray Parlour blasted Santos for the incident, and for his defensive abilities.

Ill advised: Santos accosted Robin van Persie at half-time

Ill advised: Santos accosted Robin van Persie at half-time

Controversial: Van Persie left Arsenal for 24million to Manchester United in summer

Controversial: Van Persie left Arsenal for 24million to Manchester United in summer

'That's a joke. I wouldn't have that,' Parlour said in The Sun. 'At half-time he should be concentrating on his game and he was having a nightmare.

'He can't play in a back four as he gets caught out of position all the time.'

Incensed fans also took to Twitter to vent their fury with the left-back.

On Twitter, @LBFutbol wrote: 'Santos shouldn't be allowed to come back on the pitch after that,' while another added, 'Incredible demonstration after that shambles of a 45 minutes from the “defender”.'

Others, including @GoonerTalk, said, 'Unbelievable', @wilforiley added, 'Andre Santos… The single biggest joke to ever wear the Arsenal shirt', and ‏@EddieBaby66 wrote, 'I present to you…. Andre Santos. Truly shocking'.

Unhappy: Arsene Wenger let Santos know that it was inappropriate to swap shirts with Van Persie before the game was up

Unhappy: Arsene Wenger let Santos know that it was inappropriate to swap shirts with Van Persie before the game was up

Van Persie travelled north in the summer for 24million after refusing Arsenal's offers of a new contract.

The Dutchman took only three minutes to score in his first game against his former club, but refused to celebrate his goal out of respect.

Van Persie said: 'I played at Arsenal for eight years and had a fantastic time. It was out of respect for the fans, players, manager and the whole club.'

And the gesture seemingly resonated with the men in purple and black, with Wenger first shaking hands with the Dutchman at the break, before Santos bounded the length of the pitch to ask for his shirt.

Patrice Evra doubled United's lead after Wayne Rooney had missed a penalty and Santi Cazorla hit a consolation with the last kick of the ball.

Tough task: Arsenal now turn their attentions to Schalke in their bid to progress in the Champions League

Tough task: Arsenal now turn their attentions to Schalke in their bid to progress in the Champions League

Star man: Santi Cazorla scored Arsenal's consolation goal at Old Trafford on Saturday

Star man: Santi Cazorla scored Arsenal's consolation goal at Old Trafford on Saturday

Ryder Cup 2012: Seve Ballesteros always with Europe, says Jose Maria Olazabal

We knew Seve was always with us, says emotional Olazabal after Ryder Cup triumph

By
Mike Dickson

PUBLISHED:

00:54 GMT, 1 October 2012

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UPDATED:

00:54 GMT, 1 October 2012

Far more predictable than Europe’s sensational Ryder Cup victory was that when it was all over, captain Jose Maria Olazabal could not contain his emotions.

The 46-year-old Spaniard, whose side were given just a 33-1 to chance of winning by bookmakers midway through the final afternoon, wept as he considered what an inspiration Severiano Ballesteros had been to him and his team.

‘Seve will always be present with this team, he was a big factor with this event,’ said Olazabal, reflecting on the impact still made by the Spanish genius who died aged 54 in May 2011 following a battle against brain cancer.

Top trio: McIlroy is joined by Garcia (top) and Donald

Top trio: McIlroy is joined by Garcia (top) and Donald

‘Last night when we were having our team meeting, the boys understood that believing was the most important thing, and that’s what they did.

‘It’s been a tough week. The first two days, nothing went our way. We struggled on the greens but this morning I felt a little change in that regard, and we started to make a few putts while the Americans started to miss them.

‘Winning those few matches in the latter stages, that was the key. I’ve been under pressure, hitting shots myself, but that tops anything I have felt. I am so proud of our guys.’

American captain Davis Love, who will surely rue his decision to sit Keegan Bradley out in the second set of fourballs, was dignified in defeat and insisted he had no regrets.

Emotional: Olazabal paid tribute his his late great friend Ballesteros

Emotional: Olazabal paid tribute his his late great friend Ballesteros

Legend: Olazabal played alongside Ballesteros in several Ryder Cups

Legend: Olazabal played alongside Ballesteros in several Ryder Cups

Legend: Olazabal played alongside Ballesteros in several Ryder Cups

‘I wouldn’t have done anything
different, Europe played great. Our guys had been playing so well it
didn’t seem to matter what order we sent them out in. A couple of
matches flipped their way at the end that made it easier for them,’ he
added in reference to the succession of dramatic late turnarounds.

‘We
are all kind of stunned, it’s a little bit shocking. We know what it
feels like now from Brookline. We wanted to win every segment but we got
beat badly in this one. Any time you lose a segment that badly, it’s
going to cost you the Ryder Cup.

‘Ian
Poulter’s hot streak at the end of day two gave them confidence and
they built on that. Our guys who started hot over the first couple of
days did not start hot today.

