Tag Archives: medallist

Jessica Ennis" training venue Don Valley Stadium to be demolished

So much for the legacy! Ennis' training venue Don Valley Stadium to be demolished in cost-cutting measure

/13 is unsustainable as the stadium is running at a loss.

Olympic heptathlon gold medallist Ennis trains at the stadium. She was also discovered at the stadium when she went to a summer holidays athletics club when she was 10.

After her triumph in August, some people called for the Don Valley Stadium to be renamed in her honour. It is also home to the City of Sheffield Athletics Club.

Preparation: Ennis used Don Valley Stadium as a training venue

Preparation: Ennis used Don Valley Stadium as a training venue

Yesterday, after she received her CBE at Buckingham Palace, Ennis said: 'I've some amazing memories.

'I started my athletics career there. Having that iconic stadium in my home city is incredible.

'And to lose that would be such a shame for future athletes coming through. So I hope that the right decision's made.'

Double blow: Ennis' coach Toni Minichiello lost his full-time job with UK Atheltics

Double blow: Ennis' coach Toni Minichiello lost his full-time job with UK Atheltics

The council said it subsidises every visit by more than 5 and it requires major repair and maintenance work – totalling around 1.6 million.

It has proposed the reopening of the track at the smaller Woodbourn Road Stadium nearby.

The 25,000-seat stadium, which was a temporary home to Rotherham United for four seasons, was built as the centrepiece of a 147 million construction programme when Sheffield hosted the 1991 World Student Games.

Track Cycling World Championships: Laura Trott looking to repeat Olympic omnium win over Sarah Hammer

Trott looking to repeat Olympic omnium win over dangerous American Hammer

Olympics bronze medallist Annette Edmondson fourth, just one point further back.

Trott is attempting to win an incredible sixth title at a major championships in the space of just 24 months.

Contender: Sarah Hammer, who Trott beat to the title at London 2012, leads the Brit by five points

Contender: Sarah Hammer, who Trott beat to the title at London 2012, leads the Brit by five points

She finished third in the flying lap before she came home 10th in the points race, leaving her needing to perform well in the elimination.

Trott, whose boyfriend Jason Kenny was dumped out of the sprint in disappointing fashion last night, duly won but Hammer was the last rider to go out.

Nike advert from 2011 features Oscar Pistorius as "the bullet in the chamber"

The bullet in the chamber: How Nike advert described Blade Runner Pistorius in 2011…

By
Mike Dawes

PUBLISHED:

13:14 GMT, 14 February 2013

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UPDATED:

14:00 GMT, 14 February 2013

A Nike advertising campaign has emerged which describes Oscar Pistorius as ‘the bullet in the chamber’.

The advert is believed to date back to 2011 but has re-emerged on the morning the Paralympic gold medallist, one of the most famous athletes on the planet, has been charged with murder following the death of his model girlfriend.

The 26-year-old allegedly shot Reeva Steenkamp, 30, who died of gunshot wounds at his home.

Advert: The Nike poster with Pistorius and the slogan

Advert: The Nike poster with Pistorius and the slogan

Pre-Paralympics: The advert dates back to 2011The advert dates back to 2011

Pre-Paralympics: The advert dates back to 2011

Neighbours called the police and arrived to find paramedics trying in vain to save her life.

Pistorius is due to appear in a Pretoria court tomorrow morning when police said they would oppose a bail application.

Another Nike advert shows a picture of the athlete and reads: ‘I was born without bones below the knee. I only stand 5ft 2. But this is the body I have been given.

'This is my weapon. How I conquer. How I wage my war. This is how I have broken the world record 49 times.

'How I become the fastest thing on no legs. This is my weapon. This is how I fight.’

Police spokeswoman Lieutenant
Colonel Katlego Mogale said police were called to Pistorius' house in the
Silver Lakes district at around 5am local time (3am GMT).

The call
came from a neighbour.

A 9mm pistol was recovered and the woman’s body was removed from the scene.

Pistorius was arrested at the scene as investigations began.

The athlete will appear in court tomorrow morning charged with the murder of his girlfriend

Charged: The athlete will appear in court tomorrow morning charged with the murder of his girlfriend

Double amputee Pistorius made history last summer by competing in the Olympic Games for his country, becoming the first amputee sprinter to do so.

He competed in the 400m and 4x400m relay at the Olympics and won two gold medals in the Paralympics in London.

The Johannesburg-born athlete, who was born without fibulas in his legs and had the limbs amputated below the knee when he was 11 months old, had to win a legal battle over his blades with the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) in 2008 for the right to run in able-bodied competition.

Olympic Stadium to host London Grand Prix

Olympic Stadium to host London Grand Prix on anniversary of 2012 opening ceremony… but will Bolt run away from taxman again

as she claimed gold in the heptathlon” class=”blkBorder” />

Local hero: Jessica Ennis was one of the stars of London 2012 as she claimed gold in the heptathlon

Mo Farah, who won gold medals in the
10,000 metres and 5,000m at the Olympics, said: 'The atmosphere was
electric during the Games, I'll never forget it, so it's great that the
British fans, and athletes, will get to experience that again so soon
after the Games.'

Athletics tickets were among the most sought after for the Games and heptathlon gold medallist Jessica Ennis hopes the Grand Prix will give people who were unable to buy tickets a chance to see high-class athletics at the stadium.

She said: 'It is brilliant to hear that the British Athletics London GP is going to be held at the Olympic Stadium a year after the Games.

'It will give athletes and fans who did not get to experience the amazing venue the chance to go there, and for those of us who had the most incredible experiences on the track and field, an opportunity to relive a few memories.

