Tag Archives: medley

Sports pictures of the day: October 3

Sports images of the day: Our picture editor's selection

UPDATED:

15:25 GMT, 3 October 2012

Each day, MailOnline sports picture editor Dave Muir will choose his favourite photographs from around the world in the past 24 hours.

Enjoy today's selection right here…

Laszlo Cseh of Hungary competes in the 400m individual medley at the Swimming World Cup in Dubai

Laszlo Cseh of Hungary competes in the 400m individual medley at the Swimming World Cup in Dubai

Ryan Ludwick of the Cincinnati Reds breaks his bat during the MLB clash with the St Louis Cardinals

Ryan Ludwick of the Cincinnati Reds breaks his bat during the MLB clash with the St Louis Cardinals

Lemos de Souza rides Afsare during a workout at Werribee Racecourse in Melbourne

Lemos de Souza rides Afsare during a workout at Werribee Racecourse in Melbourne

Pittsburgh Pirate Michael McKenry tags out Atlanta Braves' Reed Johnson

Pittsburgh Pirate Michael McKenry tags out Atlanta Braves' Reed Johnson

Atlanta Dream guard Angel McCoughtry goes to the basket against Indiana Fever

Atlanta Dream guard Angel McCoughtry goes to the basket against Indiana Fever

Ellie Simmonds reaches S6 50m freestyle final

Simmonds admits tough task ahead as swim star reaches S6 50m freestyle final

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UPDATED:

11:06 GMT, 4 September 2012

Ellie Simmonds shook off the cobwebs as she returned to her domain to qualify fourth fastest for the S6 50m freestyle final.

The 17-year-old has already cemented her place as one of the faces of London 2012 and her appearance behind the blocks prompted wild cheers at the Aquatics Centre.

Two titles and two world records in the SM6 200m individual medley and S6 400m freestyle have already come her way although it could well prove troublesome for Simmonds to add the one-length dash to her roll call.

Golden girl: Ellie Simmonds set up another medal shot after qualifying for the S6 50m freestyle final

Golden girl: Ellie Simmonds set up another medal shot after qualifying for the S6 50m freestyle final

Fifth in Beijing, she clocked 36.45 seconds behind Holland's defending champion Mirjam de Koning-Peper, American Victoria Arlen – second in the 400m – and Tanja Groepper of Germany.

Some think victory is a formality when Simmonds dives into a pool but she was realistic about the challenge she faces to add to her medals.

The Walsall-born swimmer said: 'It's going to be a tough race. The 50m free is my fourth best event but it helps develop my 100 free for later on in the week.

'I am really achy this morning from my 200IM: it was a bit of a killer.

'To do that time nearly on my PB and the way I am feeling I am really happy so hopefully I can go out there and do a PB. It's going to be really tough to medal.'

Great Britain's Heather Frederiksen was the fastest into the S8 100m backstroke final in which she is the defending champion.

Pooling power: Simmonds has been one of the main stars of the Aquatics Centre

Pooling power: Simmonds has been one of the main stars of the Aquatics Centre

The 26-year-old produced an emphatic performance to reach the final the fastest by some distance with more than four seconds separating her from American Jessica Long in 1min 17.63secs.

The City of Salford athlete was highly emotional after her silver in the S8 400m freestyle following 12 months of ill-health when she was diagnosed with neuralgic migraines.

When not hospitalised, Frederiksen was often bed-ridden and she had only six weeks training but the Billinge-born woman is nothing if not gutsy.

She said: 'The 100m backstroke is my main event – I was gold medallist in Beijing in it.

'So it was very nerve-wracking coming in but at the end of the day I got out there and gave it a go and I'm going in ranked No 1 tonight.

'So I'm going to get out there and get in the mix and have a right good go.'

Stephanie Millward was second into the S9 400m freestyle as she looks to claim her third medal of the Games.