‘Stricker
and Woods were put in the back just in case and fought hard, but once
the Europeans got momentum it was hard to stop them.’

Dejected: Love (right) is applauded by his team during the closing ceremony

Dejected: Love (right) is applauded by his team during the closing ceremony

Justin Rose gave Europe hope that they could make the dream become reality when he came back from one down with two to play to beat Phil Mickelson. Rose admitted: ‘We are in shock. We knew that if a couple of their guys started to wobble it was going to get incredibly tight for them.’

On his own stunning victory, Rose added: ‘Those were the three biggest putts I’ve ever made back to back in my career under pressure. I just said to myself that I haven’t putted well all week and, “Rosey, this is what it could all come down to”.

‘Coming off the green here I’ve looked down at my left sleeve (with the Ballesteros emblem) and it’s the kind of thing Seve would have done for sure.’

Martin Kaymer, the German who sealed retention of the Cup with the point that took Europe to an unassailable 14 points, was an unlikely hero. After having a relatively mediocre season following his first major win – the US PGA title – in 2010, he held his nerve to sink a five-foot put on the 18th. He credited a chat with his compatriot Bernhard Langer.

Nerves of steel: Kaymer holed the winning putt

Nerves of steel: Kaymer holed the winning putt

‘This is a feeling that I’ve never had before,’ said Kaymer, 27. ‘On Friday night I sat down with Bernhard and talked to him about the Ryder Cup because my attitude wasn’t the right one.

‘It helped me a lot to talk about it and after today I know how important the Ryder Cup is.

‘The major win was just for myself but this is a completely different level – I could see the guys behind me, my brother was here and Sergio ran on to the green, it felt like there was so much more behind me.’

Overall, Europe’s top performer was the talismanic Poulter, who ended with a 4-0 record – the only 100 per cent performer – and became one of four Europeans who won their singles by outplaying their opponents on the 17th and 18th holes.

He was more responsible than anyone for giving Europe a chink of light late on Saturday with brilliant putting in a fourballs win with Rory McIlroy.

Main man: Poulter (right) celebrates with Justin Rose

Main man: Poulter (right) celebrates with Justin Rose

‘Last night we took such a lot from those two late wins,’ he said. ‘It was amazing to see the atmosphere change in that team room, the spirit was different. The guys were pumped up, we just felt there was that glimmer of hope. Whether it’s this man here on my sleeve (Ballesteros) or just Ollie I don’t know, but it’s pretty special.’

By contrast it had been a dismal Ryder Cup for Tiger Woods, who missed at the 18th and then conceded the final putt to allow his opponent Francesco Molinari a half – the first of the entire match – because he knew the chance of regaining the trophy had gone.

‘After they retained it everything went down,’ said Woods. ‘My putt was useless, it was inconsequential, so I hit it too quick and then gave his to him. That’s twice now when I’ve been on the fairway when the Cup was already over – like at The Belfry (2002).’

PUTTING THE PAST TO BED

REVENGE FOR LANGER Kiawah Island, 1991

The ‘War on the Shore’ culminated in one of the most dramatic putts in the history of golf – and one that would haunt German Bernhard Langer for 13 years. On the final green it was down to Langer and American Hale Irwin. To the surprise of his team-mates, Langer conceded Irwin’s bogey putt, leaving himself a six-footer he had to make. Thirteen years later he captained Europe to victory in the 2004 Ryder Cup in America, where Europe slaughtered the hosts in the singles on the final day. On Sunday another German, Martin Kaymer, gained revenge for Langer by sinking a very similar putt on the 18th green to ensure Europe would retain the trophy.

REVENGE FOR BROOKLINE Brookline, 1999

The ‘Battle of Brookline’ saw Euro-American relations at an all-time low. The lead was the complete reverse of Sunday’s going into the final day – 10-6 to a European team captained by Mark James – but American captain Ben Crenshaw decided to pack the top of the order with his best players, just as Jose Maria Olazabal did at Medinah. Europe panicked and ultimately lost 15-13 but there were ugly scenes on the 17th green when Justin Leonard holed his putt and was then mobbed by his American team-mates, who trampled over Jose Maria Olazabal’s line before he’d had the chance to putt.

Michael Schumacher given penalty after Jean-Eric Vergne crash

Schumacher slapped with 10-place grid penalty after crashing into Vergne

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UPDATED:

18:13 GMT, 23 September 2012

Michael Schumacher has been handed a 10-place grid penalty for the Japanese Grand Prix after smashing into the back of Jean-Eric Vergne in Sunday's race in Singapore.

Seven-times world champion Schumacher admitted liability for the accident that occurred just after the midway point of the race at the Marina Bay Street Circuit. It followed the restart after a safety car period for HRT's Narain Karthikeyan hitting a barrier across Anderson Bridge.