'Hopefully I will be there and using the competition as part of my preparation for the World Championships.'

Speedsters: Usain Bolt (left) and his Jamaican team-mates set a new 4x100m world record in London

Speedsters: Usain Bolt (left) and his Jamaican team-mates set a new 4x100m world record in London

Lighting up London: The stadium was also full for the Paralympics last summer

Lighting up London: The stadium was also full for the Paralympics last summer

David Weir hits out at New Year Honours system

Weir having to win more medals to get recognised! Paralympic hero hits out at New Year Honours system after CBE

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UPDATED:

11:31 GMT, 29 December 2012

Six-time gold medallist David Weir has suggested Paralympians have to work harder to earn recognition than their non-disabled counterparts.

Weir has been recognised with a CBE for winning four gold medals at this summer's London Games, but the wheelchair athlete was not among the five sporting dames and knights created.

Olympic cyclist Bradley Wiggins and British Cycling performance director Dave Brailsford have both been knighted, as has sailor Ben Ainslie, with Paralympic cyclist Sarah Storey becoming a dame after taking her gold medal tally to 11 to match Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson's record.

Golden boy: David Weir won four events at London 2012

Golden boy: David Weir won four events at London 2012

British rowing performance director David Tanner has also been knighted.

In an interview with the Daily Telegraph, Weir said: 'I am absolutely honoured to receive this award.

'I would have been disappointed if Sarah Storey had not been made a dame because she deserves it with 11 gold medals.

'It's a weird one how they choose it. Sometimes it seems that Paralympians have to win lots and lots of medals to get a damehood or a knighthood.

What a summer: Weir played his part in a brilliant period for British sport

What a summer: Weir played his part in a brilliant period for British sport

'Kelly Holmes was made a dame when she won two gold medals, but it seems we have to get into double figures to get it.

'Sarah Storey should have been awarded this years ago, and I just feel that sometimes we are left out perhaps because we are not in the public eye.

'It is a bit strange, but I am just honoured to get anything from the Queen for doing a sport I love.'

Weir is the only disabled athlete among five CBEs with only two Paralympians receiving OBEs.

From Mo Farah to Bradley Wiggins, relive the most sensational festival of sport

When London lit up the world! From magical Mo to wonderful Wiggo, relive the most sensational festival of sport

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UPDATED:

01:13 GMT, 29 December 2012

We lit the flame and we lit up the world. Those were the simple words of Lord Coe, his neck flexing with exhilaration in front of a global television audience of three-quarters of a billion. He had promised at the opening ceremony a fortnight earlier that we would do it right, and so we had.

The Games of the XXX Olympiad were closing in front of our spoilt eyes and we were left to reflect on the truth that this was perhaps the best thing Britain had done since winning the Second World War.

The transformational qualities of sport were clear on London's streets. A year before, so-called student protestors had urinated on the statue of Winston Churchill. But in the summer of 2012 Britain rediscovered her senses. People were smiling. Football's tribal enmities had yielded to a more generous sporting spirit. Conversation even broke out on the Tube. This carnival gripped the nation.

Just Momentous: Farah wins the 5,000m final to complete his golden double

Just Momentous: Farah wins the 5,000m final to complete his golden
double

So much so that, after today's New Year's Honours announcement, an unprecedented four sporting notables await the Queen's sword tip. Arise Sir Ben Ainslie and Sir Bradley Wiggins, knights of sailing and cycling, Sir Dave Brailsford and Sir David Tanner, the foremost performance directors of their era, from cycling and rowing. Then there is Paralympic swimming and cycling gold medallist Sarah Storey, who becomes a dame. There are 78 high-achievers on the special Olympic and Paralympic list.

I had always been a believer in London's potential to deliver a glorious Games. Coe, with a team led by his meticulous No 2 Paul Deighton, was assiduous. Anyway, the country is habitually good at staging great events. The British public generally come round to such occasions when they arrive.

This particular slow-burner was coming at us from Greece. I saw the torch lit in that ludicrous ceremony concocted by the Nazis for the 1936 Berlin Games among the splendid old stones of ancient Olympia.

A week later, we witnessed the rain briefly lifting at the home of the modern Olympics, the Panathenaic Stadium in Athens, as the torch was passed from Greek hands to British. I reported from seat 10D on board BA flight 2012 as the flame shared the front row with the Princess Royal on our journey to the UK.

But it was in Bath on May 22 that my belief in the project became total. It was the day I ran with the Olympic flame. People were standing a dozen deep on either side of the road. Jason Gardener, relay gold medallist from the Athens Games, was a fellow runner. His eyes were moist at seeing all ages and conditions of men and women cheering and waving on the journey through the handsome streets of his home city.

Golden boys: Farah poses with Bolt at the medal ceremony

Golden boys: Farah poses with Bolt at the medal ceremony

This scene was replicated virtually every mile of the torch's progress up and down the land until the night of July 27 arrived. The Opening Ceremony was upon us.

What Danny Boyle had dreamed up in his crazy and creative mind set the whole jaunty mood. Occasionally left-leaning, yes, but it was a phantasmagoria that was undeniably bonkers and brilliant. It was unashamedly made for a home audience – Mr Bean and Only Fools and Horses featured, the first with memorable piano humour. The rest of the world was simply welcome to take from it what they could.