Eyeing up the opposition: Simmonds prepares to race in the heats of the S6 50m freestyle

Eyeing up the opposition: Simmonds prepares to race in the heats of the S6 50m freestyle

The 30-year-old did not compete in this event in Beijing, where fourth in the 100m backstroke was the closest she came to the podium, but so far in London Millward has a silver and a bronze to her name.

On Tuesday, she was seven seconds clear of her nearest rival Ellie Cole in 4:46.00 although Natalie du Toit was 13 seconds ahead of the Briton as she looks for her third successive title.

Millward said: 'It felt really good, it was pretty much the perfect morning swim. Natalie looked really good and the gold will be tough but I am feeling confident about getting a medal.'

Newham-born Amy Marren, who was inspired to take up swimming by Simmonds' double gold in Beijing, was fourth and Lauren Steadman seventh.

High hopes: Defending champion Heather Frederiksen was quickest into the S8 100m backstroke

High hopes: Defending champion Heather Frederiksen was quickest into the S8 100m backstroke

Oliver Hynd was third into the S8 100m backstroke with ParalympicsGB team-mates Thomas Young and Sean Fraser occupying the two places directly behind him.

The 17-year-old claimed silver ahead of his brother Sam in the S8 400m freestyle last Friday and this time he finished in 1:08.59 as he looks to add a Paralympic medal to his 2011 European bronze.

He said: 'Pretty happy with that for a morning swim, it's about 0.6 off my best time so for a morning swim I am satisfied.'

Hynd was clearly galvanised by his visit to the rostrum last week, something he wants to repeat.

'Once you've done it you want more, you want to get on the podium again and again so it's good motivation.

'I didn't get much sleep last night but I've got other races so I just needed to re-focus towards my goals and what I wanted to achieve in those races.'

On a hat-trick: Stephanie Millward goes for her third medal of the games in the S9 400m freestyle

On a hat-trick: Stephanie Millward goes for her third medal of the games in the S9 400m freestyle

London 2012 Paralympics: Ellie Simmonds sets world record in 200m individual medley

Simmonds produces another stunner with new world record in 200m individual medley

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UPDATED:

11:00 GMT, 3 September 2012

Ellie Simmonds underlined why she is one of the stars of the London 2012 Paralympics as she shocked herself with a new world record in the heats of the SM6 200 metres individual medley.

The 17-year-old has already set a new world mark in the S6 400m freestyle en route to a successful defence of her Paralympic title on Saturday.

On Monday morning she produced a blistering freestyle leg to make her rivals appear as if they were treading water to touch in three minutes 06.97 seconds, 1.13secs inside her own world mark from March when she became the first swimmer to set a global record in the Aquatics Centre.

Ell of a swim: Ellie Simmonds celebrates after setting a new world record in the SM6 200m individual medley

Ell of a swim: Ellie Simmonds celebrates after setting a new world record in the SM6 200m individual medley

The Swansea-based swimmer was completely taken aback and a second gold medal is a clear possibility.

Simmonds said: 'I wasn't going for a world record, I was actually going for the Paralympic record but I was just going in there to feel the stroke.

'When I walk out the crowd is amazing, that definitely gives me a big buzz. I just can't wait to race tonight.

Star of the show: British swimmer Simmonds has been superb in the pool

Star of the show: British swimmer Simmonds has been superb in the pool

'I am quite shocked with that time. When I was at the finish I couldn't actually see what (the time) was, I had to ask someone.

'I'm really pleased with a two-second PB in the heats. It's good to be on top form at the biggest Paralympic Games of my life.'

Louise Watkins going to great lengths as Brit faces showdown with rival Natalie du Toit

Watkins going to great lengths as Brit faces showdown with rival Du Toit

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UPDATED:

19:50 GMT, 26 August 2012

Louise Watkin arrives in London determined to triumph in a duel with the woman who was her childhood hero.

The 20-year-old swimmer has four
races at the Aquatics Centre and three of them are against Natalie du
Toit, the remarkable South African with 10 Paralympic golds to her
name.