In what was a repeat of two previous incidents – one at this track last year and one earlier this season when Schumacher ran into the rear of Williams' Bruno Senna in Barcelona – the stewards decided to heavily penalise the 43-year-old for the next race in Japan.

Mistake: Schumacher was penalised for crashing into the back of Jean-Eric Vergne

Mistake: Schumacher was penalised for crashing into the back of Jean-Eric Vergne

Schumacher collected a five-place penalty for the subsequent race in Monaco after hitting Senna, one which saw him start sixth after he had set the fastest time in qualifying.

On this occasion, given it was a repeat offence, the punishment was doubled, with the stewards stating: 'The penalty takes into account this is the second similar offence by the driver this season.

'The driver admitted the collision was his error due to the failure to anticipate the braking performance of the car with lower grip following a safety car period.'

Carnage: Schumacher admitted guilt for the accident appearing to apologise to Vergne (below)

Carnage: Schumacher admitted guilt for the accident appearing to apologise to Vergne (below)

Carnage: Schumacher admitted guilt for the accident appearing to apologise to Vergne (below)

For his part, Schumacher said: 'It was obviously a very unfortunate ending to my race when I ran into the car of Vergne, who accepted my apology straight afterwards.

'I am not totally sure why it happened. I was braking, but the deceleration was not as strong as it usually would be and I could not avoid running into the car in front of me.

'We have to find out what happened. Up until then I think it would have been possible to get some points.'

Sorry: The veteran is facing a ten-place grid drop at the Japanese Grand Prix

Sorry: The veteran is facing a ten-place grid drop at the Japanese Grand Prix

As the two men climbed out of their cars, Mercedes driver Schumacher waited for Vergne to come across, immediately putting his arm around the Frenchman before they headed back to their respective garages.

Toro Rosso driver Vergne said: 'I was focussing on catching Perez at that point, trying to brake late to catch him, so I am not too sure what happened exactly.

'I assume Michael braked a bit too late and could not avoid running into me.

'There is no sense in being angry about it because these things happen in racing and even the most experienced driver on the grid can make mistakes. 'He said sorry and that's the end of it.'

Scott Harrison beats Joe Elfidh in Glasgow

Harrison fails to impress after being forced to go the distance by inexperienced Elfidh

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UPDATED:

22:29 GMT, 22 September 2012

Scott Harrison laboured to a points victory over Joe Elfidh after making surprisingly hard work of his inexperienced opponent.

The former two-time world champion was making his second appearance since finally putting his problems with alcohol and depression behind him, having stopped Gyorgy Mizsei in June.

But despite dropping Elfidh in the first round, Harrison was unable to finish him off inside the scheduled six rounds.

Work to do: Scott Harrison (left) laboured to victory against Joe Elfidh (right)

Work to do: Scott Harrison (left) laboured to victory against Joe Elfidh (right)

Harrison, who was out of the ring for seven years having been stripped of his WBO featherweight title, claims he has been promised a fight with Ricky Burns, who was hugely impressive in defending his world title against Kevin Mitchell, but on this evidence he should set his expectations significantly lower for the time being.

Now fighting at lightweight, the 35-year-old took the fight to Elfidh from the first bell and a hard right followed by a flurry of punches sent Elfidh crashing to the canvas. He beat the count however and survived the remainder of the round.

Harrison continued to control the centre of the ring in the second stanza but his English opponent was proving no pushover and landed several telling blows of his own as the fight reached the midway point. The remaining rounds continued in a similar vein and, despite chasing Elfidh around the ring, Harrison was forced to settle for 60-53 decision.

Evasive action: Elfidh dodges a left hook from Harrison at the SECC in Glasgow

Evasive action: Elfidh dodges a left hook from Harrison at the SECC in Glasgow

Earlier in the evening, Bradley Saunders stopped Ivan Godor in the third round after the Slovakian was dropped three times in the stanza.

Saunders moved to four without defeat while Stephen Simmons made it six straight successes against Tayar Mehmed and John Thain was given a tough time by Lee Noble before coming through to win by decision.

John Simpson was a popular winner against Dai Davies for the Celtic super-featherweight championship, knocking the Welshman out with a crushing right hook in the second round.

Taken the full distance: Harrison celebrates his victory over Elfidh after six rounds

Taken the full distance: Harrison celebrates his victory over Elfidh after six rounds

London 2012 Olympic Cycling: Ed Clancy wins omnium bronze medal

Clancy wins omnium bronze medal after strong finish in time trial

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UPDATED:

18:01 GMT, 5 August 2012

Ed Clancy claimed bronze in the men's omnium as Great Britain missed out on Olympic gold for just a second time at the London 2012 velodrome, with Denmark's Lasse Hansen taking the title.