The rehearsal and the schedule contained no mention of the Queen's involvement nor any reference to Churchill. Those extra dimensions were revealed only at the last moment. My first-edition piece, filed as the ceremony was starting, excoriated Boyle for the omissions and was followed by a call to the office: 'Where I say there was no mention of Churchill, can we change that to barely a mention'

The Queen staged surely the greatest coup de theatre in British artistic history when she turned round to say 'Good evening, Mr Bond' from her Buckingham Palace desk. She then supposedly descended to the stadium by parachute, which prompted two American ladies watching the beach volleyball to marvel at the 86-year-old monarch. 'Did you see the Opening Ceremony' one said to the other. 'They even got the Queen to jump out of a helicopter. Can you imagine Obama doing that'

Her Maj looked tired by the time the British team – led by Sir Chris Hoy – paraded in. It had been a long but uplifting night. Coe's speech about the power of sport struck me as sensationally good. He hailed a celebration of 'what is best about mankind'. He went on: 'There is a truth to sport, a purity, a drama, an intensity of spirit that makes it irresistible.

On the Boyle: a stunning opening ceremony by the film director set the tone for the greatest Games in history

On the Boyle: a stunning opening ceremony by the film director set the tone for the greatest Games in history

'To the athletes gathered here, I say that to you is given something which is precious and irreplaceable – to run faster, to jump higher, to be stronger.' Then Lord Coe (or Mr Swan, as he called himself by adopting his grandmother's maiden name during his Games stay at the Intercontinental Hotel, Park Lane) unwound with Lady Coe ahead of the feast of sport that was to come.

And so it all began. It is difficult at a few months' detachment to think just how much we anticipated Mark Cavendish getting us off to a victorious start in the road race. The rest of the world ganged up in an anyone-but-Cav pact. Our dreams dashed.

But it hardly mattered to the party. The route was lined at every yard out to the Surrey hills and back into London. And when Lizzie Armitstead took silver in the women's race the next day we had lift-off – sort of.

But, still, after four days of sport there was no gold to show for the most lavishly funded British team of all time. The success of Beijing four years before – 19 golds, 47 medals – hung heavily. Don't panic, I wrote, our strongest sports had yet to reach the medal stages.

So it was a relief to be at a windless Dorney Lake at 12.24pm on day five to see two girls in a boat deliver that elusive bullion. Heather Stanning, a Royal Artillery captain, and Helen Glover, a PE teacher, led from the start of their pairs final and commanded the race. The team had found the key to Fort Knox.

Hampton Court that afternoon provided perhaps the most famous image of the Games: Tour de France winner Wiggins, long legs crossed and flashing a Churchillian victory sign, on a gaudy throne after winning the road race. He now had seven Olympic medals – more than any Brit including Sir Steve Redgrave. Again, the crowds were immense. We were witnessing the symbiosis of participants and supporters. Enthusiasm fed success, and success fed enthusiasm.

Famous image: Bradley Wiggins on teh throne

Famous image: Bradley Wiggins on teh throne

was our greatest in Games history when we factor in that the numerical high point in 1908 came in a different world altogether. The first of three London-hosted Games lasted 187 days and a third of all competitors were British. It was the tug-of-war era.

Here the superb volunteers had the delight to announce one night as we headed out of the Park: 'Ladies and gentleman, Yorkshire is leading Australia in the medal table.' Nobody can say we do not love sport. Heats were sold out. Sports we hardly understood against nations we could barely find on a map played to full houses. No other country could boast that, including Australia, whose Sydney Olympics in 2000 were generally acknowledged until this summer as the best. The enthusiasm for the Paralympics, complete with a new host of heroes such as Storey, Jonnie Peacock, David Weir and Ellie Simmonds, underlined the point.

You could soak in the atmosphere for free on the road routes or in Hyde Park. Or for the licence fee. Bad news, so often the staple of newspapers, barely existed. Yes, the performance of Ye Shiwen, the 16-year-old Chinese swimming sensation, came under scrutiny. But, suspicions raised, the story faded. A handful of badminton matches were thrown by nations looking to aid their chances in the knockout stages but the stink did not linger.

There were the occasional British disappointments, notably the underperformance of our own swimming team. I sensed the mood in the camp was desperately wrong at the World Championships the year before. They were so downbeat that we can just be thankful they didn't drown.

Swim sensation: China's Ye Shiwen

Swim sensation: China's Ye Shiwen

But if swimming failed, gymnastics, equestrianism, boxing all sparkled. Cycling and rowing inevitably soared. Athletics, though falling below the target set by the Mr Tough Love, aka head coach Charles van Commenee, provided the Games' most memorable evening of British endeavour. It was such a Super Saturday that long jumper Greg Rutherford is in danger of becoming a pub quiz question of the future: who was the third Briton to win a gold medal on the night that Jessica Ennis and Mo Farah both won Rutherford's misfortune, if we can call it that, was to reach the peak of his athletics career in the 44 minutes during which two of the Olympics' poster people reached theirs.

Heptathlon gold was virtually assured by the time Ennis started her final event, the 800 metres, turning it into a double lap of honour. Farah's run to 10,000m glory was packed with tension until his big eyes popped out of his head as he crossed the line first.

That day, Britain won six golds in all, the others coming through our peerless coxless four, women's double scullers and our team pursuit women in the Velodrome. It was gluttony.

We returned to see Farah go for the double the following weekend. Tired after the heats of the 5,000m, the crowd hit one of the two most ear-splitting sounds I heard all Games. The other was in the enclosed ExCeL for the boxing, first for Ireland's Katie Taylor and then our own gold medallist, the open, friendly, Nandos-loving Nicola Adams. But back to Farah. The crescendo of noise that helped push him into the front in the final lap and to withstand the late challenge of Dejen Gebremeskel and Thomas Longosiwa broke the photo-finish equipment. The vibrating stadium was too much for the technology. Thankfully, the winning margin was evident to all 80,000 loud and happy souls in the stands. It was one of the single highlights of the whole Games.