Race is on: Louise Watkin will face her great South African rival in the pool

Race is on: Louise Watkin will face her
great South African rival in the pool

The two will tangle in the S9 50 metres and 100m freestyle, as well as the SM9 200m individual medley and it could prove to be the most intriguing showdown of these Games.

Four years ago in Beijing, Watkin, who was born without a left hand, was a 16-year-old schoolgirl who had juggled GCSEs with training to get some Paralympic experience. She returned with one silver medal and three bronzes, understandably ecstatic at the achievement.

paralympics

That she lost out to Du Toit – who had her left leg amputated in 2001 after a car accident – in three events was no shame. Du Toit is eight years older and had been good enough to compete in the Olympics earlier that summer, coming 16th in the 10k open water event.

But London is different. Watkin no longer feels like the wide-eyed pretender. She knows the crown is within reach.

'Natalie's a huge inspiration to me and she has been for a very long time now,' Watkin says. 'We are really good friends too. She is from South Africa, so we only ever get to see each other during competitions but when we do see each other we get on really well.

'She was the person that I beat two years ago at the World Championships where I won gold, so to repeat that again at the Paralympic Games would be an amazing achievement.'

The race Watkin refers to was the S9 50m freestyle in Eindhoven, when a blistering 29.26sec swim left Du Toit trailing in second. Watkin has the fastest time in the world this year over that distance and is third over 100m. She is second to Du Toit in the SM9 200m, while the SB9 100m breaststroke offers her another chance of a medal. Watkin is the final member of Sportsmail's Magnificent Seven, whom we have followed in the lead-up to London 2012, to get a chance to perform in this summer extravaganza of sport.

She watched the Olympics on television and says Britain's success has provided a further spur to do well herself. She diplomatically swerves the suggestion her Paralympic team can make up for the disappointment delivered by the able-bodied swimmers, and prefers to concentrate on what a positive impact this coming fortnight can provide for those with disabilities.

'It will do a lot, and people will be
inspired by how people cope with their disabilities,' she says. 'Many
of the sessions are a sell-out which is just great because so many
people are interested in seeing us and supporting us. The atmosphere
while we are at the Games will be just incredible.

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'I remember being back in Beijing four years ago when one of the
Chinese swimmers came out and the noise inside the swimming stadium was
just unbelievable. If we can get that for us it would be amazing.'

A raucous reception is the least Watkin and her team-mates can expect.

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London 2012 Olympics: Australia medal failure down to lack of funding – John Coates

We need more money! Australian Olympic chief blames medal failure on low funding

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UPDATED:

09:15 GMT, 6 August 2012

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LIVE RESULTS |
EVENT SCHEDULE |
MEDALS TABLE

Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates blames the failure of his country's athletes to achieve the expected gold-medal success from the London Games on a shortage of government funding and a lack of compulsory sport in schools.

Australia were 24th on the games medals table after nine days, with only one gold medal, 12 silver and seven bronze. Neighboring New Zealand, with less than a fifth of Australia's population, were 14th with three gold medals.

The failure of Australia's swimmers to provide impetus for a gold medal rush led Coates on Monday to downgrade his London medal expectations from 46 to between 30 and 36 – ruling out a predicted top-five finish.

Bronze boys: Australia's men's 4x100 medley team

Bronze boys: Australia's men's 4×100 medley team

Australian swimmers won only one gold medal – in a relay – six silver and three bronze for the country's lowest Olympic medal tally in swimming since Barcelona in 1992. Australia also failed to win an individual medal in swimming for the first time since 1972.

Speaking to Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio from London, Coates said with strong performances in sailing and cycling, Australia might still finish as high as eighth on the medal tally, but a top-five finish was no longer realistic.

'If you analyse it, it is only in swimming that we are disappointed in the number of medals,' he said. 'In Beijing we got 46 medals of which 20 were in swimming.