On a day when Jason Kenny and Victoria Pendleton made serene progress in the men's and women's sprint competitions, Olympic team pursuit champion Clancy settled for third, but hailed the crowd after rising from fifth place with one discipline to go in the six-discipline event.

Clancy, the 2010 world omnium champion, won two of the events and finished second in a third, but ultimately fell short of the title due to two disappointing displays in the bunch races.

Medal won: Ed Clancy did enough to secure bronze

Medal won: Ed Clancy did enough to secure bronze

Britain had won four of the five events in the previous three days of competition – missing out only in the women's team sprint – and were well placed in tomorrow's only medal event, with Kenny untroubled in advancing to the last four of the men's sprint.

Clancy's competition was varied – he won the flying lap on day one, finished 11th in the points race and fifth in the elimination race to sit fourth at the midway point overnight.

The 27-year-old Yorkshireman moved up to second with second place in the four-kilometre individual pursuit, but fell four points off the pace with a 10th-place finish in the penultimate event, the 15km (60 lap) scratch race.

On track: Ed Clancy competes for Great Britain

On track: Ed Clancy competes for Great Britain

Clancy clocked one minute 00.981
seconds to win the final discipline, the one-kilometre time-trial. It
was a sensational time in the event which was removed as a stand-alone
event from the programme after Sir Chris Hoy won in Athens in 2004 in
1min 00.711secs.

If rumours the kilo could return for
Rio de Janeiro in 2016, possibly at the expense of the omnium, are true,
Clancy would be well placed.

Ireland's Martyn Irvine finished 11th in the final event, clocking 1:04.558, to place 13th overall.

In the mix: Clancy (centre) competes in the Men's Omnium

In the mix: Clancy (centre) competes in the Men's Omnium

London 2012 Olympics Sailing: Paul Goodison and Ali Young see medal hopes ended

Goodison and Young see medal hopes ended in Weymouth's water

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UPDATED:

16:40 GMT, 4 August 2012

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LIVE RESULTS |
EVENT SCHEDULE |
MEDALS TABLE

Great Britain's Paul Goodison and Ali Young both saw their London 2012 medal hopes ended on Saturday.

After a successful day on the water for the British sailing team on Friday, on Saturday proved a disappointment as the duo's podium hopes were extinguished.

Reigning Laser gold medallist Goodison came into the regatta amongst the favourites but has struggled all week due to a back injury picked up in just the second race.

Time to look forward: Great Britain's Paul Goodison misses out on a medal

Time to look forward: Great Britain's Paul Goodison misses out on a medal

The Yorkshireman came off the water in tears on Tuesday but fought on courageously to complete the 10-race opening series.

Goodison secured a ninth and then an eighth today to leave him sixth overall, meaning he will compete in Monday's medal race but without a chance of a medal due to the points margin.

Olympic debutant Young is in the same situation after fleet racing came to a close in the Laser Radial class.

The 25-year-old began the Games in fine form and was third overall midway through the regatta.

However, Young began to taper off and saw her hopes of a top three ended today as she was black flagged in the afternoon, before then finishing fourth in the last fleet race.

MotoGP: Jorge Lorenzo wins Italian Grand Prix at Mugello

Lorenzo completes Italian job as Yamaha rider stretches lead at top after Mugello win

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UPDATED:

15:13 GMT, 15 July 2012

Jorge Lorenzo further increased his advantage at the top of the MotoGP standings with a convincing victory in the Italian Grand Prix at Mugello.

The Spaniard (Yamaha) claimed his fifth victory in nine rounds this season after finishing over five seconds clear of countryman Dani Pedrosa (Repsol Honda), with Italian Andrea Dovizioso third on his Monster Yamaha.

Winning feeling: Yamaha MotoGP's Jorge Lorenzo (C) celebrates on the podium with second-placed Honda rider Dany Pedrosa (L) and third-placed Yamaha Andrea Dovizioso

Winning feeling: Yamaha MotoGP's Jorge Lorenzo (C) celebrates on the podium with second-placed Honda rider Dany Pedrosa (L) and third-placed Yamaha Andrea Dovizioso

Italian job: Lorenzo stretched his lead at the top of the standings

Italian job: Lorenzo stretched his lead at the top of the standings

The triumph means Lorenzo, who was also victorious at Mugello last year, now has 185 points in the overall standings at the midway point of the season, 19 clear of second-placed Pedrosa.

Reigning champion Casey Stoner of Australia, who has three victories to his name this season but could only finish eighth today, is in third spot on 148 points, with Dovizioso's fourth in 108.

Britain's Cal Crutchlow, who came home sixth on his Monster Yamaha, is fifth overall on 95.

Turning the corner: Britain's Cal Crutchlow came home in sixth place

Turning the corner: Britain's Cal Crutchlow came home in sixth place