My favourite day was the longest day, the middle Sunday. Up before dawn, Tube to Waterloo, train to Weymouth, taxi to the sailing venue. Ainslie was in the latest fight of his life for a gold medal, this time against a red-bearded Viking called Jonas Hogh-Christensen.

Flying the flag: Ben Ainslie

Flying the flag: Ben Ainslie

Our greatest sailor was being frustrated by the tactics of his rivals. 'You don't want to make me angry,' he told them. After losing the first six races to Hogh-Christensen, he wrenched his way back into contention. In the final race, he went in and then out of gold-medal position. Jacques Rogge, IOC president and himself a former Finn sailor, is an avowed Ainslie admirer. He based his whole day around being free to watch the last act of this particular drama, in which Ainslie dramatically prevailed. A sword's tap awaits the sailor's shoulder.

I run to the waiting taxi, queue for the train then squeeze into a seat for more than an hour. Tube to Stratford, walk into the stadium at 9.20pm. Usain Bolt is off at 9.50pm.

The 100m final – that most stomach-turning event of the whole Games – has arrived. Bolt, who finally admitted he had been struggling with injuries we had reported, was up against his training partner Yohan Blake.

Blake, undefeated all year, had beaten the great man in the Jamaican trials. To what extent was Bolt limited by his back-related travails Could the younger man pull off the bravest heist A reputation was on the line more than a world record was in prospect. Bolt delivered gold in 9.63sec.

If only he had been fit. If only he did not party. If only he gave up the junk food. This is a man who lives by his own rules, a point reinforced when he added the 200m and the 4x100m titles to his c.v. He declared himself a legend and nobody could argue otherwise.

Before the Olympics finished, Bolt was acting out Farah's 'Mobot' celebration. Farah was striking the 'Lightning Bolt' pose. Fun and brilliance conjoined.

In the Velodrome, Victoria Pendleton took her golden leave, hopefully happy in that sometimes mixed-up mind of hers. Laura Trott emerged as cycling's new queen, an image given a glitzy frisson when she was pictured in love with her golden team-mate Jason Kenny. The oak-legged master Hoy was emotional on the podium as he bade goodbye. His second gold of the Games, which was won in the keirin, meant he had won more Olympic golds than anyone else in British history, with six to Redgrave's five.

Cycling's new queen: Great Britain's Laura Trott

Cycling's new queen: Great Britain's Laura Trott

Hoy, a modest man of immodest ability, still reckoned that Redgrave's quintet achieved in five separate Games, conferring longevity, is the greater achievement. I am inclined to agree.

There was so much to marvel at here. We almost forget that Michael Phelps left the pool with a career total of 18 Olympic gold medals – and that's because, in London, the American won a paucity of honours by his standards: just the four golds and two silvers.

We saw Kenya's David Rudisha win the 800m like a horse running against men. Coe hailed him as the star of the Games. It was a touching compliment from one of the greatest middle-distance runners of the ages to another. We revelled in our own heroes and heroines: Katherine Grainger, in the double sculls, winning a gold at last after three silvers. Charlotte Dujardin emerging as a double star with gold in the equestrian team event and the dressage. Nick Skelton winning gold at the age of 54 in the team showjumping.

There was triathlon's Brownlee brothers – Alistair coolly strolling through the line with the Union Flag on his back to take gold; Jonny collecting his bronze once he had been treated for exhaustion. Andy Murray's joy at Wimbledon, where there had been tears just weeks before. Jade Jones, funded by a whip-round in her home town of Flint in North Wales, winning taekwondo gold. Peter Wilson, a tall chap with a nice sense of humour, taking the shooting honours in the double trap. Tom Daley, with a diving bronze just a year after his father and mentor died, doing well to make the headlines among the golden hordes.

Too soon, the show closed on this revitalised eastern edge of the capital. Rio was charged with bringing the youth of the world together for the XXXI Olympics four years hence – no pressure there. The more prosaic debate over legacy commitments took centre stage.

Tears were shed as the flame was extinguished. Pride abounded.

London had lit up the world.

Lionel Messi comes third in Argentina"s best athlete poll

Third rate! Messi loses out to boxer and taekwondo fighter for Argentina's best athlete award

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UPDATED:

20:28 GMT, 19 December 2012

Ask a group of people who you think the best athlete or sportsman in the world is, and Lionel Messi will be a name you'll hear a lot.

Unless this group of people is comprised of Argentine journalists, who don't even rate Messi as the best in their country. Or second best for that matter.

Pretty good year: Sergio Martinez with his trophy after beating Sebastian Chrismanich and Lionel Messi to the award

Pretty good year: Sergio Martinez with his trophy after beating Sebastian Chrismanich and Lionel Messi to the award

Ready for it: Martinez will fight British boxer Martin Murray in April 2013

Ready for it: Martinez will fight British boxer Martin Murray in April 2013

No, it was third place for the Barcelona superstar who finished behind boxer Sergio Martinez and taekwondo fighter Sebastian Crismanich.

Messi's incredible record breaking goal haul – he has 90 so far this year – wasn't enough to put him ahead of the competition.

Martinez won the Olimpia de Oro after beating Mexican Julio Cesar Chavez Jr in their WBC title fight earlier this year. He will fight British boxer Martin Murray in April 2013.