'We have 10 here, so realistically we are not going to get 46 medals – 30 to 36 is more likely.'

The most senior Australian member of the International Olympic Committee, former Olympian Kevin Gosper, told ABC the failure to win gold medals resulted directly from cuts to government funding of Olympic sports in 2009.

Disappointing: Australia's Blair Evans (left) and teammate Stephanie Rice

Disappointing: Australia's Blair Evans (left) and teammate Stephanie Rice

The Australian government allocated
nearly 220million to sports programs in its 2010 budget, but the 35m earmarked for Olympics-focused high performance sports was only
half what the AOC had lobbied for.

Gosper, a former IOC vice president
and current chairman of the IOC Press Commission, said more had to be
spent on top coaches and on international competition to ensure
Australian athletes were competitive at future games.

'Now that really cost us,' he said. 'You've got to put money in there. That pays for coaches, it pays for international competition.

'The money is the difference between silver and gold.'

Coates also laid blame at the feet of the government, saying it needed to change policy and priorities to ensure funding was available for sport in schools.

'Perhaps the area that needs a lot of attention … and government intention in terms of policy is getting sport back into the school curricula,' he said.

Expectations: Australia hoped for big things from James Magnussen - he took silver in the men's 100m freestyle

Expectations: Australia hoped for big things from James Magnussen – he took silver in the men's 100m freestyle

'The British are making a big thing of that being one of the legacies they're looking towards and they've been achieving that, a greater emphasis on sport in schools.

'We need that because we've got to make sure we have a talent pool.'

Federal Sports Minister Kate Lundy told ABC from London that Australian athletes were still up with the best and the world, but that the difference between gold and silver was miniscule and Australia was coming 'so close so many times.'

'It's a millimeter or a millisecond and it's just not going our way,' she said.

'I don't think that diminishes the achievements of our silver medalists. They're on the podium. We're still up there with the best of the best.'

Lunday said the success of Australia's high performance sports programs would likely be examined after the games but 'there's no one piece of our sports system that's broken.'

While Australia's lean medal count has led to national soul-searching, New Zealand has been able to celebrate three early medals in rowing. On a medal table based on national population, New Zealand, with just over four million citizens, would be in first place ahead of Slovenia.

London 2012 Olympics: Swimming: Michael Phelps wants to build legacy

Phelps hoping to build on legacy by teaching the world to swim like champions

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UPDATED:

17:34 GMT, 5 August 2012

Olympics 2012

Michael Phelps is not done with high-achieving even if his career as an Olympic athlete is over.

The American's indefatigability brought him 18 Olympic gold medals, two silver and two bronze, an unprecedented total, and after he scratches a travelling itch he will set himself new objectives.

Phelps is the man who wants to teach the world to swim, who wants to lop a heap of shots from his golf handicap, who wants nothing more than to see the sport he has dominated in the past decade continue to grow and grow.

Last one Michael Phelps says teaching children how to swim is very important to him

Last one Michael Phelps says teaching children how to swim is very important to him

Farewell: Michael Phelps retired on a high after winning the 4x100m medley relay

Farewell: Michael Phelps retired on a high after winning the 4x100m medley relay

He is also not a man who accepts
second best, as the rivals who have come and gone, lining their pockets
with silver and bronze, can attest.

Just now though, Baltimore-based
Phelps wants to enjoy life outside professional sport, the 27-year-old
having been cocooned since his mid-teens, visiting the world's greatest
cities but more likely to be taking in the sights from a coach window
than on foot. He could look but rarely touch. Now all that changes.

'I want to travel a bunch. That's
something I've always wanted to do,' Phelps said. 'I've been able to see
so many amazing places in the world but I've really never got to
experience them.

'I've seen the pool and hotels, every
year over the last 12 years of being in the national team. I'd like to
experience some things, whether it's travelling through Europe or going
back to Australia and being able to go around Australia, or South Africa
– something (South African swimmer) Chad (Le Clos) and I were talking
about.