What, not me Lionel Messi finished third in the poll of Argentine journalists

What, not me Lionel Messi finished third in the poll of Argentine journalists

Crismanich, meanwhile, was Argentina's only gold medallist in the London 2012 Olympics.

'It is an honor having won this prize contending with athletes like Sebastian Crismanich and Leo Messi,' Martinez said at the award ceremony on Tuesday night.

But having picked up the award in 2011 and being the hot favourite for the Ballon d'Or, Messi won't be too upset.

Superstars returns to BBC for Christmas with Olympic stars Mo Farah, Anthony Joshua, Jonny Brownlee

Superstars is back! British Olympians turn have-a-go heroes in return of classic show

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UPDATED:

23:48 GMT, 18 December 2012

Watching brief

Saturday, December 29 on BBC1, 6.45-8.15pm.

The one-off episode is presented by Gabby Logan with Denise Lewis and Iwan Thomas as pundits.

Next weekend, classic sports show Superstars returns for a festive special, featuring 16 of this year’s British Olympians.

Mo Farah, Anthony Joshua, Alistair and Jonny Brownlee and Lizzie Armitstead are among the heroes of London 2012 taking part.

So which member of Team GB will prove the ultimate all-rounder Take a look at these pictures taken while filming the show and decide who you think will be crowned London 2012's Superstar.

The eyes have it: Mo Farah grits his teeth in the tough men's bike race on Superstars

The eyes have it: Mo Farah grits his teeth in the tough men's bike race on Superstars

One more push: 200m breaststroke silver medallist Michael Jamieson shows the strain

One more push: 200m breaststroke silver medallist Michael Jamieson shows the strain

Gym tests: Great Britain's first medallist of the London 2012 Olympics, Lizzie Armitstead

Gym tests: Great Britain's first medallist of the London 2012 Olympics, Lizzie Armitstead

Mo's throw: 5,000m and 10,000m gold medallist Farah prepares to launch the javelin

Mo's throw: 5,000m and 10,000m gold medallist Farah prepares to launch the javelin

Jade's in sparkling form: Jones turns her hand to the javelin after winning gold in taekwondo at the Games

Jade's in sparkling form: Jones turns her hand to the javelin after winning gold in taekwondo at the Games

Poor bike! Super-heavyweight boxer Anthony Joshua uses his huge frame during the cycle race

Poor bike! Super-heavyweight boxer Anthony Joshua uses his huge frame during the cycle race

Making a splash: Jonny Brownlee, Olympic triathlon bronze medallist, races in the kayak

Making a splash: Jonny Brownlee, Olympic triathlon bronze medallist, races in the kayak

Taking aim: Lizzie Armitstead fires at the bull during the archery competition

Taking aim: Lizzie Armitstead fires at the bull during the archery competition

And they're off: (left-right) Peter Wilson, Robbie Grabarz, Anthony Joshua, Jonny Brownlee, Mo Farah, Alistair Brownlee, Michael Jamieson, Andrew Triggs-Hodge

And they're off: (left-right) Peter Wilson, Robbie Grabarz, Anthony Joshua, Jonny Brownlee, Mo Farah, Alistair Brownlee, Michael Jamieson, Andrew Triggs-Hodge

Can you remember these Superstars

Daley Thompson

David Wilkie

Shows of strength: Olympic decathlete Daley Thompson (left) and swimmer David Wilkie (right)

Pool of talent: (left-right) Bobby Moore, Tony Jacklin, David Hemery, Roger Taylor, Barry John and Joe Bugner

Pool of talent: (left-right) Bobby Moore, Tony Jacklin, David Hemery, Roger Taylor, Barry John and Joe Bugner

The original Superstar: Geoff Capes shows how the shot putt should be done

The original Superstar: Geoff Capes shows how the shot putt should be done

And who could forget the most famous Superstars moment of all (Yes, it's Kevin Keegan's bike crash…)

Alan Fraser: Bradley Wiggins proves he"s got the personality for SPOTY

Wiggo proves that he's a SPOTY winner with a real personality

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UPDATED:

00:14 GMT, 17 December 2012

The phone lines had not even opened and Bradley Wiggins already had his hands on the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Trophy.

'I was handing you the microphone not the trophy,' Sue Barker told the mischievous cyclist as he stepped onto the stage and grabbed the silverware.

Wiggins looked like The Who drummer Keith Moon in a natty double-breasted blue velour suit and seemed determined to behave with the same unpredictability.

Hello Susan! Bradley Wiggins charmed the audience, and Sue Barker

Hello Susan! Bradley Wiggins charmed the audience, and Sue Barker

'Look, Susan,' Wiggins replied with the emphasis on the presenter's Sunday name. If ever a sportsman deserved an award for personality as well as achievement, it was Wiggo, Olympic gold medallist, only British winner of the Tour de France and bit of a lad.

Modestly, he accentuated the importance of the team over the individual. All the sportsmen and sportswomen present were backed up by a team.

'Even Gary Lineker with the make up he wears has an incredible team behind him,' Wiggins added.

The audience laughed to see such fun poked at the flagship BBC presenter. More than two hours later, the programme having overrun and overflowed with sporting excellence, Wiggins was back on the podium to receive the award from the Duchess of Cambridge.

Sealed with a kiss: Wiggins let his charm and wit shine through

Sealed with a kiss: Wiggins let his charm and wit shine through

His light-hearted presumption at the beginning of the show had proved correct.

His wife, Catherine, looked on in horror as he began his acceptance speech. What would this plainest of speakers and most unpretentious of people say now She need not have worried.

He promised not to swear, thanked (Team) Sky for paying him, promised a cheque for his grandmother for voting so often and invited the 16,000 audience to a free bar paid for by the Beeb. How could you not fail to love Wiggins

The ExCeL was packed with those who excel in sport. Put a shot in any direction and you were liable to take out a British Olympic champion.

High praise: The Duchess of Cambridge (centre right) presented Wiggins with the SPOTY

High praise: The Duchess of Cambridge (centre right) presented Wiggins with the SPOTY

There have been many Olympic years when it was a struggle to come up with an Olympian as a nominee never mind a winner.

Take 1960, when a bronze medal in Rome proved sufficient for showjumper David Broome to be presented with the model of an old outside-broadcast camera. And in 1956, 1988, 1992, and 1996 Olympians were ignored for the main prize as respectively Jim Laker, Steve Davis, Nigel Mansell and Damon Hill prevailed.

Hill did not even need to win the F1 world championship. Second was good enough. Not now. Second is nowhere, as they say, with the 12 for 2012 including 11 gold medallists and Rory McIlroy, the best golfer in the world. And on holiday, judging by his absence.

Deserved: Wiggins beat Jessica Ennis and Andy Murray to the gong

Deserved: Wiggins beat Jessica Ennis and Andy Murray to the gong

The Beeb painted the vast canvas masterfully. Coverage was on radio, on television, online and behind the red button. I tuned into 5 Live to listen to the red carpet, as it were, an exercise as thrilling as watching grass grow.

Happily, I hit the red button in time to see Louis Smith arrive. Take the sports star out of the tracksuit or lycra – or in his case sequined blouse – and and you can end up with a fashion di-sas-ter, to quote Strictly's Craig Revel Horwood.

No gold, Louis, for the silver-rimmed specs. Wiggins won the fashion stakes and the day and deservedly so. Here, rarely in the history of this institution, was a personality being named Sports Personality of the Year.

SPOTY 2012: Bradley Wiggins is the champion of champions

Jonathan McEvoy: 'Champion of Champions' Wiggins caps a year to cherish as the nation crowns him Sports Personality

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UPDATED:

00:34 GMT, 17 December 2012

The everyman and his nan won the BBC Sports Personality of the Year award last night. Bradley Wiggins, the fellow who could not care less about his image, is the champion of champions in the year of sporting years.

Britain’s first Tour de France winner, and gold medallist in the Olympic time-trial, jokingly thanked his grandmother Maureen for pressing the redial button.

He won because he was, even among the dozen greats in the running, the supreme candidate.

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The Nation's Choice: Bradley Wiggins has been voted BBC Sports Personality of the Year for 2012

The Nation's Choice: Bradley Wiggins has been voted BBC Sports Personality of the Year for 2012

Great achievement: Wiggins was presented with the award by David Beckham and the Duchess of Cambridge

Great achievement: Wiggins was presented with the award by David Beckham and the Duchess of Cambridge

He attracted 492,064 of almost 1.63million votes — 30.25 per cent. Jessica Ennis, the girl-next-door heptathlete who turned into the lady in red last night, was second, 120,000 votes adrift.

Andy Murray, who ended the nation’s long wait for a male tennis grand slam winner, was third, a further 140,000 or so behind. Mo Farah was fourth another 100,000 back.

Some viewers complained they could not cast their vote in the early surge. Show organisers insisted it was not a substantial number – and, certainly, the outcome was not distorted.

In fact it was so straightforward for Wiggins that the only possible impediment would have been if he said something silly to offend Middle England. Always a possibility for this straight-talker.

But he was well behaved, even if at the start he appeared perhaps a little lubricated by the BBC’s pre-show largesse. Like the others, Wiggins talked of the team behind the athletes.

He called Sue Barker ‘Susan’ for comic effect. He poked fun at Gary Lineker’s thick make-up and later kissed him.

Golden Duo: Sport Personality of the Year Bradley Wiggins with runner-up Jessica Ennis
Golden Duo: Sport Personality of the Year Bradley Wiggins with runner-up Jessica Ennis

THE RESULTS

1. BRADLEY WIGGINS – 492,064 votes – 30.25%

2. JESSICA ENNIS – 372,765 – 22.92%

3. ANDY MURRAY – 230,444 – 14.17%

4. MO FARAH – 131,327 – 8.07%

5. DAVID WEIR – 114,633 – 7.05%

6. ELLIE SIMMONDS – 102,894 – 6.33%

7. SIR CHRIS HOY – 42,961 – 2.64%

8. NICOLA ADAMS – 35,560 – 2.19%

9. BEN AINSLIE – 35,373 – 2.17%

10. RORY MCILROY – 29,729 – 1.83%

11. KATHERINE GRAINGER – 28,606 – 1.76%

12. SARAH STOREY – 10,342 – 0.64%

TOTAL VOTES CAST: 1,626,718

After receiving the accolade from the Duchess of Cambridge, he promised not to swear. His wife, Cath, murmured, ‘Oh God’.

He was fine. The crowd loved him, chanting ‘Wiggo, Wiggo.’ As Lord Coe observed, he has a ‘rock-star quality’.

The fans and stars alike streamed
here, 16,000 souls wanting to drain every last drop of Olympic
champagne. And the BBC even altered their rules to keep the party going
right to the end of their annual knees-up.

‘For the avoidance of doubt,’ the
Beeb’s published criteria for the Team of the Year Award read, ‘it
excludes Team GB/Paralympics GB but includes the likes of British
Cycling, the rowing coxless four and European Ryder Cup.’