'There's a lot of things I want to do
for myself just to be able to relax, and even though I am retiring and
the competitive side of my career is over, there's a lot of things I
want to do around the sport.

Dream team: Brendan Hansen, Matthew Grevers, Michael Phelps and Nathan Adrian

Dream team: Brendan Hansen, Matthew Grevers, Michael Phelps and Nathan Adrian

'I would like to take it to a higher level than it is right now, and continue to grow the sport more and more.'

He also has a charitable foundation, aimed at encouraging positive lifestyles for American youngsters.

'I'm going to be able to put more
time and effort into that,' Phelps said, 'and also my summer schools.
Being able to teach children how to swim and live healthily is something
that's very important to me.'

Phelps won four golds in London,
after eight in Beijing and six in Athens. It is also often forgotten he
raced in Sydney as a 15-year-old too, but that further underlines how
swimming has been his life since childhood.

As well as two relay successes in
London, including Saturday's 4x100metres medley, he claimed individual
gold in 100m butterfly and 200m individual medley.

Phelps could easily swim on and remain competitive on a world level between now and the Rio de Janeiro Games in 2016.

Hugs: Michael Phelps with his coach Bob Bowman after receiving a special award

Hugs: Michael Phelps with his coach Bob Bowman after receiving a special award

'Sure, if I wanted to I could still go,' he said. 'But I'm ready to be done. I'm ready to retire and move on to other things.

'Whatever route I go down I'm going
to have goals. I'm still a very competitive person, so if I go out and
practice more at golf I'm going to drop x amounts of strokes.

'I'm going to have things I'll be
able to go for and try to achieve. That's the mentality I have and the
competitiveness I have, and I think it'll always be with me.'

As a boy, Phelps was diagnosed with
attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and had a school teacher who
thought he would amount to little in life. It was a prediction that was
wildly off target, with Phelps emerging as a national hero, sporting
nobility.

United States' swimmer Michael Phelps holds up a silver trophy after being honored as the most decorated Olympian

US swimmer Michael Phelps holds his trophy of the greatest olympic athlete of all time

The Greatest: Phelps was awarded a trophy for being the best Olympian of all time

As he prepared to mount the podium in
the Aquatics Centre last night, waiting for the Star-Spangled Banner to
strike up, Phelps turned to team-mate Brendan Hansen who is joining him
in retirement.

'And it was strange,' Phelps said.
'Brendan was like, 'I'm going to belt the words out', and I said, “It's
going to sound like gibberish if I do it”.

'As soon as I stuffed up on the podium I could feel the tears start coming.

'I said to Nathan (Adrian, who swam the anchor leg), “Oh no, there they come, it's going to be pretty brutal”.

'They just started coming. I tried to
fight it but I just decided to let it go, and whatever happened,
happened. I was just taking in these last moments of my swimming career.

'To be able to sit here and say I've done everything I wanted to do in my swimming career is something that's pretty special.

'That's the only thing I wanted to say when I retired. I wouldn't change anything. I didn't miss anything.

'I've had the opportunity to do something nobody else has ever done before, so I'm very happy with that.'

London 2012 Olympics Watch BBC video highlights from day six

Watch BBC video highlights from day six at the Olympics

PUBLISHED:

06:44 GMT, 3 August 2012

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UPDATED:

06:44 GMT, 3 August 2012

Great Britain's Sir Chris Hoy won
gold in the velodrome in the team sprint, alongside Phillip Hindes and
Jason Kenny. Hoy's fifth gold of his career can only be matched by Sir
Steve Redgrave – is he now the greatest Olympian Britain has ever
produced

Brits also won gold in the canoeing
and the shooting, with Etienne Stott and Tim Baillie succeeding in the
two-man slalom event and Peter Wilson earned his medal in the trap
shooting.

But there is plenty more exciting
action to catch up on, with Michael Phelps winning the 200m individual
medley to earn his 20th Olympic medal amongst other great moments.