But, no, that did not fit the spirit
of the age. It did not reflect the all-embracing hug we have all enjoyed
sharing. So the judges rightly exercised their right to amend the
criteria — and I’m not congratulating them just because my boss was one
of them.

Popular choice: Bradley Wiggins was crowned BBC Sports Personality of the Year following his Tour de France and Olympic triumphs

Sky procycling team rider Bradley Wiggins of Britain celebrates his overall victory on the podium after the 20th and final stage of the Tour de France

Bradley Wiggins of Great Britain celebrates after the Men's Individual Time Trial Road Cycling

Champion: The award caps a wonderful year for Wiggins, who won the Tour de France (left) and Olympic time trial gold

VIDEO: Bradley Wiggins receives his award

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REACTION TO THE WIGGINS WIN

UK Prime Minister on Twitter: 'PM: “Congratulations to Bradley Wiggins -a truly inspirational winner, after an incredible year for British sport”. #SPOTY'

Rio Ferdinand on Twitter: 'Congratulations to Bradley Wiggins winning #Spoty'

British Cycling president Brian Cookson: 'Bradley's win is a high point of what has been the greatest year in British Cycling's history.

'To win the Tour de France and gold in the Olympic time-trial in the same year is a feat that has anchored our sport in the mainstream of British life.

'The fact that three out of the 12 nominees this year are cyclists [Sir Chris Hoy and Sarah Storey were the others] is recognition of the hard work and dedication of not just our amazing athletes but of everyone who works in cycling.

'Dave Brailsford's win as Coach of the Year and BMX rider Quillan Isidore making it on to the short list for Young Sports Personality shows the success cycling has enjoyed across all disciplines.

'A cyclist has been crowned Sports Personality three times in the last five years, proving that cycling is the sport that has redefined our national sporting identity.'

Runner-up: Jessica Ennis came second after winning the Olympic heptathlon gold

Runner-up: Jessica Ennis came second after winning the Olympic heptathlon gold

Golden Girl: Olympic champion heptathlete Jessica Ennis is interviewed by Sue Barker on stage

Golden Girl: Olympic champion heptathlete Jessica Ennis is interviewed by Sue Barker on stage

Man in Miami: Third-placed Andy Murray was presented with his award by boxer and former SPOTY winner Lennox Lewis in Miami

Man in Miami: Third-placed Andy Murray was presented with his award by boxer and former SPOTY winner Lennox Lewis in Miami

So, that problem cleared, the party
was on. The 800-plus athletes of our British Olympic and Paralympic
teams were thrust into the centre of the occasion, winning the Team
Award. Who could begrudge them after 185 medals

Coe, now undisputedly the dominant
figure in British sport, got the Lifetime Achievement Award for
producing the Games. He also deserves a gold medal for all the ceremony
speeches he has made in the last few weeks.

VIDEO: Lord Coe receives his Lifetime Achievement award

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Lifetime achievement: Lord Coe was honoured for helping deliver the London Olympics and Paralympics

Lifetime achievement: Lord Coe was honoured for helping deliver the London Olympics and Paralympics

But, by the time the main award was
handed out, Wiggins’ boss Dave Brailsford, 48-year-old performance
director of British Cycling, had been named Coach of the Year. He is the
embodiment of the modern Lottery-era coach. Professional, clinical,
organised.

The top-performing sport at Beijing
four years ago, British Cycling won eight gold and 22 medals at this
year’s Olympics and Paralympics. And add in the small matter of
masterminding Team Sky’s Tour de France win.

Cycling has been swept from the margins to become a major British sport. Tell your boy to go into the bike shop business.

Stars: The Duchess of Cambridge and David Beckham presented the Sports Personality and Lifetime Achievement awards

Stars: The Duchess of Cambridge and David Beckham presented the Sports Personality and Lifetime Achievement awards

Who else could win the Overseas Sports
Personality of the Year but Usain Bolt In fact, he seemed bored in his
acceptance speech from Jamaica. So many awards, so many thank yous.

More sombrely, for the Helen Rollason
Award for Outstanding Achievement the Olympic symbolism stretched back
to 2005. The winner was Martine Wright, the Paralympic sitting
volleyball player who lost both legs in the 7/7 bombings. That horror
befell London the day after Coe & Co won the bid in Singapore.

Wright’s inspirational journey lent a
nice symmetry to proceedings. ‘I’d like to thank Liz for saving my life
that day,’ she said of PC Elizabeth Kenworthy. ‘This is also for the 52
who died. Now we have to go on and inspire a nation.’

The only bauble that departed from the
Olympic script was the Unsung Hero Award for Sue and Jim Houghton, the
inspiration behind a community centre in Leicestershire. One sport they
have contributed to: pigeon racing.

The Houghtons were the only unsung
heroes of the night. The hymns of praise to our Olympians rang loud and
clear at the end of a year the memory of which will never leave us.

THE SPORTS PERSONALITY WINNERS IN FULL

Sports Personality of the Year – Bradley Wiggins

Lifetime Achievement Award – Lord Coe

Overseas Sports Personality of the Year – Usain Bolt

Coach of the Year – Dave Brailsford, Performance Director of British Cycling

Team of the Year – Team GB and Paralympic GB

Unsung Hero Award – Sue and Jim Houghton – Spent 25 years transforming a derelict Leicestershire sports ground into a community facility

Helen Rollason Award – Martine Wright – 7/7 survivor who played sitting volleyball for Paralympics GB

Young Sports Personality of the Year – Josef Craig, Britain's youngest goal medallist at the 2012 Paralympics in the S7 400m freestyle swimming


Superman: Mo Farah, the double Olympic champion, is quizzed by Gary Lineker

Superman: Mo Farah, the double Olympic champion, is quizzed by Gary Lineker

Champion: Rower Katherine Grainger talks about her Olympic achievements with Clare Balding

Champion: Rower Katherine Grainger talks about her Olympic achievements with Clare Balding

City slickers: Vincent Kompany and Sergio Aguero (left) are interviewed by Gary Lineker to celebrate City's first Premier League title triumph

City slickers: Vincent Kompany and Sergio Aguero (left) are interviewed by Gary Lineker to celebrate City's first Premier League title triumph

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF BRADLEY WIGGINS

1980: Born April 28 in Ghent, Belgium before growing up in London. Son of Australian former racing cyclist Gary Wiggins.
1992: Begins track cycling at Herne Hill Velodrome, London.
1997: Wins individual pursuit gold at Junior World Track Championships in Cuba.
2000: March – Silver in team pursuit at Track Cycling World Championships in Manchester.
October – Bronze in team pursuit at Olympic Games in Sydney.
2001: September – Silver in team pursuit at Track Cycling World Championships in Antwerp, Belgium.
2002: July – Silver for England in team pursuit and individual pursuit at Commonwealth Games in Manchester. Gold in individual pursuit at Track Cycling World Championships in Stuttgart, Germany.
2003: August – Silver in team pursuit at Track Cycling World Championships in Stuttgart, Germany.
September – Wins opening stage of Tour de l'Avenir.
2004: August – Olympic gold in individual pursuit at Athens Olympics. Also wins silver in team pursuit alongside Steve Cummings, Paul Manning and Rob Hayles and bronze in Madison alongside Rob Hayles to become first Briton since 1964 to win three medals at one Games.
2005: September – Wins stage eight of Tour de l'Avenir.
2006: July – Makes Tour de France debut, riding for French team Cofidis.
2007: March – Wins gold in the individual pursuit and team pursuit at Track Cycling World Championships in Palma, Majorca.
June – Prologue victory in Dauphine Libere.
July – Finishes fourth in Tour de France prologue in London behind Swiss winner Fabian Cancellara but his team, Cofidis, later withdraw after team-mate Cristian Moreni fails a drugs test.
2008: January – Wiggins' estranged father, Gary Wiggins, is discovered unconscious in New South Wales and later dies.
March – Wins individual pursuit, team pursuit and Madison gold at Track Cycling World Championships in Manchester.
August 16 – Successfully defends Olympic individual pursuit title with gold at the Laoshan Velodrome.
August 18 – Olympic team pursuit gold alongside Ed Clancy, Geraint Thomas and Paul Manning in a world record of three minutes 53.314 seconds.
August 19 – Favourite for Olympic Madison alongside Mark Cavendish but ninth-placed finish results in Manxman suffering the ignominy of being the only member of GB's track team to leave the Laoshan Velodrome without a medal and has a public falling-out with Wiggins.
October – Releases autobiography titled 'In Pursuit of Glory' detailing his struggle with alcohol after Athens Games.
2009: July – Secures fourth place in Tour de France, matching highest-ever placing by a British rider.
September – Wins British Time-Trial Championship.
October – Wins stage five time-trial and overall title at Jayco Herald Sun Tour in Australia.
December 10 – Signs four-year deal with Team Sky, the BSkyB-backed road team which is being led by British Cycling performance director Dave Brailsford.
2010: February 7 – Makes Team Sky debut at Tour of Qatar, helping squad to victory in the race's opening team time-trial.
March – Finishes third overall in the Tour of Murcia.
May – Wins Giro d'Italia prologue to become second Briton to wear race leader's pink jersey, the maglia rosa. The victory gives Team Sky a Grand Tour stage win at the first attempt.
July – Finishes 24th on Team Sky's Tour de France debut, upgraded to 23rd after Alberto Contador is stripped of the title for a doping offence.
2011: March – Finishes third overall in Paris-Nice stage race.
May – Wins fourth stage of Bayern-Rundfahrt as team-mate Geraint Thomas wins overall.
June – Wins traditional Tour de France warm-up Criterium du Dauphine. Wins British Championships road race.
July 8 – Abandons Tour de France after fracturing collarbone in crash on seventh stage. Wiggins was sixth overall, 10 seconds behind race leader Thor Hushovd, entering the stage.
September – Finishes third overall at the Vuelta a Espana, with Team Sky colleague Chris Froome second. Finishes second in World Championships time-trial before helping Cavendish win the road race.
2012: February: Wins stage five of Volta ao Algarve.
March – Wins Paris-Nice overall, completing victory with win on stage eight.
April – Triumphs in Tour de Romandie, winning stages one and five.
June – Successfully defends his Criterium du Dauphine title and wins stage four time-trial for an unprecedented series of results.
July 7 – Takes the Tour de France yellow jersey after stage seven.
July 9 – Enhances hold on maillot jaune ahead of the first rest day with a first Tour stage win, on the stage nine time-trial to Besancon.
July 21 – Wins the time-trial on the Tour's penultimate day to all but secure victory.
July 22 – Confirmed as Britain's first-ever winner of the Tour de France.
August 1 – Claims gold medal for Team GB at London 2012 in Olympic road time-trial.
November 7 – Taken to hospital after a collision with a car near his home in Lancashire. Wiggins suffered bruising, a fractured rib, a bruised lung and a dislocated finger.
December 16 – Wins BBC Sports Personality of the Year award, finishing ahead of second-placed