You can watch highlights of day six on the video player below…

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LONDON OLYMPICS 2012: Michael Phelps wins 20th medal with gold in 200m individual medley

Legend Phelps wins his 20th Olympic medal as he claims 200m individual medley title

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UPDATED:

19:38 GMT, 2 August 2012

Michael Phelps cemented his greatness by winning a 20th Olympic medal with gold in the 200m individual medley on Thursday night.

Phelps beat his great rival Ryan Lochte in an exciting final.

The American has now won 16 gold medals – six at the Athens Games in 2004, eight at Beijing 2008, and two more at this Olympics.

Earlier Lochte could only take bronze in the 200m backstroke, behind the winner Tyler Clary.

Another success: Phelps won Olympic gold in the pool on Thursday night

Another success: Phelps won Olympic gold in the pool on Thursday night

American Rebecca Soni claimed gold in the women's 200m breaststroke after smashing her own world record in the final.

Soni was a massive odds-on favourite
to win the title after setting a world record of two minutes 20.00
seconds in the semi-finals, and fully justified her status with a
commanding performance.

The 25-year-old took control of the race after the opening length and
touched in a time of 2:19.59secs, slicing more than four tenths of a
second off her previous time. Japan's Satomi Suzuki claimed silver with
Russian Iuliia Efimova taking bronze.

London Olympics 2012: Let"s hope Ye Shiwen gets what she deserves. Martin Samuel

Let's all hope Ye gets what she deserves…

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UPDATED:

23:25 GMT, 31 July 2012

For arguably the greatest swimmer the world has ever seen it was rather a muted response. No cheers, no roar, little more than polite acknowledgement really.

They are a reserved lot in Beijing, too, so Ye Shiwen probably did not notice. The rest of the sport would have, though. The cynics and believers, the dubious and convinced. Most importantly, those at the heart of the sport — the organisers, the officiators, the other athletes — all would have noticed something missing at 8.45 in the Aquatics Centre.

Faith. Trust. The basic contract between individuals that is the soul of any sporting contest. Once that goes unsigned, competition is meaningless, and here it lay discarded in a puddle on the tiles.

All week the pool has been a wall of sound, but not for the women’s 200metre medley. The excitement surrounding the next event, a men’s freestyle relay, only served to underline the sense of reserve. Michael Phelps became the greatest Olympian in history in that event. He captured imaginations, as sheer brilliance does.

Muted celebration: Ye Shiwen is embraced by Alicia Coutts after her win

Muted celebration: Ye Shiwen is embraced by Alicia Coutts after her win

And Ye should have, too. She is a
marvel, a modern wonder of the world. No less than utterly unique. The
first woman to swim faster than the best man.

Yet that feat was what had shocked
those watching into unease. They did not believe what they had seen
then, so they were not willing to believe what they were seeing now.
After Saturday’s game-changer this was Ye winning well, but winning
ordinary. Doing enough, but no more. Where was the girl who blew away
Ryan Lochte’s final leg here on Saturday night She touched first, in
Olympic record time, but nothing that would register as unusual. Too
late. The genie is out of the bottle now.

The day had been dominated by claim
and counter-claim following John Leonard’s decision to go public on
his disquiet at Ye’s achievement. Executive director of the World
Swimming Coaches Association since 1989, Leonard is no loose-lipped
loudmouth. His questioning of Ye’s 400m medley win at the weekend was
almost forensic.

‘If you look at the woman in question
and her biomechanics in the heats, she has a steady, moderately slow,
six-beat kick,’ he said. ‘All of a sudden in the Olympic final she
turned it up to an eight-beat kick, which any coach will tell you is
very difficult to maintain for 25 metres, let alone 100.’

Double trouble: Ye added to her golden haul with victory in the 200m individual medley

Double trouble: Ye added to her golden haul with victory in the 200m individual medley

The beats refer to the number of kicks
Ye makes with each stroke. It is a rhythm only swimming coaches would
fully comprehend, and its identification carries considerably greater
weight than other markers touted as suspicious, such as the fact Ye
knocked five seconds off her personal best time.

The vested interests organising these
Games do not want it to be remembered for even the hint of a doping
scandal, so they have been playing down Leonard’s observations all day.
Lord Coe and Lord Moynihan have both cited the absence of any evidence
beyond basic scepticism, and they have a point. Proof is required before
judgment is made, although China’s record of failed drugs tests in the
pool does not lean to giving the benefit of the doubt.

Experienced swimmers, from Adrian
Moorhouse to Ian Thorpe, have also insisted that extremes can happen in
the teenage years. Great strides can be made at Ye’s age: 16. But
eight-beats-per-stroke great This is the question with, as yet, no
answer. We are left instead to consider one of life’s maxims: if
something looks too good to be true, that is what it is.

Of course, it is easy to suggest
latent racism or old-fashioned Western arrogance in the doubters, easier
still to buy into envy or baser instincts as the motivation for
cynicism. The same defences were made when Caster Semenya won the 800m
at the World Athletics Championships in a time that made little sense,
given her history. Wild accusations of sexism and anti-African racism
were thrown, but in the end it was Athletics South Africa who were
forced to admit they knew her gender was an issue all along. Leonard
Chuene, the ASA president, resigned.

A force of nature: Ye received muted applause for her achievement

A force of nature: Ye received muted applause for her achievement

It is the numbers, not skin colour or
nationality that causes questions to be asked. At the 2000 Olympics in
Sydney, Inge de Bruijn of Holland won gold medals in the 50 and 100m
freestyle and the 100m butterfly. She broke 10 world records that year.
De Bruijn is white, blonde, statuesque, pretty: after every victory she
was asked about doping.

This was the Olympics after the
pale-skinned Michelle Smith of Ireland had been banned for producing
tainted samples. Swimming feared another crisis. ‘I absolutely do not
think this is a drug-free Olympics,’ said Richard Quick, coach to the
United States women’s team. Susie O’Neill, a gold medallist for
Australia in 1996 and 2000, described De Bruijn’s achievements as
‘pretty sus’.

De Bruijn added to her gold medal
tally in Athens, and has never failed a drugs test. Her record of four
gold, two silver and two bronze medals makes her the greatest Dutch
Olympian. White skin and flaxen hair, however, did not spare her the
inquest because her times were simply considered too special.

Inquest: Inge de Bruijn

Inquest: Inge de Bruijn

So Ye wasn’t special. Not
quite. An Olympic record is special to most, but given what Ye did to
the history books on Saturday this amounted to a doodle, rather than a
scored line through the page. It was almost as if she had been told to
shield a little, to be just a little marvellous instead.

‘I’m not affected at all by the
scandal,’ she said. ‘It made no difference to my race. Training has
been very hard and I need a long break now.’

As if disappearing from view will help. Seasoned observers will say they have seen that before: it is rarely a good sign.

Ye got a better reception receiving
her medal, but considering her achievements at these Games, nothing like
she deserved. We don’t precisely know what she deserves, of course,
that is the problem. We must hope, that if she has not got it already,
she does some time soon.

London 2012 Olympics: Watch BBC video highlights from day four

Watch BBC video highlights from day four at the Olympics

PUBLISHED:

00:21 GMT, 1 August 2012

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UPDATED:

00:57 GMT, 1 August 2012

Another difficult day for Team GB as a number of medal hopes were crushed, but there was some joy in Greenwich as the equestrian riders sealed a much needed silver medal.

Over at the Aquatics Centre history was made as American swimmer Michael Phelps became the most decorated Olympian in history, securing his 18th and 19th medals in the pool.

And swimming sensation Ye Shiwen added to her golden haul with victory in the 200m individual medley.

You can watch highlights of day four on the video player below…

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